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Updated on September 17, 2017, 12:55 pm

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17 Sep: @ 12:54:12  Kamchatka Leaf Warbler (presumed) [Franklin Haas]
07 Sep: @ 22:29:30 Re: Odd warbler [Noah Arthur]
07 Sep: @ 19:24:11 Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Odd warbler [Gary Nunn]
07 Sep: @ 19:19:34 Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Odd warbler [Peter Pyle]
07 Sep: @ 19:09:53 Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Odd warbler [Lethaby, Nick]
07 Sep: @ 19:06:15 Re: Odd warbler [Dominik Mosur]
07 Sep: @ 18:59:47 Re: Odd warbler [Avery Bartels]
07 Sep: @ 18:39:27 Re: Odd warbler [Tony Leukering]
07 Sep: @ 18:13:33 Re: Odd warbler [Dominik Mosur]
07 Sep: @ 18:04:27 Re: Odd warbler [Jeff Gilligan]
07 Sep: @ 17:57:17  Odd warbler [Lethaby, Nick]
28 Aug: @ 18:43:51 Re: Another peep [Andrew Baksh]
28 Aug: @ 18:04:20 Re: Another peep [Noah Arthur]
28 Aug: @ 17:58:52 Re: Another peep [KEVIN karlson]
28 Aug: @ 17:56:23 Re: Another peep [KEVIN karlson]
28 Aug: @ 17:54:23 Re: Another peep [Jerald Reb]
28 Aug: @ 17:46:50  Another peep [Noah Arthur]
21 Aug: @ 16:06:25 Re: Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker? [Wayne Weber]
17 Aug: @ 20:43:44 Re: White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch) [Sebastien REEBER]
17 Aug: @ 19:59:35 Re: White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch) [Tony Leukering]
17 Aug: @ 14:34:13  White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch) [Nick Bonomo]
17 Aug: @ 02:01:09 Re: New species for mainland North America [Norman Deans van Swelm]
16 Aug: @ 23:13:43 Re: Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker? [Tony Leukering]
16 Aug: @ 15:14:38 Re: New species for mainland North America [Andrew Spencer]
16 Aug: @ 12:50:59 Re: New species for mainland North America [Norman Deans van Swelm]
16 Aug: @ 10:10:14 Re: New species for mainland North America [Andrew Spencer]
16 Aug: @ 10:03:46  New species for mainland North America [Norman Deans van Swelm]
15 Aug: @ 23:31:15 Re: Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker? [Wayne Weber]
15 Aug: @ 22:56:58  Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker? [Wayne Weber]





Subject: Kamchatka Leaf Warbler (presumed)
Date: Sun Sep 17 2017 12:54 pm
From: fhaasbirds AT gmail.com
 
We had a *Phylloscopus* warbler on Adak yesterday (9/16/17).

We presume it is a Kamchatka Leaf Warbler, but would appreciate any
verification.

I have posted 53 (yes, 53!) photos at
http://franklinhaas.com/Kamcha...

Frank & Barb Haas

--
Frank Haas
walber

Wisdom begins with putting the right name to a thing.

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 22:29 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
Looks like a MacGillivray's. The face pattern is really distinctive, with
those broadly separated eye-arcs. The underparts look too plain bright
yellow for a 'Gray-headed' Warbler (orestera Orange-crowned), and I think
the apparent streaking is all due to wetness.

Noah

On Thursday, September 7, 2017, Lethaby, Nick <
000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> All,
>
> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking
> warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a
> Macgillivray's except that:
>
>
> 1. It has some fine black streaking
>
> 2. I t has dark legs
>
> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile
> streaking due to compromised hormones?
>
> The photo is here:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Thanks,
>
> Nick Lethaby
> Office: 805 562 5106
> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 19:24 pm
From: garybnunn AT gmail.com
 
I agree with Avery and would go with Mac on this one too, for the reasons
stated. You can also see the rich greenery of the upperparts lack the more
blackish centers to flight feathers typical of Orange-crowned which give
them that pale traced edge look.

Gary.

On Thu, Sep 7, 2017 at 5:09 PM, Lethaby, Nick <
000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> I just confirmed with the observers that the 'streaking' became very
> noticeable after a bath, so I think the 'wet' bird theory is solid.
>
> One observer sent a link to definite Mac that does show somewhat darker
> legs, so I think it's clearly a Mac, given all the other features
> supporting that id.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:
> BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Dominik Mosur
> Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2017 5:06 PM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Odd warbler
>
> I need to stop trying to ID photos with just a glance. Yeah it looks like
> a wet Mac
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:38, Tony Leukering <000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-
> request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
> >
> > I agree that the bird looks wet, creating the appearance of dark
> streaking.
> >
> > Tony
> >
> > Tony Leukering
> > currently Guymon, OK
> > www.aba.org/photoquiz/
> > www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
> > http://cowyebird.blogspot.com
> >
> >> On Sep 7, 2017, at 18:12, Dominik Mosur <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-
> request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
> >>
> >> Looks like a an orestera ssp. orange-crowned Warbler. As for the
> streaking, ruffled feathers after a bath?
> >>
> >> Dominik
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone
> >>
> >>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:03, Jeff Gilligan
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I think it is an Orange-crowned. Why they can sometimes show faint
> diffused streaking I do not know. Here is a fairly similar one:
> https://www.pinterest.com/pin/... <
> https://www.pinterest.com/pin/...
> >>>
> >>> Here is one with blackish legs: https://www.larkwire.com/
> static/content/images/ipad/LBNA1/Orange-crownedWarbler.jpg
> >>>
> >>> Jeff Gilligan
> >>> Oregon
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Lethaby, Nick <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-
> request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> All,
> >>>>
> >>>> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an
> odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer
> to a Macgillivray's except that:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> 1. It has some fine black streaking
> >>>>
> >>>> 2. I t has dark legs
> >>>>
> >>>> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained
> juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?
> >>>>
> >>>> The photo is here:
> >>>>
> >>>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks,
> >>>>
> >>>> Nick Lethaby
> >>>> Office: 805 562 5106
> >>>> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> >>>> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >>
> >> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Gary Nunn
*you can find me on twitter, *@garybnunn

*San Diego Birding - my blog *
garybnunn@gmail.com
Mobile: 650-305-0029

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 19:19 pm
From: ppyle AT birdpop.org
 
I went back and forth but landed on Mac, mostly due to the bill shape
and paler lower mandible. Otherwise it could have gone either way,
often the case with a single photo. The back is pretty dark green for
an OCWA and the rectrices are broad. On the other hand, the
underparts are pale, especially for an adult female (which is what I
think it is based on uniform wing coverts, nice green primary
coverts, and broad primaries and rectrices). Peter

At 05:09 PM 9/7/2017, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
>I just confirmed with the observers that the 'streaking' became very
>noticeable after a bath, so I think the 'wet' bird theory is solid.
>
>One observer sent a link to definite Mac that does show somewhat
>darker legs, so I think it's clearly a Mac, given all the other
>features supporting that id.
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
>[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Dominik Mosur
>Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2017 5:06 PM
>To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Odd warbler
>
>I need to stop trying to ID photos with just a glance. Yeah it looks
>like a wet Mac
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:38, Tony Leukering
> <000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
> >
> > I agree that the bird looks wet, creating the appearance of dark streaking.
> >
> > Tony
> >
> > Tony Leukering
> > currently Guymon, OK
> > www.aba.org/photoquiz/
> > www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
> > http://cowyebird.blogspot.com
> >
> >> On Sep 7, 2017, at 18:12, Dominik Mosur
> <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
> >>
> >> Looks like a an orestera ssp. orange-crowned Warbler. As for the
> streaking, ruffled feathers after a bath?
> >>
> >> Dominik
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone
> >>
> >>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:03, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I think it is an Orange-crowned. Why they can sometimes show
> faint diffused streaking I do not know. Here is a fairly similar
> one: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/...
>
> >>>
> >>> Here is one with blackish
> legs:
> https://www.larkwire.com/stati...
> >>>
> >>> Jeff Gilligan
> >>> Oregon
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Lethaby, Nick
> <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> All,
> >>>>
> >>>> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an
> odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it
> looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> 1. It has some fine black streaking
> >>>>
> >>>> 2. I t has dark legs
> >>>>
> >>>> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained
> juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?
> >>>>
> >>>> The photo is here:
> >>>>
> >>>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks,
> >>>>
> >>>> Nick Lethaby
> >>>> Office: 805 562 5106
> >>>> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> >>>> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >>
> >> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 19:09 pm
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I just confirmed with the observers that the 'streaking' became very noticeable  after a bath, so I think the 'wet' bird theory is solid.

One observer sent a link to definite Mac that does show somewhat darker legs, so I think it's clearly a Mac, given all the other features supporting that id.

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Dominik Mosur
Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2017 5:06 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Odd warbler

I need to stop trying to ID photos with just a glance. Yeah it looks like a wet Mac

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:38, Tony Leukering <000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>
> I agree that the bird looks wet, creating the appearance of dark streaking.
>
> Tony
>
> Tony Leukering
> currently Guymon, OK
> www.aba.org/photoquiz/
> www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
> http://cowyebird.blogspot.com
>
>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 18:12, Dominik Mosur <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>>
>> Looks like a an orestera ssp. orange-crowned Warbler. As for the streaking, ruffled feathers after a bath?
>>
>> Dominik
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:03, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>>>
>>> I think it is an Orange-crowned. Why they can sometimes show faint diffused streaking I do not know. Here is a fairly similar one: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/...
>>>
>>> Here is one with blackish legs: https://www.larkwire.com/stati...
>>>
>>> Jeff Gilligan
>>> Oregon
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Lethaby, Nick <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> All,
>>>>
>>>> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 1. It has some fine black streaking
>>>>
>>>> 2. I t has dark legs
>>>>
>>>> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?
>>>>
>>>> The photo is here:
>>>>
>>>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>>
>>>> Nick Lethaby
>>>> Office: 805 562 5106
>>>> Mobile: 805 284 6200
>>>> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>>
>>>
>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 19:06 pm
From: 00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I need to stop trying to ID photos with just a glance. Yeah it looks like a wet Mac

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:38, Tony Leukering <000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>
> I agree that the bird looks wet, creating the appearance of dark streaking.
>
> Tony
>
> Tony Leukering
> currently Guymon, OK
> www.aba.org/photoquiz/
> www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
> http://cowyebird.blogspot.com
>
>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 18:12, Dominik Mosur <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>>
>> Looks like a an orestera ssp. orange-crowned Warbler. As for the streaking, ruffled feathers after a bath?
>>
>> Dominik
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:03, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>>>
>>> I think it is an Orange-crowned. Why they can sometimes show faint diffused streaking I do not know. Here is a fairly similar one: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/...
>>>
>>> Here is one with blackish legs: https://www.larkwire.com/stati...
>>>
>>> Jeff Gilligan
>>> Oregon
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Lethaby, Nick <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> All,
>>>>
>>>> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 1. It has some fine black streaking
>>>>
>>>> 2. I t has dark legs
>>>>
>>>> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?
>>>>
>>>> The photo is here:
>>>>
>>>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>>
>>>> Nick Lethaby
>>>> Office: 805 562 5106
>>>> Mobile: 805 284 6200
>>>> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>>
>>>
>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 18:59 pm
From: averybartels AT hotmail.com
 
All,


To me this is a MacGillivray's. I agree, the breast looks wet creating the impression of streaks. The shape of the tail feathers and the very rounded wing tip with short pp projection are spot on for MacGillivray's and do not fit Orange-crowned. The primaries also lack the white tipping that orange-crowned have (especially pronounced on fresh feathers in fall, such as this bird has). Finally, the legs look sturdier to me, more typically of the skulking warblers (MacGillivray's, Yellowthroat etc.).


Happy ebirding,


Avery Bartels

Vcitoria, BC


________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Lethaby, Nick <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU>
Sent: September 7, 2017 7:56 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Odd warbler

All,

A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:


1. It has some fine black streaking

2. I t has dark legs

Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?

The photo is here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Thanks,

Nick Lethaby
Office: 805 562 5106
Mobile: 805 284 6200
Email: nlethaby@ti.com


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 18:39 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I agree that the bird looks wet, creating the appearance of dark streaking.

Tony

Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
www.aba.org/photoquiz/
www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com

> On Sep 7, 2017, at 18:12, Dominik Mosur <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>
> Looks like a an orestera ssp. orange-crowned Warbler. As for the streaking, ruffled feathers after a bath?
>
> Dominik
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:03, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>>
>> I think it is an Orange-crowned. Why they can sometimes show faint diffused streaking I do not know. Here is a fairly similar one: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/...
>>
>> Here is one with blackish legs: https://www.larkwire.com/stati...
>>
>> Jeff Gilligan
>> Oregon
>>
>>
>>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Lethaby, Nick <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>>>
>>> All,
>>>
>>> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:
>>>
>>>
>>> 1. It has some fine black streaking
>>>
>>> 2. I t has dark legs
>>>
>>> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?
>>>
>>> The photo is here:
>>>
>>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Nick Lethaby
>>> Office: 805 562 5106
>>> Mobile: 805 284 6200
>>> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>>>
>>>
>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 18:13 pm
From: 00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Looks like a an orestera ssp. orange-crowned Warbler. As for the streaking, ruffled feathers after a bath?

Dominik

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 7, 2017, at 16:03, Jeff Gilligan wrote:
>
> I think it is an Orange-crowned. Why they can sometimes show faint diffused streaking I do not know. Here is a fairly similar one: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/...
>
> Here is one with blackish legs: https://www.larkwire.com/stati...
>
> Jeff Gilligan
> Oregon
>
>
>> On Sep 7, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Lethaby, Nick <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>>
>> All,
>>
>> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:
>>
>>
>> 1. It has some fine black streaking
>>
>> 2. I t has dark legs
>>
>> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?
>>
>> The photo is here:
>>
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Nick Lethaby
>> Office: 805 562 5106
>> Mobile: 805 284 6200
>> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 18:04 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
I think it is an Orange-crowned.  Why they can sometimes show faint diffused streaking I do not know.  Here is a fairly similar one:  https://www.pinterest.com/pin/... 

Here is one with blackish legs: https://www.larkwire.com/stati...

Jeff Gilligan
Oregon


> On Sep 7, 2017, at 3:56 PM, Lethaby, Nick <000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>
> All,
>
> A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:
>
>
> 1. It has some fine black streaking
>
> 2. I t has dark legs
>
> Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?
>
> The photo is here:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Thanks,
>
> Nick Lethaby
> Office: 805 562 5106
> Mobile: 805 284 6200
> Email: nlethaby@ti.com
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd warbler
Date: Thu Sep 7 2017 17:57 pm
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All,

A local bird just submitted a checklist with a photo of an odd-looking warbler. Although, they labelled it as an OCWA, it looks closer to a Macgillivray's except that:


1. It has some fine black streaking

2. I t has dark legs

Can anyone explain what this is? Hybrid? A bird with retained juvenile streaking due to compromised hormones?

The photo is here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Thanks,

Nick Lethaby
Office: 805 562 5106
Mobile: 805 284 6200
Email: nlethaby@ti.com


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Another peep
Date: Mon Aug 28 2017 18:43 pm
From: birdingdude AT gmail.com
 
Hi Kevin and all:

I think your assessment is spot on. The leg color is something we sometimes see with juvenile SESAs though not anywhere near the color of Least Sandpipers.

Cheers,

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

Swift as the wind
Quiet as the forest
onquer like the fire
Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Aug 28, 2017, at 7:02 PM, Noah Arthur wrote:
>
> I think the presence of two primaries past the tertials ruled out Least, no?
>
> Thanks for your input, Kevin!
>
> Noah
>
>
>
>
>> On Monday, August 28, 2017, KEVIN karlson wrote:
>>
>> Noah and all: I did not consider Least Sandpiper, but that is a
>> possibility. I just ruled out the two expected stints. Thanks for the
>> closer inspection, Jerald. I will look closer at the bird. Kevin Karlson
>>
>>> On August 28, 2017 at 6:52 PM Jerald Reb > > wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Noah,
>>>
>>> I'm far from an expert, but why is this not a juvenile Least Sandpiper?
>> I see yellow legs, which rules out Semipalmated and the two most expected
>> Stint species (Red-necked and Little).
>>>
>>> Jerald
>>>
>>>> On Aug 28, 2017, at 6:46 PM, Noah Arthur > > wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hey everyone!
>>>>
>>>> Here's a juvenile peep I photographed at Tamora, Nebraska yesterday:
>>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>>>
>>>> I initially ID'ed the bird as a Semipalmated Sandpiper, but several
>>>> features are now bothering me, including the very sharp-tipped bill,
>> bright
>>>> rusty back with prominent white lines, and the somewhat forked
>> supercilium.
>>>> All these features seem somewhat stint-like to me... Is this just a
>> variant
>>>> Semi, or might it be something more outlandish...?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks!
>>>>
>>>> Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE)
>>>> semirelicta@gmail.com
>>>> 510-967-2179
>>>>
>>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>>
>>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Another peep
Date: Mon Aug 28 2017 18:04 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
I think the presence of two primaries past the tertials ruled out Least, no?

Thanks for your input, Kevin!

Noah




On Monday, August 28, 2017, KEVIN karlson wrote:

> Noah and all: I did not consider Least Sandpiper, but that is a
> possibility. I just ruled out the two expected stints. Thanks for the
> closer inspection, Jerald. I will look closer at the bird. Kevin Karlson
>
> > On August 28, 2017 at 6:52 PM Jerald Reb > wrote:
> >
> >
> > Noah,
> >
> > I'm far from an expert, but why is this not a juvenile Least Sandpiper?
> I see yellow legs, which rules out Semipalmated and the two most expected
> Stint species (Red-necked and Little).
> >
> > Jerald
> >
> > > On Aug 28, 2017, at 6:46 PM, Noah Arthur > wrote:
> > >
> > > Hey everyone!
> > >
> > > Here's a juvenile peep I photographed at Tamora, Nebraska yesterday:
> > > https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> > >
> > > I initially ID'ed the bird as a Semipalmated Sandpiper, but several
> > > features are now bothering me, including the very sharp-tipped bill,
> bright
> > > rusty back with prominent white lines, and the somewhat forked
> supercilium.
> > > All these features seem somewhat stint-like to me... Is this just a
> variant
> > > Semi, or might it be something more outlandish...?
> > >
> > > Thanks!
> > >
> > > Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE)
> > > semirelicta@gmail.com
> > > 510-967-2179
> > >
> > > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Another peep
Date: Mon Aug 28 2017 17:58 pm
From: karlson3 AT comcast.net
 
Noah and all: I did not consider Least Sandpiper, but that is a possibility. I just ruled out the two expected stints. Thanks for the closer inspection, Jerald. I will look closer at the bird. Kevin Karlson

> On August 28, 2017 at 6:52 PM Jerald Reb wrote:
>
>
> Noah,
>
> I'm far from an expert, but why is this not a juvenile Least Sandpiper? I see yellow legs, which rules out Semipalmated and the two most expected Stint species (Red-necked and Little).
>
> Jerald
>
> > On Aug 28, 2017, at 6:46 PM, Noah Arthur wrote:
> >
> > Hey everyone!
> >
> > Here's a juvenile peep I photographed at Tamora, Nebraska yesterday:
> > https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> >
> > I initially ID'ed the bird as a Semipalmated Sandpiper, but several
> > features are now bothering me, including the very sharp-tipped bill, bright
> > rusty back with prominent white lines, and the somewhat forked supercilium.
> > All these features seem somewhat stint-like to me... Is this just a variant
> > Semi, or might it be something more outlandish...?
> >
> > Thanks!
> >
> > Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE)
> > semirelicta@gmail.com
> > 510-967-2179
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Another peep
Date: Mon Aug 28 2017 17:56 pm
From: karlson3 AT comcast.net
 
All: primary projection is too short for both RNST and LIST, and the projection past the longest tertial is also nowhere long enough for either of those species. At this late date in August, I don't think you can use the argument that the primary and tertial feathers are still growing. The tertials are not black centered with rust fringes as in LIST, but deep gray in shading. and the wing coverts are not unmarked and muted gray as in RNST, but rust fringed like the scapulars. So without going into other features that are speculative, such as bill length and shape, and the brightness of the back fringes, which is perfectly fine for Semipalmated Sandpiper, and which we see many birds with bills like this in the E. US, but typically not in Nebraska, I am using plumage details to eliminate these species. Kevin Karlson

>
> On August 28, 2017 at 6:46 PM Noah Arthur wrote:
>
> Hey everyone!
>
> Here's a juvenile peep I photographed at Tamora, Nebraska yesterday:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> I initially ID'ed the bird as a Semipalmated Sandpiper, but several
> features are now bothering me, including the very sharp-tipped bill, bright
> rusty back with prominent white lines, and the somewhat forked supercilium.
> All these features seem somewhat stint-like to me... Is this just a variant
> Semi, or might it be something more outlandish...?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE)
> semirelicta@gmail.com
> 510-967-2179
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Another peep
Date: Mon Aug 28 2017 17:54 pm
From: jrebelboy AT gmail.com
 
Noah,

I'm far from an expert, but why is this not a juvenile Least Sandpiper? I see yellow legs, which rules out Semipalmated and the two most expected Stint species (Red-necked and Little).

Jerald

> On Aug 28, 2017, at 6:46 PM, Noah Arthur wrote:
>
> Hey everyone!
>
> Here's a juvenile peep I photographed at Tamora, Nebraska yesterday:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> I initially ID'ed the bird as a Semipalmated Sandpiper, but several
> features are now bothering me, including the very sharp-tipped bill, bright
> rusty back with prominent white lines, and the somewhat forked supercilium.
> All these features seem somewhat stint-like to me... Is this just a variant
> Semi, or might it be something more outlandish...?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE)
> semirelicta@gmail.com
> 510-967-2179
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Another peep
Date: Mon Aug 28 2017 17:46 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
Hey everyone!

Here's a juvenile peep I photographed at Tamora, Nebraska yesterday:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

I initially ID'ed the bird as a Semipalmated Sandpiper, but several
features are now bothering me, including the very sharp-tipped bill, bright
rusty back with prominent white lines, and the somewhat forked supercilium.
All these features seem somewhat stint-like to me... Is this just a variant
Semi, or might it be something more outlandish...?

Thanks!

Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE)
semirelicta@gmail.com
510-967-2179

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?
Date: Mon Aug 21 2017 16:06 pm
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
ID People,

I have not yet received any opinions, in either private or public messages, about the ID of the sapsucker which Tony Leukering has kindly posted on his photo website at the following URL:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

This is a bird which I find very puzzling, and I would greatly appreciate any expert opinions on whether it is a hybrid sapsucker or an aberrant Red-naped. The bird was photographed in Stanley Park, Vancouver, BC in mid-July 2017.

Many thanks for any comments.

Wayne C, Weber
Delta, BC, Canada
contopus@telus.net



-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Tony Leukering
Sent: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 9:12 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?

All:


Wayne has sent me the picture that he mentioned and I have uploaded it here:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...




Tony


Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
ID columns

eBird blog
Photo quiz
Photos





-----Original Message-----
From: Wayne Weber
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Tue, Aug 15, 2017 11:31 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?

Sorry folks-- It appears that ID-Frontiers is one of the few remaining e-mail groups which does not allow photo attachments. I cannot provide a web address, because the photo is not on any website.

Is there anyone who considers themselves an expert on sapsucker ID who would be willing to take a stab at this? If you can send me a private message, I can send you the photo and would greatly appreciate your help.

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC, Canada
contopus@telus.net



-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Wayne Weber
Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2017 8:56 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?

Bird ID folks,



The attached photo was submitted for a sapsucker seen in mid-July in Stanley Park, Vancouver, BC. Is this a Red-naped or a Red-naped x Red-breasted hybrid? (Red-breasted is the normal breeding form in this area.)



There is no black border visible below the red throat, but if this is a hybrid, it has far less red on the head than would be expected, and it's hard to tell whether or not red extends onto the breast.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC, Canada

contopus@telus.net








Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch)
Date: Thu Aug 17 2017 20:43 pm
From: sebastien.reeber AT wanadoo.fr
 
Hi all,



Here in Western France, where Whiskered, Black and white-winged (rare) terns are present, the variability in the definitive prebasic moult timing is indeed variable... As stated by Tony, age and breeding status appear most certainly as the main causes for this variability. Although, in the colony I am monitoring (ca 2000 pairs, mostly Whiskered), many adults start their prebasic moult (chin, throat and cheeks) a few days or so after hatching. And so do many adults which fail in their attempt at a later stage. On the contrary, many adults failing at an early stage will try a second clutch and postpone their moult. As a consequence, in early july for example, one may see adults well through their prebasic moult, both with and without offspring, and others still in full alternate plumage, incubating or even building a nest...



All the best,



Sebastien Reeber









> Message du 18/08/17 02:59
> De : "Tony Leukering" <000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU>
> A : BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Copie :
> Objet : Re: [BIRDWG01] White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch)
>
> David/Nick et al.:
>
>
> At least two reasons underpin the great variability in appearance in birds such as these: age and breeding status. In many species, immatures that do not breed initiate the prebasic molt much, much earlier than do most adults. Additionally, adults that fail at nesting early, sometimes/often/frequently/nearly always initiate the prebasic molt early, while successful breeders wait until much later to initiate prebasic molts. Thus, in early August in someplace like, say, Cape May, one can find two-year-old Forster's Terns that have nearly completed their definitive prebasic, adults that failed early and are partly through their prebasic, and adults that are still feeding youngsters that have only started their prebasic. There are, undoubtedly, other facts that come into play, but I think that these are the most-important ones.
>
>
> Tony
>
>
>
> Tony Leukering
> currently Guymon, OK
> ID columns
>
> eBird blog
> Photo quiz
> Photos
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Nick Bonomo
> To: BIRDWG01
> Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 2:34 pm
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch)
>
> Hi all, David Shoch asked that I post this to the forum. See below my signature.
>
> Nick Bonomo
> Wallingford, CT
> www.shorebirder.com
>
> All,
>
> I was recently looking at the many great photos of the recent
> White-winged Tern in Pennsylvania, and it struck me what a wide range
> of aspects adults of this species can show in the same timeframe.
>
> For example, in late Jul/early Aug 1988 at the Logan Tract in Delaware
> there was an adult in nearly complete basic plumage (apart from the
> telltale retained dark under-primary and under-secondary coverts), and
> a similar bird was also at Little Creek (Delaware) in early Aug 1993
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Contrast those birds with, e.g., the 2017 Pennsylvania bird (Aug
> 10-13), and with the late Jul/early Aug 1989 bird at Bombay Hook
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> both in mostly alternate plumage with head molt underway.
>
> Considering these examples, does the apparent spread in molt timing of
> contour feathers seem unusual? Does either case seem particularly late
> or early (from a European perspective)? Or is the apparent variability
> in the timing of molt of contour feathers typical? (mindful that
> typical is hard to characterize and variability reflects some
> combination of factors driving molt timing, e.g. breeding
> success/failure, nutrition, post-definitive age? etc.) Black Terns
> seem to show high variability in this regard, and I wonder if what
> strikes me as remarkable simply reflects my lack of perspective on the
> progression of molt of contour feathers, which is hard to discern on
> other (non-Chlidonias) terns.
>
> Thanks for any insight.
>
> Incidentally, here™s a definite atypical case: an alternate
> White-winged Tern in southern Brazil from Nov 20 2008
>
> http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/re...
>
> presumably a bird that has switched to an austral molt calendar.
>
>
> David Shoch
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch)
Date: Thu Aug 17 2017 19:59 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
David/Nick et al.:


At least two reasons underpin the great variability in appearance in birds such as these: age and breeding status. In many species, immatures that do not breed initiate the prebasic molt much, much earlier than do most adults. Additionally, adults that fail at nesting early, sometimes/often/frequently/nearly always initiate the prebasic molt early, while successful breeders wait until much later to initiate prebasic molts. Thus, in early August in someplace like, say, Cape May, one can find two-year-old Forster's Terns that have nearly completed their definitive prebasic, adults that failed early and are partly through their prebasic, and adults that are still feeding youngsters that have only started their prebasic. There are, undoubtedly, other facts that come into play, but I think that these are the most-important ones.


Tony



Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
ID columns

eBird blog
Photo quiz
Photos





-----Original Message-----
From: Nick Bonomo
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 2:34 pm
Subject: [BIRDWG01] White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch)

Hi all, David Shoch asked that I post this to the forum. See below my signature.

Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com

All,

I was recently looking at the many great photos of the recent
White-winged Tern in Pennsylvania, and it struck me what a wide range
of aspects adults of this species can show in the same timeframe.

For example, in late Jul/early Aug 1988 at the Logan Tract in Delaware
there was an adult in nearly complete basic plumage (apart from the
telltale retained dark under-primary and under-secondary coverts), and
a similar bird was also at Little Creek (Delaware) in early Aug 1993

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Contrast those birds with, e.g., the 2017 Pennsylvania bird (Aug
10-13), and with the late Jul/early Aug 1989 bird at Bombay Hook

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

both in mostly alternate plumage with head molt underway.

Considering these examples, does the apparent spread in molt timing of
contour feathers seem unusual? Does either case seem particularly late
or early (from a European perspective)? Or is the apparent variability
in the timing of molt of contour feathers typical? (mindful that
typical is hard to characterize and variability reflects some
combination of factors driving molt timing, e.g. breeding
success/failure, nutrition, post-definitive age? etc.) Black Terns
seem to show high variability in this regard, and I wonder if what
strikes me as remarkable simply reflects my lack of perspective on the
progression of molt of contour feathers, which is hard to discern on
other (non-Chlidonias) terns.

Thanks for any insight.

Incidentally, here™s a definite atypical case: an alternate
White-winged Tern in southern Brazil from Nov 20 2008

http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/re...

presumably a bird that has switched to an austral molt calendar.


David Shoch

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: White-winged Tern molt (for David Shoch)
Date: Thu Aug 17 2017 14:34 pm
From: nbonomo AT gmail.com
 
Hi all, David Shoch asked that I post this to the forum. See below my signature.

Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com

All,

I was recently looking at the many great photos of the recent
White-winged Tern in Pennsylvania, and it struck me what a wide range
of aspects adults of this species can show in the same timeframe.

For example, in late Jul/early Aug 1988 at the Logan Tract in Delaware
there was an adult in nearly complete basic plumage (apart from the
telltale retained dark under-primary and under-secondary coverts), and
a similar bird was also at Little Creek (Delaware) in early Aug 1993

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Contrast those birds with, e.g., the 2017 Pennsylvania bird (Aug
10-13), and with the late Jul/early Aug 1989 bird at Bombay Hook

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

both in mostly alternate plumage with head molt underway.

Considering these examples, does the apparent spread in molt timing of
contour feathers seem unusual? Does either case seem particularly late
or early (from a European perspective)? Or is the apparent variability
in the timing of molt of contour feathers typical? (mindful that
typical is hard to characterize and variability reflects some
combination of factors driving molt timing, e.g. breeding
success/failure, nutrition, post-definitive age? etc.) Black Terns
seem to show high variability in this regard, and I wonder if what
strikes me as remarkable simply reflects my lack of perspective on the
progression of molt of contour feathers, which is hard to discern on
other (non-Chlidonias) terns.

Thanks for any insight.

Incidentally, here™s a definite atypical case: an alternate
White-winged Tern in southern Brazil from Nov 20 2008

http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/re...

presumably a bird that has switched to an austral molt calendar.


David Shoch

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: New species for mainland North America
Date: Thu Aug 17 2017 2:01 am
From: norman.vanswelm AT wxs.nl
 
Andrew, all I can say is that it is the typical call of Green Sandpiper,
it's given in one go when exited f.i. when, in these days just before
dusk when they and other waders are ready to go on (night) migration the
sky is filled with these very same calls. It is not song. They, the
Green Sandpipers, make this call all over their range and I don't think
they change it when out of range.

Best wishes, Norman


Op 16-8-2017 om 22:14 schreef Andrew Spencer:
> Hi Norman,
>
> I would argue that the Boesman recording from Nome does match Solitary
> Sandpiper and not Green. The first sound on the cut is actually a snippet
> of song, and matches the song of Solitary on ML132172 (
> https://macaulaylibrary.org/au... at about 2:20). The song of
> Green Sandpiper, on the other hand, is much slower and lower (see XC240530
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/2405... The remainder of the calls on the
> Alaska recording are typical flight calls for Solitary Sandpiper. These
> are indeed extremely similar to Green Sandpiper, to the point that I would
> argue that an out of range bird should not be identified on them alone.
> The song, however, is diagnostic, and in this case supports the original ID.
>
> Andrew
>
> On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 1:40 PM, Norman Deans van Swelm <
> norman.vanswelm@wxs.nl> wrote:
>
>> Hello Andrew,
>>
>> Well all I can say is the recording mentioned below produces the exact
>> call of Green Sandpiper. This species migrates at this moment over the area
>> where I live, I hear at night over my house and by day in the marshlands
>> nearby. I did check all recordings of Solitary Sandpiper on Xeno-canto and
>> the one below does not match with the rest. However you can find similar
>> calls when you go to the Green Sandpiper section of Xeno-Canto.
>>
>> Cheers, Norman
>>
>> Op 16-8-2017 om 17:10 schreef Andrew Spencer:
>>
>> Hi Norman,
>>
>> Could you elaborate on why this is a Green Sandpiper rather than a
>> Solitary? Based on what I hear in this recording I don't believe Solitary
>> can be ruled out. Thanks!
>>
>> Andrew Spencer
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Norman Deans van Swelm wrote:
>>
>>
>> Though on the Xeno Canto list as Solitary Sandpiper Tringa solitaria it
>> is in fact a Green Sandpiper Tringa ochrpus :
>>
>>
>> http://www.xeno-canto.org/3227...
>>
>>
>> The Green Sandpiper has been observed on Attu Island in the Aleutians,
>> Alaska and on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, Alaska and at Gambell,
>> St. Lawrence Island, Alaska,
>>
>> Regards, Norman
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>>
>>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 23:13 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All:


Wayne has sent me the picture that he mentioned and I have uploaded it here:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...




Tony


Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
ID columns

eBird blog
Photo quiz
Photos





-----Original Message-----
From: Wayne Weber
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Tue, Aug 15, 2017 11:31 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?

Sorry folks-- It appears that ID-Frontiers is one of the few remaining
e-mail groups which does not allow photo attachments. I cannot provide a web
address, because the photo is not on any website.

Is there anyone who considers themselves an expert on sapsucker ID who would
be willing to take a stab at this? If you can send me a private message, I
can send you the photo and would greatly appreciate your help.

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC, Canada
contopus@telus.net



-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Wayne Weber
Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2017 8:56 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?

Bird ID folks,



The attached photo was submitted for a sapsucker seen in mid-July in Stanley
Park, Vancouver, BC. Is this a Red-naped or a Red-naped x Red-breasted
hybrid? (Red-breasted is the normal breeding form in this area.)



There is no black border visible below the red throat, but if this is a
hybrid, it has far less red on the head than would be expected, and it's
hard to tell whether or not red extends onto the breast.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC, Canada

contopus@telus.net








Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: New species for mainland North America
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 15:14 pm
From: gwwarbler AT gmail.com
 
Hi Norman,

I would argue that the Boesman recording from Nome does match Solitary
Sandpiper and not Green. The first sound on the cut is actually a snippet
of song, and matches the song of Solitary on ML132172 (
https://macaulaylibrary.org/au... at about 2:20). The song of
Green Sandpiper, on the other hand, is much slower and lower (see XC240530
http://www.xeno-canto.org/2405... The remainder of the calls on the
Alaska recording are typical flight calls for Solitary Sandpiper. These
are indeed extremely similar to Green Sandpiper, to the point that I would
argue that an out of range bird should not be identified on them alone.
The song, however, is diagnostic, and in this case supports the original ID.

Andrew

On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 1:40 PM, Norman Deans van Swelm <
norman.vanswelm@wxs.nl> wrote:

> Hello Andrew,
>
> Well all I can say is the recording mentioned below produces the exact
> call of Green Sandpiper. This species migrates at this moment over the area
> where I live, I hear at night over my house and by day in the marshlands
> nearby. I did check all recordings of Solitary Sandpiper on Xeno-canto and
> the one below does not match with the rest. However you can find similar
> calls when you go to the Green Sandpiper section of Xeno-Canto.
>
> Cheers, Norman
>
> Op 16-8-2017 om 17:10 schreef Andrew Spencer:
>
> Hi Norman,
>
> Could you elaborate on why this is a Green Sandpiper rather than a
> Solitary? Based on what I hear in this recording I don't believe Solitary
> can be ruled out. Thanks!
>
> Andrew Spencer
>
> On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Norman Deans van Swelm wrote:
>
>
> Though on the Xeno Canto list as Solitary Sandpiper Tringa solitaria it
> is in fact a Green Sandpiper Tringa ochrpus :
>
>
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/3227...
>
>
> The Green Sandpiper has been observed on Attu Island in the Aleutians,
> Alaska and on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, Alaska and at Gambell,
> St. Lawrence Island, Alaska,
>
> Regards, Norman
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: New species for mainland North America
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 12:50 pm
From: norman.vanswelm AT wxs.nl
 
Hello Andrew,

Well all I can say is the recording mentioned below produces the exact
call of Green Sandpiper. This species migrates at this moment over the
area where I live, I hear at night over my house and by day in the
marshlands nearby. I did check all recordings of Solitary Sandpiper on
Xeno-canto and the one below does not match with the rest. However you
can find similar calls when you go to the Green Sandpiper section of
Xeno-Canto.

Cheers, Norman


Op 16-8-2017 om 17:10 schreef Andrew Spencer:
> Hi Norman,
>
> Could you elaborate on why this is a Green Sandpiper rather than a
> Solitary? Based on what I hear in this recording I don't believe Solitary
> can be ruled out. Thanks!
>
> Andrew Spencer
>
> On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Norman Deans van Swelm <
> norman.vanswelm@wxs.nl> wrote:
>
>> Though on the Xeno Canto list as Solitary Sandpiper Tringa solitaria it
>> is in fact a Green Sandpiper Tringa ochrpus :
>>
>>
>> http://www.xeno-canto.org/3227...
>>
>>
>> The Green Sandpiper has been observed on Attu Island in the Aleutians,
>> Alaska and on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, Alaska and at Gambell,
>> St. Lawrence Island, Alaska,
>>
>> Regards, Norman
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: New species for mainland North America
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 10:10 am
From: gwwarbler AT gmail.com
 
Hi Norman,

Could you elaborate on why this is a Green Sandpiper rather than a
Solitary? Based on what I hear in this recording I don't believe Solitary
can be ruled out. Thanks!

Andrew Spencer

On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 11:00 AM, Norman Deans van Swelm <
norman.vanswelm@wxs.nl> wrote:

> Though on the Xeno Canto list as Solitary Sandpiper Tringa solitaria it
> is in fact a Green Sandpiper Tringa ochrpus :
>
>
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/3227...
>
>
> The Green Sandpiper has been observed on Attu Island in the Aleutians,
> Alaska and on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, Alaska and at Gambell,
> St. Lawrence Island, Alaska,
>
> Regards, Norman
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: New species for mainland North America
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 10:03 am
From: norman.vanswelm AT wxs.nl
 
Though on the Xeno Canto list as Solitary Sandpiper Tringa solitaria  it
is in fact a Green Sandpiper Tringa ochrpus :


http://www.xeno-canto.org/3227...


The Green Sandpiper has been observed on Attu Island in the Aleutians,
Alaska and on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, Alaska and at Gambell,
St. Lawrence Island, Alaska,

Regards, Norman


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 23:31 pm
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
Sorry folks--  It appears that ID-Frontiers is one of the few remaining
e-mail groups which does not allow photo attachments. I cannot provide a web
address, because the photo is not on any website.

Is there anyone who considers themselves an expert on sapsucker ID who would
be willing to take a stab at this? If you can send me a private message, I
can send you the photo and would greatly appreciate your help.

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC, Canada
contopus@telus.net



-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Wayne Weber
Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2017 8:56 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?

Bird ID folks,



The attached photo was submitted for a sapsucker seen in mid-July in Stanley
Park, Vancouver, BC. Is this a Red-naped or a Red-naped x Red-breasted
hybrid? (Red-breasted is the normal breeding form in this area.)



There is no black border visible below the red throat, but if this is a
hybrid, it has far less red on the head than would be expected, and it's
hard to tell whether or not red extends onto the breast.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC, Canada

contopus@telus.net








Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Red-naped or hybrid sapsucker?
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 22:56 pm
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
Bird ID folks,



The attached photo was submitted for a sapsucker seen in mid-July in Stanley
Park, Vancouver, BC. Is this a Red-naped or a Red-naped x Red-breasted
hybrid? (Red-breasted is the normal breeding form in this area.)



There is no black border visible below the red throat, but if this is a
hybrid, it has far less red on the head than would be expected, and it's
hard to tell whether or not red extends onto the breast.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC, Canada

contopus@telus.net








Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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