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Updated on June 16, 2017, 11:40 am

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16 Jun: @ 11:31:17 Re: Stint ID help [Will Chatfield-Taylor]
16 Jun: @ 10:24:12 Re: Stint ID help [julian hough]
16 Jun: @ 10:18:26 Re: Stint ID help [Tony Leukering]
16 Jun: @ 09:56:47 Re: Stint ID help [Steve Hampton]
16 Jun: @ 09:31:14  Stint ID help [Will Chatfield-Taylor]
24 May: @ 06:00:56 Re: Solitary vireo songs [Ted Floyd]





Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 11:31 am
From: wchatfieldtaylor AT gmail.com
 
Thank you all for your input. I appreciate getting a firm ID on this finally. Western Sandpiper it is.

Will Chatfield-Taylor



> On Jun 16, 2017, at 11:20 AM, julian hough wrote:
>
> Will,
>
> The chevron-like markings on the carpal area and some finer, hair-like streaks on the rear flanks don™t jive with Little Stint. Combined with the overall jizz. and the length, shape and thickness of the bill (again bad for Little Stint) these points favor a dull Western Sandpiper. While subjective in a still image, the fact that the bird is belly deep in water also hints at a more Western Sandpiper-like feeding behavior.
>
> Regards,
>
> Julian
>
> Julian Hough New Haven, CT 06519
> www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
>
>
> On Friday, June 16, 2017 10:31 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor wrote:
>
>
> Hi All,
>
> This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern, bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight. Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.
>
> If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.
>
> All photos are found at the following link:
>
>
> http://www.livingworldphotogra...
>
>
> Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern better if they would help.
>
> Will Chatfield-Taylor
>
> Palm City, FL
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 10:24 am
From: jrhough1 AT snet.net
 
Will,
The chevron-like markings on the carpal area and some finer, hair-like streaks on the rear flanks don™t jive with Little Stint. Combined with the overall jizz. and the length, shape and thickness of the bill (again bad for Little Stint) these points favor a dull Western Sandpiper. While subjective in a still image, the fact that the bird is belly deep in water also hints at a more Western Sandpiper-like feeding behavior.
Regards,
JulianJulian Hough New Haven, CT 06519www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com

On Friday, June 16, 2017 10:31 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor wrote:


Hi All,

This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern, bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight. Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.

If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.

All photos are found at the following link:


http://www.livingworldphotogra...


Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern better if they would help.

Will Chatfield-Taylor

Palm City, FL

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 10:18 am
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I also see no suggestion of Little Stint's white braces.

Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
www.aba.org/photoquiz/
www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com

> On Jun 16, 2017, at 09:55, Steve Hampton wrote:
>
> The primary extension rules out stints. The bill shape and size, and
> indeed the plumage, seem fine for Western Sandpiper to me.
>
>
>
> On Fri, Jun 16, 2017 at 7:19 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor <
> wchatfieldtaylor@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I
>> tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern,
>> bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas
>> determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but
>> couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field
>> notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a
>> quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight.
>> Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and
>> if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little
>> Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated
>> Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow
>> in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting
>> that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.
>>
>> If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.
>>
>> All photos are found at the following link:
>>
>>
>> http://www.livingworldphotogra...
>>
>>
>> Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can
>> to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern
>> better if they would help.
>>
>> Will Chatfield-Taylor
>>
>> Palm City, FL
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 9:56 am
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
The primary extension rules out stints.  The bill shape and size, and
indeed the plumage, seem fine for Western Sandpiper to me.



On Fri, Jun 16, 2017 at 7:19 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor <
wchatfieldtaylor@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I
> tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern,
> bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas
> determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but
> couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field
> notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a
> quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight.
> Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and
> if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little
> Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated
> Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow
> in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting
> that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.
>
> If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.
>
> All photos are found at the following link:
>
>
> http://www.livingworldphotogra...
>
>
> Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can
> to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern
> better if they would help.
>
> Will Chatfield-Taylor
>
> Palm City, FL
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 9:31 am
From: wchatfieldtaylor AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern, bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but couldn’t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ‘tit-tit-tit’ call in flight. Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.

If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.

All photos are found at the following link:


http://www.livingworldphotogra...


Thank you very much in advance, and I’ll answer as many questions as I can to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern better if they would help.

Will Chatfield-Taylor

Palm City, FL

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Solitary vireo songs
Date: Wed May 24 2017 6:00 am
From: tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com
 
Hey, everybody.


I just heard a presentation on this. By Ed Pandolfino, at the recently concluded Great Basin Bird Conference in Reno, Nevada, USA. I don't see that the abstracts have been posted yet. In a nutshell, Ed reports that the songs and of Plumbeous and Cassin's vireos do in fact differ. The key difference is frequency, of the kHz sort (not frequency of the utterances-per-unit-time sort). Cassin's song is higher-pitched.


Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado, USA



I have some recordings of a solitary vireo that I was hoping to run past anybody with lots of experience separating Cassin's from Plunbeous.



Thanks,

Dominik Mosur

San Francisco



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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