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Updated on November 30, 2016, 12:15 am

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30 Nov: @ 00:14:54  Fw: Possible "Kamchatka" Mew Gull - Oregon coast [Russ Namitz]
29 Nov: @ 16:20:29 Re: Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question [Lethaby, Nick]
29 Nov: @ 15:14:53 Re: Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question [Tony Leukering]
29 Nov: @ 14:46:06  Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question [Brian Sullivan]
25 Nov: @ 15:08:09  Is this a Chandeleur Gull? + barred feathers in gull tails [00000067ff284309-dmarc-request]





Subject: Fw: Possible "Kamchatka" Mew Gull - Oregon coast
Date: Wed Nov 30 2016 0:14 am
From: namitzr AT hotmail.com
 
Hi folks~


I photographed a possible "Kamchatka" Mew Gull at the St Helens (Oregon) sewage ponds. What caught my attention was the longer bill and pale eye on this bird. The blurry photograph shows the outer two primaries (p10 & p9) with large white mirrors, but next one (p8) is mostly black which is a good characteristic for this east Asian subspecies. The only thing that bothers me is the amount of streaking around the head/neck/shoulders and the fact that it is not as extensive or coarse as I would like to see.


Photos are in my eBird checklist.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


Comments welcome.


Good birding,

Russ Namitz

Medford, OR

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question
Date: Tue Nov 29 2016 16:20 pm
From: nlethaby AT ti.com
 
FWIW, my impression is that Temminck's (Japanese) Cormorants also molt the head and neck in winter as they acquire a much more extensive white throat. I initially thought the extensive white on the throat was a sign of immature birds but pretty much all birds seemed to show it in winter. I can't comment if the molt is just confined to the head and neck or more extensive.

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Tony Leukering
Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2016 1:15 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question

All:


At Richard Crossley's suggestion a number of years ago, I have been paying more attention to winter-season Double-crests. He wondered as Brian did, because he could find no dark-necked birds at that season. Granted, spring for DCCOs comes quite early, with migrants on the move in February and with breeding adults here in Florida on nests by Feb, but in the period Nov-Dec, I, too, have not been able to find dark-necked DCCOs outside of a few non-glossy, dark-necked birds in Monterey last year. I have looked in Cape May, Florida, and Texas. I think that this subject deserves some focused effort.


Tony


Tony Leukering
Largo, FL
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/t...

http://aba.org/photoquiz/



-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Sullivan
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Tue, Nov 29, 2016 3:46 pm
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question

Hi All,

I've been looking at cormorants pretty carefully the past bunch of years, and I'm wondering about adult basic Double-crested Cormorant plumages. I have been unable to find any that are truly glossy black-necked in fall.
When I look at a bunch of cormorants this time of year, the adults have blackish necks that lack gloss, and many even show brownish-black necks at this time of year. Looking at molt sequences in the wings, these are not 2nd-winter birds--and there are too many for that solution to make sense.
Are others seeing glossy black-necked adults at this time of year (outside of Florida)? I'm wondering if the prealternate molt on adults includes the entire head and neck, as I don't see how these birds would get back to the glossy breeding state without this process. Ideas welcome, and especially evidence of glossy black-necked basic birds at this time of year!

Thanks

Brian

--
==========

*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/B...
-------------------------------

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question
Date: Tue Nov 29 2016 15:14 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All:


At Richard Crossley's suggestion a number of years ago, I have been paying more attention to winter-season Double-crests. He wondered as Brian did, because he could find no dark-necked birds at that season. Granted, spring for DCCOs comes quite early, with migrants on the move in February and with breeding adults here in Florida on nests by Feb, but in the period Nov-Dec, I, too, have not been able to find dark-necked DCCOs outside of a few non-glossy, dark-necked birds in Monterey last year. I have looked in Cape May, Florida, and Texas. I think that this subject deserves some focused effort.


Tony


Tony Leukering
Largo, FL
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/t...

http://aba.org/photoquiz/



-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Sullivan
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Tue, Nov 29, 2016 3:46 pm
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question

Hi All,

I've been looking at cormorants pretty carefully the past bunch of years,
and I'm wondering about adult basic Double-crested Cormorant plumages. I
have been unable to find any that are truly glossy black-necked in fall.
When I look at a bunch of cormorants this time of year, the adults have
blackish necks that lack gloss, and many even show brownish-black necks at
this time of year. Looking at molt sequences in the wings, these are not
2nd-winter birds--and there are too many for that solution to make sense.
Are others seeing glossy black-necked adults at this time of year (outside
of Florida)? I'm wondering if the prealternate molt on adults includes the
entire head and neck, as I don't see how these birds would get back to the
glossy breeding state without this process. Ideas welcome, and especially
evidence of glossy black-necked basic birds at this time of year!

Thanks

Brian

--
==========

*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/B...
-------------------------------

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: Basic adult Double-crested Cormorants -- a question
Date: Tue Nov 29 2016 14:46 pm
From: heraldpetrel AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

I've been looking at cormorants pretty carefully the past bunch of years,
and I'm wondering about adult basic Double-crested Cormorant plumages. I
have been unable to find any that are truly glossy black-necked in fall.
When I look at a bunch of cormorants this time of year, the adults have
blackish necks that lack gloss, and many even show brownish-black necks at
this time of year. Looking at molt sequences in the wings, these are not
2nd-winter birds--and there are too many for that solution to make sense.
Are others seeing glossy black-necked adults at this time of year (outside
of Florida)? I'm wondering if the prealternate molt on adults includes the
entire head and neck, as I don't see how these birds would get back to the
glossy breeding state without this process. Ideas welcome, and especially
evidence of glossy black-necked basic birds at this time of year!

Thanks

Brian

--
==========

*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/B...
-------------------------------

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Is this a Chandeleur Gull? + barred feathers in gull tails
Date: Fri Nov 25 2016 15:08 pm
From: 00000067ff284309-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Hi All,

I found an interesting gull on October 29 when taking routine trip around
the Galveston Bay in Texas. In fact I founded it twice during that day in
two different places – and no, I did not try to re-find it; it was purely
accidental.

When searching the internet I found a couple of notes showing that this
gull was seen already once (on October 12) and a few photos were posted with
label “Chandeleur Gull” but no comments and on another site was mentioned
as a “Chandeleur Gull candidate”; again no comments.

A few years ago I “gave up” on gulls as I decided to follow just a few
species, mostly banded individuals due to limited time available. I am not
aware about any published work after breeding colonies of American Herring and
Kelp Gulls disappeared after hurricane Katrina from Chandeleur Islands.

So here is series of photos showing the gull described somewhere else as a
Chandeleur Gull I took on October 29 that are including more details
compare to those previously posted; including open wing shots and single mirror
on p10.

According to published data Kelp x Herring hybrids sport Kelp like bills –
perhaps further inbreeding ended up with reducing bill size.

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image... resting
http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image... resting

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image... close up head, eye, legs
http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image...

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image... on the wing; p10 mirror
http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image...
http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image...

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image... bill vs. LBBG vs. AHGU vs. KELP


I would like to point out one more Kelp type gull from eight years ago. It
was seen from November 8 to December 24, 2008 and accepted as Kelp by TBRC
#2008-94. I photographed this gull on November 8, 2008 – here is a series
of photos:

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/quint...

Some people questioned the ID as pure Kelp but evidently the committee
decided to accept it as a Kelp Gull. This specimen had odd leg color and I also
see limited amount of streaking on head (some guides say that Kelp has
virtually no streaking on head all year around; whatever “virtually” means).
There is another interesting fact when comparing that gull with one
recently seen. Both are in very bad shape; with prebasic molt occurring very late
when comparing to other AHGUs and LBBGs that are about to complete it.
Also, knowing the history of hybrids in that region it seems that is more
probable to find a hybrid than pure Kelp around here and ID decision should be
very careful especially when dealing with specimen that does not sport all
traits perfectly.

I want to just add one more fact about the recent gull. It was seen at
least twice (on October 12 and 29) – during time when I recorded influx of
migrating Royal Terns (yes, I pay more attention to terns in the field)
including two banded individuals from Louisiana (banded not too far from
Chandeleur Islands.

See map and dates: http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image...

Not a proof but it is possible that this gull could as well came from that
region in migrating flocks. BTW all these hybrids from the past had to
move somewhere.

I would also appreciate argument why this individual (the recent one) could
not be LBBG x Herring hybrid (something known to occur); I see leg color
(should have some yellow) and single mirror could be possible traits against
but hoe variable these hybrids are?

At the end I just want to include a photo of the oddball with one ‘hawk
like’ barred feather in the tail. I found a few photos of gulls with fault
bars in the tail but those look different and impact the whole tail; this
feather seems to be narrower and short than other tail feathers. Were the
similar cases recorded? Any explanation offered?

http://www.pbase.com/mbb/image...

Cheers.

Mark B Bartosik

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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