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Updated on August 1, 2016, 10:15 pm

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01 Aug: @ 22:06:14  the tanager ( this link should work….) [Jeff Gilligan]
01 Aug: @ 18:20:17  608-16-07 Scarlet Tanager - Google Drive (I was told link didn't work) Here is one photo. [Jeff Gilligan]
01 Aug: @ 18:05:34  Scarlet Tanager ? Oregon [Jeff Gilligan]
21 Jul: @ 15:40:39 Re: I.d. of owl carcass? [Peter Wilkinson]
20 Jul: @ 21:52:33  I.d. of owl carcass? [Don Roberson]
20 Jul: @ 13:21:49 Re: Empid question [Jeff Gilligan]
20 Jul: @ 09:37:52 Re: Empid question [Steve Hampton]
20 Jul: @ 09:22:03  Empid question [Lethaby, Nick]
19 Jul: @ 18:47:42 Re: empid [Lethaby, Nick]





Subject: the tanager ( this link should work….)
Date: Mon Aug 1 2016 22:06 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
I apologize for the earlier attempts to  send the photos to Frontiers.  Apparently the site blocked them for some reason.  


The observers identified the bird as a female Scarlet Tanager. Below is the link to their ebird post.

I think they are correct based on the over-all greenish color, mostly dark bill, and very thin wing bars. Most in Oregon who have commented about the bird suggest that it is an unusually green Western Tanager, or that the photos are not good enough to make an identification. The Scarlet Tanager is a rarity to Oregon.

This might be appropriate to Frontiers because of the question of whether the wing bars are within the range of what a Scarlet Tanager can have, and whether a first summer Scarlet Tanager might be more likely to show some wing bars.

Comments? Photos to support conclusions?


Jeff Gilligan
Oregon



Begin forwarded message:
>
>
> Oregon2020--Indian Creek Harney, Harney, Oregon, US
> May 31, 2016 1:30 PM - 1:50 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 1 species
>
> Scarlet Tanager 1 Not sure if I have the location right but it was north of Andrews at one of the creeks bordered by willows. This bird was very green from head to rump and including breast. Gray wings and tail including underside. Faint wing bars and faint eye ring present. Bill was pale yellow peachy color and seemed slightly de-curved. Bird was vocalizing but sounded more warbler like than any tanager. In my recollection I have not seen another tanager that looked like this the best I could come up with using references was a female scarlet tanager.
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
>


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: 608-16-07 Scarlet Tanager - Google Drive (I was told link didn't work) Here is one photo.
Date: Mon Aug 1 2016 18:20 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
Drive
.
Folder Path
My Drive
Voting: First Round BATCH 2
608-16-07 Scarlet Tanager
NEW
Folders and views
My DriveMy Drive
Shared with meShared with me
Google PhotosGoogle Photos
RecentRecent
StarredStarred
TrashTrash
Get Drive for Mac
634 MB of 15 GB used
Upgrade storage
NAME
Files
.


608-16-07SCTA.docx


608-16-07f.jpg


608-16-07e.jpg


608-16-07d.jpg


608-16-07c.jpg


608-16-07b.jpg


608-16-07a.jpg


608-16-07 photos.rtf


608-16-07b.jpg
Open with
6 of 8 items



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Scarlet Tanager ? Oregon
Date: Mon Aug 1 2016 18:05 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
https://drive.google.com/drive...

All

Hopefully the attachment can be opened by those interested. The observers identified the bird as a female Scarlet Tanager.

I think they are correct based on the over-all greenish color, mostly dark bill, and very thin wing bars. Most in Oregon who have commented about the bird suggest that it is an unusually green Western Tanager, or that the photos are not good enough to make an identification. The Scarlet Tanager is a rarity to Oregon.

This might be appropriate to Frontiers because of the question of whether the wing bars are within the range of what a Scarlet Tanager can have, and whether a first summer Scarlet Tanager might be more likely to show some wing bars.

Comments? Photos to support conclusions?


Jeff Gilligan
Oregon
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: I.d. of owl carcass?
Date: Thu Jul 21 2016 15:40 pm
From: pjw42 AT waitrose.com
 
Hi All,

It's a Long-eared Owl. Size, wing formula and look at those lovely
flashes on the outer primaries. The Slater Museum collection shows the
wing differences nicely.

Hoping I haven't missed something!

Peter
Herts, England

On Wed, 2016-07-20 at 19:52 -0700, Don Roberson wrote:
> Do any of you have expertise in identifying an owl carcass? If so, please look at the eBird checklist linking to this local post
>
> > I collected and cleaned the carcass this morning. The 'long ears' were still intact once cleaned. Photos of head, feet, wing, tail added to http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> > A Long-eard Owl indeed.
> > We can only imagine what route it took. Lost and died at sea? Washed down the Pajaro River?
> >
>
> > Don Glasco. Seaside, CA
> >
> > On Jul 18, 2016, at 05:50 PM, Donald Glasco > wrote:
> >
> >> We can narrow down to an owl. Lotsa feathers on head covering an all dark bill. I looked at many pics of feet; feet/claws match owl better than a hawk.
> >> Clay Kempf suggests a Great-horned.
> >> There was no suggestion of long ear feathers, ala LEOW or GHOW, but those could have been lost.
> >>
> >> I measured a wingspan of 36-37".
> >> Per Sibley, wingspans of pertinent owls are
> >> LEOW 36"
> >> SEOW 38"
> >> BAOW 42" (Note: beak color is white or pink or light yellow - not dark)
> >> GHOW 44"
> >>
> >> No telling where it came from. If it was washed up from the bay, it would have died at sea north of Pajaro. Or it could have floated down the Pajaro River. It was within 10-15m of the south bank of the river, but 100-125 m from shoreline but within high tide wrack line.
>
> This carcass collected near the high tide wrack at Pajaro River (which forms of the boundary of between Santa Cruz and Monterey Co.). The ebird list is
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> with photos. Collector identifies it as Long-eared -- and maybe it is (but that is rare here) -- while I cannot find a clear character to eliminate Great Horned Owl (common here). So I could use some actual expertise on the topic.
>
> Thanks, Don Roberson
> Monterey County records compiler
> http://creagrus.home.montereyb...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: I.d. of owl carcass?
Date: Wed Jul 20 2016 21:52 pm
From: creagrus AT montereybay.com
 
Do any of you have expertise in identifying an owl carcass? If so, please look at the eBird checklist linking to this local post

> I collected and cleaned the carcass this morning. The 'long ears' were still intact once cleaned. Photos of head, feet, wing, tail added to http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> A Long-eard Owl indeed.=20
> We can only imagine what route it took. Lost and died at sea? Washed down the Pajaro River?
>

> Don Glasco. Seaside, CA
> =20
> On Jul 18, 2016, at 05:50 PM, Donald Glasco =
wrote:
>
>> We can narrow down to an owl. Lotsa feathers on head covering an all dark bill. I looked at many pics of feet; feet/claws match owl better than a hawk.
>> Clay Kempf suggests a Great-horned.
>> There was no suggestion of long ear feathers, ala LEOW or GHOW, but those could have been lost.
>>
>> I measured a wingspan of 36-37".
>> Per Sibley, wingspans of pertinent owls are
>> LEOW 36"
>> SEOW 38"
>> BAOW 42" (Note: beak color is white or pink or light yellow - not dark)
>> GHOW 44"
>>
>> No telling where it came from. If it was washed up from the bay, it would have died at sea north of Pajaro. Or it could have floated down the Pajaro River. It was within 10-15m of the south bank of the river, but 100-125 m from shoreline but within high tide wrack line.

This carcass collected near the high tide wrack at Pajaro River (which forms of the boundary of between Santa Cruz and Monterey Co.). The ebird list is
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
with photos. Collector identifies it as Long-eared -- and maybe it is (but that is rare here) -- while I cannot find a clear character to eliminate Great Horned Owl (common here). So I could use some actual expertise on the topic.

Thanks, Don Roberson
Monterey County records compiler
http://creagrus.home.montereyb...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid question
Date: Wed Jul 20 2016 13:21 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
Yes - it looks like a Pacific slope to me as well.  I think of the eye-ring as being  American football-shaped.  The underparts color is fine for Pacific Slope.  The bill is long and the lower mandible is almost all yellow.

Jeff Gilligan

Oregon/Washington/Arizona


On Jul 20, 2016, at 7:37 AM, Steve Hampton wrote:

> It still seems like a Pac-slope to me, in color tone and teardrop eye
> ring. Perhaps the dark bill tip is just aberrant.
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 7:21 AM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
>
>> All,
>>
>> Here is the correct version of the empid id request from Hugh Ranson.
>> Apologies for the accidental post last night when I was replying to Hugh.
>> If you want to reply direct to Hugh, his e-mail is: zonetail@sbceo.org
>>
>>
>> All,
>>
>> Yesterday, 7/19/16, I came across a silent empidonax flycatcher in Rocky
>> Nook Park, coastal Santa Barbara County, California. It was in a riparian
>> area of oaks and sycamores. The expected species here is Pacific-slope
>> Flycatcher (they breed at this location), and any other empid in mid-July
>> would be quite unexpected. As soon as I saw the bird's dusky-tipped lower
>> mandible, I started taking pictures. Unfortunately the bird only stuck
>> around for 15 seconds or so before disappearing. I have included the best 4
>> pictures on my Flickr site:
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>> http://www3.sbceo.org/web/services/go.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.flickr.com%2Fphotos%2Fzonetail%2F
>>>
>>
>> I have received several ideas as to the bird's identity but thought it best
>> to put the pictures out there for fresh discussion. I have not played with
>> the photos beyond cropping.
>>
>> Hugh Ranson
>> Santa Barbara
>>
>>
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: Empid question
Date: Wed Jul 20 2016 9:37 am
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
It still seems like a Pac-slope to me, in color tone and teardrop eye
ring. Perhaps the dark bill tip is just aberrant.



On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 7:21 AM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:

> All,
>
> Here is the correct version of the empid id request from Hugh Ranson.
> Apologies for the accidental post last night when I was replying to Hugh.
> If you want to reply direct to Hugh, his e-mail is: zonetail@sbceo.org
>
>
> All,
>
> Yesterday, 7/19/16, I came across a silent empidonax flycatcher in Rocky
> Nook Park, coastal Santa Barbara County, California. It was in a riparian
> area of oaks and sycamores. The expected species here is Pacific-slope
> Flycatcher (they breed at this location), and any other empid in mid-July
> would be quite unexpected. As soon as I saw the bird's dusky-tipped lower
> mandible, I started taking pictures. Unfortunately the bird only stuck
> around for 15 seconds or so before disappearing. I have included the best 4
> pictures on my Flickr site:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> http://www3.sbceo.org/web/services/go.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.flickr.com%2Fphotos%2Fzonetail%2F
> >
>
> I have received several ideas as to the bird's identity but thought it best
> to put the pictures out there for fresh discussion. I have not played with
> the photos beyond cropping.
>
> Hugh Ranson
> Santa Barbara
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdwg01.html



Subject: Empid question
Date: Wed Jul 20 2016 9:22 am
From: nlethaby AT ti.com
 
All,

Here is the correct version of the empid id request from Hugh Ranson. Apologies for the accidental post last night when I was replying to Hugh. If you want to reply direct to Hugh, his e-mail is: zonetail@sbceo.org


All,

Yesterday, 7/19/16, I came across a silent empidonax flycatcher in Rocky
Nook Park, coastal Santa Barbara County, California. It was in a riparian
area of oaks and sycamores. The expected species here is Pacific-slope
Flycatcher (they breed at this location), and any other empid in mid-July
would be quite unexpected. As soon as I saw the bird's dusky-tipped lower
mandible, I started taking pictures. Unfortunately the bird only stuck
around for 15 seconds or so before disappearing. I have included the best 4
pictures on my Flickr site:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

I have received several ideas as to the bird's identity but thought it best
to put the pictures out there for fresh discussion. I have not played with
the photos beyond cropping.

Hugh Ranson
Santa Barbara


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: empid
Date: Tue Jul 19 2016 18:47 pm
From: nlethaby AT ti.com
 
Sucks for you and your son. What a mess.

I was thinking on doing the hack up the Manzana this weekend but the weekend after would work too.

Would Thursday evening work? Aidan is going out to a movie that night so I am completely free (wife and daughter are in the UK).

Frontiers address is: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU

On the bright side, it seems that there has been a terrorist attack, a cop ambush, or the cops shooting an unarmed person today.

From: Hugh Ranson [mailto:hranson@goleta.k12.ca.us]
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 4:22 PM
To: Lethaby, Nick
Subject: Re: empid

Late in the day is fine with me.
A Manzana trip sounds like fun. My son has to have ear surgery (again!) soon, so my time is somewhat limited. Let me know when you might go.
I have posted to ID Frontiers before but can't remember how to do it. Any tips?
Hugh

On Tue, Jul 19, 2016 at 4:14 PM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
I can do this on weekend or a week day evening. I would prefer not do it at a time on the weekend that knocks out birding/butterfly activity, but am flexible on what your schedule allows.

I am kicking around doing a decent hike up the Manzana one day. Let me know if you are interested.

From: Hugh Ranson [mailto:hranson@goleta.k12.ca.us]
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 4:08 PM
To: Lethaby, Nick
Subject: Re: empid

One Vivid Dancer.
Perhaps this weekend on the photos? When is good for you?
Hugh

On Tue, Jul 19, 2016 at 11:19 AM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
What odes did you see?

Also when do you want to meet to do the photo caption review?

From: Hugh Ranson [mailto:hranson@goleta.k12.ca.us]
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 11:17 AM
To: Lethaby, Nick
Cc: David Compton; Peter Gaede; Wes Fritz
Subject: Re: empid

Just been out looking but with no success. It's already hot and the birds are very quiet. I did see one typical Pac-slope. By the way, there's a surprising amount of water in the creek bed. I left Bill Murdoch there looking.
Hugh

On Tue, Jul 19, 2016 at 11:07 AM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
I don’t agree that Least has a broad bill. Pac-slope has a much broader bill than Least. I am willing to buy that the angle of the photo is perhaps making the bill look narrower than it really is. Plumage-wise, the bird looks OK for a Pac-slope to me and odd for the others, but that could be a lighting effect.

From: David Compton [mailto:davcompton@verizon.net]
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 10:47 AM
To: Lethaby, Nick
Cc: Hugh Ranson; Peter Gaede; Wes Fritz
Subject: Re: empid

Bill looks long and narrow for Least to me, as Least bill is broad and not terribly long. Definitely not a Hammond's bill, and Hammond's/Dusky would be really strange for the date, as we all know. I agree with Peter. Certainly the eye ring looks Pac-slopish (to me) in the photos. Plumage looks mostly right, although the underparts are weird. I don't think the bill is so off for Pac-slope. I would say it's not a juv, as Hugh says.

I could be wrong, but I feel like there's enough to think it's the only expected empid at this location and date. If other photos or vocalizations prove otherwise, that will be great.

Dave

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 19, 2016, at 9:32 AM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
I think the bill shape looks better for Least than Hammond’s or Dusky in that it is somewhat concave.

From: Hugh Ranson [mailto:hranson@goleta.k12.ca.us]
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 9:05 AM
To: Lethaby, Nick
Cc: Peter Gaede; Dave Compton; Wes Fritz
Subject: Re: empid

The tail is pretty worn which would indicate adult, I think.

On Tue, Jul 19, 2016 at 8:50 AM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
The dingy appearance is Pac-slopish. I noticed on the photos seems to hint at spotting on the scapulars and was wondering if it might be a juv and that juvs could show a dusky bill tip.

From: Hugh Ranson [mailto:hranson@goleta.k12.ca.us]
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 8:48 AM
To: Lethaby, Nick
Cc: Peter Gaede; Dave Compton; Wes Fritz
Subject: Re: empid

I will go look again this morning after I drop Nico off. Peter thinks it's a good fit for Pac Slope, but the dusky-tipped bill would surely be an anomaly for that species. The bill seems too long for Hammond's. More to come...
Hugh

On Tue, Jul 19, 2016 at 8:35 AM, Lethaby, Nick wrote:
I took another look at this and cannot decide what it is. The lighting on the photo is too poor to really understand the colors and the angle on the primary projection may be foreshortening it. I would like to see a more obvious white throat to jump firmly in the Least camp. I am pretty certain the bill is too narrow for a Pac-slope, in addition to the dark tip. We are surely in the Least/Hammond’s/Dusky zone.

From: Hugh Ranson [mailto:hranson@goleta.k12.ca.us]
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2016 8:31 PM
To: Peter Gaede; Lethaby, Nick; Dave Compton; Wes Fritz
Subject: empid

Fellas,
I posted to sbcobirding but for some reason it hasn't appeared. Check out these photos of a briefly-seen and silent empid from Rocky Nook late this afternoon.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
Hugh






Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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