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Updated on October 25, 2014, 5:00 pm

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25 Oct: @ 16:57:50  Eurasian vs. African Collared-Dove in the ABA Area [Ted Floyd]
14 Oct: @ 13:54:55 Re: Ventura Warbler [Marcelo Brongo]
14 Oct: @ 11:57:01  Ventura Warbler [Tristan McKee]
14 Oct: @ 11:52:23 Re: Fwd: Geothlypis hybridization and variation [Lethaby, Nick]
14 Oct: @ 10:55:01 Re: Fwd: Geothlypis hybridization and variation [David Sibley]
14 Oct: @ 06:04:48  Fwd: Geothlypis hybridization and variation [Marcelo Brongo]
14 Oct: @ 03:33:27  Easier access to Geothlypis photos [Tristan McKee]
14 Oct: @ 01:52:08  Geothlypis hybridization and variation [Tristan McKee]
12 Oct: @ 22:31:37  SY Iceland Gull(?) spent over 2 months in Texas [Mark B Bartosik]
11 Oct: @ 17:22:50  Neal G. Smith - Obituary [Jean Iron]
09 Oct: @ 21:47:15 Re: Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland [Allen Chartier]
09 Oct: @ 17:04:57 Re: Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland [Tony Leukering]
09 Oct: @ 16:34:48  Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland [Lee G R Evans]
07 Oct: @ 18:07:36  Opinions sought on vagrant TANAGER in NW Scotland (UK) [Lee G R Evans]
07 Oct: @ 12:38:55 Re: Semipalmated or Western Sandpiper [David Wheeler]
06 Oct: @ 22:37:06  Semipalmated or Western Sandpiper [David Wheeler]
06 Oct: @ 22:34:33 Re: Semipalmated or Western Sandpiper [David Wheeler]
03 Oct: @ 13:32:56  Video and Birds [Mike O'Keeffe]





Subject: Eurasian vs. African Collared-Dove in the ABA Area
Date: Sat Oct 25 2014 16:57 pm
From: tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com
 
Hi, everybody.
I put together a little tutorial on collared-dove ID. I didn't appreciate until recently the challenge for ABA Area birders beyond the southern borderlands. Anyhow, here ya go:
http://tinyurl.com/AfCD-tutori...

Ted FloydLafayette, Boulder County, Colorado, USA
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Ventura Warbler
Date: Tue Oct 14 2014 13:54 pm
From: marcelobrongo AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tristan,
The open wing photo is actually showing a long primaries projection so I cannot understand your point about short primary projection. The quite longer 4-5 external primaries in relation with secondaries will show, when folded, a long primary projection. It's a point with what I get some experience with my birdbanding activities.
In addition, David Sibley raised two criticals points with the pale-edge great coverts and yellow tail and have made me change my mind. As far as I can see with these photos, Yellow Warbler seems the better option and without any good quality photos I cannot go further in the delicate field of hybrid.

Best regards
Marcelo Brongo

> On 14 oct. 2014, at 18:36, Tristan McKee wrote:
>
> I really appreciate the responses so far, namely, supporting Connecticut, Orange-crowned x Yellow, Yellow x Mourning or x MacGillivray's, and Yellow. There was a request for more info on the bird's behavior. Note that birds act odd in this tamarisk row because of traffic along the immediately adjacent road.
>
> This bird hops around hyperactively high in the tamarisks with a cocked tail, occasionally taking a long break deep in a palm across the road, and we saw it fly into a field of avocado shrubs to roost.
>
> I believe the yellow in the tail and missing/growing rectrices give the false impression that this bird's undertail coverts extend well out on the tail. Also, the call is radically different from any Connecticut recording I have heard, the bird is too slender and long-tailed, and, again, the lack of primary projection doesn't fit Connecticut. I have also been told that the leg thickness and toe structure are wrong.
>
> To me, a Yellow with eucalyptus on its face is more difficult to eliminate, although the long, cocked tail, lack of primary projection, and call note are strikingly different from any Yellow I have seen.
>
> The suggestion of Yellow x Orange-crowned would explain most things (except the call and primary projection), especially considering some apparent blurry streaks on the breast.
>
> Thanks much,
> Tristan McKee
> Arcata, CA
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Ventura Warbler
Date: Tue Oct 14 2014 11:57 am
From: atmckee AT gmail.com
 
I really appreciate the responses so far, namely, supporting Connecticut, Orange-crowned x Yellow, Yellow x Mourning or x MacGillivray's, and Yellow. There was a request for more info on the bird's behavior. Note that birds act odd in this tamarisk row because of traffic along the immediately adjacent road.

This bird hops around hyperactively high in the tamarisks with a cocked tail, occasionally taking a long break deep in a palm across the road, and we saw it fly into a field of avocado shrubs to roost.

I believe the yellow in the tail and missing/growing rectrices give the false impression that this bird's undertail coverts extend well out on the tail. Also, the call is radically different from any Connecticut recording I have heard, the bird is too slender and long-tailed, and, again, the lack of primary projection doesn't fit Connecticut. I have also been told that the leg thickness and toe structure are wrong.

To me, a Yellow with eucalyptus on its face is more difficult to eliminate, although the long, cocked tail, lack of primary projection, and call note are strikingly different from any Yellow I have seen.

The suggestion of Yellow x Orange-crowned would explain most things (except the call and primary projection), especially considering some apparent blurry streaks on the breast.

Thanks much,
Tristan McKee
Arcata, CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Fwd: Geothlypis hybridization and variation
Date: Tue Oct 14 2014 11:52 am
From: nlethaby AT ti.com
 
The dark lores in some pics are wrong for Yellow.

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of David Sibley
Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 8:17 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Fwd: Geothlypis hybridization and variation

An interesting and suggestive bird, but I don't see this as a Connecticut Warbler or a hybrid. It looks like a good match for Yellow Warbler, especially the pale-edged greater coverts visible in the side view, and the tail pattern in the spread tail photo, which seems to show a clear pattern of pale yellow inner webs with darker outer webs and tips. Both coverts and tail pattern are wrong for any Oporornis/Geothlypis, and right for Yellow Warbler. Why not a very dusky-olive Yellow Warbler with an abnormal voice?

There may be other details that point away from Yellow Warbler, but for now I don't see any reason to go beyond that species.

David Sibley
Concord, MA

On Oct 14, 2014, at 6:16 AM, Marcelo Brongo wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I cannot find anything wrong calling this bird a Connecticut Warbler.
> First fall individuals can have yellowish throat and overvall drab
> coloration (
> http://www.lilibirds.com/gallery2/d/1631-3/connecticut+warbler+1.jpg
> ). If sometimes colors can be hard to assess due to picture quality ,
> we can rely on structure with better confidence. The flying pictures
> and open wing pictures are usefull. Geothlypis' species show very long
> tail extension beyond the undertail coverts
> (http://tinyurl.com/kjuwoja)) and your bird doesn't. It's actually very
> short as a normal Connecticut W.). The wing morphology also match much
> better with Connecticut long pointed one. (
> http://tinyurl.com/kkn7mq4))
>
> Best regards
> Marcelo Brongo
>
> Wing picture was took from Slater Museum of Natural History (Wing &
> Tail Image Collection):
> http://digitalcollections.puge...
> aterwing
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Fwd: Geothlypis hybridization and variation
Date: Tue Oct 14 2014 10:55 am
From: sibleyguides AT gmail.com
 
An interesting and suggestive bird, but I don’t see this as a Connecticut Warbler or a hybrid. It looks like a good match for Yellow Warbler, especially the pale-edged greater coverts visible in the side view, and the tail pattern in the spread tail photo, which seems to show a clear pattern of pale yellow inner webs with darker outer webs and tips. Both coverts and tail pattern are wrong for any Oporornis/Geothlypis, and right for Yellow Warbler. Why not a very dusky-olive Yellow Warbler with an abnormal voice?

There may be other details that point away from Yellow Warbler, but for now I don’t see any reason to go beyond that species.

David Sibley
Concord, MA

On Oct 14, 2014, at 6:16 AM, Marcelo Brongo wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I cannot find anything wrong calling this bird a Connecticut Warbler. First
> fall individuals can have yellowish throat and overvall drab coloration (
> http://www.lilibirds.com/gallery2/d/1631-3/connecticut+warbler+1.jpg ). If
> sometimes colors can be hard to assess due to picture quality , we can rely
> on structure with better confidence. The flying pictures and open wing
> pictures are usefull. Geothlypis' species show very long tail extension
> beyond the undertail coverts (http://tinyurl.com/kjuwoja)) and your bird
> doesn't. It's actually very short as a normal Connecticut W.). The wing
> morphology also match much better with Connecticut long pointed one. (
> http://tinyurl.com/kkn7mq4))
>
> Best regards
> Marcelo Brongo
>
> Wing picture was took from Slater Museum of Natural History (Wing & Tail
> Image Collection):
> http://digitalcollections.puge...
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Fwd: Geothlypis hybridization and variation
Date: Tue Oct 14 2014 6:04 am
From: marcelobrongo AT gmail.com
 
Hi,

I cannot find anything wrong calling this bird a Connecticut Warbler. First
fall individuals can have yellowish throat and overvall drab coloration (
http://www.lilibirds.com/gallery2/d/1631-3/connecticut+warbler+1.jpg ). If
sometimes colors can be hard to assess due to picture quality , we can rely
on structure with better confidence. The flying pictures and open wing
pictures are usefull. Geothlypis' species show very long tail extension
beyond the undertail coverts (http://tinyurl.com/kjuwoja)) and your bird
doesn't. It's actually very short as a normal Connecticut W.). The wing
morphology also match much better with Connecticut long pointed one. (
http://tinyurl.com/kkn7mq4))

Best regards
Marcelo Brongo

Wing picture was took from Slater Museum of Natural History (Wing & Tail
Image Collection):
http://digitalcollections.puge...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Easier access to Geothlypis photos
Date: Tue Oct 14 2014 3:33 am
From: atmckee AT gmail.com
 
If you are having trouble viewing the photos of the Ventura bird, I have placed a few courtesy of Dorian Anderson on my flickr site:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Tristan McKee
Arcata, CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Geothlypis hybridization and variation
Date: Tue Oct 14 2014 1:52 am
From: atmckee AT gmail.com
 
A Geothylpis warbler in Ventura County, CA, has been terrorizing birders with brief and unsatisfactory views for several days. Photos are here:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...

Although first identified as a Mourning, then a Connecticut, it became clear today that this bird has yellowthroat genes. It has been suggested that more than one Geothlypis/Oporornis is present, but I scoured the small patch of Tamarisks today and yesterday and only saw that same bird repeatedly, the one in (most of) the photos. It is possible that some Yellow or Orange-crowned shots got mixed in; one flight shot looks shorter-tailed and may be a Yellow Warbler.

The bird looks like a Common Yellowthroat but is largely rich yellow below (some white on the sides/vent) and often appears to have a square-tipped tail. In reality, the tail is rounded at the corners but has a notch in the middle. My best guess is that the central rectrices (and maybe others) are missing and/or growing adventitiously. (Try counting the tail feathers.) If this is the case, then the tail shape may be leading us astray.

The chip note ranges from very Common Yellowthroat-like to Mourning Warbler-like. I have a not-so-great recording; send me an email if you'd like to hear it.

The apparent yellow in the tail has led to the suggestion of a Yellow Warbler x Common Yellowthroat hybrid, while the overall appearance suggests Mourning x yellowthroat or Connecticut x yellowthroat. In any case, I take the call note and nearly nonexistent primary projection to indicate that at least one of the parents was some kind of yellowthroat.

My suggestion of Gray-crowned Yellowthroat generated no support because of the tail length and bill depth. Some of the photos that just surfaced do suggest that the tail is not fully grown. I am unsure if a young Gray-crowned could have a developing bill this thin, but I have found photos that look similar. Is this geographically variable? The bird does have a contrastingly pale mandible and a somewhat curved culmen.

Gray-crowned is geographically variable, with the eye-arc/eyering apparently changing clinally from north to south. The facial pattern is disturbingly Gray-crowned-like, although some of that black may be eucalyptus oil.

Note the tail shape of this TX bird:

http://texasbirds.org/tbrc/gcy...

and the thin bill and yellow-looking undertail of this one:

http://www.singularvideo.com/L...

The bird responded aggressively to playback of Gray-crowned (flying out of a thick palm onto a telephone wire and chipping incessantly), but did not respond to a Common recording.

I have found recordings a Gray-crowned giving Common-like chips, but they may have been misidentified, as I have also read that they NEVER do this.

Belding's Yellowthroat could fit the bill. Obviously none of the suggestions so far are very likely here, so I will refrain from relying on likelihood too much...

We would greatly appreciate comments from folks with experience with yellowthroat hybrids, immature and calling Belding's and Gray-crowned, and/or geographic variation in Gray-crowned or other yellowthroats.

Many thanks,

Tristan McKee
Arcata, CA


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: SY Iceland Gull(?) spent over 2 months in Texas
Date: Sun Oct 12 2014 22:31 pm
From: MBB22222 AT aol.com
 
Hi All,

I would appreciate ID confirmation (or correction if I am wrong). At this
moment I believe there are only 5 officially confirmed records of ICGU in
Texas (perhaps there are more submitted) so it would be worth to submit this
record if indeed my ID is correct. Apparently it is a SY gull that in these
photos is about to complete prebasic molt (spread wing and tail are
included in the composite; showing all fresh, basic flight feathers; P9 and P10
are still growing).

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image...

And just to show ‘metamorphosis’ after completing the molt, from worn and
bleached plumage to fresh one, I will show a few headshots from different
dates during this gull molt. BTW what I enjoyed the most was fact that SY
ICGU photos I could find were usually showing bleached basic plumage of SY/TY
and now I could not only watch the progress in exchanging feathers but had
an opportunity to see them as fresh as possible right after they were full
grown.

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image...
Note: second photo from top - spider on the gull head - it seems that he
liked the spot and stayed there for a longer time. Also in last photo -
secretion from nasal salt gland

Of course if somebody wants to include a few words about kumlieni vs.
nominate race I will appreciate this as well although, I am afraid, it might not
be possible to positively IDed the race in this case.

I think I should include a short history of this find. I found it first
time in mid July on the beach in south-west end of the Bolivar Peninsula. Gull
was in very sorry shape (bleached and worn plumage) so my initial request
at that time posted on some gull forum did not return much. I found later
that at that time this gull was also seen by others. It did not triggered
much attention probably (my guess) because one local authority first IDed
this gull as Glaucous then, after day or two later, announced that this is a
bleached Ring-billed Gull. Whatever, no more records reported that I am
aware of. None on eBird – perhaps it was reported as RBGU.

Because this gull had interesting molt progress and feathers that include
some anomalies (and from the very beginning I was hoping it is ICGU) I tried
to follow it on a regular basis. For over two months (at least from mid
July to second part of September) it seems to reside in the Galveston Bay
area - please note that tip of Bolivar, tip of Texas City Dike, Pelican Island
(most parts inaccessible to visitors) and East end of Galveston are only a
few miles away from each other and many sea and shorebirds travel from one
place to another when foraging (have some banded birds I observed to
travel around). Problem is that it takes a lot of time (and miles) to move
around in the car (ferry, bridges, etc.) but I managed to find this gull usually
in 1-2 weeks intervals (time permitted; see explanation above) during
July, August and September (BTW a few other ICGUs found in Texas before also
spent several months in one location although during different months). On
couple days I could not relocated this gull at all. A few weeks ago, after
being very close to complete prebasic molt, including all flight feathers
this gull very likely moved out of this area so I missed full grown P9 and
P10. It was not only during time when its prebasic molt was almost completed
but also at that time there was an influx of all ages Lesser Black-backed
Gulls that just arrived on this part of Texas shore. As LBBGs and American
Herring Gulls seem to move quite a lot in, out and along the shore this ICGU,
that just regained full flight ability, very likely joined them in
foraging trips and stopped to depend mostly on fish carcasses found near
shoreline. BTW it was very dominant chasing away not only all LAGUs and RBGUs but
also every LBBG. It never confronted Herrings but these larger gulls also
never tried to claim food from ICGU when it was eating, even when nearby. I
have some video clips showing ICGU display postures but it will take time
before I process them, processing photos will take priority. On the other hand
if somebody thinks that some other details are needed for positive ID (that
are not well shown in included composite) I will try to process more
photos now (have plenty). BTW this gull was mute during displays, never heard it
calling.

Thanks in advance for comments

Cheers,

Mark
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Neal G. Smith - Obituary
Date: Sat Oct 11 2014 17:22 pm
From: jeaniron AT sympatico.ca
 
We've often discussed Neal Smith's studies of Thayer's Gull on ID-Frontiers.
We do not recall his obituary being mentioned here or elsewhere and we had
no idea of his passing until reading it online today. We suspect others were
unaware too. His obituary was published in The New York Times on December
23, 2012. It reads: Smith, Neal. G., of Brooklyn NY. On September 28, 2012
in Panama City, Panama. Survived by his wife, Ninochtka Franco of Panama,
sons Roger and David, four grandchildren; Harrison, Taylor, Jaden and Ryan.
Obtained his Ph.D. from Cornell, 49 years staff scientist at Smithsonian
Tropical Research Institute in Panama. He was 75.

We thank Michel Gosselin for bringing this to our attention.

Ron Pittaway and Jean Iron
Toronto ON

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland
Date: Thu Oct 9 2014 21:47 pm
From: amazilia3 AT gmail.com
 
Lee,

Scarlet Tanager has white under wing coverts, Summer does not.

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: amazilia3@gmail.com
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/m...
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogsp...

On Thu, Oct 9, 2014 at 5:19 PM, Tony Leukering wrote:

> Lee et al.:
>
> I cannot imagine a Summer Tanager with such contrastingly black wings and
> tail. I see no reason to go down that road.
>
> Tony
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Tony Leukering
> currently Mayville, MI
>
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/t...
>
> http://aba.org/photoquiz/
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lee G R Evans
> To: BIRDWG01
> Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 5:06 pm
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland
>
>
>
> Images here: http://www.western-isles-wildl...
>
> d%20general%20wildlife%20sightings%20in%20the%20western%20isles,%20outer%20hebrides
> .htm
>
> There was an overwhelming number of North American observers responding to
> my request opting for SCARLET TANAGER, while of 9 Canadian ornithologists,
> 8 were in favour of SUMMER TANAGER. The bird has been trapped and ringed
> in
> the interim but I do not have access to the biometrics but we are still
> running with it as a 'SCARLE'T' TANAGER. Is there any diagnostic ways of
> separating the two in such plumage as some commentators believe some
> first-year
>
> Summers can lack any of the orange plumage pigmentation
>
> Interested to hear any comments
>
> Many thanks
>
> Lee Evans
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
>
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html
>

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland
Date: Thu Oct 9 2014 17:04 pm
From: greatgrayowl AT aol.com
 
Lee et al.:

I cannot imagine a Summer Tanager with such contrastingly black wings and tail. I see no reason to go down that road.

Tony






Tony Leukering
currently Mayville, MI

http://www.flickr.com/photos/t...

http://aba.org/photoquiz/





-----Original Message-----
From: Lee G R Evans
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Thu, Oct 9, 2014 5:06 pm
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland



Images here: http://www.western-isles-wildl...
d%20general%20wildlife%20sightings%20in%20the%20western%20isles,%20outer%20hebrides
.htm

There was an overwhelming number of North American observers responding to
my request opting for SCARLET TANAGER, while of 9 Canadian ornithologists,
8 were in favour of SUMMER TANAGER. The bird has been trapped and ringed in
the interim but I do not have access to the biometrics but we are still
running with it as a 'SCARLE'T' TANAGER. Is there any diagnostic ways of
separating the two in such plumage as some commentators believe some first-year

Summers can lack any of the orange plumage pigmentation

Interested to hear any comments

Many thanks

Lee Evans

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Scarlet/Summer Tanager on Island of Barra - NW Scotland
Date: Thu Oct 9 2014 16:34 pm
From: LGREUK400 AT aol.com
 

Images here: http://www.western-isles-wildl...
d%20general%20wildlife%20sightings%20in%20the%20western%20isles,%20outer%20hebrides
.htm

There was an overwhelming number of North American observers responding to
my request opting for SCARLET TANAGER, while of 9 Canadian ornithologists,
8 were in favour of SUMMER TANAGER. The bird has been trapped and ringed in
the interim but I do not have access to the biometrics but we are still
running with it as a 'SCARLE'T' TANAGER. Is there any diagnostic ways of
separating the two in such plumage as some commentators believe some first-year
Summers can lack any of the orange plumage pigmentation

Interested to hear any comments

Many thanks

Lee Evans

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Opinions sought on vagrant TANAGER in NW Scotland (UK)
Date: Tue Oct 7 2014 18:07 pm
From: LGREUK400 AT aol.com
 
Putative Scarlet Tanager, 6-7 October 2014 - Island of Barra (NW  Scotland)

Selection of pictures here on Latest Sightings page - click to increase
size - _www.western-isles-wildlife.co.uk_
(http://www.western-isles-wildl...)

I am soliciting opinions from those familiar with Scarlet and Summer
Tanagers in fall - this individual appears to have a particularly bright bill
and peaked forehead. Is it possible to make a firm identification either way?

Would be very interested in any opinions

Very best wishes

Lee Evans

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...




Subject: Semipalmated or Western Sandpiper
Date: Tue Oct 7 2014 12:38 pm
From: tigger64 AT aol.com
 
Yes, apologies - it's the same Dunlin that appears in isolation a couple rows above on the Photostream, and in the group of 3.  In the group of three it's obviously a Dunlin but I noted how ambiguous it seems in a solo photo (then promptly mis-labeled the same bird elsewhere).  Should have been going through my photos in order.......


Here's the peep. I don't really think it's a Western but just variation in Semipalmated. I photographed it because the bill was slim and pointy-tipped and perhaps 25% longer than the Semi's it was with (such as the one on the right in the second photo).


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


David Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Semipalmated or Western Sandpiper
Date: Mon Oct 6 2014 22:37 pm
From: tigger64 AT aol.com
 
I photographed it because the bill was a lot longer than the Semipalmated it was with.  It's not what I think of as a Western but obviously we don't see many in the eastern Great Lakes.  Any thoughts welcome.  The photos are tinted from low sun angle - I may have some better ones.


First of four photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


David Wheeler
N. Syracuse, NY

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Semipalmated or Western Sandpiper
Date: Mon Oct 6 2014 22:34 pm
From: tigger64 AT aol.com
 
I guess actually this is the first of four:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


DW

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Video and Birds
Date: Fri Oct 3 2014 13:32 pm
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
Hi,



Here is a neat trick for steadying video. Useful for studying gestalt (jizz) and for creating sharp web animations.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...



A few other recent postings might also be of interest including:-



A guide to digital image artefacts

http://birdingimagequalitytool...



Image quality of modified images – before and after

http://birdingimagequalitytool...



A closer look at image exposure

http://birdingimagequalitytool...



… and various others, here.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...



Regards



Mike O’Keeffe

Ireland










Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


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