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Updated on December 10, 2017, 6:40 pm

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10 Dec: @ 18:29:25  Unsubscribe [Wechsler,Doug]
10 Dec: @ 17:26:57 Re: Dark-eyed Junco with Crown Stripe [David Irons]
10 Dec: @ 17:08:23  Dark-eyed Junco with Crown Stripe [Walter Szeliga]
10 Dec: @ 06:56:53 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Bates Estabrooks]
10 Dec: @ 06:17:22  Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Ross Silcock]
08 Dec: @ 22:42:35  Another Vireo Question [Robert O'Brien]
08 Dec: @ 19:00:47 Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Lethaby, Nick]
08 Dec: @ 17:56:22 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [John Sterling]
08 Dec: @ 17:17:17 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Kevin McLaughlin]
08 Dec: @ 15:59:00 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Jon Ruddy]
08 Dec: @ 10:46:45 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Wayne P. Neily]
08 Dec: @ 07:27:13 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Daniel Estabrooks]
07 Dec: @ 18:29:06 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Noah Arthur]
07 Dec: @ 18:02:34 Re: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Bates Estabrooks]
07 Dec: @ 17:58:43  Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos [Ross Silcock]
07 Dec: @ 10:26:26  Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireo? [Ross Silcock]
07 Dec: @ 10:08:05  Warbling or Philadelphia? [Ross Silcock]
25 Nov: @ 23:05:32 Re: Pacific Wren Conundrum [Joseph Miller]
25 Nov: @ 20:56:57 Re: Pacific Wren Conundrum [David Suddjian]
25 Nov: @ 20:28:01 Re: Pacific Wren Conundrum [Steve Hampton]
25 Nov: @ 13:51:54 Re: Pacific Wren Conundrum [Tony Leukering]
25 Nov: @ 10:54:56  Pacific Wren Conundrum [Joseph Miller]
22 Nov: @ 14:41:37 Re: Wood-Pewee on Dry Tortugas (11/15) [KEVIN karlson]
21 Nov: @ 15:34:36  Wood-Pewee on Dry Tortugas (11/15) [Bill Hubick]
16 Nov: @ 21:56:34 Re: Wagtail [Stefan Schlick]
16 Nov: @ 21:06:29 Re: Wagtail [Clive Harris]
16 Nov: @ 20:25:28 Re: Wagtail [Stefan Schlick]
16 Nov: @ 19:11:22 Re: Wagtail [Angus Wilson]
15 Nov: @ 18:13:29  Wagtail [Clive Harris]
10 Nov: @ 11:14:48 Re: Redhead or Greater Scaup [John Gluth]
10 Nov: @ 10:50:20 Re: Redhead or Greater Scaup [Lethaby, Nick]
10 Nov: @ 09:31:03 Re: Redhead or Greater Scaup [Jason Rogers]
10 Nov: @ 08:41:44 Re: Redhead or Greater Scaup [John Gluth]
10 Nov: @ 03:19:33 Re: Redhead or Greater Scaup [Killian Mullarney]
09 Nov: @ 19:26:29  Redhead or Greater Scaup [Lethaby, Nick]





Subject: Unsubscribe
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 18:29 pm
From: dlw98 AT drexel.edu
 
Hello Kevin,

Could you please take me off the distribution list. I haven't found time to participate or read the emails.


Thanks,


Doug Wechsler

wechsler@ansp.org


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Dark-eyed Junco with Crown Stripe
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 17:26 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Walter,


This look is fairly typical in hatch-year female "Oregon" Dark-eyed Juncos. I live in Beaverton, OR and we have a couple birds that look like this in our backyard flock of 12-15 wintering juncos. The Dark-eyed Juncos (predominantly Oregon types) that winter in the Pacific Northwest are highly variable in appearance depending on age, sex, and level of genetic introgression from other Dark-eyed Junco subspecies like Pink-sided and Slate-colored. Add in the "Cassiar" type birdsthat are considered a subspecies (J. h. cismontanus) by some, but are more likely part of an intergrade swarm of Slate-colored X Oregonand you can wear yourself out trying to appreciate the range of individual variation.


Dave Irons

Beaverton, OR


________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Walter Szeliga
Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2017 11:08 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Dark-eyed Junco with Crown Stripe

Hi all,
I have had a female Dark-eyed (Oregon) Junco with a wide brownish crown stripe visiting my feeder on the east side of the Cascades in Washington State. This bird is oddly difficult to photograph (skittish bird combined with poor lighting), but a poor quality photo showing the thickness of the crown stripe is available here:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/KX0j...

The photo is from 9 Dec 2017, please ignore the date in the corner of the photo. How common are crown stripes on Juncos? I dont recall seeing this often and I dont seem to see many examples online with this wide or long of a stripe?

Cheers,
Walter Szeliga
Ellensburg, WA
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Dark-eyed Junco with Crown Stripe
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 17:08 pm
From: walter.szeliga AT gmail.com
 
Hi all,
I have had a female Dark-eyed (Oregon) Junco with a wide brownish crown stripe visiting my feeder on the east side of the Cascades in Washington State. This bird is oddly difficult to photograph (skittish bird combined with poor lighting), but a poor quality photo showing the thickness of the crown stripe is available here:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/KX0j...

The photo is from 9 Dec 2017, please ignore the date in the corner of the photo. How common are crown stripes on Juncos? I dont recall seeing this often and I dont seem to see many examples online with this wide or long of a stripe?

Cheers,
Walter Szeliga
Ellensburg, WA
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 6:56 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Ross,

Thanks for the summary. Very helpful.

Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee

Get Outlook for Android

________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Ross Silcock
Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2017 7:15:57 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos

Thanks to the 11 people who responded to this request, two as commenters at
the link below.



http://magazine.outdoornebrask...



As I expected, results were pretty much split- 5 for Warbling, 6 for
Philadelphia. Several suggested, or left open the possibility, it was a
Western WAVI (brewsteri), which breeds in the Nebraska Panhandle, and is
more PHVI-like than Eastern WAVI (gilvus), which breeds in eastern Nebraska.
Thus many WAVI in Nebraska might be intergrades, as suggested by one
responder. These pics were taken in eastern Nebraska 11 September, so likely
in migration.



The distribution of yellow wash on the underparts seems to be a key ID point
that led towards WAVI- essentially pale or whitish throat, with yellow
towards the ventral area. PHVI should show yellow concentrated on the upper
breast and throat, fading to whitish rearward. The dark lores were thought
by two responders to be equivocal- one mentioned that both Eastern and
Western WAVI can have a "quite blackish" loral area. The "stubbier" shape
of PHVI was also mentioned by a couple of responders.



I found it interesting that all but one of the supporters of ID as PHVI were
from the eastern US.



Thanks again- this is a great resource.



Ross



Ross Silcock

Seasonal Reports Compiler

Nebraska Bird Review

Tabor, IA

402-618-4933




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 6:17 am
From: silcock AT rosssilcock.com
 
Thanks to the 11 people who responded to this request, two as commenters at
the link below.



http://magazine.outdoornebrask...



As I expected, results were pretty much split- 5 for Warbling, 6 for
Philadelphia. Several suggested, or left open the possibility, it was a
Western WAVI (brewsteri), which breeds in the Nebraska Panhandle, and is
more PHVI-like than Eastern WAVI (gilvus), which breeds in eastern Nebraska.
Thus many WAVI in Nebraska might be intergrades, as suggested by one
responder. These pics were taken in eastern Nebraska 11 September, so likely
in migration.



The distribution of yellow wash on the underparts seems to be a key ID point
that led towards WAVI- essentially pale or whitish throat, with yellow
towards the ventral area. PHVI should show yellow concentrated on the upper
breast and throat, fading to whitish rearward. The dark lores were thought
by two responders to be equivocal- one mentioned that both Eastern and
Western WAVI can have a "quite blackish" loral area. The "stubbier" shape
of PHVI was also mentioned by a couple of responders.



I found it interesting that all but one of the supporters of ID as PHVI were
from the eastern US.



Thanks again- this is a great resource.



Ross



Ross Silcock

Seasonal Reports Compiler

Nebraska Bird Review

Tabor, IA

402-618-4933




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Another Vireo Question
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 22:42 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Every 5 years or so I post these photos but have never gotten much response.
This was photographed in Western Oregon in spring migration quite a few
years ago
with a convenient to use but poor quality Sigma mirror lens.

Note especially the strong eyeline and supercilium, the strong contrast
between darker head and lighter back feathering and
the strong subcilium (did I make this word up?). Is this a Warbling,
Red-eyed, Philadelphia, or something in between?

Warbling common in western Oregon; Red-eyed scattered breeders in Eastern
Oregon, rare in Western Oregon; Philadelphia 5 migrant records
in extreme SE Oregon.

Bob OBrien
Portland OR

http://www2.rdrop.com/users/gr...

specimens from Oregon State Univ. Collection

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 19:00 pm
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All,

I am lacking in recent experience of Philly Vireo but the I would say the underpart pattern (at least as far as I can see) looks typically for many Warbling Vireos in CA in fall. The Phillies I saw out here were very bright in the throat upper breast area. I would agree that the dark loral line is darker than I would expect for Warbling. I do see the very occasional bird like this (that I have called Warbling) but it's not frequent. Having said that, this is type of thing often gets exaggerated in a photo. So I would lean Warbling just on these photos.

Nick

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Kevin McLaughlin
Sent: Friday, December 08, 2017 3:16 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos

I looked briefly at the photos (two or are there others?) the other day and my snap impression was Philadelphia Vireo and am a bit perplexed as to a Warbling ID being entertained. I say this perhaps taking in the head pattern...sharp eyeline, eyebrow, with dusky lores and roundish head shape.
I cannot get a good impression of underparts colouration and tail length from these shots. What I am most certainly not seeing is a bird that fits my idea of an eastern Warbling Vireo. I have no experience with western Warbling. To perhaps give a gestalt sense, the head is not plain enough. So my view at this time falls into what Wayne is thinking...Philadelphia Vireo.

Kevin McLaughlin
Hamilton, Ontario.

On Fri, Dec 8, 2017 at 4:57 PM, Jon Ruddy wrote:

> Hi Ross,
>
> This is a Warbling Vireo. Some Warbling Vireos, especially Western
> Warbling, can show fairly high contrast to the features throughout the
> head, and as such are more Philadelphia-like in expression. Sometimes,
> on both Eastern and Western, the loral area can be quite blackish. A
> bird showing a fairly dark crown and a blackish loral area tends to
> draw out greater contrast with its pale supercilium and the pale areas
> under its eye. Additionally, Western Warbling average slightly smaller
> and shorter-billed than Eastern, and are more Philadelphia Vireo-like
> in overall GISS. This bird does strike me as being a good candidate
> for Western Warbling. Importantly, in both photos, the throat and
> upper chest are pale, and the sides of the bird show a blush of
> yellowish/buff; a good go-to for WAVI.
>
> At any rate, it's a Warbling Vireo and not a Philadelphia.
>
> Good birding,
> Jon
>
> On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 6:57 PM, Ross Silcock
> wrote:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> >
> >
> > I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
> > enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.
> >
> >
> >
> > /http://magazine.outdoornebrask...
> > g/
> >
> >
> >
> > Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID
> > is Philadelphia Vireo
> >
> >
> >
> > Comments welcome.
> >
> >
> >
> > Ross
> >
> >
> >
> > Ross Silcock
> >
> > Seasonal Reports Compiler
> >
> > Nebraska Bird Review
> >
> > Tabor, IA
> >
> > 402-618-4933
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Jon Ruddy
> Eastern Ontario Birding
> eontbird.ca
> Cell: 1-613-558-6821 <(613)%20558-6821>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 17:56 pm
From: jsterling AT wavecable.com
 
just based upon the photos, Id go with Philly as well


John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695
530 908-3836
jsterling@wavecable.com
www.sterlingbirds.com



> On Dec 8, 2017, at 3:16 PM, Kevin McLaughlin wrote:
>
> I looked briefly at the photos (two or are there others?) the other day and
> my snap impression was Philadelphia Vireo and am a bit perplexed as to a
> Warbling ID being entertained. I say this perhaps taking in the head
> pattern...sharp eyeline, eyebrow, with dusky lores and roundish head shape.
> I cannot get a good impression of underparts colouration and tail length
> from these shots. What I am most certainly not seeing is a bird that fits
> my idea of an eastern Warbling Vireo. I have no experience with western
> Warbling. To perhaps give a gestalt sense, the head is not plain enough. So
> my view at this time falls into what Wayne is thinking...Philadelphia Vireo.
>
> Kevin McLaughlin
> Hamilton, Ontario.
>
> On Fri, Dec 8, 2017 at 4:57 PM, Jon Ruddy wrote:
>
>> Hi Ross,
>>
>> This is a Warbling Vireo. Some Warbling Vireos, especially Western
>> Warbling, can show fairly high contrast to the features throughout the
>> head, and as such are more Philadelphia-like in expression. Sometimes, on
>> both Eastern and Western, the loral area can be quite blackish. A bird
>> showing a fairly dark crown and a blackish loral area tends to draw out
>> greater contrast with its pale supercilium and the pale areas under its
>> eye. Additionally, Western Warbling average slightly smaller and
>> shorter-billed than Eastern, and are more Philadelphia Vireo-like in
>> overall GISS. This bird does strike me as being a good candidate for
>> Western Warbling. Importantly, in both photos, the throat and upper chest
>> are pale, and the sides of the bird show a blush of yellowish/buff; a good
>> go-to for WAVI.
>>
>> At any rate, it's a Warbling Vireo and not a Philadelphia.
>>
>> Good birding,
>> Jon
>>
>> On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 6:57 PM, Ross Silcock
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi all,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
>>> enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> /http://magazine.outdoornebrask...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
>>> Philadelphia Vireo
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Comments welcome.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Ross
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Ross Silcock
>>>
>>> Seasonal Reports Compiler
>>>
>>> Nebraska Bird Review
>>>
>>> Tabor, IA
>>>
>>> 402-618-4933
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Jon Ruddy
>> Eastern Ontario Birding
>> eontbird.ca
>> Cell: 1-613-558-6821 <(613)%20558-6821>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 17:17 pm
From: kevinmclaughlin05 AT gmail.com
 
I looked briefly at the photos (two or are there others?) the other day and
my snap impression was Philadelphia Vireo and am a bit perplexed as to a
Warbling ID being entertained. I say this perhaps taking in the head
pattern...sharp eyeline, eyebrow, with dusky lores and roundish head shape.
I cannot get a good impression of underparts colouration and tail length
from these shots. What I am most certainly not seeing is a bird that fits
my idea of an eastern Warbling Vireo. I have no experience with western
Warbling. To perhaps give a gestalt sense, the head is not plain enough. So
my view at this time falls into what Wayne is thinking...Philadelphia Vireo.

Kevin McLaughlin
Hamilton, Ontario.

On Fri, Dec 8, 2017 at 4:57 PM, Jon Ruddy wrote:

> Hi Ross,
>
> This is a Warbling Vireo. Some Warbling Vireos, especially Western
> Warbling, can show fairly high contrast to the features throughout the
> head, and as such are more Philadelphia-like in expression. Sometimes, on
> both Eastern and Western, the loral area can be quite blackish. A bird
> showing a fairly dark crown and a blackish loral area tends to draw out
> greater contrast with its pale supercilium and the pale areas under its
> eye. Additionally, Western Warbling average slightly smaller and
> shorter-billed than Eastern, and are more Philadelphia Vireo-like in
> overall GISS. This bird does strike me as being a good candidate for
> Western Warbling. Importantly, in both photos, the throat and upper chest
> are pale, and the sides of the bird show a blush of yellowish/buff; a good
> go-to for WAVI.
>
> At any rate, it's a Warbling Vireo and not a Philadelphia.
>
> Good birding,
> Jon
>
> On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 6:57 PM, Ross Silcock
> wrote:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> >
> >
> > I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
> > enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.
> >
> >
> >
> > /http://magazine.outdoornebrask...
> >
> >
> >
> > Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
> > Philadelphia Vireo
> >
> >
> >
> > Comments welcome.
> >
> >
> >
> > Ross
> >
> >
> >
> > Ross Silcock
> >
> > Seasonal Reports Compiler
> >
> > Nebraska Bird Review
> >
> > Tabor, IA
> >
> > 402-618-4933
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Jon Ruddy
> Eastern Ontario Birding
> eontbird.ca
> Cell: 1-613-558-6821 <(613)%20558-6821>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 15:59 pm
From: accipitriformes AT gmail.com
 
Hi Ross,

This is a Warbling Vireo. Some Warbling Vireos, especially Western
Warbling, can show fairly high contrast to the features throughout the
head, and as such are more Philadelphia-like in expression. Sometimes, on
both Eastern and Western, the loral area can be quite blackish. A bird
showing a fairly dark crown and a blackish loral area tends to draw out
greater contrast with its pale supercilium and the pale areas under its
eye. Additionally, Western Warbling average slightly smaller and
shorter-billed than Eastern, and are more Philadelphia Vireo-like in
overall GISS. This bird does strike me as being a good candidate for
Western Warbling. Importantly, in both photos, the throat and upper chest
are pale, and the sides of the bird show a blush of yellowish/buff; a good
go-to for WAVI.

At any rate, it's a Warbling Vireo and not a Philadelphia.

Good birding,
Jon

On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 6:57 PM, Ross Silcock
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
>
>
> I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
> enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.
>
>
>
> /http://magazine.outdoornebrask...
>
>
>
> Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
> Philadelphia Vireo
>
>
>
> Comments welcome.
>
>
>
> Ross
>
>
>
> Ross Silcock
>
> Seasonal Reports Compiler
>
> Nebraska Bird Review
>
> Tabor, IA
>
> 402-618-4933
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Jon Ruddy
Eastern Ontario Birding
eontbird.ca
Cell: 1-613-558-6821 <(613)%20558-6821>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 10:46 am
From: Neilyornis AT hotmail.com
 
Maybe a hybrid?  I would lean toward Philadelphia because of the strong lines through the lores.   However, those lines are wider and greyer than usual, at least in my experience.    The yellow distribution and relative size are difficult to judge and variable between races and plumages.  The second photo shows a yellowish tinge to upper breast and the first shows it to be fairly uniform to the belly.


Wayne P. Neily
Tremont, Kings Co., Nova Scotia

If you care about the future, make E.I.A.* part of every decision, action or plan you make. -
* = Environmental Impact Assessment (size appropriate to the significance of the plan or action - just thinking about it will usually help).


________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Noah Arthur
Sent: December 7, 2017 20:28
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos

Looks like a fairly bright but not too unusual Warbling to me. I don't see
any hint of the brighter yellow central breast typical of Philly. In the
first photo the bird also strikes me as rangy and long-tailed, unlike the
stubbier structure of Philly.

Noah


On Thursday, December 7, 2017, Ross Silcock wrote:

> Hi all,
>>
> I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
> enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.
> >
> /http://magazine.outdoornebrask...
> >
> Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
> Philadelphia Vireo
>>
> Comments welcome.
>
>
>Ross
>
> Ross Silcock
>
> Seasonal Reports Compiler
>
> Nebraska Bird Review
>
> Tabor, IA
>
> 402-618-4933

>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 7:27 am
From: daniel.estabrooks AT warner.edu
 
The lighting in the photos is a bit tricky, but this strikes me as a
Warbling. In Warbling the yellow tends to increase as you move from chest
to vent (which appears to be the case on this bird), whereas the opposite
is true of Philadelphia.

Daniel Estabrooks
Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences
Warner University
13895 Hwy. 27
Lake Wales, FL 33859

On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 6:57 PM, Ross Silcock
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
>
>
> I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
> enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.
>
>
>
> /http://magazine.outdoornebrask...
>
>
>
> Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
> Philadelphia Vireo
>
>
>
> Comments welcome.
>
>
>
> Ross
>
>
>
> Ross Silcock
>
> Seasonal Reports Compiler
>
> Nebraska Bird Review
>
> Tabor, IA
>
> 402-618-4933
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

--
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messaging is not a 100% secure communications medium. We advise that you
also observe this lack of security when E-mailing us. This email and its
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may be confidential. If you are not the intended recipient you must take no
action based on it, nor must you copy or distribute the information. Thank
you.

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 18:29 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
Looks like a fairly bright but not too unusual Warbling to me. I don't see
any hint of the brighter yellow central breast typical of Philly. In the
first photo the bird also strikes me as rangy and long-tailed, unlike the
stubbier structure of Philly.

Noah



On Thursday, December 7, 2017, Ross Silcock wrote:

> Hi all,
>
>
>
> I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
> enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.
>
>
>
> /http://magazine.outdoornebrask...
>
>
>
> Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
> Philadelphia Vireo
>
>
>
> Comments welcome.
>
>
>
> Ross
>
>
>
> Ross Silcock
>
> Seasonal Reports Compiler
>
> Nebraska Bird Review
>
> Tabor, IA
>
> 402-618-4933
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 18:02 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
At first blush this strikes me as being a Philadelphia Vireo due to the distinct sharp facial features.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee

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________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Ross Silcock
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 6:57:19 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos

Hi all,



I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.



/http://magazine.outdoornebrask...



Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
Philadelphia Vireo



Comments welcome.



Ross



Ross Silcock

Seasonal Reports Compiler

Nebraska Bird Review

Tabor, IA

402-618-4933




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireos
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 17:58 pm
From: silcock AT rosssilcock.com
 
Hi all,



I apologize for my inability to get these photos to the group. I've
enlisted help and hopefully this URL will work.



/http://magazine.outdoornebrask...



Photos were taken at Omaha, Nebraska 11 September 2017. Claimed ID is
Philadelphia Vireo



Comments welcome.



Ross



Ross Silcock

Seasonal Reports Compiler

Nebraska Bird Review

Tabor, IA

402-618-4933




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling vs Philadelphia Vireo?
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 10:26 am
From: silcock AT rosssilcock.com
 
Hi all,



These photos show a vireo found on 11 Sep 2017 in Omaha, Nebraska, but
claimed as Philadelphia. I'm mostly swayed to WAVI due to the white throat
and minimal contrast in color between the cap and back.



Very interested in comments.



Sorry about my earlier post- attached photos were stripped.





Thank you,





Ross Silcock

Seasonal Reports Compiler

Nebraska Bird Review

Tabor, IA

402-618-4933



















Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Warbling or Philadelphia?
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 10:08 am
From: silcock AT rosssilcock.com
 
Hi all,



These photos show a vireo seen 11 Sep 2017 in Omaha, Nebraska. I'm mostly
swayed to WAVI due to the white throat and minimal contrast in color between
the cap and back.



Very interested in comments.





Thank you,



Ross Silcock

Seasonal Reports Compile

Nebraska Bird Review

Tabor, IA

402-618-4933




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Pacific Wren Conundrum
Date: Sat Nov 25 2017 23:05 pm
From: josephlowellmiller AT gmail.com
 
Thanks for the input everybody, I did quite a bit of research on Xeno-Canto
myself this evening and was able to find several other Pacifics from the
west coast that sounded very similar to my bird, (most notably this one
) although I still don't know for certain
that Winter Wrens never make that call.

While researching this species pair I also started comparing the chatter
calls from other recordings of the two species and was excited to see that
there do seem to be fairly distinct differences between those calls as well
(our bird did match that of Pacific, but I'm not at all sure if this is a
solid field mark.) I wrote up a blog post with lots of spectrograms
comparing our bird to both classic and squeaky Pacific wrens, as well as
the chatter calls. You can find that here
,
if you're interested.

If anybody else has more input on odd sounding Pacific Wrens or on
separating them by the chatter call, please report. I still don't know what
to think on this bird for sure and I'd love to hear more

Thanks!

Joseph Miller
Nickerson, Kansas


On Sat, Nov 25, 2017 at 8:46 PM, David Suddjian wrote:

> To my ear (30 years in the redwoods of the Santa Cruz Mountains), Steve's
> "squeaky" Pacific Wren recording sounds normal for Pacific, but the Kansas
> recording does not. It strikes me as intermediate between Winter (much more
> limited personal experience) and Pacific.
>
> David Suddjian
> Littleton, CO
>
> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
> On Sat, Nov 25, 2017 at 7:27 PM, Steve Hampton
> wrote:
>
> > Joseph,
> >
> > Both of your recordings sound like an odd Pacific Wren that I recorded
> > years ago here in California along Putah Creek, Yolo/Solano Counties.
> Most
> > Pacifics have a dry almost tone-less click; this one was more squeaky and
> > very similar to yours. We were puzzled at the time-- and we were able to
> > compare directly with a regular Pacific Wren which was nearby. My
> analysis
> > found that the squeaky Pacific actually most closely matched Eurasian
> Wren
> > (!), but in the end I found some Pacifics on xeno-canto from Humboldt
> > County, CA that matched as well, so I left it at that.
> >
> > You can here my squeaky Pacific that sounds like yours here at
> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/1545... The typical Pacific Wren is calling
> in
> > the background on the same recording.
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sat, Nov 25, 2017 at 11:51 AM, Tony Leukering <
> > 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
> >
> > > Hi Joseph:
> > >
> > >
> > > I don't have any answers for you, but your bird does sound odd, the
> call
> > > being high and squeaky.
> > >
> > >
> > > The eastern subsp, salebrosus, is the one that I'd expect in Kansas;
> it's
> > > certainly the one that we expect in Colorado. I could imagine that
> there
> > > are vocal differences between salebrosus and pacificus, but the
> > > eBird/Macaulay archive is woefully short of recordings of non-song
> > > vocalizations of the former. In case you haven't done so, you might
> > check
> > > Xeno-canto, which seems to have quite a lot of recordings from areas
> that
> > > should indicate that the subjects are referable to salebrosus.
> > >
> > >
> > > The other possibility that really ought to be considered involves the
> "H"
> > > word.
> > >
> > >
> > > Good luck,
> > >
> > >
> > > Tony
> > >
> > >
> > > Tony Leukering
> > > currently Guymon, OK
> > > ID columns
> > >
> > > eBird blog
> > > Photo quiz
> > > Photos
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Joseph Miller
> > > To: BIRDWG01
> > > Sent: Sat, Nov 25, 2017 10:55 am
> > > Subject: [BIRDWG01] Pacific Wren Conundrum
> > >
> > > Hi all,
> > >
> > > As some of you may be aware, Scott Lake in western Kansas has recently
> > > received an influx of western vagrants including a Pacific Wren. A
> friend
> > > and I ventured out there on Thursday, and while we were able to find
> the
> > > other great rarities, we did not find the reported Pacific Wren.
> > >
> > > However, we did find a couple of other troglodytes wrens elsewhere
> in
> > > the park. Now even Winter Wren is a bit of a rarity this far west, so
> we
> > > made sure to document them both visually and aurally. One of them
> seemed
> > to
> > > be a standard Winter Wren, with a low "jimp" call, but the other wren
> > gave
> > > a higher, squeaky "tsip" call, (recording of this bird here
> > > > > bc5e923480899706f1e21ecb6fceadad.1406640096781.
> > > 1511550966217.1511625551335.1168&__hssc`209138.9.
> 1511625551335&__hsfp> > > 1900328990>).
> > > It isn't a perfect match for Pacific, but it also does not sound like
> the
> > > Winter Wrens I'm used to. (For comparison, here
> > > > > bc5e923480899706f1e21ecb6fceadad.1406640096781.
> > > 1511550966217.1511625551335.1168&__hssc`209138.5.
> 1511625551335&__hsfp> > > 1900328990>
> > > is a recording of the original Pacific Wren found earlier in the week.)
> > >
> > > I did some spectrographic analysis of my bird and compared that
> with
> > > traditional Winter and Pacific as well as the originally reported one.
> It
> > > seems that both my bird and the originally reported Pacific have a
> little
> > > more distinctly pronounced harmonic bands in the call than typical for
> > > Pacific, but also have the loudest part of the call at or above 6 kHz,
> > > which is more standard for Pacific per Nathan Pieplow
> > > .
> > >
> > > While the likelihood of a second Pacific Wren in the park is very
> > low
> > > and a weird Winter is rather higher, this bird seemed atypical enough
> to
> > > get a second opinion. I found that researching this ID was one of those
> > > unfortunate cases of the more you learn the less you know, and with
> > enough
> > > variance in the calls of both species, I didn't feel comfortable making
> > an
> > > ID on it.
> > >
> > > What do you all think?
> > >
> > >
> > > Joseph Miller
> > > Nickerson, Kansas
> > >
> > > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> > >
> > >
> > > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Steve Hampton
> > Davis, CA
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Pacific Wren Conundrum
Date: Sat Nov 25 2017 20:56 pm
From: dsuddjian AT gmail.com
 
To my ear (30 years in the redwoods of the Santa Cruz Mountains), Steve's
"squeaky" Pacific Wren recording sounds normal for Pacific, but the Kansas
recording does not. It strikes me as intermediate between Winter (much more
limited personal experience) and Pacific.

David Suddjian
Littleton, CO


Virus-free.
www.avast.com

<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Sat, Nov 25, 2017 at 7:27 PM, Steve Hampton
wrote:

> Joseph,
>
> Both of your recordings sound like an odd Pacific Wren that I recorded
> years ago here in California along Putah Creek, Yolo/Solano Counties. Most
> Pacifics have a dry almost tone-less click; this one was more squeaky and
> very similar to yours. We were puzzled at the time-- and we were able to
> compare directly with a regular Pacific Wren which was nearby. My analysis
> found that the squeaky Pacific actually most closely matched Eurasian Wren
> (!), but in the end I found some Pacifics on xeno-canto from Humboldt
> County, CA that matched as well, so I left it at that.
>
> You can here my squeaky Pacific that sounds like yours here at
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/1545... The typical Pacific Wren is calling in
> the background on the same recording.
>
>
>
> On Sat, Nov 25, 2017 at 11:51 AM, Tony Leukering <
> 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
>
> > Hi Joseph:
> >
> >
> > I don't have any answers for you, but your bird does sound odd, the call
> > being high and squeaky.
> >
> >
> > The eastern subsp, salebrosus, is the one that I'd expect in Kansas; it's
> > certainly the one that we expect in Colorado. I could imagine that there
> > are vocal differences between salebrosus and pacificus, but the
> > eBird/Macaulay archive is woefully short of recordings of non-song
> > vocalizations of the former. In case you haven't done so, you might
> check
> > Xeno-canto, which seems to have quite a lot of recordings from areas that
> > should indicate that the subjects are referable to salebrosus.
> >
> >
> > The other possibility that really ought to be considered involves the "H"
> > word.
> >
> >
> > Good luck,
> >
> >
> > Tony
> >
> >
> > Tony Leukering
> > currently Guymon, OK
> > ID columns
> >
> > eBird blog
> > Photo quiz
> > Photos
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Joseph Miller
> > To: BIRDWG01
> > Sent: Sat, Nov 25, 2017 10:55 am
> > Subject: [BIRDWG01] Pacific Wren Conundrum
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> > As some of you may be aware, Scott Lake in western Kansas has recently
> > received an influx of western vagrants including a Pacific Wren. A friend
> > and I ventured out there on Thursday, and while we were able to find the
> > other great rarities, we did not find the reported Pacific Wren.
> >
> > However, we did find a couple of other troglodytes wrens elsewhere in
> > the park. Now even Winter Wren is a bit of a rarity this far west, so we
> > made sure to document them both visually and aurally. One of them seemed
> to
> > be a standard Winter Wren, with a low "jimp" call, but the other wren
> gave
> > a higher, squeaky "tsip" call, (recording of this bird here
> > > bc5e923480899706f1e21ecb6fceadad.1406640096781.
> > 1511550966217.1511625551335.1168&__hssc`209138.9.1511625551335&__hsfp> > 1900328990>).
> > It isn't a perfect match for Pacific, but it also does not sound like the
> > Winter Wrens I'm used to. (For comparison, here
> > > bc5e923480899706f1e21ecb6fceadad.1406640096781.
> > 1511550966217.1511625551335.1168&__hssc`209138.5.1511625551335&__hsfp> > 1900328990>
> > is a recording of the original Pacific Wren found earlier in the week.)
> >
> > I did some spectrographic analysis of my bird and compared that with
> > traditional Winter and Pacific as well as the originally reported one. It
> > seems that both my bird and the originally reported Pacific have a little
> > more distinctly pronounced harmonic bands in the call than typical for
> > Pacific, but also have the loudest part of the call at or above 6 kHz,
> > which is more standard for Pacific per Nathan Pieplow
> > .
> >
> > While the likelihood of a second Pacific Wren in the park is very
> low
> > and a weird Winter is rather higher, this bird seemed atypical enough to
> > get a second opinion. I found that researching this ID was one of those
> > unfortunate cases of the more you learn the less you know, and with
> enough
> > variance in the calls of both species, I didn't feel comfortable making
> an
> > ID on it.
> >
> > What do you all think?
> >
> >
> > Joseph Miller
> > Nickerson, Kansas
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Pacific Wren Conundrum
Date: Sat Nov 25 2017 20:28 pm
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
Joseph,

Both of your recordings sound like an odd Pacific Wren that I recorded
years ago here in California along Putah Creek, Yolo/Solano Counties. Most
Pacifics have a dry almost tone-less click; this one was more squeaky and
very similar to yours. We were puzzled at the time-- and we were able to
compare directly with a regular Pacific Wren which was nearby. My analysis
found that the squeaky Pacific actually most closely matched Eurasian Wren
(!), but in the end I found some Pacifics on xeno-canto from Humboldt
County, CA that matched as well, so I left it at that.

You can here my squeaky Pacific that sounds like yours here at
http://www.xeno-canto.org/1545... The typical Pacific Wren is calling in
the background on the same recording.



On Sat, Nov 25, 2017 at 11:51 AM, Tony Leukering <
000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> Hi Joseph:
>
>
> I don't have any answers for you, but your bird does sound odd, the call
> being high and squeaky.
>
>
> The eastern subsp, salebrosus, is the one that I'd expect in Kansas; it's
> certainly the one that we expect in Colorado. I could imagine that there
> are vocal differences between salebrosus and pacificus, but the
> eBird/Macaulay archive is woefully short of recordings of non-song
> vocalizations of the former. In case you haven't done so, you might check
> Xeno-canto, which seems to have quite a lot of recordings from areas that
> should indicate that the subjects are referable to salebrosus.
>
>
> The other possibility that really ought to be considered involves the "H"
> word.
>
>
> Good luck,
>
>
> Tony
>
>
> Tony Leukering
> currently Guymon, OK
> ID columns
>
> eBird blog
> Photo quiz
> Photos
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Joseph Miller
> To: BIRDWG01
> Sent: Sat, Nov 25, 2017 10:55 am
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Pacific Wren Conundrum
>
> Hi all,
>
> As some of you may be aware, Scott Lake in western Kansas has recently
> received an influx of western vagrants including a Pacific Wren. A friend
> and I ventured out there on Thursday, and while we were able to find the
> other great rarities, we did not find the reported Pacific Wren.
>
> However, we did find a couple of other troglodytes wrens elsewhere in
> the park. Now even Winter Wren is a bit of a rarity this far west, so we
> made sure to document them both visually and aurally. One of them seemed to
> be a standard Winter Wren, with a low "jimp" call, but the other wren gave
> a higher, squeaky "tsip" call, (recording of this bird here
> bc5e923480899706f1e21ecb6fceadad.1406640096781.
> 1511550966217.1511625551335.1168&__hssc`209138.9.1511625551335&__hsfp> 1900328990>).
> It isn't a perfect match for Pacific, but it also does not sound like the
> Winter Wrens I'm used to. (For comparison, here
> bc5e923480899706f1e21ecb6fceadad.1406640096781.
> 1511550966217.1511625551335.1168&__hssc`209138.5.1511625551335&__hsfp> 1900328990>
> is a recording of the original Pacific Wren found earlier in the week.)
>
> I did some spectrographic analysis of my bird and compared that with
> traditional Winter and Pacific as well as the originally reported one. It
> seems that both my bird and the originally reported Pacific have a little
> more distinctly pronounced harmonic bands in the call than typical for
> Pacific, but also have the loudest part of the call at or above 6 kHz,
> which is more standard for Pacific per Nathan Pieplow
> .
>
> While the likelihood of a second Pacific Wren in the park is very low
> and a weird Winter is rather higher, this bird seemed atypical enough to
> get a second opinion. I found that researching this ID was one of those
> unfortunate cases of the more you learn the less you know, and with enough
> variance in the calls of both species, I didn't feel comfortable making an
> ID on it.
>
> What do you all think?
>
>
> Joseph Miller
> Nickerson, Kansas
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Pacific Wren Conundrum
Date: Sat Nov 25 2017 13:51 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Hi Joseph:


I don't have any answers for you, but your bird does sound odd, the call being high and squeaky.


The eastern subsp, salebrosus, is the one that I'd expect in Kansas; it's certainly the one that we expect in Colorado. I could imagine that there are vocal differences between salebrosus and pacificus, but the eBird/Macaulay archive is woefully short of recordings of non-song vocalizations of the former. In case you haven't done so, you might check Xeno-canto, which seems to have quite a lot of recordings from areas that should indicate that the subjects are referable to salebrosus.


The other possibility that really ought to be considered involves the "H" word.


Good luck,


Tony


Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
ID columns

eBird blog
Photo quiz
Photos





-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph Miller
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Sat, Nov 25, 2017 10:55 am
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Pacific Wren Conundrum

Hi all,

As some of you may be aware, Scott Lake in western Kansas has recently
received an influx of western vagrants including a Pacific Wren. A friend
and I ventured out there on Thursday, and while we were able to find the
other great rarities, we did not find the reported Pacific Wren.

However, we did find a couple of other troglodytes wrens elsewhere in
the park. Now even Winter Wren is a bit of a rarity this far west, so we
made sure to document them both visually and aurally. One of them seemed to
be a standard Winter Wren, with a low "jimp" call, but the other wren gave
a higher, squeaky "tsip" call, (recording of this bird here
).
It isn't a perfect match for Pacific, but it also does not sound like the
Winter Wrens I'm used to. (For comparison, here

is a recording of the original Pacific Wren found earlier in the week.)

I did some spectrographic analysis of my bird and compared that with
traditional Winter and Pacific as well as the originally reported one. It
seems that both my bird and the originally reported Pacific have a little
more distinctly pronounced harmonic bands in the call than typical for
Pacific, but also have the loudest part of the call at or above 6 kHz,
which is more standard for Pacific per Nathan Pieplow
.

While the likelihood of a second Pacific Wren in the park is very low
and a weird Winter is rather higher, this bird seemed atypical enough to
get a second opinion. I found that researching this ID was one of those
unfortunate cases of the more you learn the less you know, and with enough
variance in the calls of both species, I didn't feel comfortable making an
ID on it.

What do you all think?


Joseph Miller
Nickerson, Kansas

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Pacific Wren Conundrum
Date: Sat Nov 25 2017 10:54 am
From: josephlowellmiller AT gmail.com
 
Hi all,

As some of you may be aware, Scott Lake in western Kansas has recently
received an influx of western vagrants including a Pacific Wren. A friend
and I ventured out there on Thursday, and while we were able to find the
other great rarities, we did not find the reported Pacific Wren.

However, we did find a couple of other troglodytes wrens elsewhere in
the park. Now even Winter Wren is a bit of a rarity this far west, so we
made sure to document them both visually and aurally. One of them seemed to
be a standard Winter Wren, with a low "jimp" call, but the other wren gave
a higher, squeaky "tsip" call, (recording of this bird here
).
It isn't a perfect match for Pacific, but it also does not sound like the
Winter Wrens I'm used to. (For comparison, here

is a recording of the original Pacific Wren found earlier in the week.)

I did some spectrographic analysis of my bird and compared that with
traditional Winter and Pacific as well as the originally reported one. It
seems that both my bird and the originally reported Pacific have a little
more distinctly pronounced harmonic bands in the call than typical for
Pacific, but also have the loudest part of the call at or above 6 kHz,
which is more standard for Pacific per Nathan Pieplow
.

While the likelihood of a second Pacific Wren in the park is very low
and a weird Winter is rather higher, this bird seemed atypical enough to
get a second opinion. I found that researching this ID was one of those
unfortunate cases of the more you learn the less you know, and with enough
variance in the calls of both species, I didn't feel comfortable making an
ID on it.

What do you all think?


Joseph Miller
Nickerson, Kansas

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Wood-Pewee on Dry Tortugas (11/15)
Date: Wed Nov 22 2017 14:41 pm
From: karlson3 AT comcast.net
 
Bill and all: I don't know if any recent information has proven reliable to separate these two species using plumage only, but features used in the past to identify Western Wood-Peewee include a heavier, dusky wash to the underparts that does not show the vertical pale line down the breast of Eastern; grayer crown and upperparts versus more greenish-olive ones on Eastern; a larger dark tip on the bill; and slightly longer wings and shorter tail on Western. Your bird seems to fit the bill on the first 3 plumage/bare parts features, but I can't objectively see a shorter tail or longer wings, which are probably features that require extensive review of them in comparison with skins or in the field, which is something that I don't have. Although these features suggest Western, there is much overlap in both species, so much so that I don't think you can safely call this a Western, but only a possible Western. Call would have been the clincher, with Eastern very vocal at all times!
of the year, even in winter, but in my 150+ days and nights on the Tortugas in the late 90s- early 2000s, I found that not too many birds seem inclined to call or sing, due to the uncomfortable nature of their location and stressful journey getting there. Good luck with this one. Maybe someone out West has new information on these two species.

Kevin Karlson

> On November 21, 2017 at 4:23 PM Bill Hubick <0000046f8583d29e-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU mailto:0000046f8583d29e-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU .EDU> wrote:
>
>
> Hi Everyone,
>
> Michael Ostrowski and I found this wood-pewee on 11/15 on Garden Key in the Dry Tortugas, Monroe Co., Florida. It gave us a strong impression of Western Wood-Pewee between overall very dark coloration, wing bar details, posture, and so on. Unfortunately we did not hear or record it vocalizing. The linked photos are cropped but otherwise not edited.
>
> Here's the full (and to us very fun) eBird checklist for the visit.http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> Zip file of full-res photos:http://www.billhubick.com/temp...
>
> We'd welcome any feedback on whether this bird is identifiable from photos. I certainly wouldn't try to push this as an Eastern if photographed out west. :)
>
> Thanks in advance for taking a look! Happy Thanksgiving!
> Bill Bill HubickPasadena, Marylandbill_hubick@yahoo.com mailto:Marylandbill_hubick@yahoo.com http://www.billhubick.com
> http://www.marylandbiodiversit...
> http://www.facebook.com/Maryla...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Wood-Pewee on Dry Tortugas (11/15)
Date: Tue Nov 21 2017 15:34 pm
From: 0000046f8583d29e-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Hi Everyone,

Michael Ostrowski and I found this wood-pewee on 11/15 on Garden Key in the Dry Tortugas, Monroe Co., Florida. It gave us a strong impression of Western Wood-Pewee between overall very dark coloration, wing bar details, posture, and so on. Unfortunately we did not hear or record it vocalizing. The linked photos are cropped but otherwise not edited.

Here's the full (and to us very fun) eBird checklist for the visit.http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
Zip file of full-res photos:http://www.billhubick.com/temp...

We'd welcome any feedback on whether this bird is identifiable from photos. I certainly wouldn't try to push this as an Eastern if photographed out west. :)

Thanks in advance for taking a look! Happy Thanksgiving!
BillBill HubickPasadena, Marylandbill_hubick@yahoo.comhttp://www.billhubick.com
http://www.marylandbiodiversit...
http://www.facebook.com/Maryla...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Wagtail
Date: Thu Nov 16 2017 21:56 pm
From: greenfant AT hotmail.com
 
Oops, Clive, I only looked at that one picture. It clearly shows in the other pix. Totally agree, the lack of a full yellow border is weird.


Cheers,


Stefan Schlick

Hillsboro, OR

________________________________
From: Clive Harris
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 7:04 PM
To: Stefan Schlick
Cc: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Wagtail

Stefan

Many thanks. I agree all those are consistent with Citrine and this is probably what it is. But the dark nape is clearly joined to the dark ear coverts in the bird in question. There is a photo from the rear showing this. I'd agree there are no other unusual features.

Regards

Clive Harris

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2017, at 9:15 PM, Stefan Schlick wrote:
>
> What also really points to Citrine Wagtail are the all black bill, all gray back and white undertail coverts. The dark ear covert may not be showing the yellow border near the neck since the bird has its head turned slightly to left.
>
>
> Stefan Schlick
>
> Hillsboro, OR
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Angus Wilson
> Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 5:10 PM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Wagtail
>
> Was hoping others with more experience of central Asian wagtails would
> chime in. Have been going back and forth on the extent of variation within
> female Citrine Wagtails. However, I suspect that's what Clive's bird is,
> rather than a hybrid. I can see hints of the black shawl at the edge of
> gray mantle bordering on the yellow of the head.
>
> This checklist, also from Oman, includes a similarly dark cheeked
> individual.
>
> https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...
>
> Lovely birds!
>
> Angus Wilson, New York, USA
>
> On Wed, Nov 15, 2017 at 7:01 PM, Clive Harris <
> 00000464ec375886-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
>
>> Dear all
>> I photographed this wagtail recently in Muscat. It basically seems to be a
>> Citrine but I can't recall seeing that species with a head pattern like
>> this, with a dark cap and neck joining a line going through the eye (rather
>> than the yellow on the face circling the coverts). I couldn't find a photo
>> of a similar bird either. However I practically never get the chance to
>> see this species these days, so perhaps I'm forgetting something. I'd
>> appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Citrine or if it might have
>> some mixed lineage.
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>> 37558576065/
>> Many thanks
>> Clive Harris
>> .
>>
>>
>> | | Virus-free. www.avg.com |
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Angus Wilson
> New York City & The Springs, NY, USA
> http://birdingtotheend.blogspo...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Wagtail
Date: Thu Nov 16 2017 21:06 pm
From: 00000464ec375886-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Stefan

Many thanks. I agree all those are consistent with Citrine and this is probably what it is. But the dark nape is clearly joined to the dark ear coverts in the bird in question. There is a photo from the rear showing this. I'd agree there are no other unusual features.

Regards

Clive Harris

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2017, at 9:15 PM, Stefan Schlick wrote:
>
> What also really points to Citrine Wagtail are the all black bill, all gray back and white undertail coverts. The dark ear covert may not be showing the yellow border near the neck since the bird has its head turned slightly to left.
>
>
> Stefan Schlick
>
> Hillsboro, OR
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Angus Wilson
> Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 5:10 PM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Wagtail
>
> Was hoping others with more experience of central Asian wagtails would
> chime in. Have been going back and forth on the extent of variation within
> female Citrine Wagtails. However, I suspect that's what Clive's bird is,
> rather than a hybrid. I can see hints of the black shawl at the edge of
> gray mantle bordering on the yellow of the head.
>
> This checklist, also from Oman, includes a similarly dark cheeked
> individual.
>
> https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...
>
> Lovely birds!
>
> Angus Wilson, New York, USA
>
> On Wed, Nov 15, 2017 at 7:01 PM, Clive Harris <
> 00000464ec375886-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
>
>> Dear all
>> I photographed this wagtail recently in Muscat. It basically seems to be a
>> Citrine but I can't recall seeing that species with a head pattern like
>> this, with a dark cap and neck joining a line going through the eye (rather
>> than the yellow on the face circling the coverts). I couldn't find a photo
>> of a similar bird either. However I practically never get the chance to
>> see this species these days, so perhaps I'm forgetting something. I'd
>> appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Citrine or if it might have
>> some mixed lineage.
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>> 37558576065/
>> Many thanks
>> Clive Harris
>> .
>>
>>
>> | | Virus-free. www.avg.com |
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Angus Wilson
> New York City & The Springs, NY, USA
> http://birdingtotheend.blogspo...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Wagtail
Date: Thu Nov 16 2017 20:25 pm
From: greenfant AT hotmail.com
 
What also really points to Citrine Wagtail are the all black bill, all gray back and white undertail coverts. The dark ear covert may not be showing the yellow border near the neck since the bird has its head turned slightly to left.


Stefan Schlick

Hillsboro, OR


________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Angus Wilson
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 5:10 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Wagtail

Was hoping others with more experience of central Asian wagtails would
chime in. Have been going back and forth on the extent of variation within
female Citrine Wagtails. However, I suspect that's what Clive's bird is,
rather than a hybrid. I can see hints of the black shawl at the edge of
gray mantle bordering on the yellow of the head.

This checklist, also from Oman, includes a similarly dark cheeked
individual.

https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...

Lovely birds!

Angus Wilson, New York, USA

On Wed, Nov 15, 2017 at 7:01 PM, Clive Harris <
00000464ec375886-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> Dear all
> I photographed this wagtail recently in Muscat. It basically seems to be a
> Citrine but I can't recall seeing that species with a head pattern like
> this, with a dark cap and neck joining a line going through the eye (rather
> than the yellow on the face circling the coverts). I couldn't find a photo
> of a similar bird either. However I practically never get the chance to
> see this species these days, so perhaps I'm forgetting something. I'd
> appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Citrine or if it might have
> some mixed lineage.
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> 37558576065/
> Many thanks
> Clive Harris
> .
>
>
> | | Virus-free. www.avg.com |
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Angus Wilson
New York City & The Springs, NY, USA
http://birdingtotheend.blogspo...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Wagtail
Date: Thu Nov 16 2017 19:11 pm
From: oceanwanderers AT gmail.com
 
Was hoping others with more experience of central Asian wagtails would
chime in. Have been going back and forth on the extent of variation within
female Citrine Wagtails. However, I suspect that's what Clive's bird is,
rather than a hybrid. I can see hints of the black shawl at the edge of
gray mantle bordering on the yellow of the head.

This checklist, also from Oman, includes a similarly dark cheeked
individual.

https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...

Lovely birds!

Angus Wilson, New York, USA

On Wed, Nov 15, 2017 at 7:01 PM, Clive Harris <
00000464ec375886-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> Dear all
> I photographed this wagtail recently in Muscat. It basically seems to be a
> Citrine but I can't recall seeing that species with a head pattern like
> this, with a dark cap and neck joining a line going through the eye (rather
> than the yellow on the face circling the coverts). I couldn't find a photo
> of a similar bird either. However I practically never get the chance to
> see this species these days, so perhaps I'm forgetting something. I'd
> appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Citrine or if it might have
> some mixed lineage.
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> 37558576065/
> Many thanks
> Clive Harris
> .
>
>
> | | Virus-free. www.avg.com |
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Angus Wilson
New York City & The Springs, NY, USA
http://birdingtotheend.blogspo...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Wagtail
Date: Wed Nov 15 2017 18:13 pm
From: 00000464ec375886-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Dear all
I photographed this wagtail recently in Muscat. It basically seems to bea Citrine but I can't recall seeing that species with a head pattern like this, with a dark cap and neckjoining a line going through the eye (rather than the yellow on the face circling the coverts). I couldn't finda photo of a similar bird either. However I practically never get the chance to see this species these days, so perhaps I'm forgetting something. I'd appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Citrine or if it might have some mixed lineage.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
Many thanks
Clive Harris
.


| | Virus-free. www.avg.com |


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Redhead or Greater Scaup
Date: Fri Nov 10 2017 11:14 am
From: jgluth AT optonline.net
 
*Slaps forehead* Don't know why I didn't consider RNDU as well. Even though I see ample numbers of Ring-necks every Fall/Winter, I see relatively few immature males and even fewer in flight. Will have to start taking and studying flight photos of them now that I have a DSLR and telephoto lens.

John Gluth,
Sent from my iPhone
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Redhead or Greater Scaup
Date: Fri Nov 10 2017 10:50 am
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All,

I am buying in on the RN Duck identification. Found a photo after a lot of looking of a bird that matches the face pattern and eye color: https://ebird.org/media/catalo...

The pattern of the black trailing edge to the wing fading out on the very innermost secondaries also fits RN Duck perfectly and better than Redhead, which tends to start to fade on the outer secondaries.

Thanks a lot for the help.

Nick

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jason Rogers
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 7:31 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Redhead or Greater Scaup

Agree. I don't see Redhead here and bill structure and pattern isn't right for scaup. I'd say Ring-necked Duck.


Cheers,


Jason Rogers

Calgary, AB


________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Killian Mullarney
Sent: November 10, 2017 9:18 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Redhead or Greater Scaup

Surely a first-year male Ring-necked Duck?

Regards,

Killian Mullarney

On Fri, Nov 10, 2017 at 1:25 AM, Lethaby, Nick < 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> All,
>
> Adam Searcy was out on Santa Barbara Island recently and photographed
> this aythya duck flying by:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Although, it was tentatively claimed as a Greater Scaup, I was
> wondering if it might in fact be a Redhead. One feature that seems
> strongly pro-Redhead, if correctly represented in the photographs, is
> the fact the black trailing edge to the wing appears to fade out on
> the inner secondaries in both photos that show this area. Greater
> Scaup seems to consistently show a broad black trailing edge along the
> whole length of the wing.
>
> The face pattern seems to pretty strongly favor Greater Scaup,
> although I was able to find a couple of Redhead pictures that seemed
> to show a brown head without an eye-ring and some pale around the bill base.
>
> I think the bill pattern favors Redhead although I found Greater
> Scaups showing a hint of a similar pattern and also reddish-brown eyes
> link this bird.
>
> Whatever it is, it will be a new island bird, so we'd like to be sure
> of the identification.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Nick Lethaby
> Goleta, CA 93117
>
> Office: 805 562 5106
> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Redhead or Greater Scaup
Date: Fri Nov 10 2017 9:31 am
From: hawkowl AT hotmail.com
 
Agree. I don't see Redhead here and bill structure and pattern isn't right for scaup. I'd say Ring-necked Duck.


Cheers,


Jason Rogers

Calgary, AB


________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Killian Mullarney
Sent: November 10, 2017 9:18 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Redhead or Greater Scaup

Surely a first-year male Ring-necked Duck?

Regards,

Killian Mullarney

On Fri, Nov 10, 2017 at 1:25 AM, Lethaby, Nick <
000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> All,
>
> Adam Searcy was out on Santa Barbara Island recently and photographed this
> aythya duck flying by:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Although, it was tentatively claimed as a Greater Scaup, I was wondering
> if it might in fact be a Redhead. One feature that seems strongly
> pro-Redhead, if correctly represented in the photographs, is the fact the
> black trailing edge to the wing appears to fade out on the inner
> secondaries in both photos that show this area. Greater Scaup seems to
> consistently show a broad black trailing edge along the whole length of the
> wing.
>
> The face pattern seems to pretty strongly favor Greater Scaup, although I
> was able to find a couple of Redhead pictures that seemed to show a brown
> head without an eye-ring and some pale around the bill base.
>
> I think the bill pattern favors Redhead although I found Greater Scaups
> showing a hint of a similar pattern and also reddish-brown eyes link this
> bird.
>
> Whatever it is, it will be a new island bird, so we'd like to be sure of
> the identification.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Nick Lethaby
> Goleta, CA 93117
>
> Office: 805 562 5106
> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Redhead or Greater Scaup
Date: Fri Nov 10 2017 8:41 am
From: jgluth AT optonline.net
 
Interesting bird. From the eye to tip of tail the bird looks good for Greater Scaup -  not sure how much weight I'd put on the blackness of the trailing edge of the wings given the viewing angle, lighting and sharpness of the photos. It's forward of the eye where I can certainly understand the suspicion of Redhead. First, the amount of white feathering at the base of the bill seems insufficient for Greater Scaup, and with a rear margin that is too indistinct, though that may be a factor of age/molt (perhaps HY female scaup could have this reduced amount of white?). The bill itself is even more problematic for GRSC. The outer half doesn't appear broad and spatulate enough, and the amount of white behind the nail - if not a lighting artifact - seems well outside the "norm" for GRSC. This bird may be a case where the dreaded "H" word may come into play.

John Gluth,
Sent from my iPhone



John Gluth,
Sent from my iPhone
> On Nov 10, 2017, at 1:01 AM, BIRDWG01 automatic digest system wrote:
>
> There is 1 message totaling 46 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Redhead or Greater Scaup
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2017 01:25:59 +0000
> From: "Lethaby, Nick"
> Subject: Redhead or Greater Scaup
>
> All,
>
> Adam Searcy was out on Santa Barbara Island recently and photographed this aythya duck flying by:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Although, it was tentatively claimed as a Greater Scaup, I was wondering if it might in fact be a Redhead. One feature that seems strongly pro-Redhead, if correctly represented in the photographs, is the fact the black trailing edge to the wing appears to fade out on the inner secondaries in both photos that show this area. Greater Scaup seems to consistently show a broad black trailing edge along the whole length of the wing.
>
> The face pattern seems to pretty strongly favor Greater Scaup, although I was able to find a couple of Redhead pictures that seemed to show a brown head without an eye-ring and some pale around the bill base.
>
> I think the bill pattern favors Redhead although I found Greater Scaups showing a hint of a similar pattern and also reddish-brown eyes link this bird.
>
> Whatever it is, it will be a new island bird, so we'd like to be sure of the identification.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Nick Lethaby
> Goleta, CA 93117
>
> Office: 805 562 5106
> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of BIRDWG01 Digest - 28 Oct 2017 to 9 Nov 2017 (#2017-104)
> **************************************************************

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Redhead or Greater Scaup
Date: Fri Nov 10 2017 3:19 am
From: ktmullarney AT gmail.com
 
Surely a first-year male Ring-necked Duck?

Regards,

Killian Mullarney

On Fri, Nov 10, 2017 at 1:25 AM, Lethaby, Nick <
000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> All,
>
> Adam Searcy was out on Santa Barbara Island recently and photographed this
> aythya duck flying by:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Although, it was tentatively claimed as a Greater Scaup, I was wondering
> if it might in fact be a Redhead. One feature that seems strongly
> pro-Redhead, if correctly represented in the photographs, is the fact the
> black trailing edge to the wing appears to fade out on the inner
> secondaries in both photos that show this area. Greater Scaup seems to
> consistently show a broad black trailing edge along the whole length of the
> wing.
>
> The face pattern seems to pretty strongly favor Greater Scaup, although I
> was able to find a couple of Redhead pictures that seemed to show a brown
> head without an eye-ring and some pale around the bill base.
>
> I think the bill pattern favors Redhead although I found Greater Scaups
> showing a hint of a similar pattern and also reddish-brown eyes link this
> bird.
>
> Whatever it is, it will be a new island bird, so we'd like to be sure of
> the identification.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Nick Lethaby
> Goleta, CA 93117
>
> Office: 805 562 5106
> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Redhead or Greater Scaup
Date: Thu Nov 9 2017 19:26 pm
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All,

Adam Searcy was out on Santa Barbara Island recently and photographed this aythya duck flying by:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Although, it was tentatively claimed as a Greater Scaup, I was wondering if it might in fact be a Redhead. One feature that seems strongly pro-Redhead, if correctly represented in the photographs, is the fact the black trailing edge to the wing appears to fade out on the inner secondaries in both photos that show this area. Greater Scaup seems to consistently show a broad black trailing edge along the whole length of the wing.

The face pattern seems to pretty strongly favor Greater Scaup, although I was able to find a couple of Redhead pictures that seemed to show a brown head without an eye-ring and some pale around the bill base.

I think the bill pattern favors Redhead although I found Greater Scaups showing a hint of a similar pattern and also reddish-brown eyes link this bird.

Whatever it is, it will be a new island bird, so we'd like to be sure of the identification.

Thanks,

Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA 93117

Office: 805 562 5106
Mobile: 805 284 6200
Email: nlethaby@ti.com


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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