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Updated on August 28, 2015, 1:40 am

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28 Aug: @ 01:35:38  Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office. [Paul Wood]
27 Aug: @ 17:55:34  Collaborative Identification and the future of Rarity Assessment [Mike O'Keeffe]
24 Aug: @ 10:30:33 Re: Cabot's/Sandwich Tern ID - Massachusetts [Reid Martin]
23 Aug: @ 01:39:46  Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office. [Paul Wood]
22 Aug: @ 12:18:58  Help with Seaside Sparrow images [Ian McLaren]
22 Aug: @ 04:02:08  Progress on a Birders Digital Identification Manual [Mike O'Keeffe]
19 Aug: @ 22:07:01 Re: Western Gull in Korea-- request for comments [Peter Adriaens]
18 Aug: @ 10:30:20 Re: Cabot's/Sandwich Tern ID - Massachusetts [julian hough]
17 Aug: @ 20:27:33  Cabot's/Sandwich Tern ID - Massachusetts [David Hollie]
17 Aug: @ 14:52:14 Re: Common Sandpiper candidate in New Mexico [karlson3]
16 Aug: @ 00:43:08 Re: Common Sandpiper candidate in New Mexico [John Sterling]
15 Aug: @ 23:19:20  Common Sandpiper candidate in New Mexico [Noah Arthur]
15 Aug: @ 19:15:47  Mystery bird from Colorado in May [quetzal65]
08 Aug: @ 02:52:18  Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office. [Paul Wood]
07 Aug: @ 02:42:00 Re: Birding Images in 3D [Mike O'Keeffe]
07 Aug: @ 01:36:37 Re: Birding Images in 3D [Mark B Bartosik]
06 Aug: @ 18:41:23  Birding Images in 3D [Mike O'Keeffe]
28 Jul: @ 14:33:42  "Buttons" the Passenger Pigeon -- perhaps not pure Passenger? [Noah Arthur]





Subject: Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office.
Date: Fri Aug 28 2015 1:35 am
From: paul.r.wood AT uk.pwc.com
 
I will be out of the office from 27/08/2015 until 01/09/2015.

I will respond to your message when I return.




Note: This is an automated response to your message BIRDWG01 Digest - 24
Aug 2015 to 27 Aug 2015 (#2015-93) sent on 28/08/2015 06:01:20. This is the
only notification you will receive while this person is away.

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Subject: Collaborative Identification and the future of Rarity Assessment
Date: Thu Aug 27 2015 17:55 pm
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
Hi,



Some thoughts on Collaborative Identification and the future of Rarity
Assessment.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
identification.html



With the arrival of new online decision making tools like Loomio (
https://www.loomio.org/)) are we seeing the start
of the end for rarity committees and what are some of the challenges ahead?



Through the internet we now have to power to harness the knowledge of an
entire birding community for rarity assessment and to help manage regional
and national bird lists? Loomio is an example of a decision making tool for
democracy but bird identification is not a democratic process. There are
other hurdles like group think and the problem of 'birds of unknown origin'
that need to be overcome. But where there is a will there is a way.



Perhaps it is time for that debate.



Regards



Mike O'Keeffe

Ireland


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Cabot's/Sandwich Tern ID - Massachusetts
Date: Mon Aug 24 2015 10:30 am
From: upupa AT airmail.net
 
Dear Julian/All,
FYI I have created a page on my web site that illustrates some of issues Julian has mentioned:

http://www.martinreid.com/Main...

---
Martin Reid
San Antonio
www.martinreid.com





On Aug 18, 2015, at Aug 18, 10:10 AM, julian hough wrote:

> David et al.,
> Birders in the mid-Atlantic states are and should be mindful of the potential of Eurasian 'sandvichensis', given the record of adults in Chicago and more recently Massachusetts. Much of the current identification info of 'sandvichensis' and 'acuflavida' is based on information that has come out of the investigation that Cabot's (acuflavida) Tern reach Europe as vagrants. Martin Garner has delineated and championed some of the key points and gives links to Greg Neise's thorough documentation of the Chicago bird which is invaluable and informative: http://birdingfrontiers.com/20...
> David's pix show a bird that is quite worn and molting crown feathers and for me this bird, in this state of molt, would be a difficult one to assess…most of the outer primaries are worn, and the inner primaries look worn. "Sandvichensis', according to the literature, molt earlier and so perhaps this individual's state of molt perhaps fits 'acuflavida' better?
> In assessing a hurricane corpse of a CT "sandwich Tern" to eliminate 'sandvichensis', it became evident that some features used to separate these two races/taxon can be difficult to judge, especially now, in August, when wear and molt may impact a true assessment of the key features of primary fringes and head pattern that are helpful in separating these forms. Bill size and shape is often ambiguous in some birds, and while the CT bird had broad pale fringes to the newly-moulted inner primaries very suggestive of 'sandvichensis', it is the shape and pattern of the outer primaries that are more reliable (Neise and Garner, pers.comm) which wasn't something that was highlighted in the current information and should be borne in mind when deciding which actual primaries on which to concentrate.
> Regards,
> Julian Julian Hough New Haven, CT 06519 www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
>
>
> On Monday, August 17, 2015 9:16 PM, David Hollie wrote:
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> I am currently working as a Roseate Tern resighter in Cape Cod,
> Massachusetts. Yesterday (August 16, 2015), I photographed a
> Sandwich/Cabot's Tern. Having never seen the nominate *sandvicensis* before,
> I do not feel experienced enough to make the call as to the subspecies (or
> species, depending on who you ask!) of this tern and would really
> appreciate some feedback. Since my job involves sorting through hundreds
> and thousands of terns every day, it is not unlikely that I will run into
> another Sandwich/Cabot's Tern, and I would like to be prepared if I do see
> another one.
> Photos of the tern (as well as my comments) are in the eBird checklist
> linked below. If you would like to see larger photos, click on one of them
> and it will take you to flickr where you can zoom in on them.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24643201
>
> Good Birding!
>
> David Hollie
> Ringgold, GA (currently in Eastham, MA)
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...
>
>
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html


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Subject: Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office.
Date: Sun Aug 23 2015 1:39 am
From: paul.r.wood AT uk.pwc.com
 
I will be out of the office from 21/08/2015 until 25/08/2015.

I will respond to your message when I return.




Note: This is an automated response to your message BIRDWG01 Digest - 19
Aug 2015 to 22 Aug 2015 (#2015-90) sent on 23/08/2015 06:00:24. This is the
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Subject: Help with Seaside Sparrow images
Date: Sat Aug 22 2015 12:18 pm
From: I.A.McLaren AT dal.ca
 
All:


I wonder if anybody familiar with s.e. U.S. Seaside Sparrows might help me on possible IDs of of images of the three birds that I obtained near Halifax, NS, in Jan 74 and Jan 80. Many years ago I concluded from the (confusing) literature that two of them were nominate maritimus and one possibly macgillivraii. The latter also seems to match some web-available images. And it would not be totally unlikely, given that we also have an amply confirmed specimen of waynei Marsh Wren from the same s.e. US coastal marshes.


So, if anyone can help, please contact me and I will send the images in question.


Thanks and cheers,


Ian McLaren

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Progress on a Birders Digital Identification Manual
Date: Sat Aug 22 2015 4:02 am
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
All,



Some recent postings that might be of interest.



For the gull enthusiasts some work on digital grey scales and gulls. Under
Shadow Topography I look at the hidden bird topography defined by a bird's
shape and the interaction with light and shadow. A bit of time in recent
months spent under the topic of gestalt looking at the issues of taking
measurements from bird photographs and related topics. Also spent a bit of
time again on the complexity of light including a closer look at how
perspective affects tones, the difference between direct and diffuse
lighting in images and some optical illusions we should be aware of.
Finally a bit of forensics - the dangers of fringe artefacts when working in
RAW, maximising image sharpness and some of the science behind 3D lighting
and vignetting. Hope you find some of this useful.



For those interested in getting email updates from the blog I have a set up
a link and some other widgets such as a translate button, visitor trends and
the most popular posts.



If anyone has an interesting imaging puzzle or an area you think the blog
should look at I'd love to hear from you.



BIRDS AND LIGHT

Foliage Canopy Edge - where many of us will be training our bins and cameras
over the next couple of months

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
anopy-edge.html



COLOUR

Beak Colouration

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
tml



FIELD MARKS

Grey scales and gulls

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
nd-gulls.html

Shadow Topography

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
aphy.html



FORENSICS

Cosine fourth law explains natural vignetting

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
aw-of.html

Lambert's cosine law explains how illuminance works in 3D environments

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
-law.html

Maximising Image Sharpness

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
harpness.html

Fringe Artefacts while working in Raw

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
s-while.html



GESTALT

Measurements from photographs

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
-photographs.html

The limitations of primary projection

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
imary.html

The limitations of bill to eye ratio

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ll-to-eye-ratio.html

The limitations of GISS (General Impressions of size and shape)

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ss-general.html

The limitations of leg proportion analysis

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
g-proportion.html

Simple 3D modelling from 2D images. A potentially useful tool

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ng-from-2d.html

Beak Structure and Shape

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

An Irish Etymology for JIZZ

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
f-jizz.html



HUMAN BIAS

Lighting and Perspective (Part 2)

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
and.html

Brightness Illusions - pales parts of a bird in the shade often appear
brighter than the really are.

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
usions.html

Tonal gradient illusions - the relative brightness of individual feather
tracts may be influenced by neighbouring tracts.

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
-illusions.html



Regards



Mike O'Keeffe

Ireland




http://birdingimagequalitytool...







UPDATE MAY 2015

From: Mike O'Keeffe [mailto:okeeffeml@eircom.net]
Sent: 01 May 2015 19:00
To: 'BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU'; 'Irish Bird Network'
Subject: Progress on a Birders Digital Identification Manual



All,



Members of this list may find some recent blog postings of interest. The
scope of the blog is about as wide as it is likely to get. There are a web
of strands of investigation now ongoing. These cross in various places but
I have kept them separate below and as separate pages in the blog. So
hopefully people can easily find what they have an interest in. Hope people
are finding this stuff of use. Feedback as always welcome.



BIRDS AND LIGHT

Lighting under foliage canopy - it is about that green light we experience
in temperate zones right about now.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
iage-canopy.html





COLOUR

Birders Colour Pallet Rev. 2.0 - A pallet designed with birders in mind to
help with the objective analysis of colour from digital images.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
-20.html

UV reflectance in Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus. A continuation of one of
the more popular series of postings in this blog.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
tance.html

Colour Profiling - A technique for comparing subtle colour differences
between different images and individual birds. Chiffchaff forms looked at
here.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
-revisited.html

Colour Saturation Experiments - saturation is interesting as it is not
measured by the camera.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
l



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
our-saturation.html

The links between brightness, contrast, saturation and sharpening tools,
post-processing. All post-processing modifications have a knock-on effect
on colour.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ects-of-image.html





FIELD MARKS (A categorisation based on feather structure)

A Summary



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
eld-marks.html

Fringes, Notches and Tips - i.e. the outer rim



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
es-and-tips.html

Feather centres - i.e. from the edge inwards.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
es-subterminal.html

Shaft-streaks and Tramlines - i.e. closest to the feather centre.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
-and-tramlines.html

Colours



http://birdingimagequalitytool...



FIELD MARKS (Analysis - The Bold versus The Bland)

A Summary of the concept that field marks effectively come in two forms,
bold markings and bland markings.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
d.html

Testing the concept



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
e-test.html



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ml



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
-test.html



FIELD MARKS (Lighting Considerations)

Lighting and avian anatomy



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
avian-anatomy.html

Lighting and bareparts



http://birdingimagequalitytool.blogspot.ie/2015/01/field-marks-lighting-and-
bare-parts.html

Shadow Topography - when field marks and contours align we have a potential
problem



http://birdingimagequalitytool.blogspot.ie/2015/04/field-marks-shadow-topogr
aphy.html

False Malar Stripe - one of the more prominent false field marks, owing to a
bald patch, the submalar apterium



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
tripe.html

False Contrast - Manipulating image contrast can make some field marks go
away and cause others to magically appear



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
t.html



FIELD MARKS (False Field Marks)

A summary



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
arks.html





FORENSICS

Lighting and shadow direction - a couple of techniques to gauge lighting
direction in an image



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
hting-and.html

3D Modelling - potential uses in understanding lighting



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
l





GESTALT

An overview - summarising an area where the blog will be heading


http://birdingimagequalitytool...





HUMAN BIAS

Colour - "The Dress" Viral Phenomenon, 2015 - an incredible mass optical
illusion from earlier this year.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
n_25.html



Regards



Mike O'Keeffe

Ireland




http://birdingimagequalitytool.blogspot.ie/





UPDATE JANUARY 2015



From: Mike O'Keeffe [mailto:okeeffeml@eircom.net]
Sent: 21 January 2015 07:56
To: 'BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU'; 'Irish Bird Network'
Subject: On human cognitive bias, birds and light, and image forensics



All,



Members of this list may find some recent postings of interest.



FORENSICS / BIRDS AND LIGHT

Lighting and Avian Anatomy

http://birdingimagequalitytool.blogspot.ie/2015/01/field-marks-lighting-and-
avian-anatomy.html

Lighting and Bareparts

http://birdingimagequalitytool.blogspot.ie/2015/01/field-marks-lighting-and-
bare-parts.html

Underexposure

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
is.html

Artefacts

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
is-artefacts.html

White Balance

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
is-white.html

Lighting and Perspective

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
and-perspective.html

Defocus

http://birdingimagequalitytool.blogspot.ie/2014/11/forensics-gaussian-analys
is-defocus.html

Colour Sample Homogeneity - a technique using the Gaussian Blur Tool

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
mogenity-and.html

High Dynamic Range Imaging

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
m-raw.html

Lighting in Arid and Semiarid Areas

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
semiarid-areas.html

Lighting in Snow and Ice

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ce.html

Winter Solstice

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
d.html



HUMAN COGNITIVE BIAS AND BIRD IDENTIFICATION

An Introduction

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
bias.html

Distraction

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ml

Memory Bias

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

Evaluation Bias

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
l

The Self and the Group

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
l

Experimental Bias

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
tml

Ten Tips

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
sions.html



A QUICK DIGITAL IMAGING REFERENCE GUIDE

http://birdingimagequalitytool...
l





Regards



Mike O'Keeffe

Ireland



http://birdingimagequalitytool.blogspot.ie/














Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Western Gull in Korea-- request for comments
Date: Wed Aug 19 2015 22:07 pm
From: p_adriaens AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all,

this is a very, very late reply on this Korean gull, but I have been traveling and had not yet seen the debate.

First of all, it would be good to establish the age of the bird beyond doubt.
The observer presumes that the bird was in its first cycle, but the only ageing criteria used seem rather 'soft',
namely dark eye, dark bill, and lack of any grey wing-coverts.
I would add that the photo at http://www.birdskorea.org/Bird... clinches the age as first winter indeed;
the regular pattern of parallel dark bars across the greater coverts certainly makes these feathers look juvenile, so I agree on the age.

My first thought on seeing the pictures, however, was that I have photographed a few not too dissimilar birds in Japan.
As a European birder it is a bit intimidating to go against the opinion of someone who sees Slaty-backed Gulls all the time like Nial, but I cannot help having the impression that the debate too quickly shifted away from this species and towards American taxa.

I have uploaded a few of my photos here:
http://www.pbase.com/smiths_1/... were taken in early March 2012.

These birds may be not that extreme as the Korean gull, but I feel that they contradict a few of the statements on the birdskorea webpages, and with distant, biref views in dull evening light they might give a similar impression. Also, earlier on in winter their plumage may have been even darker (photos were taken in March, so three months later in the first cycle than the Korean bird).
At the least, these images show that dark grey body colour, extensive dark grey on scapulars, dark underside of outer hand, as well as extensively blackish tail contrasting with white rump and uppertail coverts can be found in some first-cycle East Asian large gulls.
Can we really be sure that an aberrantly dark Slaty-backed Gull has been ruled out here?

Cheers,Peter




On Thursday, July 9, 2015 7:18 AM, Peter Pyle wrote:



Hello all -

Nial Moores of Birds Korea requests opinion and commentary on a
candidate first-cycle Western Gull photographed in Gangneung this
past December. I believe it would represent the first record for the
Palearctic. Please feel free to comment directly to Nial via the
above email address and/or to the group.

http://www.birdskoreablog.org/?p214

Thanks, Peter

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...




Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html




Subject: Cabot's/Sandwich Tern ID - Massachusetts
Date: Tue Aug 18 2015 10:30 am
From: jrhough1 AT snet.net
 
David et al.,
Birders in the mid-Atlantic states are and should be mindful of the potential of Eurasian 'sandvichensis', given the record of adults in Chicago and more recently Massachusetts. Much of the current identification info of 'sandvichensis' and 'acuflavida' is based on information that has come out of the investigation that Cabot's (acuflavida) Tern reach Europe as vagrants. Martin Garner has delineated and championed some of the key points and gives links to Greg Neise's thorough documentation of the Chicago bird which is invaluable and informative: http://birdingfrontiers.com/20...
David's pix show a bird that is quite worn and molting crown feathers and for me this bird, in this state of molt, would be a difficult one to assess…most of the outer primaries are worn, and the inner primaries look worn. "Sandvichensis', according to the literature, molt earlier and so perhaps this individual's state of molt perhaps fits 'acuflavida' better?
In assessing a hurricane corpse of a CT "sandwich Tern" to eliminate 'sandvichensis', it became evident that some features used to separate these two races/taxon can be difficult to judge, especially now, in August, when wear and molt may impact a true assessment of the key features of primary fringes and head pattern that are helpful in separating these forms. Bill size and shape is often ambiguous in some birds, and while the CT bird had broad pale fringes to the newly-moulted inner primaries very suggestive of 'sandvichensis',  it is the shape and pattern of the outer primaries that are more reliable (Neise and Garner, pers.comm) which wasn't something that was highlighted in the current information and should be borne in mind when deciding which actual primaries on which to concentrate.
Regards,
Julian Julian Hough New Haven, CT 06519 www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com


On Monday, August 17, 2015 9:16 PM, David Hollie wrote:


Hi all,

I am currently working as a Roseate Tern resighter in Cape Cod,
Massachusetts. Yesterday (August 16, 2015), I photographed a
Sandwich/Cabot's Tern. Having never seen the nominate *sandvicensis* before,
I do not feel experienced enough to make the call as to the subspecies (or
species, depending on who you ask!) of this tern and would really
appreciate some feedback. Since my job involves sorting through hundreds
and thousands of terns every day, it is not unlikely that I will run into
another Sandwich/Cabot's Tern, and I would like to be prepared if I do see
another one.
Photos of the tern (as well as my comments) are in the eBird checklist
linked below. If you would like to see larger photos, click on one of them
and it will take you to flickr where you can zoom in on them.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24643201

Good Birding!

David Hollie
Ringgold, GA (currently in Eastham, MA)

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Cabot's/Sandwich Tern ID - Massachusetts
Date: Mon Aug 17 2015 20:27 pm
From: featherbrain1223 AT gmail.com
 
Hi all,

I am currently working as a Roseate Tern resighter in Cape Cod,
Massachusetts. Yesterday (August 16, 2015), I photographed a
Sandwich/Cabot's Tern. Having never seen the nominate *sandvicensis* before,
I do not feel experienced enough to make the call as to the subspecies (or
species, depending on who you ask!) of this tern and would really
appreciate some feedback. Since my job involves sorting through hundreds
and thousands of terns every day, it is not unlikely that I will run into
another Sandwich/Cabot's Tern, and I would like to be prepared if I do see
another one.
Photos of the tern (as well as my comments) are in the eBird checklist
linked below. If you would like to see larger photos, click on one of them
and it will take you to flickr where you can zoom in on them.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24643201

Good Birding!

David Hollie
Ringgold, GA (currently in Eastham, MA)

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Common Sandpiper candidate in New Mexico
Date: Mon Aug 17 2015 14:52 pm
From: karlson3 AT comcast.net
 
Noah and all:
this is an adult Spotted Sandpiper transitioning to nonbreeding plumage. Common Sandpiper averages longer tailed, although some Spotted's can have longer tails than depicted in most guides. Your bird has a slightly decurved bill, which it typical of Spotted Sandpiper and not Common, which has a slightly longer and slightly more slender straight bill. Common also shows a duskier upper breast on average. No reason to suspect Common Sandpiper on this bird, and all of your behavioral observations occur in both species depending upon their moods or behavior. Kevin Karlson

----- Original Message -----

From: "Noah Arthur"
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 2015 11:30:11 PM
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Common Sandpiper candidate in New Mexico

A couple hours ago, in fading light, I photographed a most unusual Actitis
sandpiper at a pond in Las Cruces, New Mexico. I first noticed it as a very
dark-backed Actitis that looked long, tall, and attenuated; structurally
very like Solitary Sandpiper. I kept having to look closely at the bird
again prove to myself that I wasn't watching a Solitary. It almost never
noticeably teetered its rear end, and often craned its neck far forward,
recalling Upland Sandpiper!

Some bad pics including a spread underwing video-grab:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

I'll try to get the full videos uploaded soon. I want to get the word out
as fast as possible if this bird looks good... So what do you think, is
this a good candidate for Common Sandpiper?

Noah Arthur, Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Common Sandpiper candidate in New Mexico
Date: Sun Aug 16 2015 0:43 am
From: jsterling AT wavecable.com
 
tail is too short for a Common Sandpiper

John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695
530 908-3836
jsterling@wavecable.com
www.sterlingbirds.com

Monterey Seabirds
www.montereyseabirds.com
(831) 375-4658


> On Aug 15, 2015, at 8:30 PM, Noah Arthur wrote:
>
> A couple hours ago, in fading light, I photographed a most unusual Actitis
> sandpiper at a pond in Las Cruces, New Mexico. I first noticed it as a very
> dark-backed Actitis that looked long, tall, and attenuated; structurally
> very like Solitary Sandpiper. I kept having to look closely at the bird
> again prove to myself that I wasn't watching a Solitary. It almost never
> noticeably teetered its rear end, and often craned its neck far forward,
> recalling Upland Sandpiper!
>
> Some bad pics including a spread underwing video-grab:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> I'll try to get the full videos uploaded soon. I want to get the word out
> as fast as possible if this bird looks good... So what do you think, is
> this a good candidate for Common Sandpiper?
>
> Noah Arthur, Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE
>
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Common Sandpiper candidate in New Mexico
Date: Sat Aug 15 2015 23:19 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
A couple hours ago, in fading light, I photographed a most unusual Actitis
sandpiper at a pond in Las Cruces, New Mexico. I first noticed it as a very
dark-backed Actitis that looked long, tall, and attenuated; structurally
very like Solitary Sandpiper. I kept having to look closely at the bird
again prove to myself that I wasn't watching a Solitary. It almost never
noticeably teetered its rear end, and often craned its neck far forward,
recalling Upland Sandpiper!

Some bad pics including a spread underwing video-grab:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

I'll try to get the full videos uploaded soon. I want to get the word out
as fast as possible if this bird looks good... So what do you think, is
this a good candidate for Common Sandpiper?

Noah Arthur, Oakland, CA/Lincoln, NE

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Mystery bird from Colorado in May
Date: Sat Aug 15 2015 19:15 pm
From: quetzal65 AT comcast.net
 
A friend photographed a bird back on May 9, 2015, that we thought at the time was a female Scott's Oriole, which would be rare at that location (Hasty Campground below the Arkansas River dam at John Martin Reservoir State Park, in Bent County,, southeastern Colorado). We did not see it well in the field so we are relying on this one photograph to document the identification. In preparing to submit the record to the Colorado Bird Records Committee, I find myself questioning the ID of Scott's Oriole. But if not that, then what is it? I am stumped. Any suggestions? The photo is at http://www.pbase.com/quetzal/i...

Nick Komar
Fort Collins CO

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: Paul R Wood/UK/TLS/PwC is out of the office.
Date: Sat Aug 8 2015 2:52 am
From: paul.r.wood AT uk.pwc.com
 
I will be out of the office from 07/08/2015 until 10/08/2015.

I will respond to your message when I return.




Note: This is an automated response to your message BIRDWG01 Digest - 6 Aug
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Subject: Birding Images in 3D
Date: Fri Aug 7 2015 2:42 am
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
Hi Mark,



Thanks for the response.



The Purpose

There are multiple uses for 3D models but I’ll briefly discuss two that interest me at the moment.



Gestalt

When trying to measure size and shape from 2D images we constantly run into the problem of perspective foreshortening. Accurate 3D models allow us to manipulate a model to align it for measurement. In birding we often talk about primary projection, eye/bill ratios, tibia/tarsus ratios and so on. In recent postings on the blog I outlined in turn why each of these is seriously problematic. A 3D model gives us a much clearer appreciation of the relative proportions of things and also opens up the possibility of accurate comparative measurements being taken remotely.

For more see various postings below

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

http://birdingimagequalitytool...

http://birdingimagequalitytool...



Understanding Lighting

Lighting and shadows can cause a lot of confusion in terms of identification. A 3D model can be introduced to an artificial lighting environment where lighting can be played around with to try and replicate and explain the lighting in a specific context. This type of technology has been used in the past for example by Prof. Hany Farid of Darthmouth College to verify if an image is real or fake.

For more see this posting and related video.

http://birdingimagequalitytool...



Time Required

Modern computers can work through the calculations required for generate these models in a matter of minutes. Here is a rough idea of how long this particular model took.

2 minutes to download the software programmes

2 minutes to crop the images and upload to Visual SFM

1 minute to do a comparison of points in the images

1 minute to generate the point cloud

5 minutes to generate the mesh

Job done in under 10 minutes with minimal effort.



Depending on the size and complexity of the model it could take up to an hour to work through a highly complex model. The video of the rock linked to in the posting is a good example.

To give you another example. There are software programs that will break up a video into its frames and put the frames in a folder. This can be uploaded to Visual SFM and a 3D model can be created from the video file. This is not hard work!



Expense

If you own a camera currently this software is totally free. If you looked at the rock video linked from the posting it should be clear that there is no end to the fine detail and complexity that can be modelled.



Limitations with moving subjects

This is a first stab. I have no doubt that the results can be greatly improved upon. I think it is amazing that a 3D model can be generated from a series of stills of a moving subject and the more stills the better the model. The beauty of this technique is that it filters out mismatches so what we end up with is an average shape, average lighting and texture on our model. I look forward to more trails.



Regards



Mike O’Keeffe

Ireland









From: MBB22222@aol.com [mailto:MBB22222@aol.com]
Sent: 07 August 2015 06:40
To: okeeffeml@EIRCOM.NET; BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Birding Images in 3D



And what would be a purpose to use that? In the process many important details would be lost so it cannot be use for any serious purpose; perhaps some presentations to try impress the audience? Can the time spend to play with these applications be justified for this kind of results? Perhaps I am missing something? For example I see a purpose to scan bones and present a 3D model of the skeleton, or internal organs, etc. But these tasks require some serious, expensive equipment, not only software. Using photo camera to do a just a decent job would required literally hundreds if not thousands of photos to be taken of not moving bird (dead, stuffed) and cannot be done in the field for obvious reasons… I am sure many new things will happen in the future.



Kind regards,



Mark B Bartosik



In a message dated 8/6/2015 5:53:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time, okeeffeml@EIRCOM.NET writes:

Hi,



Ever wondered if it might be possible to create 3D models from your bird
images? Well it is! And guess what? The software solutions are free!

For more check out my blog.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ng-from-2d.html



Is this the future?



Regards



Mike O'Keeffe

Ireland


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Birding Images in 3D
Date: Fri Aug 7 2015 1:36 am
From: MBB22222 AT aol.com
 
And what would be a purpose to use that? In the process many important  
details would be lost so it cannot be use for any serious purpose; perhaps some
presentations to try impress the audience? Can the time spend to play with
these applications be justified for this kind of results? Perhaps I am
missing something? For example I see a purpose to scan bones and present a 3D
model of the skeleton, or internal organs, etc. But these tasks require
some serious, expensive equipment, not only software. Using photo camera to
do a just a decent job would required literally hundreds if not thousands of
photos to be taken of not moving bird (dead, stuffed) and cannot be done
in the field for obvious reasons… I am sure many new things will happen in
the future.

Kind regards,

Mark B Bartosik


In a message dated 8/6/2015 5:53:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
okeeffeml@EIRCOM.NET writes:

Hi,



Ever wondered if it might be possible to create 3D models from your bird
images? Well it is! And guess what? The software solutions are free!

For more check out my blog.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ng-from-2d.html



Is this the future?



Regards



Mike O'Keeffe

Ireland


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html



Subject: Birding Images in 3D
Date: Thu Aug 6 2015 18:41 pm
From: okeeffeml AT eircom.net
 
Hi,



Ever wondered if it might be possible to create 3D models from your bird
images? Well it is! And guess what? The software solutions are free!

For more check out my blog.



http://birdingimagequalitytool...
ng-from-2d.html



Is this the future?



Regards



Mike O'Keeffe

Ireland


Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...



Subject: "Buttons" the Passenger Pigeon -- perhaps not pure Passenger?
Date: Tue Jul 28 2015 14:33 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
Hi everyone. I was looking at some Passenger Pigeon photos today, and
noticed that the specimen named "Buttons" -- the last known wild Passenger
-- looks rather different from the other specimens and live photos. She's
dark and uniformly-colored on the foreparts, with a strong contrast between
the dark, grayish breast and pale belly. No photos of other Passengers seem
to show this contrast.

The pattern reminds me somewhat of Rock Pigeon. I wonder... Might "Buttons"
have been a RockXPassenger hybrid??

Here's a couple photos of the specimen:
http://www.birdzilla.com/blog/...
https://ohiohistory.files.word...

Noah Arthur, Oakland, CA

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archiv...


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