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Updated on July 7, 2020, 7:10 pm

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07 Jul: @ 19:08:53  Sandhill Crane pics [Ed Haesche via CTBirds]
07 Jul: @ 12:55:29  No Sandhill Crane Hammonasset [Tim via CTBirds]
07 Jul: @ 12:49:49 Re: Eurasian Shorebirds in our area [Angela Dimmitt via CTBirds]
07 Jul: @ 10:21:05  Pileated Woodpecker North Haven/Hamden [Cecilia Duffy via CTBirds]
07 Jul: @ 09:23:23  Beaches are not numbered at Hammonasset. Need better clue please. [MICKY KOMARA via CTBirds]
07 Jul: @ 08:36:28 Re: Eurasian Shorebirds in our area [Matthew via CTBirds]
07 Jul: @ 08:22:50  Eurasian Shorebirds in our area [David Provencher via CTBirds]
07 Jul: @ 07:18:35  Sandhill Crane at Hammonasset now [FRANK GALLO via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 20:48:58  Killiingworth hummingbirds and foxes but no wood thrush [W RUPP via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 20:19:41  Extralimital - Access to Charlestown Breachway mudflats [Aaron Dollar via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 20:07:12 Re: O M G! [David Lawton via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 19:45:28  O M G! [Paul Desjardins via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 19:22:32 Re: hummingbirds [Angela Dimmitt via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 19:22:01 Re: New Britain lack of Hummers [Skaught via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 19:08:52  New Britain lack of Hummers [Robert Jase via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 19:05:16  Rare Shorebirds in RI [Chris Loscalzo via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 18:51:54  Extralimital - Little Stint in RI (in addition to red-necked stint) [Aaron Dollar via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 16:53:08 Re: hummingbirds & wood thrushes [Fritzandsheila via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 16:11:15 Re: hummingbirds [C. S. Wood via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 15:51:16 Re: hummingbirds [Kathy Van Der Aue via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 14:20:44 Re: hummingbirds [SARAH FAULKNER via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 13:31:15 Re: hummingbirds [Bill Banks via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 13:30:03 Re: hummingbirds [Bill Banks via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 13:29:42 Re: hummingbirds [Paul Plotnick via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 12:23:29  hummingbirds [AMY HOPKINS via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 11:22:52  New Britain B H Cowbird [Robert Jase via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 10:52:08 Re: Wood Thrush [Nancy via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 10:28:30  Juv Barred Owls [Joe Bear via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 10:05:33 Re: Wood Thrush [Eric Lichtenberger via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 08:12:05  Wood Thrush [Nancy via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 06:25:20  Extralimital Red Necked Sint Continues [Dan Rottino via CTBirds]
06 Jul: @ 02:54:39  Night Sound help [John Oshlick via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 21:42:40  Night sound help...probably not a bird tho [Joseph Budrow via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 15:44:18  Extralimital: Red-necked Stint in RI [Nick Bonomo via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 12:15:49 Re: Dead mouse [Phil Asprelli via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 12:06:30 Re: Fireworks and Red winged black bird deaths (Audubon article) [Bev via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 11:46:04 Re: BG Gnatcatcher [C.S. Wood via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 11:41:27  Fireworks and Red winged black bird deaths (Audubon article) [Beverly Propen via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 11:37:55  BG Gnatcatcher [Cin and Bill Kobak via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 10:51:00  Dead mouse [Susanne Shrader via CTBirds]
05 Jul: @ 07:20:56  Chester, 7/5: post July 4th observations [Tammy Eustis via CTBirds]
04 Jul: @ 13:26:14  Block 19A - Colebrook this am - 71 species [Fran via CTBirds]
04 Jul: @ 12:35:47  Greenwich island birding + COTE nest site questions [William (Will) Schenck via CTBirds]
04 Jul: @ 10:57:55  A few thoughts on atlasing [FRANK GALLO via CTBirds]
04 Jul: @ 09:55:22  Protein meal? [Phil Asprelli via CTBirds]
03 Jul: @ 21:22:19  Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccine—but the ecosystem may suffer. [Bev via CTBirds]
03 Jul: @ 19:25:35 Re: AT&T Subscribers Back In Action? [Jim Voros via CTBirds]
03 Jul: @ 14:09:30  Sad news [Chris Loscalzo via CTBirds]
02 Jul: @ 22:23:02  atlasing in July (is the best!) [Chris Elphick via CTBirds]
02 Jul: @ 21:59:00 Re: Dr. Chris Elphick on NPR today [Chris Elphick via CTBirds]





Subject: Sandhill Crane pics
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 19:08 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Hammonasset this morning west end of park .
https://photos.app.goo.gl/rQLt...


Ed Haesche Guilford
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Subject: No Sandhill Crane Hammonasset
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 12:55 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
7/5/20-Madison, Hammonasset Beach State Park-No Sandhill Crane-in case anyone was wondering.

Tim Antanaitis
Portland

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Eurasian Shorebirds in our area
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 12:49 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
As an aside at the very local level, checking Wimisink marsh in Sherman yesterday, there were ten times as many tree swallows and also common grackles as usual, indicating they were perhaps staging for migration a bit early.
Angela Dimmitt
New Milford

-----Original Message-----
From: Matthew via CTBirds
Cc: CT Birds Listserv
Sent: Tue, Jul 7, 2020 9:35 am
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Eurasian Shorebirds in our area

To follow up on Dave™s insight:

From reports I™m hearing from friends in California about abnormally high shorebird numbers for this time of year (peaking about 2-3 weeks earlier than normal) along with a researcher in Montana who is reporting that a large number of his satellite tagged Hudsonian Godwits in AK have already started moving south over two weeks ago, it sounds like there could have been a bad breeding season in the arctic (at the very least, Western Alaska) this year. A potential for a longer shorebird migration period may result in more rarities being discovered. It™s definitely worth checking not only the popular spots, but under-reported locations as well for anything that may decide to take a CT vacation.

-Matt Bell
Vernon

> On Jul 7, 2020, at 09:21, David Provencher via CTBirds wrote:
>
> Rhode Island is having a remarkable string of rare shorebirds recently with
> Terek Sandpiper, Red-necked Stint, and Little Stint. From a probability
> point of view, these three occurring as single individuals in one small
> geographic area and time period is not highly likely. It also is quite
> possible that there are other individuals in our area as yet unfound. Most
> likely species to have others around is Red-necked Stint and least likely
> is Terek's. The Terek's is likely from Asia but the Stints could be of
> European origin as well as Asia. So CT birders should be on alert and
> checking known shorebirds spots now for these and other potential Eurasian
> Shorebirds. Not to mention the RI known birds may move through CT in
> the near future.
>
> Dave Provencher
> Preston
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...


_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...



Subject: Pileated Woodpecker North Haven/Hamden
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 10:21 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Pileated Woodpecker calling from a dead elm, preening and flying over.
https://youtu.be/41T2gcGDbS8
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...
Ceclia Duffy
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Subject: Beaches are not numbered at Hammonasset. Need better clue please.
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 9:23 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
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Subject: Eurasian Shorebirds in our area
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 8:36 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
To follow up on Dave™s insight:

From reports I™m hearing from friends in California about abnormally high shorebird numbers for this time of year (peaking about 2-3 weeks earlier than normal) along with a researcher in Montana who is reporting that a large number of his satellite tagged Hudsonian Godwits in AK have already started moving south over two weeks ago, it sounds like there could have been a bad breeding season in the arctic (at the very least, Western Alaska) this year. A potential for a longer shorebird migration period may result in more rarities being discovered. It™s definitely worth checking not only the popular spots, but under-reported locations as well for anything that may decide to take a CT vacation.

-Matt Bell
Vernon

> On Jul 7, 2020, at 09:21, David Provencher via CTBirds wrote:
>
> Rhode Island is having a remarkable string of rare shorebirds recently with
> Terek Sandpiper, Red-necked Stint, and Little Stint. From a probability
> point of view, these three occurring as single individuals in one small
> geographic area and time period is not highly likely. It also is quite
> possible that there are other individuals in our area as yet unfound. Most
> likely species to have others around is Red-necked Stint and least likely
> is Terek's. The Terek's is likely from Asia but the Stints could be of
> European origin as well as Asia. So CT birders should be on alert and
> checking known shorebirds spots now for these and other potential Eurasian
> Shorebirds. Not to mention the RI known birds may move through CT in
> the near future.
>
> Dave Provencher
> Preston
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...


_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...



Subject: Eurasian Shorebirds in our area
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 8:22 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Rhode Island is having a remarkable string of rare shorebirds recently with
Terek Sandpiper, Red-necked Stint, and Little Stint. From a probability
point of view, these three occurring as single individuals in one small
geographic area and time period is not highly likely. It also is quite
possible that there are other individuals in our area as yet unfound. Most
likely species to have others around is Red-necked Stint and least likely
is Terek's. The Terek's is likely from Asia but the Stints could be of
European origin as well as Asia. So CT birders should be on alert and
checking known shorebirds spots now for these and other potential Eurasian
Shorebirds. Not to mention the RI known birds may move through CT in
the near future.

Dave Provencher
Preston
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Subject: Sandhill Crane at Hammonasset now
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 7:18 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
There is a Sandhill Crane standing in the grass at the #11 beach sign near the West Pavillion at Hammonasset Beach State Park, now. Thank you Bev Skully for the heads up.

Frank Gallo

Tour Leader: Sunrisebirding.com
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Subject: Killiingworth hummingbirds and foxes but no wood thrush
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 20:48 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
In our neighborhood we have not heard a single wood thrush this year for the first time within memory but the hummingbirds have been visiting the feeders daily. This year we have seen foxes almost daily while in previous years it was uncommon to see one although we knew they were around. Might this be the reason for no wood thrushes here this year?
Dean RuppKillingworth
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Subject: Extralimital - Access to Charlestown Breachway mudflats
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 20:19 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
https://ribird.org/locations/7

Get Outlook for Android
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Subject: O M G!
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 20:07 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Does anyone know how best to access the mud flats by any chance?

David LAWTON
Avon

On Mon, Jul 6, 2020, 8:45 PM Paul Desjardins via CTBirds <
ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org> wrote:

>
>
> Paul Desjardins
> paul.desjardins2@gmail.com
> Phone: (860) 623-3696
>
> A Little Stint was photographed at the Charlestown Breachway in Rhode
> Island today!
>
> Paul Desjardins
> Windsor Locks
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)
> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
>
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This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
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Subject: O M G!
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 19:45 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Paul Desjardins
paul.desjardins2@gmail.com
Phone: (860) 623-3696

A Little Stint was photographed at the Charlestown Breachway in Rhode Island today!

Paul Desjardins
Windsor Locks


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Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 19:22 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
I have also had a strange hiatus - May 1 the male appeared where the feeder was hanging last year, female a day or two later. Visited feeders frequently; male found perch on top of dead twig, sat there every day for a couple of weeks then vanished, ditto female. Very occasional sightings until about ten days ago when I saw both starting to visit flowers, then the feeders. Yesterday I was weeding and almost got hit by the male chasing the female into the flower bed - she hid in a plant, he did his "U" display repeatedly - today he was back on his perch and also displaying. Both visited feeders and flowers repeatedly. Now I have to watch for the nest.....hopefully her second after she raised a family elsewhere.
Angela Dimmitt
New Milford


-----Original Message-----
From: AMY HOPKINS via CTBirds
To: ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org
Sent: Mon, Jul 6, 2020 1:22 pm
Subject: [CT Birds] hummingbirds

Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always have hummingbirds this time of year.
Amy Hopkins
Guilford
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_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...



Subject: New Britain lack of Hummers
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 19:22 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
I've had hummers here as well as the woodpeckers. Not as many as in the past, but still regulars. Bloomfield


-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Jase via CTBirds
To: ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org
Sent: Mon, Jul 6, 2020 8:08 pm
Subject: [CT Birds] New Britain lack of Hummers

I also haven't seen any since May, the woodpeckers have been drinking all the nectar
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For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...



Subject: New Britain lack of Hummers
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 19:08 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
I also haven't seen any since May, the woodpeckers have been drinking all the nectar
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Subject: Rare Shorebirds in RI
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 19:05 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
OK, so that™s one extremely rare and two very rare shorebirds in RI in the past 8 days.  Time to get a petition going to annex RI into CT!

Chris Loscalzo,
Woodbridge

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

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Subject: Extralimital - Little Stint in RI (in addition to red-necked stint)
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 18:51 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Being seen now at the Charlestown Breachway.

Get Outlook for Android
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Subject: hummingbirds & wood thrushes
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 16:53 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Hummingbirds - Overrun with adults and kids now, they are draining two
feeders every two days!

Wood thrushes - This has been a good year for them here, too, plenty of
foraging in the yard and multiple singing males.



Reporting from the woods in NE East Haddam.

Harold "Fritz" Moritz

Sheila Gleason

fritzandsheila@pobox.com



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Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 16:11 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
In recent years I™ve had at least a couple females and one or two males (hummingbirds, of course, don™t come in pairs - they are polygamous and males have nothing to do with the family after mating); based on how timid our lone female and male were at first, i speculated that our former neighbors did not make it back this year. Other than that, RTHUs seem to be normally represented on regular birding routes and Atlas blocks.

The other day, a male was performing his courtship dive over my yard, so hopefully a second clutch will be on the way soon.

Chris Wood
Woodbury, CT
203 558-0654

Flickr: C.S.Wood-Photos
Blog: WoodWarbling

> On Jul 6, 2020, at 3:20 PM, SARAH FAULKNER via CTBirds wrote:
>
> I have always, in 18 years in this house, had at least 2, sometimes 3 pairs of hummingbirds. This year: just one lone male. It makes me very sad.
>
> Sarah Faulkner
> Collinsville
>> On 07/06/2020 2:29 PM Bill Banks via CTBirds wrote:
>>
>>
>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
>> On Monday, July 6, 2020, AMY HOPKINS via CTBirds wrote:
>>
>> Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always have hummingbirds this time of year.
>> Amy Hopkins
>> Guilford
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...



Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 15:51 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Hummers are still very busy at our house.  My experience has been that they
slow down a little while nesting but I don't notice any change from other
years.


Kathy Van Der Aue
Southport, CT


On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 3:20 PM SARAH FAULKNER via CTBirds <
ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org> wrote:

> I have always, in 18 years in this house, had at least 2, sometimes 3
> pairs of hummingbirds. This year: just one lone male. It makes me very
> sad.
>
> Sarah Faulkner
> Collinsville
> > On 07/06/2020 2:29 PM Bill Banks via CTBirds <
> ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org> wrote:
> >
> >
> > Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
> > Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
> > On Monday, July 6, 2020, AMY HOPKINS via CTBirds <
> ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org> wrote:
> >
> > Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on
> migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always
> have hummingbirds this time of year.
> > Amy Hopkins
> > Guilford
> > _______________________________________________
> > This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association
> (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> > For subscription information visit
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association
> (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> > For subscription information visit
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)
> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
>
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...



Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 14:20 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
I have always, in 18 years in this house, had at least 2, sometimes 3 pairs of hummingbirds.  This year: just one lone male.  It makes me very sad.

Sarah Faulkner
Collinsville
> On 07/06/2020 2:29 PM Bill Banks via CTBirds wrote:
>
>
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
> OnMonday, July 6, 2020,AMY HOPKINS via CTBirdswrote:
>
> Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always have hummingbirds this time of year.
> Amy Hopkins
> Guilford
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...

_______________________________________________
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Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 13:31 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
About every 25 minutes to our feeder

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
OnMonday, July 6, 2020,AMY HOPKINS via CTBirdswrote:

Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always have hummingbirds this time of year.
Amy Hopkins
Guilford
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For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...

_______________________________________________
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For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...



Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 13:30 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
OnMonday, July 6, 2020,AMY HOPKINS via CTBirdswrote:

Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always have hummingbirds this time of year.
Amy Hopkins
Guilford
_______________________________________________
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For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...

_______________________________________________
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Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 13:29 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
After a hiatus of one month, a female hummer checked out the spot where the
feeder usually hung, so I filled the feeder again and placed it on the
stand. Within minutes, the female showed up and began feeding - always
returning to the same spot in the same tree. We'll see if she's joined by
young.

On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 1:23 PM AMY HOPKINS via CTBirds <
ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org> wrote:

> Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on
> migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always
> have hummingbirds this time of year.
> Amy Hopkins
> Guilford
> _______________________________________________
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> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
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Subject: hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 12:23 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Have people been seeing hummingbirds? I had a few come through on migration in April, but none since to my feeder or deck flowers. I always have hummingbirds this time of year.
Amy Hopkins
Guilford
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Subject: New Britain B H Cowbird
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 11:22 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Finally! I've been missing these, they used to be regulars.
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Subject: Wood Thrush
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 10:52 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
That's awesome news !!!

Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 11:07 AM, Paul Plotnick wrote: First Wood Thrush in years in the woods in back of my house in Stamford.
On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 11:05 AM Eric Lichtenberger via CTBirds wrote:

We have more Wood Thrushes in my yard in Simsbury than ever, too. COVID keeping people in, encouraging animals to come out more?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2020, at 9:12 AM, Nancy via CTBirds wrote:
>
> 7/6 Durham I am hearing and seeing many Wood Thrush in my yard this year. One even nested in a close-by Rhododendron. ( A gorgeously made nest I might add). And they are quite visible this year as well. The song is an otherworldly delight.
> I'm wondering if any one else has experienced this as well.
> Nancy Morand
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...


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Subject: Juv Barred Owls
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 10:28 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Agreed- sounds exactly like recently fledged Barred Owls. We have them nesting in our wet woods for many years and the fledglings are quite vocal right now just as you described.

Joe Bear
Wilton

Sent from my iPhone
Go GATORS!

> Message: 7
> Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2020 02:41:51 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Joseph Budrow
> To: "ctbirds@lists.ctbirding.org"
> Subject: [CT Birds] Night sound help...probably not a bird tho
> Message-ID: <493932690.1150082.1594003311716@mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> We live in the swampy woods of mid Madison. 8 years. I feel I know every sound out there. Tonight, at dusk, I hear something that has me stumped. At first, there was a single ascending "screeeeee." High pitched squeek, thin with a slight rasp. Every 30 seconds. As darkness fell there were multiple vocalers. Ended by 9:30.
> Doubting a bird.
> Slim chance a frog.
> Maybe a mammal. Or insect.
> Any guesses or confirmations?
> Joe Budrow
>
> Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail on Android
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2020 03:53:44 -0400
> From: John Oshlick
> To: ctbirds
> Subject: [CT Birds] Night Sound help
> Message-ID:
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Try listening to a recording of the juvenile Barred Owl call. They make a
> call similar to what you described.
>
> John Oshlick
> Bethany

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Subject: Wood Thrush
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 10:05 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
We have more Wood Thrushes in my yard in Simsbury than ever, too. COVID keeping people in, encouraging animals to come out more?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2020, at 9:12 AM, Nancy via CTBirds wrote:
>
> 7/6 Durham I am hearing and seeing many Wood Thrush in my yard this year. One even nested in a close-by Rhododendron. ( A gorgeously made nest I might add). And they are quite visible this year as well. The song is an otherworldly delight.
> I'm wondering if any one else has experienced this as well.
> Nancy Morand
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...


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Subject: Wood Thrush
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 8:12 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
7/6  Durham  I am hearing and seeing many Wood Thrush in my yard this year. One even nested in a close-by Rhododendron. ( A gorgeously made nest I might add). And they are quite visible this year as well. The song is an otherworldly delight.
I'm wondering if any one else has experienced this as well.
Nancy Morand


Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Extralimital Red Necked Sint Continues
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 6:25 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
July 6th, 7:10 AM Napatree Point, RI. RED-NECKED STINT contiues at the lagoon just after the fog lifted

Dan, Trudy, Emily, Danny Rottino
East Haddam, CT
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Subject: Night Sound help
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 2:54 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Try listening to a recording of the juvenile Barred Owl call. They make a
call similar to what you described.

John Oshlick
Bethany
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Subject: Night sound help...probably not a bird tho
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 21:42 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
We live in the swampy woods of mid Madison. 8 years. I feel I know every sound out there. Tonight, at dusk, I hear something that has me stumped. At first, there was a single ascending "screeeeee." High pitched squeek, thin with a slight rasp. Every 30 seconds. As darkness fell there were multiple vocalers. Ended by 9:30.
Doubting a bird.
Slim chance a frog.
Maybe a mammal. Or insect.
Any guesses or confirmations?
Joe Budrow

Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail on Android
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Subject: Extralimital: Red-necked Stint in RI
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 15:44 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Napatree Point strikes again.

Forwarding from RI:

Bill Thompson found a Red-necked Stint at Napatree Point this morning. There are birders at the edge of the lagoon looking at it now


Nick Bonomo
Wallingford

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Dead mouse
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:15 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Susann, when I first saw the mouse, it seemed to have an injury to the head area. I™m wondering if the jay didn™t cause the injury that led to it™s demise. The jay seemed to know exactly where the mouse was. At any rate it ended up bad for the mouse. Regards, Phil


Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 11:50 AM, Susanne Shrader wrote:

That is very interesting, thank you for sharing it. I hope the mouse didn™t die from any kind of poison. The mouse could™ve gone out and bled to death and then it would have been bad for the Blue jay.

Susanne Shrader


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Subject: Fireworks and Red winged black bird deaths (Audubon article)
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:06 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Yes- Audubon coastal center closes the beach area but that doesn't prevent fireworks from local areas impacting shorebirds nesting.
I've never been a fan of fireworks.
Bev

> On Jul 5, 2020, at 12:59 PM, Arthur Shippee wrote:
>
> I too am tired of the unending booms.
>
> But this was 2011, and of a winter roost.
>
> But I do wonder about the effects, eg, on our heronry.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 5, 2020, at 12:41 PM, Beverly Propen via CTBirds wrote:
>>
>> https://www.audubon.org/news/i...
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
>

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Subject: BG Gnatcatcher
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 11:46 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Actually probably the opposite. The first clutch has fledged and females are loading up in prep for another. When young are on the nest, insects become a larger share of foraging by females.

Chris Wood
Woodbury, CT
203 558-0654

Flickr: C.S.Wood-Photos
Blog: WoodWarbling

> On Jul 5, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Cin and Bill Kobak via CTBirds wrote:
>
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher sunbathed with wings spread in the path of our back
> garden at 12:15pm for about 2 minutes.
>
> Two RT Hummingbirds are emptying our 2 feeders in less than two days! We
> have plenty of nectar plants in the gardens, but they are interested in them
> only when the feeders are dry. Would this recent uptick in trips to feeders
> indicate young in nests?
>
>
>
> Cindi Kobak
>
> Guilford
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mai...
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Subject: Fireworks and Red winged black bird deaths (Audubon article)
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 11:41 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
https://www.audubon.org/news/i...
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Subject: BG Gnatcatcher
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 11:37 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher sunbathed with wings spread in the path of our back
garden at 12:15pm for about 2 minutes.

Two RT Hummingbirds are emptying our 2 feeders in less than two days! We
have plenty of nectar plants in the gardens, but they are interested in them
only when the feeders are dry. Would this recent uptick in trips to feeders
indicate young in nests?



Cindi Kobak

Guilford

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Subject: Dead mouse
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 10:51 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
That is very interesting, thank you for sharing it. I hope the mouse didn™t die from any kind of poison.  The mouse could™ve gone out and bled to death and  then it would have been bad for the Blue jay.

Susanne Shrader

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Subject: Chester, 7/5: post July 4th observations
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 7:20 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
So is everyone else's ears still ringing? Last night was brutal in our
neighborhood, with the illegal fireworks. A family that lives 1/4 mile
from our house really went to town for about 30 minutes, until they
stopped (probably a complaint from local horse owners). But the rest of
the surrounding area sounded like a microwave full of popcorn.

And this is bird-related: I went out at dawn today, to listen to the
dawn chorus, and I heard something I've never heard before. None of the
birds were singing from our east-side woods, which is the direction the
loudest explosions were coming from last night. I get up at 4:30 every
morning year-round, and I can tell you that the birds *always* sing from
the east. I stood in our yard and listened carefully, and I only heard
birds singing in the west woods. Now I can only imagine the scramble in
the dark, as families of birds - many with fledglings - flew in a panic
to get away from last night's noise.

I stayed outside for over an hour until I heard the "regulars" start to
trickle back into the yard and the east woods. Still missing our
cardinals and grosbeaks, who were both feeding young yesterday. No
hawks, no owls. Also still waiting on the woodpeckers and their babies.
I put out suet and nuts, which I usually wouldn't do in the heat of
summer; but I figure they all need as much comfort food as possible.

Tammy Eustis
Chester

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Subject: Block 19A - Colebrook this am - 71 species
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 13:26 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Took your advice Chris & Frank!

Spent 4 hours surveying Colebrook atlas block 19A (4:45-8:30am). 71 species and many confirmed breeders.

One highlight was the 16 cuckoos - 8 each of Black-billed and Yellow-billed - in the area. Continues to prove a great year for cuckoos!

- Fran
Barkhamsted

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Subject: Greenwich island birding + COTE nest site questions
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 12:35 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Yesterday and the day before I decided to atlas some spots which in my
experience are some of the more underbirded locations in Connecticut -- the
islands of the Long Island Sound. On Thursday, I was fortunate enough to be
able to board a boat and visit four islands off the coast of Greenwich --
Bowers, Calf, Shell, and Great Captain's Island.

On Bowers Island, a colony of cormorants in the hundreds and a few pairs of
Great Black-backed Gulls provided the first confirmed breeders of the day,
but Great Captain's Island was easily the most exciting island visited:
first, on the stone causeway linking the eastern and western parts of the
island, was an Osprey nest directly on the ground, with one chick. How
uncommon are such nests? In the saltmarsh in the west, some fluffy Willet
babies not able to fly seem to be newly confirmed for Greenwich! Also
confirmed were numerous Oystercatchers, including a juvenile. Herring and
Black-backed babies were everywhere, even in the predator-free forests, and
their parents' defenses were fierce. The heron rookery on the eastern side
was active as well: Great and Snowy Egret and cormorant nests were
abundant, as well as Black-crowned Night-Heron juveniles. Block 117A's only
land mass is the eastern end of Great Captain's Island, so it was nice to
confirm some birds for this as yet untouched block.

Yesterday, on a much more relaxed trip to the Belle Haven peninsula, there
was another confirmation surprise. While paddleboarding off the beach my
boyfriend and I were vigorously attacked by a Common Tern, which
immediately raised our suspicions. We marked where it landed -- a floating
platform covered in coiled ropes (lobster trap?) and a second visit
(enduring more vicious swooping by tern) got us views of two eggs lying
directly on the wooden surface! This was a great surprise to me for many
reasons. As far as I knew, terns are a colony nester -- how rare is a
solitary nest? Are nearby colonies (ie, Cockenoe) not proving viable sites?
The location of this nest proved intriguing as well, located only feet away
from well-traversed docks and beaches: we observed the terns attacking at
least two other unsuspecting kayaks while sitting a safe distance away on
the beach, as well as Ospreys and colony Herring Gulls. Also, is this a
late date for eggs?

Many questions from this visit to Greenwich's beautiful coast -- I can echo
Frank's and other's message of how fun it is to get out and explore
underbirded blocks!

Good birding and happy 4th,

Will Schenck
Connecticut Young Birders' Club
Greenwich
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Subject: A few thoughts on atlasing
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 10:57 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Hi all,
Happy 4th. As Chris mentioned, July is a great month for confirming breeding in your block. I wanted to reiterate that whether or not you have an assigned block you can contribute to the atlas. Wherever you go birding, if you see evidence of breeding, report it to the atlas. It doesn't matter if it's in your block or not. It's a group effort and every little bit helps. Even if you can't confirm breeding, providing sightings and their status to the atlas adds to the species lists and database for each block. If you're using ebird, remember to code each species at the highest level warranted before sharing with the atlas. I share all my relevant sightings with the atlas. As an example, the other day at Duck Island in Madison, we confirmed Snowy Egret, Black-crowned Night-Heron, and Glossy Ibis as breeders. I assumed that all would have been confirmed already as this is an active longstanding heronry, but I shared the sightings anyway. Later, when I checked the species list for the block, I was surprised to see that Snowy Egret was not yet confirmed even though there are many pairs nesting on the island. It's why I enter nearly all sighting, especially confirmations; the atlas God will sort them out ...
If you see an area on the atlas map that has few confirmations, and you're available, start birding in that area. It's called blockbusting. I'm doing a lot of blockbusting in southwestern Connecticut and coordinating with others in the area. Several of us have split up blocks that either had little or no coverage or are blocks where the captains have moved away. We each have blocks we've adopted and concentrate on but we visit any number of blocks in the area. We often atlas together in pairs to help one another out. It's easy to social distance and provides company and an extra set of eyes and ears. We're working several blocks at a time, often concentrating on one or two, and once a block is up to an acceptable level, we move on to another.
Although early mornings are often most productive when it comes to hearing bird songs; this time of year, birds are feeding young and are active all day. If you can't make it out in the morning, go when you can. I've confirmed quite a few species at midday or late in the afternoon. I've been finding late afternoon to be as productive as many mornings, especially for aerial insectivores such as swallows, as they are actively hawking insects and then delivering them to their young.
There are three categories or levels of confirmation, possible, probable, and confirmed. Usually just seeing or hearing a bird in an area puts it on the list as a possible breeder. There are a number of ways to bump it up to probable; one of the easiest is to find a male singing in the same spot a week or more after sighting it the first time. I make repeat visits on a loose schedule to the same area just for this reason. Another is having multiple males singing (7+) in the same area. A slow walk along a trail or road in good habitat reliably garners 7 or more singing males of the same species. Territorial defense is another, and countersinging is one form of territorial defense that occurs often. Birds of the same species will sing back and forth to one another to defend their turf.
To confirm a bird is breeding is often trickier. Nests are generally designed to be hidden. Seeing birds carrying food, fecal sacs, or nesting materials is a very useful way to confirm breeding. However, observing birds carrying food or other objects often requires a different approach to watching birds than during migration when the idea is to find a wide variety of species. Confirming breeding is about finding one species and watching it over time. I've learned to slow down and observe, sometimes for 30 or more minutes, when I suspect a bird is nesting in an area. I find I'm learning a great deal about bird behavior and I'm thoroughly enjoying the experience. I know folks who bring a chair and just sit and scan.
When things grow quiet, especially in the afternoon, another technique I find to work at this time of year is to hoot like a barred owl and pish (Screech-Owl also works). Birds get excited and come to mob the predator often bringing their babies or arrive carrying food in their mouths. This happened the other day with a Scarlet Tanager that I'd been trying to confirm for weeks. I hooted and the male tanager came in to scold me with a baby in tow, and a catbird jumped up with a large caterpillar in its bill. This technique works especially well with woodpeckers. I use Barred Owl because it has the added benefit of attracting any Barred Owls in the area, even during the day. This has happened several times this year. Listen for mobbing calls. I heard Blue Jays and robins scolding near me and assumed at first that they were scolding me until I turned around and looked up into the eyes of a male Barred Owl who sat quietly above me before sounding off in earnest. Using bird songs to attract the attention of more difficult species can also work. Both techniques, used judiciously, are effective.
Again, happy 4th, and good luck in your atlas blocks.

Frank GalloTour Leadeer: Sunrisebirding.com

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Subject: Protein meal?
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 9:55 am
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
While returning to the house after tending to the feeders I noticed a dead mouse under a tree. At the house I went out onto the deck to relax with a cup of coffee. Not much was happening birding wise until a Blue jay flew into the tree over head. After a few seconds the jay dropped down, picked up the mouse and flew off.      Phil Asprelli. No Haven

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Subject: Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccine—but the ecosystem may suffer.
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 21:22 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
https://www.nationalgeographic...

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Subject: AT&T Subscribers Back In Action?
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 19:25 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
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Subject: Sad news
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 14:09 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
Louisa Cunningham, an active CT birder for many years and longtime member of the New Haven Bird Club, passed away yesterday.  Louisa was a tireless advocate for conservation, education, and peace in our local communities and beyond.  She created the nature trail at the Massaro Community Farm in Woodbridge and led many walks there for children.  She had a depth of knowledge about the natural world that was impressive and it was matched by her humility and humor.  She will be deeply missed by all of us who were fortunate to know her.

Chris Loscalzo,
COA President
Woodbridge

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

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Subject: atlasing in July (is the best!)
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 22:23 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
July is traditionally seen as a slow birding month, although shorebird migration does start to pick up (with a better than average start, albeit just across the border into RI, this year!). July is also, by far, the best month to be atlasing, because it is when it is easiest to confirm breeding in most species. At the same time, however, we've discovered that the rate at which we receive checklists drops considerably in July. So, if you're looking for something to do, while waiting for migration to really heat up, finding a block without many confirmed species and seeing what you can add would be a great help.

For more on the topic, check out the latest blog post:http://ctbirdatlas.org/blog/in...
Chris



Chris Elphick @ssts
Storrs, CT
elphick@sbcglobal.net
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Subject: Dr. Chris Elphick on NPR today
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 21:59 pm
From: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
 
If you listen to the NPR piece that Jim mentioned, I urge you to listen to the end to hear the interview with Corina Newsome (skip over my part if you don't have time for it all). Corina was also one of the organizers of the recent #BlackBirdersWeek events, and a participant in a conversation that National Audubon hosted about the experiences Black birders face every day, and that many of us barely, if ever, have to think about. The conversation is fun in places (tips on song ID), sobering in others (the list of birding hotspots the participants don't feel safe visiting). There's also some key comments about how some natural history listservs/Facebook pages have acted in ways that discourage participation by members of minority groups (I hope to never see that on ctbirds). If, like me, you struggle to name more than 1 or 2 Black birders that you personally know, I'd especially encourage you to listen to the whole conversation, as we all need the perspective it brings. The link is here:
https://www.facebook.com/Natio... we want to protect birds, we need to broaden the birding tent in all the ways that we can. More importantly, welcoming all into the birding community is simply the decent thing to do.

Chris
Chris Elphick @ssts
Storrs, CT
elphick@sbcglobal.net


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