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Updated on August 29, 2014, 12:50 am

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29 Aug: @ 00:49:26  Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office. [Paul Wood]
28 Aug: @ 13:58:16 Re: SY graellsii vs. taimyrensis [Peter Adriaens]
28 Aug: @ 08:30:22  Okay, SY Lesser vs. Great Black-backed Gull [Suzanne Sullivan]
28 Aug: @ 05:55:35  Okay, SY Lesser vs. Great Black-backed Gull [Tristan McKee]
27 Aug: @ 23:12:04  SY graellsii vs. taimyrensis [Tristan McKee]
27 Aug: @ 13:17:27  Blue-winged Teal hybridisation in the USA [Lee G R Evans]
20 Aug: @ 13:54:42  Interesting juv. cowbird [Ian McLaren]
19 Aug: @ 22:22:10 Re: Dowitcher ID [Jason Hoeksema]
18 Aug: @ 18:26:52 Re: Little Blue Heron juvenile bill & lore color [karlson3]
16 Aug: @ 21:08:32  Little Blue Heron juvenile bill & lore color [Glenn d'Entremont]
16 Aug: @ 12:10:58  Dowitcher ID [Jed Hertz]
16 Aug: @ 01:36:25  Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office. [Paul Wood]
15 Aug: @ 12:41:12  Got it! [Chris Hill]
15 Aug: @ 12:16:44 Re: AOU Checklist supplement [John Sterling]
15 Aug: @ 12:08:37  Steve Howell contact [Chris Hill]
12 Aug: @ 03:05:52  Status of parrots in S TX? [Noah Arthur]
07 Aug: @ 18:16:12 Re: UV Bird Photography [Mike O'Keeffe]
01 Aug: @ 15:32:22 Re: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler [Reid Martin]
31 Jul: @ 17:10:08 Re: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler [Phil Davis]
30 Jul: @ 23:25:19 Re: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler [Lethaby, Nick]
30 Jul: @ 21:04:23 Re: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler [Reid Martin]
30 Jul: @ 19:59:23 Re: AOU Checklist supplement [Peter Pyle]
30 Jul: @ 16:50:40 Re: AOU Checklist supplement [Reid Martin]
30 Jul: @ 15:13:18  AOU Checklist supplement [Ian Paulsen]
30 Jul: @ 09:11:53  Flicker [Andy Dettling]
29 Jul: @ 16:12:06 Re: Bluebird - Mountain or Eastern? [Tony Leukering]
29 Jul: @ 15:53:26  Bluebird - Mountain or Eastern? [David Wheeler]
29 Jul: @ 08:11:04 Re: Strange (?) calidrid [julian hough]
28 Jul: @ 22:25:55  Florida junco followup [Bill Pranty]
28 Jul: @ 22:01:49  Asian Raptor ID articles [Robert DeCandido PhD]
28 Jul: @ 21:19:32 Re: Allen's vs Rufous Hummingbird question [Steve Hampton]
28 Jul: @ 19:38:26 Re: Strange (?) calidrid [Jerry Jourdan]
28 Jul: @ 17:09:25 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [Jocelyn Hudon]
28 Jul: @ 16:47:46 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [Thomas Wetmore]
28 Jul: @ 16:47:05 Re: UV Bird Photography [Mike O'Keeffe]
28 Jul: @ 16:45:47 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [Peter Pyle]
28 Jul: @ 16:22:11 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [Kevin J. McGowan]
28 Jul: @ 15:24:50 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [David Sibley]
28 Jul: @ 15:07:47 Re: Strange (?) calidrid [karlson3]
28 Jul: @ 13:46:32 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [David Wheeler]
28 Jul: @ 11:24:15 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [Richard Klim]
28 Jul: @ 10:58:42 Re: Strange (?) calidrid [julian hough]
28 Jul: @ 10:54:18 Re: Northern Flickers - Intergrade? [Jocelyn Hudon]
28 Jul: @ 08:28:06 Re: Strange (?) calidrid [Kevin J. McGowan]
28 Jul: @ 00:29:17  Allen's vs Rufous Hummingbird question [Steve Hampton]





Subject: Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office.
Date: Fri Aug 29 2014 0:49 am
From: paul.r.wood AT uk.pwc.com
 


I will be out of the office from 29/08/2014 until 02/09/2014.

I will respond to your message when I return.




Note: This is an automated response to your message BIRDWG01 Digest - 27
Aug 2014 to 28 Aug 2014 (#2014-117) sent on 29/08/2014 06:00:29. This is
the only notification you will receive while this person is away.

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Subject: SY graellsii vs. taimyrensis
Date: Thu Aug 28 2014 13:58 pm
From: p_adriaens AT yahoo.com
 
Hi Tristan,


I think I still cannot post to the entire list (due to my Yahoo address), but I hope that this email reaches you well.

Lesser Black-backed Gull is a species that I am very familiar with; I spent a lot of time in the local breeding colonies here in Belgium (4,000+ pairs) in 2010, 2011 and 2012, ringing the chicks and studying colour-ringed birds. It is a species I see daily.

I have also studied and photographed (presumed) taimyrensis in Japan; see e.g. my collection of 1c birds here: http://www.pbase.com/smiths_1/... I have reported a 1c Lesser Black-backed Gull (a big brute!) at Half Moon Bay, California, in Jan 2011; this bird was accepted by the CBRC (http://www.californiabirds.org....


In all respects, the Eureka bird looks like a relatively normal graellsiito me. 
Here is a similar bird from Belgium, photographed just two weeks ago and wrongly reported as a Yellow-legged Gull (birds like this are confusing even to European birders!):
http://waarnemingen.be/waarnem...

  There are lots of photos for comparison at the Gull Research website (http://www.gull-research.org/l.... Here is another one fairly similar to the Eureka bird: http://www.gull-research.org/l...
Pale inner webs on 2nd-generation inner primaries are pretty normal in this species. See, for instance, this colour-ringed bird from France:

http://tinyurl.com/lqbo9a5

  Therefore, to conclude, I would not be able to tell this bird from the local Lesser Black-backed Gulls if I came across it on the beach here...


I hope this is of some help.


Peter





On Thursday, August 28, 2014 6:56 AM, Tristan McKee wrote:


>
>
>A large, heavy-bodied Lesser Black-backed Gull has been frequenting
>Eureka, CA this month. This is the first documented record of this
>"species" in northwestern California. While most experts agree that it
>fits L.  f. graellsii fairly well, it has a few odd characteristics
>that are more typically associated with taimyrensis:
>
>1) cinnamon tones to neck, wings, and axillars.
>
>2) medium, californicus-like gray coming into the upper back and outer
>greater coverts.
>
>3) strongly contrasting medium-gray inner webs of the central and
>inner primaries.
>
>4) large size, bulkiness, and broad wings.
>
>Sean McCallister was able to approach the bird by kayak and snap the
>nicest shot yet:
>
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>Rob Fowler captured this shot of the spread wings:
>
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>Because this record is an outlier in season and location (the
>mountain-bound north coast seemingly off the beaten path for invading
>graellsii), I don't feel comfortable with labeling this a "true"
>Lesser Black-backed unless we can firmly eliminate birds from the
>Taimyr Peninsula. The consensus is that this size and structure are
>within normal variation of graellsii. Amar Ayyash provided some photos
>of a presumed Dutch intergrade with cinnamon tones that approached
>this bird, and I have seen photos of intermedius that looked similar.
>Based on the paleness of incoming gray on the mantle, the rather
>short, broad wings, and the pale underwings, I don't think we have to
>worry too much about pure intermedius. Similarly, I would expect
>heuglini sensu stricto to have a darker mantle shade and to be much
>whiter on the head and underparts with more distinct dark streaking in
>summer.
>
>I contacted Nial Moores from Korea about this bird, who suggested that
>it looked a lot like taimyrensis but was less advanced in molt than
>expected, and that I should look for experts from further west to
>determine if graellsii can be eliminated.
>
>Questions:
>
>a) How likely is it for graellsii-types to combine distinct cinnamon
>tones with this pale mantle shade and contrasting inner webs to the
>primaries?
>
>b) The bird only had three first-cycle primaries left on each side
>when we found it at the beginning of the month. There was a distinct
>pattern break between the innermost greater coverts (boldly barred
>buff and blackish) and the incoming outer greater coverts (medium
>grayish), perhaps suggesting that the molt was termporarilly suspended
>(so the bird may have started molting earlier than it appears at first
>glance). Is this off for taimyrensis? I presume this all fits
>graellsii fairly well?
>
>c) Is there any way to actually eliminate such a mysterious form as taimyrensis?
>
>d) Have I eliminated heuglini sensu stricto prematurely?
>
>e) What can we do to address the possibility of a graellsii x
>smithsonianus hybrid?
>
>Here are Rob Fowler's photos:
>
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>and Gary Bloomfield"s:
>
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>
>Thanks for any input,
>
>Tristan McKee
>
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
>
>
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Okay, SY Lesser vs. Great Black-backed Gull
Date: Thu Aug 28 2014 8:30 am
From: swampy435 AT gmail.com
 
Dear Tristan,
Not sure about Lesser Black-Back, I certainly can see why you question that
conclusion. The mantle seems too light and so well marked for a LBBG
approaching its second year. If it were my sighting I would question for
sure. The most curious thing is the light inner webs of what is there of
the primaries. And the bill, the upper mandible, seems to curve down like
a Yellow - legged gull. Did you look into Yellow- legged? It is really hard
to tell from the photos how dark the wing really is. There is one thing I
can say with a level of confidence, this is not a Great Black-Backed Gull.
They are just massive, every part of them is heavy, head bill, etc. and I
have seen on occasion smaller ones which always make me wonder if there is
something else in the gene pool. But they always have that look. Of coarse
this is like the worst time of year to id out of range gulls because some
of the key features like the outer primaries are molting. The tail
feathers would be nice to see also, which are not there. Some gulls just
can't be id'ed, lord knows I have many. But this looks like a fun bird to
pick apart and learn on for sure. I can take a closer look later when I get
home. Hopefully some of the experts out there will weigh in and help you.
Cheers
Suzanne Sullivan
Wilmington ma

On Thursday, August 28, 2014, Tristan McKee wrote:

> One more question has resurfaced regarding the Eureka bird: why isn't this
> a small female Great Black-backed Gull? I must admit this was my very first
> impression in the field. Note that size is incredibly difficult to judge
> from photos and even in the field, in this case. In some photos, it looks
> the same size as a Glaucous-winged or Western, while in others, barely
> larger than a California. I felt it generally blended in with the with
> large gulls and always dwarfed the Californias, but others insist it was
> smaller and easily a Lesser Black-backed. I am ignoring the pale gray in
> the back for now because it is very limited and there is so much confusion
> over developing gray in SY large gulls in general. The primary projection
> was short for a Lesser Black-backed but generally looked longer than Great
> Black-backed due to the missing rectrices.
>
> I've been discouraged from pursuing this bird's ID any further because it
> is "just a Lesser Black-backed", but I'm pretty confused at this point and
> feel it is rather cavalier to identify such an odd rarity so casually. East
> Coast and European observers, please help.
>
> Thanks again,
> Tristan McKee
> Arcata, CA
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



--
Suzanne M. Sullivan
Wilmington, MA
swampy435@gmail.com

Be the Voice of the River
http://www.ipswichriver.org

Please support me in Buzz for a Cure
http://my.e2rm.com/PersonalPage.aspx?registrationID#19868&langPref=e-CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Okay, SY Lesser vs. Great Black-backed Gull
Date: Thu Aug 28 2014 5:55 am
From: atmckee AT gmail.com
 
One more question has resurfaced regarding the Eureka bird: why isn't this
a small female Great Black-backed Gull? I must admit this was my very first
impression in the field. Note that size is incredibly difficult to judge
from photos and even in the field, in this case. In some photos, it looks
the same size as a Glaucous-winged or Western, while in others, barely
larger than a California. I felt it generally blended in with the with
large gulls and always dwarfed the Californias, but others insist it was
smaller and easily a Lesser Black-backed. I am ignoring the pale gray in
the back for now because it is very limited and there is so much confusion
over developing gray in SY large gulls in general. The primary projection
was short for a Lesser Black-backed but generally looked longer than Great
Black-backed due to the missing rectrices.

I've been discouraged from pursuing this bird's ID any further because it
is "just a Lesser Black-backed", but I'm pretty confused at this point and
feel it is rather cavalier to identify such an odd rarity so casually. East
Coast and European observers, please help.

Thanks again,
Tristan McKee
Arcata, CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: SY graellsii vs. taimyrensis
Date: Wed Aug 27 2014 23:12 pm
From: atmckee AT gmail.com
 
A large, heavy-bodied Lesser Black-backed Gull has been frequenting
Eureka, CA this month. This is the first documented record of this
"species" in northwestern California. While most experts agree that it
fits L. f. graellsii fairly well, it has a few odd characteristics
that are more typically associated with taimyrensis:

1) cinnamon tones to neck, wings, and axillars.

2) medium, californicus-like gray coming into the upper back and outer
greater coverts.

3) strongly contrasting medium-gray inner webs of the central and
inner primaries.

4) large size, bulkiness, and broad wings.

Sean McCallister was able to approach the bird by kayak and snap the
nicest shot yet:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Rob Fowler captured this shot of the spread wings:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Because this record is an outlier in season and location (the
mountain-bound north coast seemingly off the beaten path for invading
graellsii), I don't feel comfortable with labeling this a "true"
Lesser Black-backed unless we can firmly eliminate birds from the
Taimyr Peninsula. The consensus is that this size and structure are
within normal variation of graellsii. Amar Ayyash provided some photos
of a presumed Dutch intergrade with cinnamon tones that approached
this bird, and I have seen photos of intermedius that looked similar.
Based on the paleness of incoming gray on the mantle, the rather
short, broad wings, and the pale underwings, I don't think we have to
worry too much about pure intermedius. Similarly, I would expect
heuglini sensu stricto to have a darker mantle shade and to be much
whiter on the head and underparts with more distinct dark streaking in
summer.

I contacted Nial Moores from Korea about this bird, who suggested that
it looked a lot like taimyrensis but was less advanced in molt than
expected, and that I should look for experts from further west to
determine if graellsii can be eliminated.

Questions:

a) How likely is it for graellsii-types to combine distinct cinnamon
tones with this pale mantle shade and contrasting inner webs to the
primaries?

b) The bird only had three first-cycle primaries left on each side
when we found it at the beginning of the month. There was a distinct
pattern break between the innermost greater coverts (boldly barred
buff and blackish) and the incoming outer greater coverts (medium
grayish), perhaps suggesting that the molt was termporarilly suspended
(so the bird may have started molting earlier than it appears at first
glance). Is this off for taimyrensis? I presume this all fits
graellsii fairly well?

c) Is there any way to actually eliminate such a mysterious form as taimyrensis?

d) Have I eliminated heuglini sensu stricto prematurely?

e) What can we do to address the possibility of a graellsii x
smithsonianus hybrid?

Here are Rob Fowler's photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

and Gary Bloomfield"s:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Thanks for any input,

Tristan McKee

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Blue-winged Teal hybridisation in the USA
Date: Wed Aug 27 2014 13:17 pm
From: LGREUK400 AT aol.com
 
I was wondering how extensive and widespread the hybridisation of
Blue-winged Teal and Northern Shoveler is in North America, especially as perhaps 1
out of every 5 'Blue-winged Teals' I twitch in the UK seems to be one.
Browsing some superb North American websites on the net specialising in
wildfowl seems to suggest that some of the 'Shoveler-billed' Blue-winged Teals are
in fact hybrids (or certainly have Shoveler influence) and it also worries
me how extensively orange-legged some individuals are (the majority of
adult Blue-winged Teals have yellow legs and feet). Just intrigued to know the
extent of such happenings in the USA.

All the very best

Lee

You can now follow Lee on Twitter at LeeEvansBirding



Lee G R Evans, Ornithological Consultant, Author, Bird Guide & Tour Leader
General Ornithology - _www.uk400clubonline.co.uk_
(http://www.uk400clubonline.co....)
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Subject: Interesting juv. cowbird
Date: Wed Aug 20 2014 13:54 pm
From: I.A.McLaren AT dal.ca
 
Those who have a Facebook account might check today's postings on Nova Scotia Bird Society (open access without posting privilege) and scroll down to see a juvenile cowbird  photo'd by a novice (almost all on that site are thus). Anyone who wants an image otherwise can also contact me.


Comments welcome.


Ian McLaren

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Dowitcher ID
Date: Tue Aug 19 2014 22:22 pm
From: hoeksema AT olemiss.edu
 
Jed,
To me, both birds look like adults, and at least one appears to have
upperparts feathers with white tips and rufous internal markings, pointing
to Long-billed. Also, in several photos, at least one of the individuals
looks quite hunch-backed / grapefruit-filled, pointing to Long-billed.
Without knowing which individuals are which in the different photos, I'm
hesitant to ID both birds, but at least one of them seems to be a
Long-billed.
Jason Hoeksema
Oxford, MS


On Sat, Aug 16, 2014 at 11:28 AM, Jed Hertz wrote:

> Hi all,
>
>
> On 7/18/2014 I sighted and photographed two Dowitcher species in a wet
> agricultural field NE of Kankakee, IL and refound the same two birds on two
> successive visits. I photographed the Dowitcher on both the 18th and 19th
> and since submitting the records to "ebird" have been discussing the merits
> of SB vs LB with the ebird reviewer hoping to get beyond the "dowitcher
> species" designation. I would appreciate further input from the wider
> birding community to add to this discussion.
>
>
> Ten photos from 7/18 + 19/ 2014 can be viewed at my Flickr website:
> (Photos can be further zoomed using the Control key and Mouse Scroll
> function on your computer):
>
>
> *https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> *
>
>
>
> Thank you in advance for your consideration.
>
> Jed Hertz
>
> Kankakee, Kankakee Co, IL (60 mi South of Chicago)
>
>
>
> Photos/Videos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/j...
>
>
>
> Data: http://ebird.org/content/ebird
>
>
>
> Birdscaping: http://bringingnaturehome.net/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Little Blue Heron juvenile bill & lore color
Date: Mon Aug 18 2014 18:26 pm
From: karlson3 AT comcast.net
 
Glenn and all: Very young Little Blue Herons can commonly have yellowish lores and a yellow hue to their bills into late August, but most show these traits for about a month after they fledge. I see this every year at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge in NY, where they occur along side young Snowy Egrets, who have similar leg and bill shading. However, their bills are shorter and stockier than Snowy, and their necks are noticeably shorter and thicker as well. They also have very small black tips to their primaries, and this is easily seen if you look for it, and easily missed if you don't. Some young birds don't show as much yellow in the bill as others, and some have lores that just have a bit of yellow color. If you get them next to a Snowy, the physical differences are quite different, with Snowy's dagger-like bill unlike the thicker bill with slightly decurved upper mandible of Little Blue. Kevin Karlson


----- Original Message -----

From: "Glenn d'Entremont"
To: "Frontiers, ID"
Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2014 9:32:58 PM
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Little Blue Heron juvenile bill & lore color

Today in Gloucester MA I saw a juvenile bird which structurally looked like a Little Blue Heron. Present was another juvenile and an adult Little Blue. The birds were far apart so no direct comparison for size. My impression was the bird was smaller than the other white plumaged bird, but when the adult interacted they were similar in size. I was surprised to see the lores were yellow and the bill had a yellow hue. I had not seen this before in Little Blue so started thinking about the "h" word; these birds nest on an island just a few miles from this location with Snowy Egrets. I did a quick search and came up with this image which is very close to the bird I saw:

http://www.pwconserve.org/wild...

My question is if the lores are yellow on any given bird does the bill follow suit with a yellow hue? The gray/slate lored birds show gray/slate colored bills, as the second bird today did, and I have seen light pink with lightness on the bill.

Thanks.

Glenn

Glenn d'Entremont: gdentremont1@comcast.net Stoughton, MA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Little Blue Heron juvenile bill & lore color
Date: Sat Aug 16 2014 21:08 pm
From: gdentremont1 AT comcast.net
 
Today in Gloucester MA I saw a juvenile bird which structurally looked like a Little Blue Heron.  Present was another juvenile and an adult Little Blue.  The birds were far apart so no direct comparison for size.  My impression was the bird was smaller than the other white plumaged bird, but when the adult interacted they were similar in size.  I was surprised to see the lores were yellow and the bill had a yellow hue.  I had not seen this before in Little Blue so started thinking about the "h" word; these birds nest on an island just a few miles from this location with Snowy Egrets.  I did a quick search and came up with this image which is very close to the bird I saw:

http://www.pwconserve.org/wild...

My question is if the lores are yellow on any given bird does the bill follow suit with a yellow hue? The gray/slate lored birds show gray/slate colored bills, as the second bird today did, and I have seen light pink with lightness on the bill.

Thanks.

Glenn

Glenn d'Entremont: gdentremont1@comcast.net Stoughton, MA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Dowitcher ID
Date: Sat Aug 16 2014 12:10 pm
From: jhh_60910 AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all,

 
On 7/18/2014 I sighted and photographed two Dowitcher species in a wet agricultural field NE of Kankakee, IL and refound the same two birds on two successive visits.  I photographed the Dowitcher on both the 18th and 19th and since submitting the records to "ebird" have been discussing the merits of SB vs LB with the ebird reviewer hoping to get beyond the "dowitcher species" designation.  I would appreciate further input from the wider birding community to add to this discussion.


Ten photos from 7/18 + 19/ 2014 can be viewed at my Flickr website:  (Photos can be further zoomed using the Control key and Mouse Scroll function on your computer): 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...




Thank you in advance for your consideration.
 
Jed Hertz

Kankakee, Kankakee Co, IL (60 mi South of Chicago)



Photos/Videos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/j...



Data: http://ebird.org/content/ebird



Birdscaping: http://bringingnaturehome.net/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office.
Date: Sat Aug 16 2014 1:36 am
From: paul.r.wood AT uk.pwc.com
 


I will be out of the office from 15/08/2014 until 18/08/2014.

I will respond to your message when I return.




Note: This is an automated response to your message BIRDWG01 Digest - 12
Aug 2014 to 15 Aug 2014 (#2014-111) sent on 16/08/2014 06:00:23. This is
the only notification you will receive while this person is away.

______________________________________________________________________


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Subject: Got it!
Date: Fri Aug 15 2014 12:41 pm
From: chill AT coastal.edu
 
Thanks to many quick respondents who gave me Steve’s email, and to Jeremiah Trimble of the MCZ, who is going to help directly with my question.

Chris

************************************************************************
Christopher E. Hill
Biology Department
Coastal Carolina University
Conway, SC 29528-1954
843-349-2567
chill AT coastal.edu
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/c...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement
Date: Fri Aug 15 2014 12:16 pm
From: jsterling AT wavecable.com
 
I heard the call note of the one in Oceano, San Luis Obispo County and pointed it out to Guy McCaskie who was standing next to me.  It was diagnostic for Arctic Warbler.....at the time I had two summers of experience working with Phylloscopus in Siberia and northwestern Russia and knew the call notes of those species well.


John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695
530 908-3836
jsterling@wavecable.com
www.sterlingbirds.com

On Jul 30, 2014, at 5:49 PM, Peter Pyle wrote:

> I also wonder how decidedly the California birds were identified as borealis...
>
> At 02:38 PM 7/30/2014, Reid Martin wrote:
>> Dear All,
>> My understanding is that Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is only identifiable by voice or DNA (is this correct?)
>> Assuming this is right, can someone confirm that there are audio recordings and/or specimen material that has been genetically examined that back up the AOU statement that this taxon is "Casual in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration."?
>> Regards,
>> Martin
>>
>> ---
>> Martin Reid
>> San Antonio
>> www.martinreid.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jul 30, 2014, at Jul 30, 2:56 PM, Ian Paulsen wrote:
>>
>>> HI ALL:
>>> Here's the latest AOU Checklist supplement:
>>>
>>> http://aoucospubs.org/doi/full...
>>>
>>> sincerely
>>> --
>>>
>>> Ian Paulsen
>>> Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
>>> Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
>>> http://birdbookerreport.blogsp...
>>>
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>>
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Steve Howell contact
Date: Fri Aug 15 2014 12:08 pm
From: chill AT coastal.edu
 
Hi All,

I have a question for Steve Howell about a specimen in the MCZ that he’s inspected and I’m having trouble getting more information on. If someone can send me his email address privately I would appreciate it (and it might help us resolve an apparent mistake on the South Carolina bird list).

Chris

Chair, SC Bird Records Committee
************************************************************************
Christopher E. Hill
Biology Department
Coastal Carolina University
Conway, SC 29528-1954
843-349-2567
chill AT coastal.edu
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/c...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Status of parrots in S TX?
Date: Tue Aug 12 2014 3:05 am
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
Hi everyone. I know this isn't exactly about bird ID, but it is
bird-related so hopefully not too OT...

Does anyone know what the current consesus is on the status of Green
Parakeet and Red-crowned Parrot in south TX? Most older books seem to say
that some may be wild vagrants, while more recent books generally say that
they're 100% escapes. To me it seems like it would be very hard to prove
either way...

Noah Arthur, Oakland, CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: UV Bird Photography
Date: Thu Aug 7 2014 18:16 pm
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
Hi,

I have put up some UV reflectance bird images on the blog. Not very
inspiring I'm afraid. Mostly I have delved more deeply in UV imaging
pitfalls and come up with some related theories and notes. Ultimately I
think we need a proper UV imaging camera to properly get to grips with UV
and birds and I have some design specs and mockups included for good
measure.

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

Regards

Mike

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
Date: Fri Aug 1 2014 15:32 pm
From: upupa AT airmail.net
 
Dear Phil,
That's great; this information closes the gap nicely, and when attached to the Proposal forms a complete audit trail for the acceptance of this taxon onto the NACC List - thank you Terry and Phil.

FYI I'd like to point out that in Kenyon's Birds of Amchitka Island (published in the Auk, 1961), two specimens of P. b. examinandus are mentioned (USNM 465415 & USNM 465421) - but there is no description of the birds nor any detail of how they were identified as examinandus. Presumably Kenyon IDed them as such using the criteria established at that time (what were those, I wonder?). Given that the authors who recently split this taxon from xanthodryas warn that DNA and/or vocal evidence is needed to be sure of the ID between these taxa, I don't think we can say that the USNM specimens have been confirmed as examinanus - unless there are more data available that confirms DNA analysis for these two specimens?

Regards,
Martin
---
Martin Reid
San Antonio
www.martinreid.com





On Jul 31, 2014, at Jul 31, 4:58 PM, Phil Davis wrote:

> ID Frontiers:
>
> The messages below are from Terry Chesser, Chair of the AOU’s Committee on Classification and Nomenclature—North and Middle America.
>
> Phil
>
>
>> From: "Chesser, Terry"
>> To: 'Phil Davis'
>> CC: "David Bridge (bridgedavid@earthlink.net)"
>> Subject: FW: [BIRDWG01] AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
>> Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:07:21 +0000
>>
>> Phil,
>>
>> Could you post the message below on this list-serve? Apparently I’m not allowed.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Terry
>>
>> From: Chesser, Terry
>> Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 12:03 PM
>> To: 'BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU'
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
>>
>> Dear Martin, Mary, Nick, and others,
>>
>> Thanks for your interest in the checklist and in the P. examinandus question in particular. After the proposal on splitting P. borealis was submitted and voted on by the committee, the identification of purported examinandus specimens in the Alaska Museum from the Aleutians was confirmed using genetic methods, and the committee voted to add examinandus to the checklist. As a result of the confusion regarding this issue, we will be adding the following statement as an addendum to the proposal, to clarify the rationale for the committee’s decision:
>>
>> Numerous Aleutian Island specimens at the Alaska Museum, previously thought to be examinandus on morphological grounds, have now been positively identified as examinandus using DNA (J. Withrow, pers. comm.). All specimens from which genetic samples have been analyzed (12+ specimens from the Aleutians) have been confirmed as examinandus. In addition, Kenyon 1961 (Auk 78, pp. 322-323) previously published two specimens of examinandus (before Vaurie lumped this race with xanthrodryas) that are in the bird collection at the USNM. P. examinandus has not yet been added to the Alaska list because they follow AOU taxonomy and it is only now being split. Ordinarily we would wait for the local committee to accept the records before we add the species, but in this case there are peer-reviewed published specimens at USNM, the Alaska Museum specimens have been confirmed as this species, and Dan Gibson has said that there will be no difficulty adding P. examinandus to the Alaska list, so the committee has voted to add this species to the AOU Check-list coincident with the splitting of this species from P. borealis.
>>
>> Best regards,
>> Terry Chesser
>>
> ==================================================> Phil Davis, Secretary
> MD/DC Records Committee
> 2549 Vale Court
> Davidsonville, Maryland 21035 USA
> 301-261-0184
> mailto:PDavis@ix.netcom.com
>
> MD/DCRC Web site: http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/...
> ==================================================> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
Date: Thu Jul 31 2014 17:10 pm
From: pdavis AT ix.netcom.com
 
ID Frontiers:

The messages below are from Terry Chesser, Chair
of the AOU’s Committee on Classification and
Nomenclature—North and Middle America.

Phil


>From: "Chesser, Terry"
>To: 'Phil Davis'
>CC: "David Bridge (bridgedavid@earthlink.net)"
>Subject: FW: [BIRDWG01] AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
>Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:07:21 +0000
>
>Phil,
>
>Could you post the message below on this
>list-serve? Apparently I’m not allowed.
>
>Thanks,
>Terry
>
>From: Chesser, Terry
>Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 12:03 PM
>To: 'BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU'
>Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
>
>Dear Martin, Mary, Nick, and others,
>
>Thanks for your interest in the checklist and in
>the P. examinandus question in
>particular. After the proposal on splitting P.
>borealis was submitted and voted on by the
>committee, the identification of purported
>examinandus specimens in the Alaska Museum from
>the Aleutians was confirmed using genetic
>methods, and the committee voted to add
>examinandus to the checklist. As a result of
>the confusion regarding this issue, we will be
>adding the following statement as an addendum to
>the proposal, to clarify the rationale for the committee’s decision:
>
>Numerous Aleutian Island specimens at the Alaska
>Museum, previously thought to be examinandus on
>morphological grounds, have now been positively
>identified as examinandus using DNA (J. Withrow,
>pers. comm.). All specimens from which genetic
>samples have been analyzed (12+ specimens from
>the Aleutians) have been confirmed as
>examinandus. In addition, Kenyon 1961 (Auk 78,
>pp. 322-323) previously published two specimens
>of examinandus (before Vaurie lumped this race
>with xanthrodryas) that are in the bird
>collection at the USNM. P. examinandus has not
>yet been added to the Alaska list because they
>follow AOU taxonomy and it is only now being
>split. Ordinarily we would wait for the local
>committee to accept the records before we add
>the species, but in this case there are
>peer-reviewed published specimens at USNM, the
>Alaska Museum specimens have been confirmed as
>this species, and Dan Gibson has said that there
>will be no difficulty adding P. examinandus to
>the Alaska list, so the committee has voted to
>add this species to the AOU Check-list
>coincident with the splitting of this species from P. borealis.
>
>Best regards,
>Terry Chesser
>

==================================================Phil Davis, Secretary
MD/DC Records Committee
2549 Vale Court
Davidsonville, Maryland 21035 USA
301-261-0184
mailto:PDavis@ix.netcom.com

MD/DCRC Web site: http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/...
==================================================
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
Date: Wed Jul 30 2014 23:25 pm
From: nlethaby AT ti.com
 
While I agree the acceptance of Kamchatka Leaf Warbler seems rather cavalier (especially given how reluctance the Alaska Records Committee is to accept even some photo-documented records), I think the assumption that the Shemya birds are Kamchatka Leaf Warblers is pretty safe. Most Borealis would be long gone from that latitude even in mid-September. In contrast Kamchatka is a common migrant through Hegura-jima (off Honshu) throughout October and even regular into November. Borealis is only known from there in Sept (Watabe-san told me this and he is pretty good) and its peak in Hong Kong is the second half of September. I believe Borealis is thought to be uncommon/rare in Japan even as a migrant (probably similar to Yellow-browed Warbler in status) so probably is not passing through Kamchatka in any numbers.

From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Reid Martin
Sent: Wednesday, July 30, 2014 6:48 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler

Dear Mary,
Thanks for the link. If I read the proposal correctly (and my ADHD means that sometimes I miss things...) then there is no confirmed evidence that Kamchatka Leaf Warbler or Japanese Leaf Warbler have occurred in the AOU area - at best there is evidence that one or the other has occurred; maybe both but we don't know for sure.

The proposal states that "According to ORNIS, there are at least three Aleutians specimens identified as subspecies xanthodryas at UAM. Given that the name xanthodryas has previously been applied to both E Asian taxa now split by other sources as examinandus and xanthodryas, it seems on geographical grounds much more likely to pertain to the species referred to by Alstrom et al (2011) as examinandus. The odds of the northerly breeding examinandus occurring in the Aleutians are naturally high, while xanthodryas (as restricted by Alstrom et al. 2011), which breeds in central and southern Japan, would be an unlikely vagrant to the Aleutians. The identity of these specimens needs to be rechecked in light of this restriction of xanthodryas."

The proposal also says: "Arctic Warblers considered to be of the NE race examinandus have been recorded in rather large numbers on Shemya Island, with for example at least 10 recorded between 15 Sep to 18Oct (Tobish 2006)."

NOTE my underlines to emphasize the terms used to quantify the ID of these records.

There is nothing in these statements that establishes that examinandus is proven to have occurred in the AOU area. I am puzzled that the AOU seems willing to state categorically in its change to the Checklist that examinandus is "Casual in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration." This has not been proven based on the AOU Proposal, so perhaps there is some other evidence that confirms this?

For me it rather feels like the AOU is saying "these Arctic Warblers have never been firmly IDed to taxon level when they were ssp. of borealis, and with this split we can't leave them unassigned, so we'll go with the most likely taxon."

Why can't the checklist leave off examinandus as occurring in the AOU, and instead include the first paragraph quoted above? If the three specimens can provide proof of examinandus (or more material in the form of audio recordings or fresh DNA can provide this) then the species can be added next time, once there is proof.

Note that Clements 6.8 says for the range of xanthodryas (as split from examinandus): "Incompletely known. Breeds Japan (Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu); winters range uncertain". Here's a quote from the 2009-2010 Hong Kong Bird Report: "Since the period covered by this report, the Arctic Warbler complex has been split into three species. Two of these have now been accepted to occur in Hong Kong: Arctic Warbler P. borealis and Japanese Leaf Warbler P. xanthodryas. Kamchatka Leaf Warbler P. examinandus may also occur. Due to difficulties in field identification, all records of this species group are included under a single entry in this report." These statements show that the now-split xanthodryas is a migrant, and its range is incompletely known but at least reaches Hong Kong on migration. The vector from Hong Kong to Honshu, when extended north, goes through the Aleutians.

As for relying on likelihood: here's a quote from the ABA 2003 Checklist Report: "Its occurrence in Alaska was unexpected, as Spotted Flycatcher is unrecorded anywhere in eastern Asia or the Indian Subcontinent."

Regards,
Martin
---
Martin Reid
San Antonio
www.martinreid.com




On Jul 30, 2014, at Jul 30, 5:19 PM, Mary Gustafson wrote:


http://www.aou.org/committees/...
p. 33 for the split. No, there's not much information there on the split, but there are specimens that can be followed up on.

Mary Gustafson
Mission, Texas


-----Original Message-----
From: Reid Martin
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Wed, Jul 30, 2014 4:41 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] AOU Checklist supplement
Dear All,
My understanding is that Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is only identifiable by voice or DNA (is this correct?)
Assuming this is right, can someone confirm that there are audio recordings and/or specimen material that has been genetically examined that back up the AOU statement that this taxon is "Casual in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration."?
Regards,
Martin

---
Martin Reid
San Antonio
www.martinreid.com




On Jul 30, 2014, at Jul 30, 2:56 PM, Ian Paulsen wrote:


HI ALL:
Here's the latest AOU Checklist supplement:

http://aoucospubs.org/doi/full...

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
http://birdbookerreport.blogsp...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement - Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
Date: Wed Jul 30 2014 21:04 pm
From: upupa AT airmail.net
 
Dear Mary,
Thanks for the link. If I read the proposal correctly (and my ADHD means that sometimes I miss things...) then there is no confirmed evidence that Kamchatka Leaf Warbler or Japanese Leaf Warbler have occurred in the AOU area - at best there is evidence that one or the other has occurred; maybe both but we don't know for sure.

The proposal states that "According to ORNIS, there are at least three Aleutians specimens identified as subspecies xanthodryas at UAM. Given that the name xanthodryas has previously been applied to both E Asian taxa now split by other sources as examinandus and xanthodryas, it seems on geographical grounds much more likely to pertain to the species referred to by Alstrom et al (2011) as examinandus. The odds of the northerly breeding examinandus occurring in the Aleutians are naturally high, while xanthodryas (as restricted by Alstrom et al. 2011), which breeds in central and southern Japan, would be an unlikely vagrant to the Aleutians. The identity of these specimens needs to be rechecked in light of this restriction of xanthodryas."

The proposal also says: "Arctic Warblers considered to be of the NE race examinandus have been recorded in rather large numbers on Shemya Island, with for example at least 10 recorded between 15 Sep to 18Oct (Tobish 2006)."

NOTE my underlines to emphasize the terms used to quantify the ID of these records.

There is nothing in these statements that establishes that examinandus is proven to have occurred in the AOU area. I am puzzled that the AOU seems willing to state categorically in its change to the Checklist that examinandus is "Casual in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration." This has not been proven based on the AOU Proposal, so perhaps there is some other evidence that confirms this?

For me it rather feels like the AOU is saying "these Arctic Warblers have never been firmly IDed to taxon level when they were ssp. of borealis, and with this split we can't leave them unassigned, so we'll go with the most likely taxon."

Why can't the checklist leave off examinandus as occurring in the AOU, and instead include the first paragraph quoted above? If the three specimens can provide proof of examinandus (or more material in the form of audio recordings or fresh DNA can provide this) then the species can be added next time, once there is proof.

Note that Clements 6.8 says for the range of xanthodryas (as split from examinandus): "Incompletely known. Breeds Japan (Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu); winters range uncertain". Here's a quote from the 2009-2010 Hong Kong Bird Report: "Since the period covered by this report, the Arctic Warbler complex has been split into three species. Two of these have now been accepted to occur in Hong Kong: Arctic Warbler P. borealis and Japanese Leaf Warbler P. xanthodryas. Kamchatka Leaf Warbler P. examinandus may also occur. Due to difficulties in field identification, all records of this species group are included under a single entry in this report." These statements show that the now-split xanthodryas is a migrant, and its range is incompletely known but at least reaches Hong Kong on migration. The vector from Hong Kong to Honshu, when extended north, goes through the Aleutians.

As for relying on likelihood: here's a quote from the ABA 2003 Checklist Report: "Its occurrence in Alaska was unexpected, as Spotted Flycatcher is unrecorded anywhere in eastern Asia or the Indian Subcontinent."

Regards,
Martin
---
Martin Reid
San Antonio
www.martinreid.com





On Jul 30, 2014, at Jul 30, 5:19 PM, Mary Gustafson wrote:

> http://www.aou.org/committees/...
> p. 33 for the split. No, there's not much information there on the split, but there are specimens that can be followed up on.
>
> Mary Gustafson
> Mission, Texas
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Reid Martin
> To: BIRDWG01
> Sent: Wed, Jul 30, 2014 4:41 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] AOU Checklist supplement
>
> Dear All,
> My understanding is that Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is only identifiable by voice or DNA (is this correct?)
> Assuming this is right, can someone confirm that there are audio recordings and/or specimen material that has been genetically examined that back up the AOU statement that this taxon is "Casual in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration."?
> Regards,
> Martin
>
> ---
> Martin Reid
> San Antonio
> www.martinreid.com
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jul 30, 2014, at Jul 30, 2:56 PM, Ian Paulsen wrote:
>
>> HI ALL:
>> Here's the latest AOU Checklist supplement:
>>
>> http://aoucospubs.org/doi/full...
>>
>> sincerely
>> --
>>
>> Ian Paulsen
>> Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
>> Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
>> http://birdbookerreport.blogsp...
>>
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement
Date: Wed Jul 30 2014 19:59 pm
From: ppyle AT birdpop.org
 
I also wonder how decidedly the California birds were identified as borealis...

At 02:38 PM 7/30/2014, Reid Martin wrote:
>Dear All,
>My understanding is that Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is only identifiable
>by voice or DNA (is this correct?)
>Assuming this is right, can someone confirm that there are audio
>recordings and/or specimen material that has been genetically
>examined that back up the AOU statement that this taxon is "Casual
>in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration."?
>Regards,
>Martin
>
>---
>Martin Reid
>San Antonio
>www.martinreid.com
>
>
>
>
>
>On Jul 30, 2014, at Jul 30, 2:56 PM, Ian Paulsen wrote:
>
>>HI ALL:
>>Here's the latest AOU Checklist supplement:
>>
>>http://aoucospubs.org/doi/full...
>>
>>sincerely
>>--
>>
>>Ian Paulsen
>>Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
>>Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
>>http://birdbookerreport.blogsp...
>>
>>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement
Date: Wed Jul 30 2014 16:50 pm
From: upupa AT airmail.net
 
Dear All,
My understanding is that Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is only identifiable by voice or DNA (is this correct?)
Assuming this is right, can someone confirm that there are audio recordings and/or specimen material that has been genetically examined that back up the AOU statement that this taxon is "Casual in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration."?
Regards,
Martin

---
Martin Reid
San Antonio
www.martinreid.com





On Jul 30, 2014, at Jul 30, 2:56 PM, Ian Paulsen wrote:

> HI ALL:
> Here's the latest AOU Checklist supplement:
>
> http://aoucospubs.org/doi/full...
>
> sincerely
> --
>
> Ian Paulsen
> Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
> Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
> http://birdbookerreport.blogsp...
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: AOU Checklist supplement
Date: Wed Jul 30 2014 15:13 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI ALL:
Here's the latest AOU Checklist supplement:

http://aoucospubs.org/doi/full...

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
http://birdbookerreport.blogsp...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Flicker
Date: Wed Jul 30 2014 9:11 am
From: dendroica AT sbcglobal.net
 
Forwarding on Julie's behalf.   See below.

>
> I am the observer of the “intergrade” flicker mentioned by Jocelyn Hudon in a previous post; my interpretation was based on the best information available at the time (2002) and the fact that the bird also had a cafer-like brown crown. At any rate, Jocelyn and I have been in frequent communication regarding the diet-based pigmentation theory.
>
>
>
> My area of research for many years has been the role of non-native fruit in the diet of birds in urban areas. I have many observations and thousands of fecal samples. So the angle I have been pursuing in the flicker issue is if and when flickers consume the fruits that contain the pigment rhodoxanthin, the pigment responsible for orange tail bands on waxwings and presumably the pigment responsible for red feathers on yellow-shafted flickers.
>
>
>
> Rhodoxanthin is present in the fruit of the non-native bush honeysuckles Lonicera tatarica (Tatarian Honeysuckle), L. morrowii (Morrow’s Honeysuckle), their hybrids, L. x bella; as well as Taxus spp. (yews), which we will leave aside for the time being. It is not present in L. maackii (Amur Honeysuckle).
>
>
>
> At least here in southeast Michigan, the rhodoxanthin-containing fruit are stripped by mid-August (Amur Honeysuckle blooms and fruits later, becoming available in early September).
>
>
>
> Thus, determining which primaries have red pigmentation, estimating the dates they may have been growing, and the phenology of the rhodoxanthin-containing honeysuckles is an important part of this puzzle.
>
>
>
> That might be moot if flickers don’t eat any/much honeysuckle fruit to begin with. My observations/fecal samples of flickers are limited compared to other bird species, but I have no records of them eating honeysuckle fruit; they favor poison ivy and shrub dogwoods.
>
>
>
> I’d be interested in compiling evidence on
>
> 1) instances of flickers eating rhodoxanthin-containing honeysuckle fruit, with dates. The easiest way to separate the rhodoxanthin-containing honeysuckles from Amur honeysuckle is leaf shape (generally rounded and egg-shaped in the rhodoxanthin-containing species, pointed at the tip in Amur) and length of the fruit stalk/peduncle (> 5 mm up to 25 mm in rhodoxanthin-containing species, very short often < 4 mm in Amur).
>
> 2) Phenology of rhodoxanthin-containing species – specificially the date when the fruit of these species is no longer available.
>
>
>
> A final mystery is if/how rhodoxanthin can influence the other red-shafted-like plumage traits in yellow-shafted flickers – red feathers in “mustache”, brown crown, etc.
>
>
>
> I’ll pass this data on to Jocelyn. Feel free to send to jac.rrbo@gmail.com – any similar data for yews is welcome, too.
>
>
>
> --
> Julie A. Craves
> Rouge River Bird Observatory
> University of Michigan-Dearborn
> http://www.rrbo.org
> net-results.blogspot.com
> facebook.com/go.rrbo

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Bluebird - Mountain or Eastern?
Date: Tue Jul 29 2014 16:12 pm
From: greatgrayowl AT aol.com
 

Dave:

It certainly sounds like that was a fun day! If it weren't for the photos in which the bluebird is perched, I would feel confident that it was a Mountain Bluebird. The in-flight pix certainly show the paler blue tail and the gray back typical of a female Mountain Bluebird. Though the chest is a bit warmer than typical, a sizable minority of female Mountains show such (see the treatment in the NGS Complete guide).

However, in the photos of the perched bird -- granted, they're not the best and I'd be hesitant to be definitive about anything from them, the bird seems to have the high-domed look to the head and thick bill typical of Eastern Bluebird. The two species have been known to hybridize. While I'm not writing that the bird is not a Mountain Bluebird, I'd be leery of voting to accept were I sitting on NYSARC.

Sincerely,

Tony




Tony Leukering
currently Caro, MI

http://www.flickr.com/photos/t...

http://aba.org/photoquiz/





-----Original Message-----
From: David Wheeler
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Tue, Jul 29, 2014 4:42 pm
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Bluebird - Mountain or Eastern?


Thanks for all the comments about the Flicker. Also turning up after-the-fact in photos from the same day is this bluebird, which was accompanying a fly-by flock of Eastern Bluebirds. It is the bird on the right in the perched photos and on the left in the flight photos. We did not notice it in the field but it was a very busy day. Comments so far have leaned slightly to Mountain.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Dave Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

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Subject: Bluebird - Mountain or Eastern?
Date: Tue Jul 29 2014 15:53 pm
From: tigger64 AT aol.com
 

Thanks for all the comments about the Flicker. Also turning up after-the-fact in photos from the same day is this bluebird, which was accompanying a fly-by flock of Eastern Bluebirds. It is the bird on the right in the perched photos and on the left in the flight photos. We did not notice it in the field but it was a very busy day. Comments so far have leaned slightly to Mountain.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Dave Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Strange (?) calidrid
Date: Tue Jul 29 2014 8:11 am
From: jrhough1 AT snet.net
 
Hi Jerry,

All the birds in the images are Semipalmated Sandpipers and from a plumage point of view are typical of that species at this time of year. Structurally, females may stand out from the males in a flock by being longer-legged, slightly longer bodied/winged and longer-billed but plumage wise there is nothing unusual I see in the images to suggest anything other than typical Semips. 

Looking through flocks locally here in CT at this time of year, it is apparent that Semips are very variable - some being quite grey-toned while others are darker/browner. The upperpart color and pattern is rather monochrome, with the scapulars having a dark centre (with a pale basal area) and paler buffier fringe. 

The breast pattern and underpart markings can be very variable with some individuals showing heavily coalesced chevrons/streaking across the breast while others are more lightly marked on the breast, but most, like the birds in your images, show hairline streaks along the rear flanks and lateral tail coverts.

Hope these comments help.

Thanks,

Julian


 
Julian Hough
New Haven, CT 06519
www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com


________________________________
From: Jerry Jourdan
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2014 8:12 PM
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Strange (?) calidrid



Julian, Kevin(s), et. al.,

To follow up, I was photographing some of the Semipalmated Sandpipers here in SE Michigan over the weekend and came across a couple of birds that 'appeared' significantly larger than the rest of the Semipalms on the nearby mudflats. Here is a typical Semipalm:
http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...


The middle peep looks larger and heavier-headed than the foreground bird:
http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...


The bird appears darker, more heavily streaked on the breast that might suggest a White-rump, but bill shape and wing projection scream Semipalm. I have no experience w/ hybrids and am fine w/ Semipalm, but there is just something about this bird that requires a second look:
http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...

http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...


I'm grateful for any comments,

Jerry
http://jerryjourdan.blogspot.c...






On Mon, Jul 28, 2014 at 3:28 PM, wrote:

Julian and all:
>
>the first three shots all look fine for a first summer White-rumped that has retained all of its juvenile wing coverts and flight feathers, and replaced its upperparts with somewhat typical White-rumped breeding feathers, including the dark centers and a few rust edges if you look real close. The head and bill shape (although a bit fine-tipped) are fine for White-rumped in these shots, as is the long rear body and wings that reach the tail tip, which is fine for some smaller male White-rumpeds whose wings do not  extend past the tail. The pale legs could just be a by-product of low sexual hormones in this nobreeding bird, who probably did not go north to breed, with many post-breeding Semipalmated Sandpipers showing similar gray to pale straw-colored legs in August. I don't see any hybrid influence in this bird, and the heavily streaked upper breast and lack of flank streaking is fine for some first summer White-rumpeds that I have seen in NJ in June.
The last shot is a weird posture that I dismissed from any evaluation pertinent to the ID due to the odd angle of the head going away and the outstretched neck. Kevin Karlson
>
>
>
>________________________________
>
>From: "hough, julian"
>To: "Frontiers, ID"
>Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:36:06 PM
>
>Subject: [BIRDWG01] Strange (?) calidrid
>
>
>
>I have posted a few pix of a funny-looking
sandpiper I took in CT many July's ago - I'd appreciate any comments, even if it
is to the point that it is not identifiable (or maybe it is!)

>https://naturescapeimages.word...
>

>Thanks,

>Julian

>Julian Hough
>CT, 06519
>USA
>jrhough1@snet.net
>

>Blog: www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
>website: www.JulianRHough.com
>
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html
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Subject: Florida junco followup
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 22:25 pm
From: billpranty AT hotmail.com
 
Good evening,

A month ago I posted an RFI to this list referring to a junco that Dave Gagne, Gail Deterra, and I discovered and that Gail and I photographed, at North Anclote Bar, Anclote Key Preserve State Park, Pasco County, Florida, on 30 June 2014. We identified the junco as being an "Oregon" type, a subspecies-group that had never been verifiably documented previously in Florida.

Through this list and personal contact, I received comments from 11 others, all of whom agreed that the bird was an "Oregon" Junco. (Thanks to Cameron Cox, Elias Elias, Ted Floyd, Jon Greenlaw, Richard Hoyer, Alvaro Jaramillo, Ed Kwater, Tony Leukering, MIchael Price, Peter Pyle, and David Sibley). Four observers sexed the junco as a male, and two aged it as a second-calendar-year. Based on its plumage and appearance in Florida, Peter and Ted suggested that the junco was of the migratory subspecies montanus (following Nolan et al. 2002, BNA account) or shufeldti (following Pyle 1997 and others) that breeds from central British Columbia and southwestern Alberta to eastern Oregon, western Idaho, and western Montana.

According to Stevenson and Anderson (1994, The Birdlife of Florida), all specimens of Dark-eyed Junco in Florida are of the nominate "Slate-colored" subspecies J. h. hyemalis, except for one J. h. cistmontanus ("Cassiar" Junco) felled by a TV tower at Tallahassee, 5 December 1955. This specimen is housed at Tall Timbers Research Station (# 2165). Through courtesy of Jim Cox, today I received three photographs of this specimen. To me, it seems like a rather typical eastern "Slate-colored" Junco, with gray plumage showing minor brown highlights and with no contrast between the head and back.

The three photos of TTRS 2165, and three of Gail's image of the North Anclote Bar "Oregon" Junco are posted at the link below.

Comments are welcome.

http://postimg.org/gallery/3cv...

Thank you.


Best regards,

Bill Pranty
Bayonet Point, Florida

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Asian Raptor ID articles
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 22:01 pm
From: rdcny AT earthlink.net
 
Below find download links to three newly published (popular) articles on
raptors in Thailand and Nepal. The articles stem from our raptor migration
work along the east coast of southern Thailand (Khao Dinsor), as well as up
in the mountains of Nepal near Pokhara (Thoolakharka).

Each article contains many color photos of Asian raptors in the hand and in
flight:

(1) Flight Identification of Six Southeast Asian Accipiter Species: Chinese
Sparrowhawk; Japanese Sparrowhawk; Shikra; Besra; Crested Goshawk and
Eurasian Sparrowhawk. Here is the link:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/641k...


(2) Ringing (Banding) migrant sparrowhawks in southern Thailand:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/oo7b...


(3) Flight identification of ‘Black-eared’ Kite and ‘Pariah’ Kite in Nepal
and Thailand:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ccwp...


All the articles were published in BirdingASIA within the last year. We
recommend reading each of the articles as a two-page display - in Adobe
Acrobat go to: VIEW > PAGE DISPLAY > TWO PAGE VIEW

If you want to know more about our research site in Thailand, download this
article:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ru91...

If you want to know more about our research site in Nepal, download this
article: https://www.dropbox.com/s/qd93...

Any questions, problems, concerns: do send them this way.

Robert DeCandido PhD

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Allen's vs Rufous Hummingbird question
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 21:19 pm
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
All,

I've obtained more pics and posted them at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

I'm feeling pretty solid about imm male Allen's, with R5 on the right side
molted and now an adult feather.




On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 10:02 PM, Steve Hampton
wrote:

> All,
>
> I am seeking opinions on this hummingbird here:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> There are two photos.
>
> Photographed July 27 in Davis, CA. (near Sacramento).
>
> Allen's is very rare and difficult to detect here, but recent banding has
> proven they are regular in June-July. Rufous is a regular migrant in
> spring and fall. However, the day before this photo, at a banding station
> a few miles from this bird, 4 or 5 Selasphorus banded were Allen's.
>
> This bird appears to be an immature male Allen's with R5 on the right side
> already molted to an adult feather and R5 on the left consistent with juv
> Allen's.
>
> A photo at
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> is labeled Rufous, but Sheri Williamson says it is Allen's. Note it also
> has one R5 of each type. That photo is from Aug 18.
>
> Comments appreciated.
>
> thanks,
>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Strange (?) calidrid
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 19:38 pm
From: jerry.jourdan AT gmail.com
 
Julian, Kevin(s), et. al.,

To follow up, I was photographing some of the Semipalmated Sandpipers here
in SE Michigan over the weekend and came across a couple of birds that
'appeared' significantly larger than the rest of the Semipalms on the
nearby mudflats. Here is a typical Semipalm:
http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...

The middle peep looks larger and heavier-headed than the foreground bird:
http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...

The bird appears darker, more heavily streaked on the breast that might
suggest a White-rump, but bill shape and wing projection scream Semipalm. I
have no experience w/ hybrids and am fine w/ Semipalm, but there is just
something about this bird that requires a second look:
http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...
http://www.pbase.com/jourdaj/i...

I'm grateful for any comments,

Jerry
http://jerryjourdan.blogspot.c...



On Mon, Jul 28, 2014 at 3:28 PM, wrote:

> Julian and all:
> the first three shots all look fine for a first summer White-rumped that
> has retained all of its juvenile wing coverts and flight feathers, and
> replaced its upperparts with somewhat typical White-rumped breeding
> feathers, including the dark centers and a few rust edges if you look real
> close. The head and bill shape (although a bit fine-tipped) are fine for
> White-rumped in these shots, as is the long rear body and wings that reach
> the tail tip, which is fine for some smaller male White-rumpeds whose wings
> do not extend past the tail. The pale legs could just be a by-product of
> low sexual hormones in this nobreeding bird, who probably did not go north
> to breed, with many post-breeding Semipalmated Sandpipers showing similar
> gray to pale straw-colored legs in August. I don't see any hybrid influence
> in this bird, and the heavily streaked upper breast and lack of flank
> streaking is fine for some first summer White-rumpeds that I have seen in
> NJ in June. The last shot is a weird posture that I dismissed from any
> evaluation pertinent to the ID due to the odd angle of the head going away
> and the outstretched neck. Kevin Karlson
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"hough, julian"
> *To: *"Frontiers, ID"
> *Sent: *Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:36:06 PM
>
> *Subject: *[BIRDWG01] Strange (?) calidrid
>
> I have posted a few pix of a funny-looking sandpiper I took in CT many
> July's ago - I'd appreciate any comments, even if it is to the point that
> it is not identifiable (or maybe it is!)
>
>
> https://naturescapeimages.word...
>
> Thanks,
>
> Julian
>
> Julian Hough
> CT, 06519
> USA
> jrhough1@snet.net
>
> Blog: www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
> website: www.JulianRHough.com
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

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Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 17:09 pm
From: Jocelyn.Hudon AT gov.ab.ca
 
Many thanks David for providing a much broader context to the initial flicker question than my expeditious post.

Please allow me to add a few precisions to two of the listed studies:

In spite of what I think was strong evidence for a dietary explanation (year-to-year variability in which feathers were red on a single flicker), Ingold and Weise (1985) actually invoked a developmental explanation instead: genes turned on and off during the molt process that can influence all growing flight feathers but that are imperfect in timing, genes always on but exerting their action only on certain flight feathers, etc...

The assessment has been perpetuated in subsequent studies, for example Julie Craves' interpretation of a young flicker with red shafts (at http://www.rrbo.org/in-the-fie... also in a publication in Michigan Birds and Natural History (http://www.rrbo.org/pdf/nofl.p...) .

Finally, Short counted as intergrades birds just like the one described by Jim, well documented in collections, some of which go back quite a few years, so the true extent of introgression in the Northern Flicker is likely much more limited than currently believed.

Best,

Jocelyn

From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of David Sibley
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2014 2:11 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?

Hi Jim and all,

I've been interested in this question for a long time, and can add a few observations here that may be useful. First, intergrades (as you would expect) are extremely variable, showing the complete range of intermediate plumage features; and the appearance of different parts of the bird is not always linked. That is, a bird can have wings close to Red-shafted but a face pattern more like Yellow-shafted, etc. In general, among the intergrades that I see in the northern Great Plains from Minnesota to Montana, wing and tail color is not a very reliable way to identify them. I always look for head pattern, which I use to confirm a suspected intergrade in a bird with wing color a little bit "off", and it also reveals a lot of intergrades that I did not even suspect based on wing color. I don't think any records of intergrades (or Red-shafted) in the east should be accepted based on wing and tail color alone - only with careful study of the head pattern.

One thing I don't see in intergrades is the contrasting mix of pure yellow and pure red flight feather colors shown in the Dave Wheeler photo from Derby Hill. A pattern like that suggests the red color was somehow "switched on" during molt, and therefore probably doesn't mean an intergrade. Intergrades typically show a more uniform and more subtle shading of orange color across all of the feathers.

I'm looking forward to seeing the results of Jocelyn Hudon's research on this. In the meantime you might be interested in these older papers.

Ingold, James L. and Charles M. Weise. 1985. Observations On Feather Color Variation in a Presumed Common Flicker intergrade. Journal of Field Ornithology. 56: 403-405 https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def... - Directly relevant to the Derby Hill birds, an otherwise typical male Yellow-shafted Flicker with a few contrasting red flight feathers was trapped and banded in Wisconsin in Feb 1976 and again in Feb 1977 and Feb 1978. The exact position of red feathers in the wings and tail was different in each of the three years (but symmetrical in each year). No other trace of introgression was found. They suspected the red color was diet-related.

Test, F. H. 1969. Relation of wing and tail color of the woodpeckers Colaptes auratus and C. cafer to their food. Condor 71: 206-211. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def... - studied captive flickers on a controlled diet,

Short, Lester L. Jr. 1965. Hybridization in the Flickers (Colaptes) of North America. Bull. of the Am. Mus. of Nat. Hist. 129: 307-428 - a massive study of variation in flickers, finding an intergrade zone many hundreds of miles wide, and evidence of introgression from coast to coast.

Good Birding,

David Sibley
Concord, MA

On Jul 27, 2014, at 11:30 PM, Jim Tarolli wrote:


Hi everyone,
This spring we had large numbers of Yellow-Shafted Northern Flickers go by the Derby Hill Hawk Watch in Mexico, NY. The two high counts, per Steve Kolbe, the Derby Hill Hawk counter were: April 13th which had 1,356; and April 20th which had 1,250. We had a couple other days that 150-200 were counted going by. We were able to photograph a few possible intergrades. In both of the following photos, the birds have some red shafts. But also, they both appear to have brown faces. In "The Sibley Guide to Birds" it shows the Intergrade as having a mostly gray face and males having a red malar stripe.

On April 11th I photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
And on May 9th, Dave Wheeler photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
Are these intergrades? Or is it possibly diet related? Any thoughts or answers on the subject would be appreciated.


Jim Tarolli
Baldwinsville, NY
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

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Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 16:47 pm
From: ttw4 AT verizon.net
 
Just a FYI.

On April 21, 1972, my wife and I were en route to grad school in Fairbanks, Alaska, and we stopped off for a day at the Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota. We ate lunch in the Cottonwood Campground. The trees around us were filled with literally hundreds of flickers of all possible combinations of colors and markings. At the time I was strictly an easterner, anxious to get his first glimpse at a Red-shafted Flicker (1972 was before the lump). There were so many combinations in those many birds that if I remember correctly I had to look through a few birds before finding a pure and simple classic Red-shafted.

Tom Wetmore

On Jul 28, 2014, at 4:11 PM, David Sibley wrote:

> Hi Jim and all,
>
> I’ve been interested in this question for a long time, and can add a few observations here that may be useful. First, intergrades (as you would expect) are extremely variable, showing the complete range of intermediate plumage features; and the appearance of different parts of the bird is not always linked. That is, a bird can have wings close to Red-shafted but a face pattern more like Yellow-shafted, etc. In general, among the intergrades that I see in the northern Great Plains from Minnesota to Montana, wing and tail color is not a very reliable way to identify them. I always look for head pattern, which I use to confirm a suspected intergrade in a bird with wing color a little bit “off", and it also reveals a lot of intergrades that I did not even suspect based on wing color. I don’t think any records of intergrades (or Red-shafted) in the east should be accepted based on wing and tail color alone - only with careful study of the head pattern.
>
> One thing I don’t see in intergrades is the contrasting mix of pure yellow and pure red flight feather colors shown in the Dave Wheeler photo from Derby Hill. A pattern like that suggests the red color was somehow “switched on” during molt, and therefore probably doesn’t mean an intergrade. Intergrades typically show a more uniform and more subtle shading of orange color across all of the feathers.
>
> I’m looking forward to seeing the results of Jocelyn Hudon’s research on this. In the meantime you might be interested in these older papers.
>
> Ingold, James L. and Charles M. Weise. 1985. Observations On Feather Color Variation in a Presumed Common Flicker intergrade. Journal of Field Ornithology. 56: 403-405 https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def... - Directly relevant to the Derby Hill birds, an otherwise typical male Yellow-shafted Flicker with a few contrasting red flight feathers was trapped and banded in Wisconsin in Feb 1976 and again in Feb 1977 and Feb 1978. The exact position of red feathers in the wings and tail was different in each of the three years (but symmetrical in each year). No other trace of introgression was found. They suspected the red color was diet-related.
>
> Test, F. H. 1969. Relation of wing and tail color of the woodpeckers Colaptes auratus and C. cafer to their food. Condor 71: 206-211. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def... - studied captive flickers on a controlled diet,
>
> Short, Lester L. Jr. 1965. Hybridization in the Flickers (Colaptes) of North America. Bull. of the Am. Mus. of Nat. Hist. 129: 307-428 - a massive study of variation in flickers, finding an intergrade zone many hundreds of miles wide, and evidence of introgression from coast to coast.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> David Sibley
> Concord, MA
>
> On Jul 27, 2014, at 11:30 PM, Jim Tarolli wrote:
>
>> Hi everyone,
>>
>> This spring we had large numbers of Yellow-Shafted Northern Flickers go by the Derby Hill Hawk Watch in Mexico, NY. The two high counts, per Steve Kolbe, the Derby Hill Hawk counter were: April 13th which had 1,356; and April 20th which had 1,250. We had a couple other days that 150-200 were counted going by. We were able to photograph a few possible intergrades. In both of the following photos, the birds have some red shafts. But also, they both appear to have brown faces. In "The Sibley Guide to Birds" it shows the Intergrade as having a mostly gray face and males having a red malar stripe.
>>
>> On April 11th I photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>> And on May 9th, Dave Wheeler photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>> Are these intergrades? Or is it possibly diet related? Any thoughts or answers on the subject would be appreciated.
>>
>>
>> Jim Tarolli
>> Baldwinsville, NY
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

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Subject: UV Bird Photography
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 16:47 pm
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
Hi,

More on UV photography here including a bit more fine-tuning of the gear and
10 of the 33 Irish butterfly species captured in UV.
The Common Blue is an absolute gem! Still working on bird UV images. More
in due course.

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

Regards

Mike

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 16:45 pm
From: ppyle AT birdpop.org
 
Regarding color and molt interactions, I often
see clines in coloration indicating color change
while a bird is in molt; i.e., clines from p1 to
p10, from s1 inward, and from the tertials
outward (actually usually bidirectionally from
the second tertial, e.g., s8 in passerines). s1
typically drops about when p6 drops, resulting in
a contrast between p1 and s1 in these cases (for
example, first-year male blackbirds, where p1 is
still brownish, clining towards blacker by p6,
and s1 matching p6 and contrasting with p1).
These molt sequence patterns seem very fixed in
birds (about the only thing about molt that is
fixed!) and so appears in all taxa. Red beginning
at p7 in Northern Flicker could represent such a
pattern, and the coloration could have to do with
diet (especially reds) or other hormonal
pigment-deposition processes, of which we know little about.

Alternating feather colors (e.g. red and yellow
in flickers) is rarer to me in birds, and I'd
first consider feathers dropping accidentally and
being replaced according to a different
color-deposition signal. Or I've seen it
sometimes within a generation due to
feather-follicle injury or some other problem. In
each of these cases, the pattern should not be
symmetrical between wings. If symmetrical, I'd
then consider some sort of hormonal balance anomaly.

Peter

At 01:52 PM 7/28/2014, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
>Cornell has a large series of specimens of
>Northern Flickers from Lester Short’s Ph.D.
>work in the 1960s on hybridization across the
>Great Plains, and I’ve gone through them a
>number of times. What one sees in the hybrids
>are a mix of face and feather characteristics
>(gray crown and brown cheek/ brown crown and
>gray cheek, red or black mustache, yellow, red
>or orange feathers), but not mixes of yellow and
>red feathers in one individual. The colors run
>from yellow to orange to red, but any one bird
>has all the feathers the same color. I forget
>if tail feathers always match the wings, but I
>think they do. You do see a mix of black and red
>in the males’ mustache, though. I have a scan
>of an old image of representatives of the series at
>https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/mX1nxxeDJlT10xmMmR8Lw9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=drectlink
>(This shot was actually one of the first images
>I ever put online, back in 1995.)
>
>While I was curating the Cornell collection I
>noticed that we started getting in a large
>proportion of flickers with red in the
>primaries, and sometimes in the tail. It got so
>that virtually every individual had some tinge
>of red, with a few having about half the
>feathers orange-to-red. It was always the same
>feathers, with the shaft of primary 7 (I think)
>having the deepest coloration. If any feather
>would have red, it was that one. I figured this
>pattern indicated molt and diet, and I was
>guessing this was another case of cheap
>carotenoids gathered from the invasive
>honeysuckle that makes Cedar Waxwings’ tails
>orange. I got a young between-schools student to
>start looking at specimens in the major
>collections, but his life took a different turn
>(as did mine) and we never progressed on the
>project. We did prepare a fair number of
>spread-wing specimens here at Cornell. I look
>forward to seeing Jocelyn’s study results!
>
>I’m still working to get decent flight shots
>of the flickers, but I did manage a decent one
>of a sitting mixed-color female flicker the other day:
>https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/BS8Cccyw5xN9kcFCLpvAQdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=drectlink.
>Note that she has a very red primary, but no
>hint of gray throat or face. Also, the base of
>the feather is yellowish. This looks like diet
>and molt interactions, not genetics to me.
>
>Best,
>
>Kevin
>
>
>Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
>Instructor
>Home Study Course in Bird Biology
>Investigating Behavior: Courtship and Rivalry in Birds
>Cornell Lab of Ornithology
>159 Sapsucker Woods Road
>Ithaca, NY 14850
>Kjm2@cornell.edu
>607-254-2452
>
>Do you know about our other distance-learning
>opportunities? Visit
>http://www.birds.cornell.edu/c...
>and learn about our comprehensive Home Study
>Course in Bird Biology, our online course
>Investigating
>Behavior:
>Courtship and Rivalry in Birds, our
>Be
>A Better Birder
>tutorials,
>and our series of
>webinars.
>Purchase the webinars here.
>
>
>From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field
>Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jocelyn Hudon
>Sent: Monday, July 28, 2014 11:24 AM
>To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
>
>Hi Jim,
>
>I am working on a pigment paper showing that the
>aberrant red shafts are diet-related. The red
>color in some of these birds is redder than in pure “Red-shafted Flickers”!
>
>I am currently compiling instances of this type
>of variation to ascertain geographical
>extent/time of year and would appreciate being
>informed (privately) of other examples of this. Proper credits will be given.
>
>Many thanks,
>
>Jocelyn
>
>Jocelyn Hudon, Ph.D.
>Curator of Ornithology
>Royal Alberta Museum
>
>From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field
>Identification
>[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU]
>On Behalf Of Jim Tarolli
>Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:30 PM
>To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
>
>Hi everyone,
>This spring we had large numbers of
>Yellow-Shafted Northern Flickers go by the Derby
>Hill Hawk Watch in Mexico, NY. The two high
>counts, per Steve Kolbe, the Derby Hill Hawk
>counter were: April 13th which had 1,356; and
>April 20th which had 1,250. We had a couple
>other days that 150-200 were counted going by.
>We were able to photograph a few possible
>intergrades. In both of the following photos,
>the birds have some red shafts. But also, they
>both appear to have brown faces. In "The Sibley
>Guide to Birds" it shows the Intergrade as
>having a mostly gray face and males having a red malar stripe.
>
>On April 11th I photographed this bird:
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>And on May 9th, Dave Wheeler photographed this
>bird:
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>Are these intergrades? Or is it possibly diet
>related? Any thoughts or answers on the subject would be appreciated.
>
>
>Jim Tarolli
>Baldwinsville, NY
>Archives:
>http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
>This email and any files transmitted with it are
>confidential and intended solely for the use of
>the individual or entity to whom they are
>addressed. If you have received this email in
>error please notify the system manager. This
>message contains confidential information and is
>intended only for the individual named. If you
>are not the named addressee you should not
>disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail.

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 16:22 pm
From: kjm2 AT cornell.edu
 
Cornell has a large series of specimens of Northern Flickers from Lester Short’s Ph.D. work in the 1960s on hybridization across the Great Plains, and I’ve gone through them a number of times. What one sees in the hybrids are a mix of face and feather characteristics (gray crown and brown cheek/ brown crown and gray cheek, red or black mustache, yellow, red or orange feathers), but not mixes of yellow and red feathers in one individual. The colors run from yellow to orange to red, but any one bird has all the feathers the same color.  I forget if tail feathers always match the wings, but I think they do. You do see a mix of black and red in the males’ mustache, though.  I have a scan of an old image of representatives of the series at
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/mX1nxxeDJlT10xmMmR8Lw9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=drectlink
(This shot was actually one of the first images I ever put online, back in 1995.)

While I was curating the Cornell collection I noticed that we started getting in a large proportion of flickers with red in the primaries, and sometimes in the tail. It got so that virtually every individual had some tinge of red, with a few having about half the feathers orange-to-red. It was always the same feathers, with the shaft of primary 7 (I think) having the deepest coloration. If any feather would have red, it was that one. I figured this pattern indicated molt and diet, and I was guessing this was another case of cheap carotenoids gathered from the invasive honeysuckle that makes Cedar Waxwings’ tails orange. I got a young between-schools student to start looking at specimens in the major collections, but his life took a different turn (as did mine) and we never progressed on the project. We did prepare a fair number of spread-wing specimens here at Cornell. I look forward to seeing Jocelyn’s study results!

I’m still working to get decent flight shots of the flickers, but I did manage a decent one of a sitting mixed-color female flicker the other day:
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/BS8Cccyw5xN9kcFCLpvAQdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=drectlink.
Note that she has a very red primary, but no hint of gray throat or face. Also, the base of the feather is yellowish. This looks like diet and molt interactions, not genetics to me.

Best,

Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Instructor
Home Study Course in Bird Biology
Investigating Behavior: Courtship and Rivalry in Birds
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
Kjm2@cornell.edu
607-254-2452

Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/c... and learn about our comprehensive Home Study Course in Bird Biology, our online course Investigating Behavior: Courtship and Rivalry in Birds, our Be A Better Birder tutorials, and our series of webinars. Purchase the webinars here.


From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jocelyn Hudon
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2014 11:24 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?

Hi Jim,

I am working on a pigment paper showing that the aberrant red shafts are diet-related. The red color in some of these birds is redder than in pure “Red-shafted Flickers”!

I am currently compiling instances of this type of variation to ascertain geographical extent/time of year and would appreciate being informed (privately) of other examples of this. Proper credits will be given.

Many thanks,

Jocelyn

Jocelyn Hudon, Ph.D.
Curator of Ornithology
Royal Alberta Museum

From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Tarolli
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:30 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?

Hi everyone,
This spring we had large numbers of Yellow-Shafted Northern Flickers go by the Derby Hill Hawk Watch in Mexico, NY. The two high counts, per Steve Kolbe, the Derby Hill Hawk counter were: April 13th which had 1,356; and April 20th which had 1,250. We had a couple other days that 150-200 were counted going by. We were able to photograph a few possible intergrades. In both of the following photos, the birds have some red shafts. But also, they both appear to have brown faces. In "The Sibley Guide to Birds" it shows the Intergrade as having a mostly gray face and males having a red malar stripe.

On April 11th I photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
And on May 9th, Dave Wheeler photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
Are these intergrades? Or is it possibly diet related? Any thoughts or answers on the subject would be appreciated.


Jim Tarolli
Baldwinsville, NY
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. This message contains confidential information and is intended only for the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail.



Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 15:24 pm
From: sibleyguides AT gmail.com
 
Hi Jim and all,

I’ve been interested in this question for a long time, and can add a few observations here that may be useful. First, intergrades (as you would expect) are extremely variable, showing the complete range of intermediate plumage features; and the appearance of different parts of the bird is not always linked. That is, a bird can have wings close to Red-shafted but a face pattern more like Yellow-shafted, etc. In general, among the intergrades that I see in the northern Great Plains from Minnesota to Montana, wing and tail color is not a very reliable way to identify them. I always look for head pattern, which I use to confirm a suspected intergrade in a bird with wing color a little bit “off", and it also reveals a lot of intergrades that I did not even suspect based on wing color. I don’t think any records of intergrades (or Red-shafted) in the east should be accepted based on wing and tail color alone - only with careful study of the head pattern.

One thing I don’t see in intergrades is the contrasting mix of pure yellow and pure red flight feather colors shown in the Dave Wheeler photo from Derby Hill. A pattern like that suggests the red color was somehow “switched on” during molt, and therefore probably doesn’t mean an intergrade. Intergrades typically show a more uniform and more subtle shading of orange color across all of the feathers.

I’m looking forward to seeing the results of Jocelyn Hudon’s research on this. In the meantime you might be interested in these older papers.

Ingold, James L. and Charles M. Weise. 1985. Observations On Feather Color Variation in a Presumed Common Flicker intergrade. Journal of Field Ornithology. 56: 403-405 https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def... - Directly relevant to the Derby Hill birds, an otherwise typical male Yellow-shafted Flicker with a few contrasting red flight feathers was trapped and banded in Wisconsin in Feb 1976 and again in Feb 1977 and Feb 1978. The exact position of red feathers in the wings and tail was different in each of the three years (but symmetrical in each year). No other trace of introgression was found. They suspected the red color was diet-related.

Test, F. H. 1969. Relation of wing and tail color of the woodpeckers Colaptes auratus and C. cafer to their food. Condor 71: 206-211. https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def... - studied captive flickers on a controlled diet,

Short, Lester L. Jr. 1965. Hybridization in the Flickers (Colaptes) of North America. Bull. of the Am. Mus. of Nat. Hist. 129: 307-428 - a massive study of variation in flickers, finding an intergrade zone many hundreds of miles wide, and evidence of introgression from coast to coast.

Good Birding,

David Sibley
Concord, MA

On Jul 27, 2014, at 11:30 PM, Jim Tarolli wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> This spring we had large numbers of Yellow-Shafted Northern Flickers go by the Derby Hill Hawk Watch in Mexico, NY. The two high counts, per Steve Kolbe, the Derby Hill Hawk counter were: April 13th which had 1,356; and April 20th which had 1,250. We had a couple other days that 150-200 were counted going by. We were able to photograph a few possible intergrades. In both of the following photos, the birds have some red shafts. But also, they both appear to have brown faces. In "The Sibley Guide to Birds" it shows the Intergrade as having a mostly gray face and males having a red malar stripe.
>
> On April 11th I photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> And on May 9th, Dave Wheeler photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Are these intergrades? Or is it possibly diet related? Any thoughts or answers on the subject would be appreciated.
>
>
> Jim Tarolli
> Baldwinsville, NY
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Strange (?) calidrid
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 15:07 pm
From: karlson3 AT comcast.net
 
Julian and all:
the first three shots all look fine for a first summer White-rumped that has retained all of its juvenile wing coverts and flight feathers, and replaced its upperparts with somewhat typical White-rumped breeding feathers, including the dark centers and a few rust edges if you look real close. The head and bill shape (although a bit fine-tipped) are fine for White-rumped in these shots, as is the long rear body and wings that reach the tail tip, which is fine for some smaller male White-rumpeds whose wings do not extend past the tail. The pale legs could just be a by-product of low sexual hormones in this nobreeding bird, who probably did not go north to breed, with many post-breeding Semipalmated Sandpipers showing similar gray to pale straw-colored legs in August. I don't see any hybrid influence in this bird, and the heavily streaked upper breast and lack of flank streaking is fine for some first summer White-rumpeds that I have seen in NJ in June. The last shot is a weird posture that I dismissed from any evaluation pertinent to the ID due to the odd angle of the head going away and the outstretched neck. Kevin Karlson

----- Original Message -----

From: "hough, julian"
To: "Frontiers, ID"
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:36:06 PM
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Strange (?) calidrid

I have posted a few pix of a funny-looking sandpiper I took in CT many July's ago - I'd appreciate any comments, even if it is to the point that it is not identifiable (or maybe it is!)
https://naturescapeimages.word...
Thanks,
Julian
Julian Hough
CT, 06519
USA
jrhough1@snet.net
Blog: www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
website: www.JulianRHough.com
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 13:46 pm
From: tigger64 AT aol.com
 
I wondered why the red-shafted feathers are mostly in a block on a bird that is not otherwise unusual for yellow-shafted.  The feathers in the block would be molted sequentially so they perhaps form a record (of sorts) of what the bird was eating while those feathers were being replaced.  I assume known intergrades are usually a "sloppy mess" of characteristics.  One could also ask: "what will it look like a year later?" ie, the birds in the photos could end up looking like normal yellow-shafted flickers after the next complete molt.  What do true intergrades look like after a full molt?  Do they end up as before or with a different pattern?


We photographed many fly-by Flickers this spring and at least in my case, am just now going through all the photos.


Dave Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 11:24 am
From: richard AT klim.co.uk
 
Incidentally, wef 24 Jul 2014, BirdLife/IUCN/HBW split Red-shafted Flicker and Guatemalan Flicker from Yellow-shafted Flicker:
www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726414
www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726420
www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726404

Richard Klim
Somerset, UK



From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jocelyn Hudon
Sent: 28 July 2014 16:24
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?



Hi Jim,



I am working on a pigment paper showing that the aberrant red shafts are diet-related. The red color in some of these birds is redder than in pure “Red-shafted Flickers”!



I am currently compiling instances of this type of variation to ascertain geographical extent/time of year and would appreciate being informed (privately) of other examples of this. Proper credits will be given.



Many thanks,



Jocelyn



Jocelyn Hudon, Ph.D.

Curator of Ornithology

Royal Alberta Museum



From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Tarolli
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:30 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?



Hi everyone,

This spring we had large numbers of Yellow-Shafted Northern Flickers go by the Derby Hill Hawk Watch in Mexico, NY. The two high counts, per Steve Kolbe, the Derby Hill Hawk counter were: April 13th which had 1,356; and April 20th which had 1,250. We had a couple other days that 150-200 were counted going by. We were able to photograph a few possible intergrades. In both of the following photos, the birds have some red shafts. But also, they both appear to have brown faces. In "The Sibley Guide to Birds" it shows the Intergrade as having a mostly gray face and males having a red malar stripe.


On April 11th I photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

And on May 9th, Dave Wheeler photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Are these intergrades? Or is it possibly diet related? Any thoughts or answers on the subject would be appreciated.


Jim Tarolli

Baldwinsville, NY

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. This message contains confidential information and is intended only for the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail.


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Strange (?) calidrid
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 10:58 am
From: jrhough1 AT snet.net
 
Kevin,

Thanks for the reply. I should say that the legs are dark and not pale, a feature I omitted in my post. The paleness I think is a photo artifact and exacerbated by mud.
Had they been in fact yellowish, it would have narrowed my identification choices considerably. 

The bird was slightly bigger than nearby Semi-ps and to my eyes, since I feel I know Least and Pectoral very well, it isn't either of those - structure/jizz, leg color and length and  breast pattern is wrong for both and bill shape is particularly wrong for Pectoral. It could have some Pectoral in it, but I can't assign it confidently to any pure species I know.

Best,

Julian
 
Julian Hough
New Haven, CT 06519
www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com


________________________________
From: Kevin J. McGowan
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Monday, July 28, 2014 9:02 AM
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Strange (?) calidrid




Pale legs suggest Pectoral or Least, as does the light streaks on the back.
 
Kevin
 
 
Kevin J. McGowan
Ithaca, NY 14850
Kjm2@cornell.edu
607-254-2452
 
Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/c... learn about our comprehensive Home Study Course in Bird Biology, our online course InvestigatingBehavior: Courtship and Rivalry in Birds, our Be A Better Birder tutorials, and our series of webinars. Purchase the webinars here.
 
 
 
From:NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Julian Hough
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:36 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Strange (?) calidrid
 
I have posted a few pix of a funny-looking sandpiper I took in CT many July's ago - I'd appreciate any comments, even if it is to the point that it is not identifiable (or maybe it is!)
 
https://naturescapeimages.word...
 
Thanks,
 
Julian
 
Julian Hough
CT, 06519
USA
jrhough1@snet.net
 
Blog: www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
website: www.JulianRHough.com
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Northern Flickers - Intergrade?
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 10:54 am
From: Jocelyn.Hudon AT gov.ab.ca
 
Hi Jim,

I am working on a pigment paper showing that the aberrant red shafts are diet-related. The red color in some of these birds is redder than in pure “Red-shafted Flickers”!

I am currently compiling instances of this type of variation to ascertain geographical extent/time of year and would appreciate being informed (privately) of other examples of this. Proper credits will be given.

Many thanks,

Jocelyn

Jocelyn Hudon, Ph.D.
Curator of Ornithology
Royal Alberta Museum

From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Tarolli
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:30 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Northern Flickers - Intergrade?

Hi everyone,
This spring we had large numbers of Yellow-Shafted Northern Flickers go by the Derby Hill Hawk Watch in Mexico, NY. The two high counts, per Steve Kolbe, the Derby Hill Hawk counter were: April 13th which had 1,356; and April 20th which had 1,250. We had a couple other days that 150-200 were counted going by. We were able to photograph a few possible intergrades. In both of the following photos, the birds have some red shafts. But also, they both appear to have brown faces. In "The Sibley Guide to Birds" it shows the Intergrade as having a mostly gray face and males having a red malar stripe.

On April 11th I photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
And on May 9th, Dave Wheeler photographed this bird: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
Are these intergrades? Or is it possibly diet related? Any thoughts or answers on the subject would be appreciated.


Jim Tarolli
Baldwinsville, NY
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. This message contains confidential information and is intended only for the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail.



Subject: Strange (?) calidrid
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 8:28 am
From: kjm2 AT cornell.edu
 
Pale legs suggest Pectoral or Least, as does the light streaks on the back.

Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan
Ithaca, NY 14850
Kjm2@cornell.edu
607-254-2452

Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/c... and learn about our comprehensive Home Study Course in Bird Biology, our online course Investigating Behavior: Courtship and Rivalry in Birds, our Be A Better Birder tutorials, and our series of webinars. Purchase the webinars here.



From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Julian Hough
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:36 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Strange (?) calidrid

I have posted a few pix of a funny-looking sandpiper I took in CT many July's ago - I'd appreciate any comments, even if it is to the point that it is not identifiable (or maybe it is!)

https://naturescapeimages.word...

Thanks,

Julian

Julian Hough
CT, 06519
USA
jrhough1@snet.net

Blog: www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
website: www.JulianRHough.com
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Allen's vs Rufous Hummingbird question
Date: Mon Jul 28 2014 0:29 am
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
All,

I am seeking opinions on this hummingbird here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
There are two photos.

Photographed July 27 in Davis, CA. (near Sacramento).

Allen's is very rare and difficult to detect here, but recent banding has
proven they are regular in June-July. Rufous is a regular migrant in
spring and fall. However, the day before this photo, at a banding station
a few miles from this bird, 4 or 5 Selasphorus banded were Allen's.

This bird appears to be an immature male Allen's with R5 on the right side
already molted to an adult feather and R5 on the left consistent with juv
Allen's.

A photo at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
is labeled Rufous, but Sheri Williamson says it is Allen's. Note it also
has one R5 of each type. That photo is from Aug 18.

Comments appreciated.

thanks,

--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


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