ABA's Birding News >> ID Frontiers

ID Frontiers bird news by date

Updated on May 4, 2016, 5:30 am

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


04 May: @ 05:27:45  Tanager ID [Russ Ruffing]
02 May: @ 18:54:48 Re: NYC: Central Park mystery warbler with Hermit appearance, BTGreen song [David Irons]
02 May: @ 18:11:02 Re: NYC: Central Park mystery warbler with Hermit appearance, BTGreen song [karlson3]
01 May: @ 22:44:37  NYC: Central Park mystery warbler with Hermit appearance, BTGreen song [Karen Fung]
26 Apr: @ 14:13:09 Re: Song Sparrow Subspecies identification [Steve Hampton]
26 Apr: @ 13:16:00  Song Sparrow Subspecies identification [Dan A]
25 Apr: @ 17:25:31 Re: hawk question [Steve Hampton]
25 Apr: @ 13:15:49 Re: hawk question [Brian Sullivan]
25 Apr: @ 11:45:26  hawk question [Steve Hampton]
20 Apr: @ 14:35:07  RFI: Audio recording of Myrtle Warbler in Britain [Ted Floyd]
15 Apr: @ 17:50:44  Odd Harrier in Nebraska [Noah Arthur]
11 Apr: @ 14:06:56  Gestalt Keys - A Possible Solution to Gestalt from Digital Images [Mike O'Keeffe]





Subject: Tanager ID
Date: Wed May 4 2016 5:27 am
From: ruff2 AT verizon.net
 
 Hi All,

I'd be interested in your opinions on the ID of this tanager. The picture was taken on 8/22/15 and is admittedly back lit and not the greatest. I do not want to bias anyone by revealing the location. I have only cropped the photo, otherwise it is as it came right out of the camera. The one preceding it in my queue has been brightened a bit.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

thanks,

Russ Ruffing

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: NYC: Central Park mystery warbler with Hermit appearance, BTGreen song
Date: Mon May 2 2016 18:54 pm
From: llsdirons AT msn.com
 
The traditional description of a Black-throated Green song could also describe many local dialects of the Hermit Warbler song, which is comprised of a sequence fast "zee" notes and concludes with an emphatic up slurred two-note phrase that often sounds like the"zoo-zee" ending of a BT Green. This bird looks like a pure Hermit with no obvious indications of hybridization. Geographic variation in the songs of Hermit,  BT Gray and Townsend's are well known and persist in confounding even the the most experienced western birders at times. I don't think that vocalization similarity can be used as an indicator of hybridization within this species complex. Unless there are intermediate plumage characteristics, this warbler should be presumed to be a non-hybrid. As Kevin Karlson indicated, male Hermits can show some dark feathering in the auriculars.

Dave Irons
Portland, OR

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 1, 2016, at 8:44 PM, Karen Fung wrote:
>
> Four photos from this morning (1 May 2016) are in this gallery:
>
> http://www.birdsiviews.com/Bir...
>
> Appearance points to Hermit Warbler based on the yellow head, dark
> upperparts, dark nape, neat black triangular bib, white underparts with no
> yellow and almost no streaking, lack of yellow in the vent. The bird had a
> yellow eye-ring, but some folks are saying that the auricular patch looks
> little dark for a Hermit with a solid black bib like this one.
>
> The bird occasionally sang the Zee-Zee-Zee-Zoo-Zee song of the
> Black-throated Green, or some song very close to it.
>
> I apologize for the quality of the pics, which are blurry and heavily
> cropped, but am hoping that someone who has expertise in Hermit and
> Townsend's can weigh in on whether a Hermit Warbler vocalizations ever
> approach this particular BTGreen song and if not, whether this is some sort
> of hybrid. Hermits and BTGreens do not overlap in their breeding ranges
> and this warbler did not really show any Townsend's features, so what
> scenarios might lead to this result? One person suggested that perhaps a
> Hermit showed up in the East during breeding season last year, which seems
> like a plausible explanation.
>
> More info on the discovery of this bird can be found in Anthony Collerton's
> blog:
>
> http://welshbirder.blogspot.co...
>
> Many thanks,
>
> Karen Fung
> NYC
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: NYC: Central Park mystery warbler with Hermit appearance, BTGreen song
Date: Mon May 2 2016 18:11 pm
From: karlson3 AT comcast.net
 
Karen,female or young male Hermit Warblers have dark markings on the cheek,but the complete black throat and bold mostly yellow face suggests a male, plus it was singing,so probably a male.I am not familiar with Hermit song variations, but nothing in the photos suggests a hybrid. Looks like a good Hermit Warbler. Congratulations on the good photos. Kevin Karlson
----- Original Message -----
From: Karen Fung
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Mon, 02 May 2016 03:34:20 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: [BIRDWG01] NYC: Central Park mystery warbler with Hermit appearance, BTGreen song

Four photos from this morning (1 May 2016) are in this gallery:

http://www.birdsiviews.com/Bir...

Appearance points to Hermit Warbler based on the yellow head, dark
upperparts, dark nape, neat black triangular bib, white underparts with no
yellow and almost no streaking, lack of yellow in the vent. The bird had a
yellow eye-ring, but some folks are saying that the auricular patch looks
little dark for a Hermit with a solid black bib like this one.

The bird occasionally sang the Zee-Zee-Zee-Zoo-Zee song of the
Black-throated Green, or some song very close to it.

I apologize for the quality of the pics, which are blurry and heavily
cropped, but am hoping that someone who has expertise in Hermit and
Townsend's can weigh in on whether a Hermit Warbler vocalizations ever
approach this particular BTGreen song and if not, whether this is some sort
of hybrid. Hermits and BTGreens do not overlap in their breeding ranges
and this warbler did not really show any Townsend's features, so what
scenarios might lead to this result? One person suggested that perhaps a
Hermit showed up in the East during breeding season last year, which seems
like a plausible explanation.

More info on the discovery of this bird can be found in Anthony Collerton's
blog:

http://welshbirder.blogspot.co...

Many thanks,

Karen Fung
NYC

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: NYC: Central Park mystery warbler with Hermit appearance, BTGreen song
Date: Sun May 1 2016 22:44 pm
From: easternbluebird AT gmail.com
 
Four photos from this morning (1 May 2016) are in this gallery:

http://www.birdsiviews.com/Bir...

Appearance points to Hermit Warbler based on the yellow head, dark
upperparts, dark nape, neat black triangular bib, white underparts with no
yellow and almost no streaking, lack of yellow in the vent. The bird had a
yellow eye-ring, but some folks are saying that the auricular patch looks
little dark for a Hermit with a solid black bib like this one.

The bird occasionally sang the Zee-Zee-Zee-Zoo-Zee song of the
Black-throated Green, or some song very close to it.

I apologize for the quality of the pics, which are blurry and heavily
cropped, but am hoping that someone who has expertise in Hermit and
Townsend's can weigh in on whether a Hermit Warbler vocalizations ever
approach this particular BTGreen song and if not, whether this is some sort
of hybrid. Hermits and BTGreens do not overlap in their breeding ranges
and this warbler did not really show any Townsend's features, so what
scenarios might lead to this result? One person suggested that perhaps a
Hermit showed up in the East during breeding season last year, which seems
like a plausible explanation.

More info on the discovery of this bird can be found in Anthony Collerton's
blog:

http://welshbirder.blogspot.co...

Many thanks,

Karen Fung
NYC

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Song Sparrow Subspecies identification
Date: Tue Apr 26 2016 14:13 pm
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
I want to make people aware of a Facebook group dedicated to sharing Song
Sparrow photos and discussing subspecific id at
https://www.facebook.com/group...

There's also a Fox Sparrow Facebook group at
https://www.facebook.com/group...



On Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 11:05 AM, Dan A wrote:

> Good day, all!
> As a long-time lurker, I've followed many a discussion on the listserv
> with great interest and learned a lot. I finally have a bird to submit for
> subspecies identification. This Song Sparrow was photographed at Frank
> Lake, in southern Alberta, Canada in early March, and managed to
> successfully overwinter in our extremely temperate cold season at a water
> outflow channel, and was observed by several birders throughout the season.
> What caught my eye was the overall grayish and reddish-brown tones to the
> bird, which is more typical of the western subspecies complex, rather than
> the eastern Melospiza melodia montana subspecies, which is much paler and
> browner overall.
> I've got a few ideas of what subspecies this bird belongs to, but I look
> forward to your expert opinions!
> Photo 1:https://flic.kr/p/E3MXk6
> Photo 2:https://flic.kr/p/Ey3S5E
> Photo 3:https://flic.kr/p/F1aUFB
> Daniel Arndt
>
> Cell: (403) 836-7405
>
> bowvalleytours.com
>
> Flickr.com/photos/ubermoogle
>
> www.birdscalgary.com
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: Song Sparrow Subspecies identification
Date: Tue Apr 26 2016 13:16 pm
From: danielarndt AT hotmail.com
 
Good day, all!
As a long-time lurker, I've followed many a discussion on the listserv with great interest and learned a lot. I finally have a bird to submit for subspecies identification. This Song Sparrow was photographed at Frank Lake, in southern Alberta, Canada in early March, and managed to successfully overwinter in our extremely temperate cold season at a water outflow channel, and was observed by several birders throughout the season.
What caught my eye was the overall grayish and reddish-brown tones to the bird, which is more typical of the western subspecies complex, rather than the eastern Melospiza melodia montana subspecies, which is much paler and browner overall.
I've got a few ideas of what subspecies this bird belongs to, but I look forward to your expert opinions!
Photo 1:https://flic.kr/p/E3MXk6
Photo 2:https://flic.kr/p/Ey3S5E
Photo 3:https://flic.kr/p/F1aUFB
Daniel Arndt

Cell: (403) 836-7405

bowvalleytours.com

Flickr.com/photos/ubermoogle

www.birdscalgary.com
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: hawk question
Date: Mon Apr 25 2016 17:25 pm
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
Thanks all.  A wide variety of answers (Broad-winged, Swainson's, and
possible hybrid) but the consensus is over-exposed Swainson's in the wind,
based on the a combination of plumage features.

Here is the most detailed and informative response, from Louis Bevier:

This is a Swainson’s Hawk. The fine barring in the remiges is too narrow
for Broad-winged of any age. It’s an adult by virtue of the dark band along
the trailing edge of those remiges, and adult Broad-wings have a few pale
bars in the emarginated tips of P9-8. Swainson’s shows all dark in those
“fingers” as you can see in the photo.

Also, if an adult, then the tail is obviously wrong for Broad-winged, and
you don’t see 1st year Broad-wings ever showing the dark breast like an
adult yet with wings of an adult and tail of juvenile. Moreover the
spotting below the breast is typical of Swainson’s Hawk. An adult-ish
(looking) Broad-wing has dark spade-shaped marks or bars down there and on
the leg feathers.

I think the wings are pulled up and away from the plane of the camera,
making it look short winged (and that may have been an impression enhanced
by the wind). Everything else fits adult Swainson’s.

On Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 11:15 AM, Brian Sullivan
wrote:

> Hi Steve et al.
>
> This bird is consistent with an adult Swainson's Hawk, likely female given
> the uniform brown head and breast. The strong light, and wind, are
> affecting how we perceive both its plumage and shape.
>
> Thanks
>
> Brian
>
> On Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 9:45 AM, Steve Hampton
> wrote:
>
>> All,
>>
>> This hawk was photographed April 16 near Davis, CA by Mark Sawyer.
>>
>> Expected species in this area are Swainson's and Red-tailed.
>>
>> This hawk was thought to be a possible Broad-winged, as it seemed smaller
>> than adjacent Swainson's and with widespread primaries (although it was
>> windy at the time).
>>
>> https://flic.kr/p/Gx1bY2
>>
>> Comments are welcome.
>>
>> thanks,
>>
>>
>> --
>> Steve Hampton
>> Davis, CA
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
>
>
> --
> ===========
>
>
> *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> www.ebird.org
>
> *Photo Editor*
> Birds of North America Online
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/B...
> -------------------------------
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: hawk question
Date: Mon Apr 25 2016 13:15 pm
From: heraldpetrel AT gmail.com
 
Hi Steve et al.

This bird is consistent with an adult Swainson's Hawk, likely female given
the uniform brown head and breast. The strong light, and wind, are
affecting how we perceive both its plumage and shape.

Thanks

Brian

On Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 9:45 AM, Steve Hampton
wrote:

> All,
>
> This hawk was photographed April 16 near Davis, CA by Mark Sawyer.
>
> Expected species in this area are Swainson's and Red-tailed.
>
> This hawk was thought to be a possible Broad-winged, as it seemed smaller
> than adjacent Swainson's and with widespread primaries (although it was
> windy at the time).
>
> https://flic.kr/p/Gx1bY2
>
> Comments are welcome.
>
> thanks,
>
>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
==========

*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/B...
-------------------------------

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: hawk question
Date: Mon Apr 25 2016 11:45 am
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
All,

This hawk was photographed April 16 near Davis, CA by Mark Sawyer.

Expected species in this area are Swainson's and Red-tailed.

This hawk was thought to be a possible Broad-winged, as it seemed smaller
than adjacent Swainson's and with widespread primaries (although it was
windy at the time).

https://flic.kr/p/Gx1bY2

Comments are welcome.

thanks,


--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: RFI: Audio recording of Myrtle Warbler in Britain
Date: Wed Apr 20 2016 14:35 pm
From: tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com
 
Hi, Everybody.


Just a quick request: Can anybody point me to a sound recording of a Myrtle [Yellow-rumped] Warbler, Setophaga coronata, from Britain? (Or anywhere else in the Palearctic.)


Many thanks,


Ted Floyd

Boulder County, Colorado, USA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd Harrier in Nebraska
Date: Fri Apr 15 2016 17:50 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
Hey everyone! Potential vagrants are few and far between in Nebraska spring
migration (unlike winter), but there was an interesting harrier at Waco
Waterfowl Area in Waco, NE, on April 1st.

The underwing of this female/immature harrier strikes me as having
unusually thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the primaries, and it looks
like there are only 4 bars on each primary -- potentially characteristic of
Eurasian Hen Harrier. And the wings also look a little bit large, long and
narrow to me.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Am I (as usual) freaking out over nothing, or could this be a (state
first) Hen Harrier?

Noah Arthur
Lincoln, NE/Oakland, CA
semirelicta@gmail.com

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Gestalt Keys - A Possible Solution to Gestalt from Digital Images
Date: Mon Apr 11 2016 14:06 pm
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
Hi,



As everyone knows gestalt or ‘jizz’ is very hard to describe and even harder to nail down, especially from still digital images. I have come up with a solution which I think will vastly improve the accuracy of measurements currently taken from digital images including such standard ones as primary projection, bill-eye ratio, tibia-tarsus ratio and structural angle measurement such as the gular pouch angle used for identifying Cormorants by race in Europe or the Dowitcher Loral Angle used in North America.



The concept is simple enough – a mask or stencil is placed over an image and scaled/rotated into position. Provided certain key ‘loci’ match up with their position on the subject image an accurate measurement is possible. If there is no alignment then the image us unsuitable for the test. So in that way the gestalt key serves not only to encourage accurate measurement but also to educate about the fundamental requirements and nature of the measurement itself.



I have produced a couple of simple prototype Gestalt Keys which I have incorporated in the introductory post. I hope to produce better keys and make them freely available through the blog for people to test and critique in time. Hope people here find this useful.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...



Regards



Mike O’Keeffe

Ireland


This email has been scanned by BullGuard antivirus protection.
For more info visit www.bullguard.com

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


ABA RBA



ABA's FREE Birder's Guide. Get the most recent issue now >>


ABA RBA



If you live nearby, or are travelling in the area, come visit the ABA Headquarters in Delaware City. Beginning this spring we will be having bird walks, heron watches and evening cruises, right from our front porch!

Click here to view the full calender, and register for events >>



Get Flight Calls, the ABA newsletter, delivered to your inbox each month...




Contact us.