ABA's Birding News >> ID Frontiers

ID Frontiers bird news by date

Updated on April 19, 2018, 12:20 pm

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


19 Apr: @ 12:07:02  African raptor identification [Lethaby, Nick]
16 Apr: @ 12:51:58 Re: Audio ID? [Bates Estabrooks]
16 Apr: @ 10:23:39 Re: Audio ID? [David Hollie]
16 Apr: @ 10:02:39  Audio ID? [Bates Estabrooks]
07 Apr: @ 20:12:30 Re: Need Audio Help-Thanks [Bates Estabrooks]
07 Apr: @ 16:21:06 Re: Need Audio Help [Bates Estabrooks]
07 Apr: @ 14:13:14 Re: Need Audio Help [Christopher Hill]
07 Apr: @ 14:07:46 Re: Need Audio Help [Jeff Skevington]
07 Apr: @ 14:03:41 Re: Need Audio Help [Christopher Hill]
07 Apr: @ 13:33:03 Re: Need Audio Help [JAMES HOLDSWORTH]
07 Apr: @ 11:47:27 Re: Need Audio Help [Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes]
07 Apr: @ 09:57:23  Need Audio Help [Bates Estabrooks]
25 Mar: @ 17:45:23 Re: Cassin's Finch - mosaic gynandromorph or unusual molt pattern? [Tony Leukering]
25 Mar: @ 16:30:58  Cassin's Finch - mosaic gynandromorph or unusual molt pattern? [Jason A Wilder]
18 Mar: @ 19:36:52  What happened to NABPP? [Larry Sirvio]





Subject: African raptor identification
Date: Thu Apr 19 2018 12:07 pm
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All,

I have a couple of photographs of unidentified raptors from Namibia. If there is anyone on the list with some expertise in African raptors, I would be happy to send the photos.

Thanks,

Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA 93117

Office: 805 562 5106
Mobile: 805 284 6200
Email: [email protected]


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID?
Date: Mon Apr 16 2018 12:51 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
David,

After looking at a bunch of sonograms from Macaulay Library, I think Field Sparrow has merit. Thanks for the suggestion.

Bates Estabrooks

Get Outlook for Android



From: David Hollie
Sent: Monday, April 16, 11:23 AM
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Audio ID?
To: Bates Estabrooks
Cc: [email protected]


I'm going to throw out the possibility of a distant Field Sparrow? The song at 11.5 is easier for me to decipher as it is not being covered up by the BTNW and EATO.

David Hollie

On Mon, Apr 16, 2018 at 10:01 AM, Bates Estabrooks > wrote:
Any help in identifying the bird noted in this Xeno Canto post would be appreciated.

The details are in the post.

https://www.xeno-canto.org/for...

Thank you.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee

Get Outlook for Android


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



--

David Hollie
http://www.flickr.com/photos/f...



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID?
Date: Mon Apr 16 2018 10:23 am
From: featherbrain1223 AT gmail.com
 
I'm going to throw out the possibility of a distant Field Sparrow? The song
at 11.5 is easier for me to decipher as it is not being covered up by the
BTNW and EATO.

David Hollie

On Mon, Apr 16, 2018 at 10:01 AM, Bates Estabrooks wrote:

> Any help in identifying the bird noted in this Xeno Canto post would be
> appreciated.
>
> The details are in the post.
>
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/for...
>
> Thank you.
>
> Bates Estabrooks
> Tennessee
>
> Get Outlook for Android
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--

David Hollie
http://www.flickr.com/photos/f...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID?
Date: Mon Apr 16 2018 10:02 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Any help in identifying the bird noted in this Xeno Canto post would be appreciated.

The details are in the post.

https://www.xeno-canto.org/for...

Thank you.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee

Get Outlook for Android


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Need Audio Help-Thanks
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 20:12 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Thanks to everyone who responded.


Based on the responses, and after looking into collections of recordings, I think this is likely an odd Black-throated Green Warbler.


Thanks again.


Bates Estabrooks


________________________________
From: Bates Estabrooks
Sent: Saturday, April 7, 2018 10:56 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Need Audio Help


This was recorded yesterday. The details are in the link, below. The habitat is mature deciduous forest (with a few pines) at ~1600 ft. elevation.


Several species (e.g., BTG Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet) have been suggested in other forums, but none of these fit the frequency span (6Khz sweeping up to >7 KHz) of this vocalization, along with the abrupt drop to the final note below 6Khz.


Help is appreciated.


Thanks.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee


https://www.xeno-canto.org/409...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Need Audio Help
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 16:21 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Barry,


I've not tried that. I'll look into it.


Thanks.


Bates




________________________________
From: bom
Sent: Saturday, April 7, 2018 4:37 PM
To: Bates Estabrooks; BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Need Audio Help

have you tried the Warblr app from Xeno-canto?

Barry


On 07/04/2018 15:56, Bates Estabrooks wrote:
> This was recorded yesterday. The details are in the link, below. The habitat is mature deciduous forest (with a few pines) at ~1600 ft. elevation.
>
>
> Several species (e.g., BTG Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet) have been suggested in other forums, but none of these fit the frequency span (6Khz sweeping up to >7 KHz) of this vocalization, along with the abrupt drop to the final note below 6Khz.
>
>
> Help is appreciated.
>
>
> Thanks.
>
>
> Bates Estabrooks
>
> Tennessee
>
>
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/409...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> http://www.avg.com
>
>

--
Barry O'Mahony
Cork, Ireland


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Need Audio Help
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 14:13 pm
From: 000004f138ff0f1e-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Black-throated Green is probably a better bet than Redstart.  Certainly better on tone.  I don™t usually hear too much pattern variation in Black-throated Greens, but I don™t get to hear them singing all that often, so Jeff has convinced me.

CH

On Apr 7, 2018, at 3:06 PM, Jeff Skevington > wrote:

It sounds like a Black-throated Green Warbler to me. They can be quite variable and this wispy high pitched song is not that different from other variants I have heard and tracked down.


On Sat, Apr 7, 2018 at 3:02 PM, Christopher Hill <[email protected]&data&sdata&reserved&data&sdata&reserved&data&sdata&reserved&data&sdata&reserved



Subject: Need Audio Help
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 14:07 pm
From: jhskevington AT gmail.com
 
It sounds like a Black-throated Green Warbler to me. They can be quite
variable and this wispy high pitched song is not that different from other
variants I have heard and tracked down.


On Sat, Apr 7, 2018 at 3:02 PM, Christopher Hill <
[email protected]> wrote:

> I haven™t heard anything exactly like that before (of course. if it were
> familiar and not some weird variant it wouldn™t be posted here). I was
> thinking warbler, and possibly an American Redstart. I don™t hear a
> creeper there, but then I don™t hear it all that clearly anyway. But
> pattern-wise it could be a redstart, and they have lots of variation in
> their song.
>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
>
> > On Apr 7, 2018, at 12:47 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
> cth4 AT CORNELL.EDU> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Bates,
> >
> > This sounds like a slightly weird Brown Creeper to me (no headphones or
> detailed analysis, just computer speakers, so I could be mistaken).
> >
> > Hope this helps!
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > Chris T-H
> >
> > On Apr 7, 2018, at 10:56 AM, Bates Estabrooks [email protected]>> wrote:
> >
> > This was recorded yesterday. The details are in the link, below. The
> habitat is mature deciduous forest (with a few pines) at ~1600 ft.
> elevation.
> >
> >
> > Several species (e.g., BTG Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Brown Creeper,
> Golden-crowned Kinglet) have been suggested in other forums, but none of
> these fit the frequency span (6Khz sweeping up to >7 KHz) of this
> vocalization, along with the abrupt drop to the final note below 6Khz.
> >
> >
> > Help is appreciated.
> >
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> >
> > Bates Estabrooks
> >
> > Tennessee
> >
> >
> > https://na01.safelinks.protect...
> https%3A%2F%2Fwww.xeno-canto.org%2F409818&data=02%7C01%
> 7CChill%40coastal.edu%7C271582856946411e38db08d59ca75a90%
> 7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797%7C0%7C1%7C636587164959351224&sdata=
> 8tQg8wMhTv%2BJ0fTFuwCEnJj9fZuSqs6V6BbjElE7Nc0%3D&reserved=0
> >
> > Archives: https://na01.safelinks.protect...
> https%3A%2F%2Flistserv.ksu.edu%2Fbirdwg01.html&data=02%
> 7C01%7CChill%40coastal.edu%7C271582856946411e38db08d59ca75a90%
> 7Cbf1f856b8ef84e52be9387d3c3622797%7C0%7C1%7C636587164959351224&sdata=
> ty2PesGEsiqvlHb19YWHTxiY3aAbNv39A0aVriFG3GA%3D&reserved=0
> >
> > --
> > Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
> > Field Applications Engineer
> > Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> > 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
> > W: 607-254-2418&data&sdata&reserved&data&sdata&reserved



Subject: Need Audio Help
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 14:03 pm
From: 000004f138ff0f1e-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I haven™t heard anything exactly like that before (of course.  if it were familiar and not some weird variant it wouldn™t be posted here).  I was thinking warbler, and possibly an American Redstart.  I don™t hear a creeper there, but then I don™t hear it all that clearly anyway.  But pattern-wise it could be a redstart, and they have lots of variation in their song.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC

> On Apr 7, 2018, at 12:47 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes wrote:
>
> Hi Bates,
>
> This sounds like a slightly weird Brown Creeper to me (no headphones or detailed analysis, just computer speakers, so I could be mistaken).
>
> Hope this helps!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
> On Apr 7, 2018, at 10:56 AM, Bates Estabrooks > wrote:
>
> This was recorded yesterday. The details are in the link, below. The habitat is mature deciduous forest (with a few pines) at ~1600 ft. elevation.
>
>
> Several species (e.g., BTG Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet) have been suggested in other forums, but none of these fit the frequency span (6Khz sweeping up to >7 KHz) of this vocalization, along with the abrupt drop to the final note below 6Khz.
>
>
> Help is appreciated.
>
>
> Thanks.
>
>
> Bates Estabrooks
>
> Tennessee
>
>
> https://na01.safelinks.protect...
>
> Archives: https://na01.safelinks.protect...
>
> --
> Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
> Field Applications Engineer
> Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
> W: 607-254-2418&data&sdata&reserved&data&sdata&reserved



Subject: Need Audio Help
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 13:33 pm
From: jmholdsworth AT rogers.com
 
..that's what I hear as well - minus the terminal noteJames Holdsworth, Biological Consulting Services226-228-1428, [email protected]
'If one does not fail at times, then one has not challenged himself.'' - Ferdinand Porsche

From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Saturday, April 7, 2018 12:47 PM
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Need Audio Help

Hi Bates,

This sounds like a slightly weird Brown Creeper to me (no headphones or detailed analysis, just computer speakers, so I could be mistaken).

Hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

On Apr 7, 2018, at 10:56 AM, Bates Estabrooks > wrote:

This was recorded yesterday. The details are in the link, below. The habitat is mature deciduous forest (with a few pines) at ~1600 ft. elevation.


Several species (e.g., BTG Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet) have been suggested in other forums, but none of these fit the frequency span (6Khz sweeping up to >7 KHz) of this vocalization, along with the abrupt drop to the final note below 6Khz.


Help is appreciated.


Thanks.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee


https://www.xeno-canto.org/409...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418



Subject: Need Audio Help
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 11:47 am
From: cth4 AT cornell.edu
 
Hi Bates,

This sounds like a slightly weird Brown Creeper to me (no headphones or detailed analysis, just computer speakers, so I could be mistaken).

Hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

On Apr 7, 2018, at 10:56 AM, Bates Estabrooks > wrote:

This was recorded yesterday. The details are in the link, below. The habitat is mature deciduous forest (with a few pines) at ~1600 ft. elevation.


Several species (e.g., BTG Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet) have been suggested in other forums, but none of these fit the frequency span (6Khz sweeping up to >7 KHz) of this vocalization, along with the abrupt drop to the final note below 6Khz.


Help is appreciated.


Thanks.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee


https://www.xeno-canto.org/409...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418



Subject: Need Audio Help
Date: Sat Apr 7 2018 9:57 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
This was recorded yesterday.  The details are in the link, below.  The habitat is mature deciduous forest (with a few pines) at ~1600 ft. elevation.


Several species (e.g., BTG Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet) have been suggested in other forums, but none of these fit the frequency span (6Khz sweeping up to >7 KHz) of this vocalization, along with the abrupt drop to the final note below 6Khz.


Help is appreciated.


Thanks.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee


https://www.xeno-canto.org/409...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Cassin's Finch - mosaic gynandromorph or unusual molt pattern?
Date: Sun Mar 25 2018 17:45 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Jason et al.:

The transition from brown, streaked imm male plumage to red adult male plumage is a prebasic molt, which shouldn™t even start until much later in the year. So, the bird™s appearance is not due to the normal process of plumage change in the species.

Tony

Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
www.aba.org/photoquiz/
www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com

> On Mar 25, 2018, at 16:30, Jason A Wilder wrote:
>
> I have an unusual Cassin's Finch that has been coming to my feeders for the last two weeks. The majority of the bird looks like a normal adult male, but there is a very clearly defined quadrant of female-type patterning on the right breast, with a sharp break to male-like plumage along the bird's longitudinal midline and at the upper breast. While I've seen male Cassin's Finches, presumably young ones, with some streaks on the breast, I've not seen a bird with such a distinct sector of female-like plumage.
>
> I've been able to take pictures of the bird over the last two weeks, with photos on 3/11, 3/13, and 3/25 in this Flickr album:
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskyhDRm1
>
> Does anyone have any thoughts on whether this is just an unusual molt pattern in an otherwise normal male, or perhaps a mosaic gynandromorphic individual?
>
> Jason Wilder
> Flagstaff, AZ
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Cassin's Finch - mosaic gynandromorph or unusual molt pattern?
Date: Sun Mar 25 2018 16:30 pm
From: Jason.Wilder AT nau.edu
 
I have an unusual Cassin's Finch that has been coming to my feeders for the last two weeks. The majority of the bird looks like a normal adult male, but there is a very clearly defined quadrant of female-type patterning on the right breast, with a sharp break to male-like plumage along the bird's longitudinal midline and at the upper breast. While I've seen male Cassin's Finches, presumably young ones, with some streaks on the breast, I've not seen a bird with such a distinct sector of female-like plumage.

I've been able to take pictures of the bird over the last two weeks, with photos on 3/11, 3/13, and 3/25 in this Flickr album:
https://flic.kr/s/aHskyhDRm1

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether this is just an unusual molt pattern in an otherwise normal male, or perhaps a mosaic gynandromorphic individual?

Jason Wilder
Flagstaff, AZ


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: What happened to NABPP?
Date: Sun Mar 18 2018 19:36 pm
From: lmsirvio AT comcast.net
 
Does any one know what happened to the North American Bird Phenology Program?
I have not been able to log in for months.
Thanks

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


American Birding Podcast







ABA's FREE Birder's Guide. Get the most recent issue now >>




Contact us.