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Updated on January 14, 2020, 12:25 am

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14 Jan: @ 00:21:33 Re: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel? [Wayne Weber]
11 Jan: @ 13:18:34 Re: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel? [Tony Leukering]
11 Jan: @ 12:52:53 Re: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel? [Alvaro Jaramillo]
11 Jan: @ 01:00:52 Re: BIRDWG01 Digest - 23 Dec 2019 to 10 Jan 2020 (#2020-1) [Doug Pratt]
11 Jan: @ 00:06:18 Re: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel? [Alvaro Jaramillo]
10 Jan: @ 23:30:43  Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel? [Wayne Weber]
23 Dec: @ 15:01:56 Re: Swan ID Thoughts? [0000012933c40dff-dmarc-request]
23 Dec: @ 12:23:18  Swan ID Thoughts? [Bates Estabrooks]





Subject: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
Date: Tue Jan 14 2020 0:21 am
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
Many thanks to everyone who offered comments on the ID of this curlew,
especially Alvaro and Tony. It seems that this is definitely a Long-billed
Curlew (much scarcer in NW Washington at any time of year than Whimbrel).

This bird had much less of the usual cinnamon tones than I have seen on any
other Long-billed Curlew. I was also fooled by the apparent dark
superciliary stripe, which is usually not seen in Long-bills. Of course, had
the bird woken up and showed me its bill, I would not have made this
mistake, but it didn't.

Another lesson learned in bird ID!

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC, Canada
[email protected]



-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Wayne Weber
Sent: Friday, January 10, 2020 9:30 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?

On June 28, 2019, I photographed a bird at Blaine, Washington, which I
identified as a Whimbrel. I was recently told by an eBird editor that the
bird was not a Whimbrel, and was most likely a Long-billed Curlew.



I would appreciate opinions from this group on whether or not this bird is a
Whimbrel, and if not, exactly why not. Thanks in advance for your comments.



My photo can be seen (and enlarged by clicking on it) at the following eBird
checklist:



https://ebird.org/checklist/S5...



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC, Canada

[email protected]




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
Date: Sat Jan 11 2020 13:18 pm
From: 0000012933c40dff-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All:

Juvenile Long-billed Curlews often/usually have noticeable dark lateral crown stripes, though I don™t know how long into the first plumage cycle they retain them. The preformative molt in the species seems to start early in at least some individuals, but I don™t get to see well anywhere near enough immature LBCUs in fall to estimate the overall parameters of that molt.

I whole-heartedly agree with Alvaro on this bird. All of his points are bang on.

Sincerely,

Tony

Tony Leukering
Wiley, CO
www.aba.org/photoquiz/
www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com

> On Jan 11, 2020, at 14:12, Alvaro Jaramillo wrote:
>
> Norman
> Dark crowns like this are common in Long-billed Curlews, and how much they stand out depends on wear and molt state. Supercilium is not important, but the eye line is.
> Alvaro
>
> Alvaro Jaramillo
> [email protected]
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: NORMAN D D VAN SWELM
> Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2020 10:34 AM
> To: Wayne Weber ; BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Cc: Doug Pratt ; Alvaro Jaramillo
> Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
>
> Hi all.
>
> It seems to me that Wayne's curlew has a crown stripe, it's supercilium will fit many Whimbrels, see links below. The tertial pattern indicate the bird is in it's 2nd year or 1st summer.
>
> All the best, in 2020,
>
> Norman
>
>
> https://www.radioactiverobins....
>
>
> https://www.radioactiverobins....
>
>
> https://www.radioactiverobins....
>
>
> https://radioactiverobins.com/...
>
>
> https://radioactiverobins.com/...
>
>
> https://radioactiverobins.com/...
>
>
>
>
> Op 11-1-2020 om 06:30 schreef Wayne Weber:
>> On June 28, 2019, I photographed a bird at Blaine, Washington, which I
>> identified as a Whimbrel. I was recently told by an eBird editor that
>> the bird was not a Whimbrel, and was most likely a Long-billed Curlew.
>>
>>
>>
>> I would appreciate opinions from this group on whether or not this
>> bird is a Whimbrel, and if not, exactly why not. Thanks in advance for your comments.
>>
>>
>>
>> My photo can be seen (and enlarged by clicking on it) at the following
>> eBird
>> checklist:
>>
>>
>>
>> https://ebird.org/checklist/S5...
>>
>>
>>
>> Wayne C. Weber
>>
>> Delta, BC, Canada
>>
>> [email protected]
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
Date: Sat Jan 11 2020 12:52 pm
From: chucao AT coastside.net
 
Norman
Dark crowns like this are common in Long-billed Curlews, and how much they stand out depends on wear and molt state. Supercilium is not important, but the eye line is.
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
[email protected]
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NORMAN D D VAN SWELM
Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2020 10:34 AM
To: Wayne Weber ; BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Cc: Doug Pratt ; Alvaro Jaramillo
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?

Hi all.

It seems to me that Wayne's curlew has a crown stripe, it's supercilium will fit many Whimbrels, see links below. The tertial pattern indicate the bird is in it's 2nd year or 1st summer.

All the best, in 2020,

Norman


https://www.radioactiverobins....


https://www.radioactiverobins....


https://www.radioactiverobins....


https://radioactiverobins.com/...


https://radioactiverobins.com/...


https://radioactiverobins.com/...




Op 11-1-2020 om 06:30 schreef Wayne Weber:
> On June 28, 2019, I photographed a bird at Blaine, Washington, which I
> identified as a Whimbrel. I was recently told by an eBird editor that
> the bird was not a Whimbrel, and was most likely a Long-billed Curlew.
>
>
>
> I would appreciate opinions from this group on whether or not this
> bird is a Whimbrel, and if not, exactly why not. Thanks in advance for your comments.
>
>
>
> My photo can be seen (and enlarged by clicking on it) at the following
> eBird
> checklist:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S5...
>
>
>
> Wayne C. Weber
>
> Delta, BC, Canada
>
> [email protected]
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: BIRDWG01 Digest - 23 Dec 2019 to 10 Jan 2020 (#2020-1)
Date: Sat Jan 11 2020 1:00 am
From: dpratt14 AT nc.rr.com
 
Looks like LB Curlew to me.  Buffy underparts not heavily streaked on neck and breast, head stripes not well defined, pattern on wing coverts  -Doug


> On Jan 11, 2020, at 1:00 AM, BIRDWG01 automatic digest system wrote:
>
> There is 1 message totaling 40 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2020 21:30:10 -0800
> From: Wayne Weber
> Subject: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
>
> On June 28, 2019, I photographed a bird at Blaine, Washington, which I
> identified as a Whimbrel. I was recently told by an eBird editor that the
> bird was not a Whimbrel, and was most likely a Long-billed Curlew.
>
>
>
> I would appreciate opinions from this group on whether or not this bird is a
> Whimbrel, and if not, exactly why not. Thanks in advance for your comments.
>
>
>
> My photo can be seen (and enlarged by clicking on it) at the following eBird
> checklist:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S5...
>
>
>
> Wayne C. Weber
>
> Delta, BC, Canada
>
> [email protected]
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of BIRDWG01 Digest - 23 Dec 2019 to 10 Jan 2020 (#2020-1)
> *************************************************************

"Some people have been kind enough to call me a fine artist. I've always called myself an illustrator. I'm not sure what the difference is." - Norman Rockwell

H. Douglas Pratt, Ph. D.
Ornithologist, illustrator, musician
1205 Selwyn Lane
Cary, NC 27511

Research Curator of Birds, Emeritus
North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones Street
Raleigh NC 27601

Phone 919-379-1679
Cell phone 919-270-0857 (for travel use only)

Website: http://www.hdouglaspratt.com/i...










Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
Date: Sat Jan 11 2020 0:06 am
From: chucao AT coastside.net
 
Wayne
It is a Long-billed Curlew:

- almost no eyeline visible. Whimbrel has a strong eyeline, particularly so
the lores will be quite dark.
- no primary extension. Whimbrel has substantially longer wings than LB
Curlew, which shows up as a noticeable extension past the tertials.
- strong scalloped tertials typical of Long-billed Curlew. More muted on
Whimbrel.
- striped look to coverts, typical of LB Curlew due to dark shaft and
adjacent stripe. This pattern not on Whimbrel. Striped look good to
differentiate from Marbled Godwit as well.
- Big pale ovals on scapulars, again typical of Long-billed Curlew, not
seen in Whimbrel.
- essentially no barring on flanks or streaking on neck. Whimbrel would show
more pattern. This is a faded/worn Long-billed Curlew based on that pattern.


So, yes it is a Long-billed Curlew.
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
[email protected]
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
On Behalf Of Wayne Weber
Sent: Friday, January 10, 2020 9:30 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?

On June 28, 2019, I photographed a bird at Blaine, Washington, which I
identified as a Whimbrel. I was recently told by an eBird editor that the
bird was not a Whimbrel, and was most likely a Long-billed Curlew.



I would appreciate opinions from this group on whether or not this bird is a
Whimbrel, and if not, exactly why not. Thanks in advance for your comments.



My photo can be seen (and enlarged by clicking on it) at the following eBird
checklist:



https://ebird.org/checklist/S5...



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC, Canada

[email protected]




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Whimbrel or not a Whimbrel?
Date: Fri Jan 10 2020 23:30 pm
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
On June 28, 2019, I photographed a bird at Blaine, Washington, which I
identified as a Whimbrel. I was recently told by an eBird editor that the
bird was not a Whimbrel, and was most likely a Long-billed Curlew.



I would appreciate opinions from this group on whether or not this bird is a
Whimbrel, and if not, exactly why not. Thanks in advance for your comments.



My photo can be seen (and enlarged by clicking on it) at the following eBird
checklist:



https://ebird.org/checklist/S5...



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC, Canada

[email protected]




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Swan ID Thoughts?
Date: Mon Dec 23 2019 15:01 pm
From: 0000012933c40dff-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Hi Bates:
I assume that the subspecific ID was engendered by the pale bill. However, both Whistling and Trumpeter swans have pale bills as juvs/imms. The dark neck proves that age and the photos do not permit differentiation of subspecies given that age. Seehttps://cobirds.org/CFO/Colora...
Enjoy,
Tony
Tony LeukeringWiley, COID columns
eBird blogPhoto quizPhotos


-----Original Message-----
From: Bates Estabrooks
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Mon, Dec 23, 2019 3:40 pm
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Swan ID Thoughts?

I'd be interested on folks' thoughts on the ID of this swan. I entered this in eBird last year as a "Historical" sighting. My notes are from back when I saw the bird (1982). They reflect personal comms. with the person who (if I recall correctly) first reported it.

Is the ID supported by the notes and old photos?

Thanks.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee

https://ebird.org/checklist/S4...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Swan ID Thoughts?
Date: Mon Dec 23 2019 12:23 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
I'd be interested on folks' thoughts on the ID of this swan.  I entered this in eBird last year as a "Historical" sighting.  My notes are from back when I saw the bird (1982).  They reflect personal comms. with the person who (if I recall correctly) first reported it.

Is the ID supported by the notes and old photos?

Thanks.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee

https://ebird.org/checklist/S4...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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