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Updated on January 14, 2018, 8:25 am

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14 Jan: @ 08:10:39 Re: Nebraska GWF Goose -- possible 'elgasi' or 'flavirostris'? [Clive Harris]
13 Jan: @ 23:55:55  Nebraska GWF Goose -- possible 'elgasi' or 'flavirostris'? [Noah Arthur]
13 Jan: @ 18:39:03  East Tennessee Canada Goose Subspecies? [Bates Estabrooks]
21 Dec: @ 05:04:32  Cuckoo in Africa [Robert H Davis]
20 Dec: @ 17:33:21 Re: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow [Alvaro Jaramillo]
20 Dec: @ 16:59:46 Re: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow [jkennedy366]
20 Dec: @ 16:14:55 Re: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow [Alvaro Jaramillo]
20 Dec: @ 15:56:06  Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow [Lethaby, Nick]
17 Dec: @ 16:05:05  Loon sp. at Pt. Pinos, Monterey County, California--16 December [Brian Sullivan]





Subject: Nebraska GWF Goose -- possible 'elgasi' or 'flavirostris'?
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 8:10 am
From: 00000464ec375886-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Noah
The bill on this bird looks quite long,a bit concave andwith a fairly extensive parallel-edged outer portion. This would fita N American form better than flavirostris which usually has a deeper and heftier-looking bill. Also the belly seems pale and the white flank stripe quite broader than would be typical for flavirostris.
I've found the topic of identifying GWFG to ssp very interesting from the of looking at usually lone birds here in the mid-Atlantic and wrote up some notes on this based on a couple of days in Ireland looking at flavirostris and visits to some collections. I'd appreciate any comments or observations people might have on this:
http://gwfgmdde.blogspot.com/2...
and also some notes on some birds from the mid-Atlantic:
http://gwfgmdde.blogspot.com/2...

Regards
Clive HarrisCabin John, MD

From: Noah Arthur
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Sunday, January 14, 2018 12:55 AM
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Nebraska GWF Goose -- possible 'elgasi' or 'flavirostris'?

This very dark-necked Greater White-fronted Goose was with about a thousand
other geese in a field in Ogallala, NE today. The exceedingly dark neck
makes me think this is either a 'Tule Goose' (elgasi) or a 'Greenland
White-fronted Goose' (flavirostris)... either of which would be mega-rare
in Nebraska and could be a state 1st...

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Any thoughts, bird friends?

Thanks!

Noah

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Nebraska GWF Goose -- possible 'elgasi' or 'flavirostris'?
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 23:55 pm
From: semirelicta AT gmail.com
 
This very dark-necked Greater White-fronted Goose was with about a thousand
other geese in a field in Ogallala, NE today. The exceedingly dark neck
makes me think this is either a 'Tule Goose' (elgasi) or a 'Greenland
White-fronted Goose' (flavirostris)... either of which would be mega-rare
in Nebraska and could be a state 1st...

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Any thoughts, bird friends?

Thanks!

Noah

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: East Tennessee Canada Goose Subspecies?
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 18:39 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
I need some subspecies ID help with these Canada Geese.


I photographed them this morning at Cove Lake SP in Campbell County, Tennessee. Using the Gadwall drake in the background as a reference, they struck me as smaller than the usual CANG found here (maxima?). They also seem to have "short-ish" necks and a noticeable angle between the culmen and the forehead.


I am a novice at the goose-subspecies-ID business, so any suggestions would be appreciated.


Thanks.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee


https://photos.google.com/shar...

[https://lh3.googleusercontent....

Cove Lake Goose 1-13-18
photos.google.com
New photo added to shared album





Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Cuckoo in Africa
Date: Thu Dec 21 2017 5:04 am
From: rhdavis AT srv.net
 
Greetings,
Can any cuckoo experts shed light on this bird? Initially IDd as Lesser Cuckoo but Madagascar Cuckoo also possible. Photographed in southern DR Congo Nov 4, 2017, outside the known winter range for either species. These are cropped photos of the distant bird.

A query to the African Bird Club returned mixed opinions.

Thanks,
Robert Davis



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow
Date: Wed Dec 20 2017 17:33 pm
From: chucao AT coastside.net
 
Joseph
Neat photos! I can see why they thought Grey Kingbird, but Grey is
actually a pretty short-winged bird and your bird has a pretty long primary
extension (from the Eastern Kingbird parent). On Greys, you usually see 2 or
3 primaries poking past the tertials, and the separation of primary tips is
not great.
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
[email protected]
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of jkennedy366
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 2:59 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

Back in 2008, I photographed hybrid couch's and eastern kingbirds with the
male an eastern in Smith Point Texas. The pair was accompanied by a second
female couch's. One young was white-breasted and one yellow breasted. I had
watched the young fledge a bit earlier but they were out in the setting sun.
When I took the pictures, they were both being fed by 2 or 3 mixed adults.

A number of people id'd the white-breasted bird as a gray kingbird which
would be even odder than a hybrid. At least 2 pairs of couch's had nested at
the site for several years and successfully raised young each year. The two
females in 2008 were the only birds I found that year and in September the
eye of hurricane Ike passed about a mile from the site and no
yellow-breasted or hybrids seen after that date.

The pictures are at

http://www.pbase.com/edit_gall...

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Alvaro Jaramillo
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 4:15 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

Nick,
They are very similar in shape, and even voice is similar. If you had to
consider a Tropical without green or yellow tones vs Grey Kingbird, I think
that Grey would on average show a larger bill, more of a flat crowned
appearance; Tropical showing a rounded crown. Also I would expect the
Tropical to have a vested appearance, with a slightly darker area on breast
sides that may form a band across the central breast. The vest of Grey is
much less extensive and paler on average.
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
[email protected]
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lethaby, Nick
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 1:55 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

All, please see forwarded post below.

-------- Original Message --------
From: "Lethaby, Nick"
Date: Wed, Dec 20, 2017, 12:05 PM
To: Frontiers of Field Identification
Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

All,

I am birding on the Pacific coast of Mexico in Guerrero and just found a
gray-and-white kingbird that is either a Gray or a Tropical with no yellow
or green tones. I have no access to literature or to the internet to check
photos. Can anyone advise how I might distinguish a freak Tropical from a
Gray. I will probably go back to try for photos after discovering I had
forgotten my SD card today!

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow
Date: Wed Dec 20 2017 16:59 pm
From: jkennedy366 AT comcast.net
 
Back in 2008, I photographed hybrid couch's and eastern kingbirds with the
male an eastern in Smith Point Texas. The pair was accompanied by a second
female couch's. One young was white-breasted and one yellow breasted. I had
watched the young fledge a bit earlier but they were out in the setting sun.
When I took the pictures, they were both being fed by 2 or 3 mixed adults.

A number of people id'd the white-breasted bird as a gray kingbird which
would be even odder than a hybrid. At least 2 pairs of couch's had nested at
the site for several years and successfully raised young each year. The two
females in 2008 were the only birds I found that year and in September the
eye of hurricane Ike passed about a mile from the site and no
yellow-breasted or hybrids seen after that date.

The pictures are at

http://www.pbase.com/edit_gall...

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Alvaro Jaramillo
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 4:15 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

Nick,
They are very similar in shape, and even voice is similar. If you had to
consider a Tropical without green or yellow tones vs Grey Kingbird, I think
that Grey would on average show a larger bill, more of a flat crowned
appearance; Tropical showing a rounded crown. Also I would expect the
Tropical to have a vested appearance, with a slightly darker area on breast
sides that may form a band across the central breast. The vest of Grey is
much less extensive and paler on average.
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
[email protected]
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lethaby, Nick
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 1:55 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

All, please see forwarded post below.

-------- Original Message --------
From: "Lethaby, Nick"
Date: Wed, Dec 20, 2017, 12:05 PM
To: Frontiers of Field Identification
Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

All,

I am birding on the Pacific coast of Mexico in Guerrero and just found a
gray-and-white kingbird that is either a Gray or a Tropical with no yellow
or green tones. I have no access to literature or to the internet to check
photos. Can anyone advise how I might distinguish a freak Tropical from a
Gray. I will probably go back to try for photos after discovering I had
forgotten my SD card today!

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow
Date: Wed Dec 20 2017 16:14 pm
From: chucao AT coastside.net
 
Nick,
They are very similar in shape, and even voice is similar. If you had to
consider a Tropical without green or yellow tones vs Grey Kingbird, I think
that Grey would on average show a larger bill, more of a flat crowned
appearance; Tropical showing a rounded crown. Also I would expect the
Tropical to have a vested appearance, with a slightly darker area on breast
sides that may form a band across the central breast. The vest of Grey is
much less extensive and paler on average.
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
[email protected]
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification
[mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lethaby, Nick
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 1:55 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

All, please see forwarded post below.

-------- Original Message --------
From: "Lethaby, Nick"
Date: Wed, Dec 20, 2017, 12:05 PM
To: Frontiers of Field Identification
Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

All,

I am birding on the Pacific coast of Mexico in Guerrero and just found a
gray-and-white kingbird that is either a Gray or a Tropical with no yellow
or green tones. I have no access to literature or to the internet to check
photos. Can anyone advise how I might distinguish a freak Tropical from a
Gray. I will probably go back to try for photos after discovering I had
forgotten my SD card today!

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow
Date: Wed Dec 20 2017 15:56 pm
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All, please see forwarded post below.

-------- Original Message --------
From: "Lethaby, Nick"
Date: Wed, Dec 20, 2017, 12:05 PM
To: Frontiers of Field Identification
Subject: Gray Kingbird v. Tropical Kingbird with no yellow

All,

I am birding on the Pacific coast of Mexico in Guerrero and just found a gray-and-white kingbird that is either a Gray or a Tropical with no yellow or green tones. I have no access to literature or to the internet to check photos. Can anyone advise how I might distinguish a freak Tropical from a Gray. I will probably go back to try for photos after discovering I had forgotten my SD card today!

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Loon sp. at Pt. Pinos, Monterey County, California--16 December
Date: Sun Dec 17 2017 16:05 pm
From: heraldpetrel AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

During a good passage of Pacific Loons yesterday morning--some 20,000 birds
in the first hour--Karl Bardon and I noticed this loon that stuck out from
the rest. It was by itself, unfortunately, but seemed a bit bigger, more
heavily-built and lumbering in flight than Pacific, with more extensive
white in the flanks. We couldn't find a Pacific Loon in the subsequent
hours that had as much white in the rear end as this bird. I'm hoping
someone who sees Arctic Loons in flight might comment on this bird. With
250,000 Pacific Loons moving by Pinos each season, we're expecting to get
an Arctic eventually, but I'm not confident I'd be able to pick it out in
flight. I've only seen a few Arctic Loons and none has been in flight. This
is the first real candidate that we've seen in three fall seasons of
counting at Pinos. Thoughts would be appreciated. The bird is currently
under "Loon sp." on this eBird checklist (and may be best kept there when
all is said and done!).

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Thanks

Brian

--
==========

*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/B...
-------------------------------

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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