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Updated on July 20, 2017, 8:05 am

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20 Jul: @ 08:03:10 Re: Possible Common Ringed-plover? [julian hough]
20 Jul: @ 05:08:05 Re: Possible Common Ringed-plover? [Defos du rau Pierre]
20 Jul: @ 04:34:31 Re: Possible Common Ringed-plover? [CROCHET Pierre Andre]
20 Jul: @ 03:03:41  Possible Common Ringed-plover? [Noah Arthur]
17 Jul: @ 21:05:14 Re: Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's Thrush Hybrid [Alvaro Jaramillo]
17 Jul: @ 19:28:28  Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's Thrush Hybrid [Ron Pittaway]
15 Jul: @ 13:31:54 Re: Pochard-type duck from Kansas [Colin Bradshaw]
13 Jul: @ 10:50:07  Pochard-type duck from Kansas [Will Chatfield-Taylor]
02 Jul: @ 13:11:40 Re: possible hybrid Snowy x Little Egret in Connecticut [Alvaro Jaramillo]
02 Jul: @ 12:45:59  possible hybrid Snowy x Little Egret in Connecticut [Nick Bonomo]
16 Jun: @ 11:31:17 Re: Stint ID help [Will Chatfield-Taylor]
16 Jun: @ 10:24:12 Re: Stint ID help [julian hough]
16 Jun: @ 10:18:26 Re: Stint ID help [Tony Leukering]
16 Jun: @ 09:56:47 Re: Stint ID help [Steve Hampton]
16 Jun: @ 09:31:14  Stint ID help [Will Chatfield-Taylor]





Subject: Possible Common Ringed-plover?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 8:03 am
From: jrhough1 AT snet.net
 
Noah,



To me, the head shape, bill shapeand overall proportions fit Semipalmated. The stubby bill with the red restrictedto the basal third, the white frontal shield not really extending down underthe eye, narrow breast band and a narrow, but clearly yellow orbital ring allexclude Common Ringed Plover.



Some birds are clearly tough,and there is variation in many features such as upperpart color, judging breastband, obviousness of the white post-ocular super, etc .
The oft-cited difference in loral pattern (first described in Birding World byKillian Mullarney) is not shown on this bird and is useful when dealing withjuveniles and I don™t believe there™s a solid and consistent difference whendealing with adults, but I could be wrong.



To me, any adult or juvenile birdshowing a narrow yellow orbital ring would cause me to move on from consideringCommon Ringed. However, it is worth noting that adult Common Ringed often showa swollen and clearly yellow orbital ring during the early spring, presumably resultingfrom high hormone levels linked to breeding.

Julian Hough New Haven, CT 06519www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com

On Thursday, July 20, 2017 4:03 AM, Noah Arthur wrote:


Among thousands of Western Sandpipers and smaller numbers of other
shorebirds in Alameda, CA, on the 18th was this female-type plover. The
dark lores are broad and extend down to, and even slightly below, the gape
of the bill... This is an oft-cited field mark for Common Ringed-plover,
but I'm hesitant to make that call... What do you all think?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Thanks!

Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA)
semirelicta@gmail.com
510-967-2179

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Possible Common Ringed-plover?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 5:08 am
From: pierre.defosdurau AT oncfs.gouv.fr
 
Dear all

Still from Europe, I would fully agree with the exotic feeling of your bird as written by Pierre-Andr Crochet. I would just complement his message with additional features that I tend to see on your bird and that do not stick with RingedP to my opinion: restricted dirty white supercilium and relatively thin regular black breast collar (not bulging on breast-sides).
regards

-------
Pierre Defos du Rau


-----Message d'origine-----
De: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] De la part de CROCHET Pierre Andre
Envoy: jeudi 20 juillet 2017 11:34
: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Objet: Re: [BIRDWG01] Possible Common Ringed-plover?

Dear Noah,

From a European perspective, this bird has a distinct exotic feeling and several characters I associate with Semipalmated, including the bill shape with short stubby tip and slightly upturned look, bill coloration with deep orange area restricted to the lower bill base, head shape with vertical forehead, and body shape with elongated read body. The head pattern seems also typical of Semipalmated (lots of dark and deep eye patch).

I might want to see the palmation or hear it call to claim it in Europe of course :). But I would clearly not claim it as Ringed in North America.

Hope this helps

Pierre

Pierre-Andr Crochet
CNRS-UMR5175 CEFE
Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
1919, route de Mende
34293 Montpellier cedex 5
France
Tel: +33467 61 32 98
Fax: +33467 61 33 36
Mobile: +33607 32 60 75

-----Message d'origine-----
De: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] De la part de Noah Arthur
Envoy: jeudi 20 juillet 2017 10:03
: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Objet: [BIRDWG01] Possible Common Ringed-plover?

Among thousands of Western Sandpipers and smaller numbers of other
shorebirds in Alameda, CA, on the 18th was this female-type plover. The
dark lores are broad and extend down to, and even slightly below, the gape
of the bill... This is an oft-cited field mark for Common Ringed-plover,
but I'm hesitant to make that call... What do you all think?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Thanks!

Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA)
semirelicta@gmail.com
510-967-2179

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Possible Common Ringed-plover?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 4:34 am
From: Pierre-andre.CROCHET AT cefe.cnrs.fr
 
Dear Noah,

From a European perspective, this bird has a distinct exotic feeling and several characters I associate with Semipalmated, including the bill shape with short stubby tip and slightly upturned look, bill coloration with deep orange area restricted to the lower bill base, head shape with vertical forehead, and body shape with elongated read body. The head pattern seems also typical of Semipalmated (lots of dark and deep eye patch).

I might want to see the palmation or hear it call to claim it in Europe of course :). But I would clearly not claim it as Ringed in North America.

Hope this helps

Pierre

Pierre-Andr Crochet
CNRS-UMR5175 CEFE
Centre d™Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
1919, route de Mende
34293 Montpellier cedex 5
France
Tel: +33467 61 32 98
Fax: +33467 61 33 36
Mobile: +33607 32 60 75

-----Message d'origine-----
De: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] De la part de Noah Arthur
Envoy: jeudi 20 juillet 2017 10:03
: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Objet: [BIRDWG01] Possible Common Ringed-plover?

Among thousands of Western Sandpipers and smaller numbers of other
shorebirds in Alameda, CA, on the 18th was this female-type plover. The
dark lores are broad and extend down to, and even slightly below, the gape
of the bill... This is an oft-cited field mark for Common Ringed-plover,
but I'm hesitant to make that call... What do you all think?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Thanks!

Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA)
semirelicta@gmail.com
510-967-2179

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Possible Common Ringed-plover?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 3:03 am
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
Among thousands of Western Sandpipers and smaller numbers of other
shorebirds in Alameda, CA, on the 18th was this female-type plover. The
dark lores are broad and extend down to, and even slightly below, the gape
of the bill... This is an oft-cited field mark for Common Ringed-plover,
but I'm hesitant to make that call... What do you all think?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Thanks!

Noah Arthur (Oakland, CA)
semirelicta@gmail.com
510-967-2179

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's Thrush Hybrid
Date: Mon Jul 17 2017 21:05 pm
From: chucao AT coastside.net
 
All,
You can download the article here
http://www.ace-eco.org/vol12/i...
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro@alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ron Pittaway
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 5:27 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's Thrush Hybrid

FitzGerald et al (2017) report that a putative Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's
Thrush hybrid was captured in southern Labrador: "We also found that the
degree of genetic divergence within Gray-cheeked Thrushes was similar to
that found in Bicknell's Thrushes, and that these two species are divergent
from one another at a deeper level, with the important exception of one
putative hybrid individual that we captured in southern Labrador. This bird
was phenotypically a Gray-cheeked Thrush, but possessed a Bicknell's Thrush
mitochondrial haplotype. At the nuclear FIB7 intron, the putative hybrid
possessed a T allele that had a frequency of 0.014 in Gray-cheeked Thrush
(including the putative hybrid) and 0.886 in Bicknell's Thrush, suggesting
that the heterozygosity at this site may be due to hybridization rather than
retained ancestral polymorphism. The mitochondrial haplotype of the putative
hybrid from southern Labrador, the allele frequency distributions of FIB7,
and the fact that all heterozygous Bicknell's Thrushes were sampled in the
northern reaches of that species' range suggest that occasional
hybridization may occur where their ranges abut along the north shore of the
Gulf of St. Lawrence or on islands around Nova Scotia and in the gulf, as
suggested by Marshall (2001). The geographic boundaries of the breeding
ranges of these two species are not clearly established and they may have
been separated by less than 60 km along the north shore of the Gulf of
St.Lawrence in the past century (Marshall 2001) before the breeding range of
Bicknell's Thrush became more restricted (Ouellet 1993, COSEWIC 2009)."

Subspecies: The authors also report that "Our results support previous
designations of C. m. minimus from Newfoundland and southeastern Labrador as
a subspecies distinct from C. m. aliciae found further west."

Literature Cited: FitzGerald, A.M., D.M. Whitaker, J. Ralston, J.J.Kirchman,
and I.G. Warkentin. 2017. Taxonomy and distribution of the imperiled
Newfoundland Gray-cheeked Thrush, Catharus minimus minimus. Avian
Conservation and Ecology 12(1):10.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's Thrush Hybrid
Date: Mon Jul 17 2017 19:28 pm
From: jeaniron AT sympatico.ca
 
FitzGerald et al (2017) report that a putative Gray-cheeked x Bicknell's
Thrush hybrid was captured in southern Labrador: "We also found that the
degree of genetic divergence within Gray-cheeked Thrushes was similar to
that found in Bicknell's Thrushes, and that these two species are divergent
from one another at a deeper level, with the important exception of one
putative hybrid individual that we captured in southern Labrador. This bird
was phenotypically a Gray-cheeked Thrush, but possessed a Bicknell's Thrush
mitochondrial haplotype. At the nuclear FIB7 intron, the putative hybrid
possessed a T allele that had a frequency of 0.014 in Gray-cheeked Thrush
(including the putative hybrid) and 0.886 in Bicknell's Thrush, suggesting
that the heterozygosity at this site may be due to hybridization rather than
retained ancestral polymorphism. The mitochondrial haplotype of the putative
hybrid from southern Labrador, the allele frequency distributions of FIB7,
and the fact that all heterozygous Bicknell's Thrushes were sampled in the
northern reaches of that species' range suggest that occasional
hybridization may occur where their ranges abut along the north shore of the
Gulf of St. Lawrence or on islands around Nova Scotia and in the gulf, as
suggested by Marshall (2001). The geographic boundaries of the breeding
ranges of these two species are not clearly established and they may have
been separated by less than 60 km along the north shore of the Gulf of
St.Lawrence in the past century (Marshall 2001) before the breeding range of
Bicknell's Thrush became more restricted (Ouellet 1993, COSEWIC 2009)."

Subspecies: The authors also report that "Our results support previous
designations of C. m. minimus from Newfoundland and southeastern Labrador as
a subspecies distinct from C. m. aliciae found further west."

Literature Cited: FitzGerald, A.M., D.M. Whitaker, J. Ralston, J.J.Kirchman,
and I.G. Warkentin. 2017. Taxonomy and distribution of the imperiled
Newfoundland Gray-cheeked Thrush, Catharus minimus minimus. Avian
Conservation and Ecology 12(1):10.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Pochard-type duck from Kansas
Date: Sat Jul 15 2017 13:31 pm
From: drcolbradshaw AT gmail.com
 
difficult to say with this quality ogf image but, as a UK birder, it
doesn't look like a pochard to me

On 13 July 2017 at 16:49, Will Chatfield-Taylor
wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> I found this duck at Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area in May 2016. The odd
> marking at the base of the bill caught my attention, as it reminded me of a
> Common Pochard™s bill. When compared to a Redhead, the head shape seems off
> as well. The eye doesn™t appear to be dark either. I™ve shown this to
> several very experienced birders, and nobody has been able to determine
> what it is: a Pochard, Redhead, hybrid, or something else entirely.
>
> I™ve attached a link to a photo, one of which has been brightened to bring
> out more detail.
>
> I™m very curious as to what this is.
>
> Thank you for your help.
>
> Will Chatfield-Taylor,
>
> Palm City, FL
>
> http://www.livingworldphotogra...
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Pochard-type duck from Kansas
Date: Thu Jul 13 2017 10:50 am
From: wchatfieldtaylor AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

I found this duck at Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Area in May 2016. The odd marking at the base of the bill caught my attention, as it reminded me of a Common Pochard’s bill. When compared to a Redhead, the head shape seems off as well. The eye doesn’t appear to be dark either. I’ve shown this to several very experienced birders, and nobody has been able to determine what it is: a Pochard, Redhead, hybrid, or something else entirely.

I’ve attached a link to a photo, one of which has been brightened to bring out more detail.

I’m very curious as to what this is.

Thank you for your help.

Will Chatfield-Taylor,

Palm City, FL

http://www.livingworldphotogra...
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: possible hybrid Snowy x Little Egret in Connecticut
Date: Sun Jul 2 2017 13:11 pm
From: chucao AT coastside.net
 
Nick 
For what it's worth, when I used to visit Antigua (Lesser Antilles) we found numbers of Little Egrets there. Eventually these were confirmed to be breeding there. But in with the Littles we found several of these Snowy with long plumed birds. Given the setup there, I am pretty confident these birds were hybrids. But like you mention, other features were Snowy like. I think that on the whole the hybrids look Snowy like on facial features, it is the intermediate head plumes that give them away. I bet that many if not most of these long plumed birds that people see on the Atlantic Coast are hybrids. There are likely more Little Egrets breeding in the Americas than we realize and they are not always finding Little Egrets to nest with.
Regards
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro@alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Nick Bonomo
Sent: Sunday, July 2, 2017 10:45 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] possible hybrid Snowy x Little Egret in Connecticut

Every now and then a Snowy Egret with a long Little Egret-like head plume or two is seen in the northeast USA (and elsewhere?). Generally, to my eyes, these have appeared to be Snowy Egrets in every other way, so I have thought them to more likely be aberrant SNEGs than hybrids.
I saw one such bird in CT last summer. I believe these birds have been discussed on this forum in the past, if memory serves.

Yesterday I had a single-plumed bird in CT that showed secondary features possibly anomalous with Snowy Egret, perhaps hinting more strongly at a hybrid SNEGxLIEG. These included darker-than-typical lores, the impression of a more dagger-like head/bill combo from most angles, less recurved rear body plumes and a less prominent mane from which the single long plume arises.

The photos are not good, but what I have are posted at the link below.
An interesting bird.

http://www.shorebirder.com/201...


Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: possible hybrid Snowy x Little Egret in Connecticut
Date: Sun Jul 2 2017 12:45 pm
From: nbonomo AT gmail.com
 
Every now and then a Snowy Egret with a long Little Egret-like head
plume or two is seen in the northeast USA (and elsewhere?). Generally,
to my eyes, these have appeared to be Snowy Egrets in every other way,
so I have thought them to more likely be aberrant SNEGs than hybrids.
I saw one such bird in CT last summer. I believe these birds have been
discussed on this forum in the past, if memory serves.

Yesterday I had a single-plumed bird in CT that showed secondary
features possibly anomalous with Snowy Egret, perhaps hinting more
strongly at a hybrid SNEGxLIEG. These included darker-than-typical
lores, the impression of a more dagger-like head/bill combo from most
angles, less recurved rear body plumes and a less prominent mane from
which the single long plume arises.

The photos are not good, but what I have are posted at the link below.
An interesting bird.

http://www.shorebirder.com/201...


Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 11:31 am
From: wchatfieldtaylor AT gmail.com
 
Thank you all for your input. I appreciate getting a firm ID on this finally. Western Sandpiper it is.

Will Chatfield-Taylor



> On Jun 16, 2017, at 11:20 AM, julian hough wrote:
>
> Will,
>
> The chevron-like markings on the carpal area and some finer, hair-like streaks on the rear flanks don™t jive with Little Stint. Combined with the overall jizz. and the length, shape and thickness of the bill (again bad for Little Stint) these points favor a dull Western Sandpiper. While subjective in a still image, the fact that the bird is belly deep in water also hints at a more Western Sandpiper-like feeding behavior.
>
> Regards,
>
> Julian
>
> Julian Hough New Haven, CT 06519
> www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com
>
>
> On Friday, June 16, 2017 10:31 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor wrote:
>
>
> Hi All,
>
> This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern, bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight. Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.
>
> If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.
>
> All photos are found at the following link:
>
>
> http://www.livingworldphotogra...
>
>
> Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern better if they would help.
>
> Will Chatfield-Taylor
>
> Palm City, FL
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 10:24 am
From: jrhough1 AT snet.net
 
Will,
The chevron-like markings on the carpal area and some finer, hair-like streaks on the rear flanks don™t jive with Little Stint. Combined with the overall jizz. and the length, shape and thickness of the bill (again bad for Little Stint) these points favor a dull Western Sandpiper. While subjective in a still image, the fact that the bird is belly deep in water also hints at a more Western Sandpiper-like feeding behavior.
Regards,
JulianJulian Hough New Haven, CT 06519www.naturescapeimages.wordpress.com

On Friday, June 16, 2017 10:31 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor wrote:


Hi All,

This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern, bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight. Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.

If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.

All photos are found at the following link:


http://www.livingworldphotogra...


Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern better if they would help.

Will Chatfield-Taylor

Palm City, FL

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 10:18 am
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I also see no suggestion of Little Stint's white braces.

Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
www.aba.org/photoquiz/
www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com

> On Jun 16, 2017, at 09:55, Steve Hampton wrote:
>
> The primary extension rules out stints. The bill shape and size, and
> indeed the plumage, seem fine for Western Sandpiper to me.
>
>
>
> On Fri, Jun 16, 2017 at 7:19 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor <
> wchatfieldtaylor@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I
>> tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern,
>> bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas
>> determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but
>> couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field
>> notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a
>> quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight.
>> Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and
>> if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little
>> Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated
>> Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow
>> in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting
>> that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.
>>
>> If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.
>>
>> All photos are found at the following link:
>>
>>
>> http://www.livingworldphotogra...
>>
>>
>> Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can
>> to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern
>> better if they would help.
>>
>> Will Chatfield-Taylor
>>
>> Palm City, FL
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 9:56 am
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
The primary extension rules out stints.  The bill shape and size, and
indeed the plumage, seem fine for Western Sandpiper to me.



On Fri, Jun 16, 2017 at 7:19 AM, Will Chatfield-Taylor <
wchatfieldtaylor@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I
> tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern,
> bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas
> determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but
> couldn™t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field
> notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a
> quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ˜tit-tit-tit™ call in flight.
> Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and
> if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little
> Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated
> Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow
> in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting
> that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.
>
> If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.
>
> All photos are found at the following link:
>
>
> http://www.livingworldphotogra...
>
>
> Thank you very much in advance, and I™ll answer as many questions as I can
> to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern
> better if they would help.
>
> Will Chatfield-Taylor
>
> Palm City, FL
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Stint ID help
Date: Fri Jun 16 2017 9:31 am
From: wchatfieldtaylor AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

This bird was seen on some marshy mud flats in Pahoke, FL on 5/28/2017. I tentatively identified it as a possible Little Stint based on head pattern, bill shape, and feather pattern. Mark Robbins of the University of Kansas determined that it was either a Little Stint or a Least Sandpiper, but couldn’t make a definitive determination based on photos alone. My field notes indicated that the legs were black, and that the bird fed with a quick bobbing motion. It also gave a rapid ‘tit-tit-tit’ call in flight. Mark suggested that I submit it here to see what you all have to say, and if there is enough in this photo to definitively say that it is a Little Stint (or something else). Morphometrics were used to rule out Semipalmated Sandpiper and Red-necked Stint. Photo enhancement shows no sign of yellow in the small bit of the tibia that can be seen in the photos, suggesting that at least the upper parts of the tibia are black as well.

If confirmed, this would be the first record of Little Stint for Florida.

All photos are found at the following link:


http://www.livingworldphotogra...


Thank you very much in advance, and I’ll answer as many questions as I can to help. I also have some lightened versions that show the face pattern better if they would help.

Will Chatfield-Taylor

Palm City, FL

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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