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Updated on May 24, 2017, 6:05 am

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24 May: @ 06:00:56 Re: Solitary vireo songs [Ted Floyd]
19 May: @ 16:23:05  Interesting sapsuckers in eastern N America [Tony Leukering]
18 May: @ 17:28:51  Potential positions for birders in Hawaii [Peter Pyle]
14 May: @ 16:51:28 Re: Swift sp. [Bates Estabrooks]
14 May: @ 15:32:34  Swift sp. [Dan Greenham]
14 May: @ 06:08:43  Audio ID Help, Please [Bates Estabrooks]
12 May: @ 11:43:08 Re: Solitary vireo songs [Dominik Mosur]
12 May: @ 11:26:36 Re: Solitary vireo songs [Steve Hampton]
12 May: @ 10:43:11  Solitary vireo songs [Dominik Mosur]
07 May: @ 14:32:31  Help With Contacting The Warbler Guide Authors? [Bates Estabrooks]
07 May: @ 14:22:28  The Warbler Guide Authors? [Bates Estabrooks]
06 May: @ 18:36:48 Re: Empid tail-pumper [Matthew G Hunter]
06 May: @ 15:34:58 Re: Empid in San Francisco [Steve Hampton]
06 May: @ 13:56:15 Re: Empid in San Francisco [Dominik Mosur]
06 May: @ 13:41:02 Re: Empid in San Francisco [Brian Fitch]
06 May: @ 12:16:25  Empid in San Francisco [Dominik Mosur]
06 May: @ 09:53:09 Re: Empid tail-pumper [David Irons]
05 May: @ 14:47:36 Re: Empid tail-pumper [Tim Janzen]
05 May: @ 13:45:20  Empid tail-pumper [Matthew G Hunter]
03 May: @ 07:15:52 Re: BIRDWG01 Digest - 25 Apr 2017 to 2 May 2017 (#2017-46) [Bates Estabrooks]
03 May: @ 05:41:35 Re: BIRDWG01 Digest - 25 Apr 2017 to 2 May 2017 (#2017-46) [Patty McLean]
02 May: @ 04:52:15  Audio ID Helps Needed [Bates Estabrooks]
25 Apr: @ 12:03:10 Re: Odd Zonotrichia pt 2 [Robert O'Brien]





Subject: Solitary vireo songs
Date: Wed May 24 2017 6:00 am
From: tedfloyd57 AT hotmail.com
 
Hey, everybody.


I just heard a presentation on this. By Ed Pandolfino, at the recently concluded Great Basin Bird Conference in Reno, Nevada, USA. I don't see that the abstracts have been posted yet. In a nutshell, Ed reports that the songs and of Plumbeous and Cassin's vireos do in fact differ. The key difference is frequency, of the kHz sort (not frequency of the utterances-per-unit-time sort). Cassin's song is higher-pitched.


Ted Floyd

Lafayette, Boulder County, Colorado, USA



I have some recordings of a solitary vireo that I was hoping to run past anybody with lots of experience separating Cassin's from Plunbeous.



Thanks,

Dominik Mosur

San Francisco



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Interesting sapsuckers in eastern N America
Date: Fri May 19 2017 16:23 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Hi all:

First off, sorry for cross-posting this, but both groups may have an interest/be able to provide thoughts.

In review of various photographic reports in eBird, I have come across these two recent reports of interesting sapsuckers in the Great Lakes region, one from Ontario and one from Michigan.

http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/...

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

I was struck by the fact that, though not all relevant features of either bird are shown well by the provided photos, both birds' plumage appear to be fairly good to perfect for IDs of Red-naped Sapsucker, a species that is uber-rare in the East (or, at least, very rarely reported).

I would be interested in thoughts for or against an ID of RNSA for either or both birds.

Tony

Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
www.aba.org/photoquiz/
www.flickr.com/photos/tony_leukering
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Potential positions for birders in Hawaii
Date: Thu May 18 2017 17:28 pm
From: ppyle AT birdpop.org
 
Greetings all and please forgive this slightly off-topic message:

The USFWS is seeking volunteers on Midway Atoll
during Fall-Winter 2017-18 and NOAA Fisheries is
seeking at-sea seabird observers in Hawaiian
waters during July-December 2017. Birders are
qualified for and often take these positions,
recording noteworthy observations and vagrants.
For those of us interested in Hawaiian birds, who
wish we could go but can't, we like having
birders in these positions to report back.
Details on these openings are below. I'm not sure
whether or not these positions are open to non-US
residents but neither description mentions a restriction.

Best, Peter

Midway:

The US Fish and Wildlife Service seeks Refuge
Biology volunteers for a Six-month tour of duty
for the Fall-Winter 2017-18 Season at Midway
Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and the
Battle of Midway National Memorial (NM).

About the refuge: Located on the far northern end
of the Hawaiian archipelago within the
Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument. It is
one the oldest atoll formations in the world that
provides nesting habitat for millions of seabirds
and it a touchstone for one of the most
significant naval battles in our human history.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff, volunteers
and contractors live on Midway Atoll NWR to
support the recovery and integrity of wildlife
habitat and species and to protect historical
resources while balancing their own human impact on the land and seascapes.

Dates: The fall/winter volunteer season begins on
September 5, 2017 and will end in mid-March 2018
(2018 flight schedule TBD). Applications are due
by June 15, 2017. Start dates are set due to
limited contract flights to Midway Atoll NWR and
training requirements for new volunteers.
Round-trip flights between Midway Atoll NWR and
Honolulu, three meals a day, and housing at Midway Atoll NWR are provided..

Responsibilities: Volunteer work emphasizes
habitat restoration including native plant
propagation and out-planting, seed collection and
processing, removal of invasive plants both by
hand and through chemical application of
herbicide, and monitoring plant populations.
Other work includes seabird and Laysan duck
monitoring, marine debris removal, data entry,
and equipment maintenance, along with other tasks
depending on current projects and refuge needs.

Volunteers:
o are expected to work 40 hours/week with
additional weekend work when necessary
o should have a strong work ethic along with the
ability to live and work closely with a small group of people for six months
o are responsible for the proper upkeep of their
living quarters which includes individual
bedrooms, a common living area, and a full kitchen
o must be willing and able to perform all duties
in sub-tropical wind, sun, rain and humidity extremes
o must be physically fit and able to confidently ride a bike
o able to hike up to three miles in the sand or
on uneven terrain while carrying a spray pack, lift 50 pounds
o must be willing to spray herbicide with proper protective gear
o must be willing to handle albatrosses and other
seabirds for banding, monitoring studies, and disentanglements.
o able to pass a swimming proficiency test

Midway Atoll NWR is a remote site and accessible
by plane twice a month. Because of the isolated
nature of this work, safety is of the utmost
importance. Volunteers should be aware that
evacuation for emergencies or medical issues can
typically take at least 24 hours and be
potentially very expensive. All volunteers will
need to carry medical-evacuation insurance. A
current passport is required for travel to and
from Midway Atoll NWR. Volunteers are responsible
for their own travel to Honolulu.

The Clipper House on Midway Atoll NWR serves
cafeteria-style food with a wide variety of
dishes, including vegetarian options and a full
salad bar, courtesy of the hydroponics garden.
There is also a small convenience store on Midway
Atoll NWR that provides some basics: toiletries,
refreshments, etc. Midway Atoll NWR is a small
community where volunteers will be working and
living amongst Service employees, cooperators,
and contractors. For everyone's well being, there
is a zero tolerance policy for harassment or
abuse of any kind, including alcohol or drug abuse.
TO APPLY: Email
deisha_norwood@fws.gov
one .pdf file titled, YourLastName_Winter2017-18
which includes the following: cover letter
resume outlining relevant education and work experience
three work-related references (with phone and e-mail)

Preference will be given to those with an
educational or professional background in
biology, conservation science, or botany. Habitat
restoration, plant propagation, weed control,
remote field, and/or bird handling experience preferred.

For more information, please call: Deisha Norwood, 808-954-4817.

Selected applicants will be sent a packet of
additional information on the island, duties, and
suggested items to bring, as well as required
forms. A current physical, tetanus shot, and TB
test are also required. The required
documentation must be submitted by September 1st.

The National Wildlife Refuge System has owed its
very existence to concerned citizens eager to
protect America's natural resources. Over 42,000
volunteers and more than 200 nonprofit Refuge
Friends organizations support national wildlife
refuges. Friends and volunteers are crucial to
conserving and protecting our nation's wildlife
and teaching millions of Americans that their
actions today determine the conservation legacy of tomorrow.

At Sea positions:

NOAA Fisheries is conducting a cetacean and
ecosystem assessment survey of the Hawaiian
Archipelago in the summer and fall of 2017 and
has two openings for seabird observers. Seabird
observers will maintain watch for seabirds using
strip transect methodology, identify birds to
species level, estimate group size, and record
sightings on a computer. Additional
responsibilities include assisting with ancillary
programs (e.g., photo identification), maintain
logs, assist in the loading and unloading of the
research vessel, and perform other tasks as
assigned by the scientist-in-charge. Seabird
observers will maintain a watch for up to 8 hours
each day while at-sea, including weekends and holidays.

There will be a team of two seabird observers on
each ship and we are actively seeking two seabird
observers - one for each ship. The sailing dates
are 6 July to 10 October 2017 (87 days at sea)
and 17 August 9 December 2017 (100 days at sea).
Only observers that are able to sail the entirety
of the survey will be considered. Seabird
observers will be contracted through Ocean Associates, Inc.

If you would like to be considered for a seabird
observer position on HICEAS, please would you
send your CV and two professional references to
annette.henry@noaa.gov by 24 May 2017? If you
have any questions about the survey, please do not hesitate to ask.

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Swift sp.
Date: Sun May 14 2017 16:51 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Here's the only one I could find.  None on Macaulay Library.


http://www.hbw.com/ibc/video/b...


Bates Estabrooks

Black Swift (Cypseloides niger) Three shots at slow motion ...
www.hbw.com
Citation Josep del Hoyo, IBC1374696. Accessible at hbw.com/ibc/1374696. Extended version Josep del Hoyo, IBC1374696. Video of Black Swift Cypseloides niger at Canopy ...





________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Dan Greenham
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 4:22 PM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Swift sp.

All,

I wonder if anybody could point me towards, or forward, video of Black Swift in flight.

Particularly interested in views from the rear. But all are appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Dan Greenham
Point Pelee Birds Record Committee.

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Swift sp.
Date: Sun May 14 2017 15:32 pm
From: prufrock55 AT hotmail.com
 
All,

I wonder if anybody could point me towards, or forward, video of Black Swift in flight.

Particularly interested in views from the rear. But all are appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Dan Greenham
Point Pelee Birds Record Committee.

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID Help, Please
Date: Sun May 14 2017 6:08 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
All,


This is an extract from a much longer (~1.5 min.) recording of the very busy morning chorus. This song is only heard once. It consists of a short buzz and then five sharp notes.


I have filtered everything out except in the band of ~3000-5100 Hz, to isolate this song. If anyone would like, I can email them the entire audio.


Suggestions would be appreciated.


Thanks.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee


http://www.xeno-canto.org/3698...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Solitary vireo songs
Date: Fri May 12 2017 11:43 am
From: 00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Thank you, Steve. Point taken. I've had similar experience with very drab spring solitary vireos in trying to ID by sight.

Dominik

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 12, 2017, at 09:25, Steve Hampton wrote:
>
> Personally I've seen and heard Cassin's and Plumbeous singing side by side
> in the same tree in SE Arizona and the differences were virtually
> undetectable to me. Perhaps they could be quantified thru an analysis of
> recordings, but I have no confidence to distinguish a single bird in the
> field.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Fri, May 12, 2017 at 8:43 AM Dominik Mosur <
> 00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
>
>> I have some recordings of a solitary vireo that I was hoping to run past
>> anybody with lots of experience separating Cassin's from Plunbeous.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Dominik Mosur
>> San Francisco
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
> --
> Steve Hampton
> Davis, CA
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Solitary vireo songs
Date: Fri May 12 2017 11:26 am
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
Personally I've seen and heard Cassin's and Plumbeous singing side by side
in the same tree in SE Arizona and the differences were virtually
undetectable to me. Perhaps they could be quantified thru an analysis of
recordings, but I have no confidence to distinguish a single bird in the
field.





On Fri, May 12, 2017 at 8:43 AM Dominik Mosur <
00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> I have some recordings of a solitary vireo that I was hoping to run past
> anybody with lots of experience separating Cassin's from Plunbeous.
>
> Thanks,
> Dominik Mosur
> San Francisco
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Solitary vireo songs
Date: Fri May 12 2017 10:43 am
From: 00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I have some recordings of a solitary vireo that I was hoping to run past anybody with lots of experience separating Cassin's from Plunbeous.

Thanks,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Sent from my iPhone
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Help With Contacting The Warbler Guide Authors?
Date: Sun May 7 2017 14:32 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
All,



I am interested in contacting Tom Stephenson with questions re. details of two of the recordings on The Warbler Guide audio download. If Tom is on this group (or someone could contact him) would he kindly contact me off list?


Thanks much.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee


P.S. Please excuse me if this post (or similar) shows up several time on the list. I appear to be experiencing "technical difficulties". :-)

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: The Warbler Guide Authors?
Date: Sun May 7 2017 14:22 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
I am interested in contacting Tom Stephenson with questions re. details of two of the recordings on The Warbler Guide audio download.  If Tom is on this group (or someone could contact him) would he kindly contact me off list?


Thanks much.


Bates Estabrooks

Tennessee

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid tail-pumper
Date: Sat May 6 2017 18:36 pm
From: matthewghunter AT gmail.com
 
Thanks for the on and offline replies. No one suggested anything other than
Dusky Flycatcher for the bird. Although some were not sure about the tail
behavior, others reported that it looked normal to them, so perhaps my
memory is a bit dusky as well, but it still strikes me as odd, haha! though
I can't necessarily quantify it; and I generally trust my feelings on
something like that... But, ... thanks for the feedback.

Matt Hunter
SW OR

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid in San Francisco
Date: Sat May 6 2017 15:34 pm
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
The mostly dark lower mandible, short primary extension, and long-tailed
appearance all suggest Dusky to me.



On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 11:56 AM Dominik Mosur <
00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> Thank you for reminding of the importance of context, Brian. The bird gave
> what sounded like flat "whit" calls, unlike the sharp Pygmy nuthatch like
> "pip" calls of a Hammond's.
>
> Dominik Mosur
> San Francisco
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 6, 2017, at 11:30, Brian Fitch wrote:
> >
> > Members of this list have often complained about the increasing trend of
> > presenting photos with no accompanying description. As the finder of
> this
> > bird, I can add that the photos were taken at notable distance and
> > partially misrepresent the bird's appearance. The beak was wider at the
> > base than the photos show, and had some visible orange in the lower
> > mandible, which is only apparent in one photo. The bird flicked its tail
> > upward quickly and often, sometimes in conjunction with wing flicks.
> Most
> > importantly, the bird was clearly heard giving "whit" calls by all
> > observers, and two observers later heard it giving several repeated
> phrases
> > of "chebenk." The song was immediately compared in the field to that of
> > Least Flycatcher, and matched exactly.
> >
> > Brian Fitch
> > San Francisco
> >
> > On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 10:15 AM, Dominik Mosur <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-
> > request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
> >
> >> Looking to learn more about Empidonax ID so I can better fulfill my
> duties
> >> as eBird reviewer in my area, would anyone care to comment on the bird
> in
> >> this checklist?:
> >>
> >> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> >>
> >> Are the photos good enough to get down to
> >> Species?
> >>
> >> Dominik Mosur
> >> San Francisco
> >>
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone
> >> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
> >>
> >
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid in San Francisco
Date: Sat May 6 2017 13:56 pm
From: 00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Thank you for reminding of the importance of context, Brian. The bird gave what sounded like flat "whit" calls, unlike the sharp Pygmy nuthatch like "pip" calls of a Hammond's.

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 6, 2017, at 11:30, Brian Fitch wrote:
>
> Members of this list have often complained about the increasing trend of
> presenting photos with no accompanying description. As the finder of this
> bird, I can add that the photos were taken at notable distance and
> partially misrepresent the bird's appearance. The beak was wider at the
> base than the photos show, and had some visible orange in the lower
> mandible, which is only apparent in one photo. The bird flicked its tail
> upward quickly and often, sometimes in conjunction with wing flicks. Most
> importantly, the bird was clearly heard giving "whit" calls by all
> observers, and two observers later heard it giving several repeated phrases
> of "chebenk." The song was immediately compared in the field to that of
> Least Flycatcher, and matched exactly.
>
> Brian Fitch
> San Francisco
>
> On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 10:15 AM, Dominik Mosur <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-
> request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
>
>> Looking to learn more about Empidonax ID so I can better fulfill my duties
>> as eBird reviewer in my area, would anyone care to comment on the bird in
>> this checklist?:
>>
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>>
>> Are the photos good enough to get down to
>> Species?
>>
>> Dominik Mosur
>> San Francisco
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid in San Francisco
Date: Sat May 6 2017 13:41 pm
From: fogeggs AT gmail.com
 
Members of this list have often complained about the increasing trend of
presenting photos with no accompanying description. As the finder of this
bird, I can add that the photos were taken at notable distance and
partially misrepresent the bird's appearance. The beak was wider at the
base than the photos show, and had some visible orange in the lower
mandible, which is only apparent in one photo. The bird flicked its tail
upward quickly and often, sometimes in conjunction with wing flicks. Most
importantly, the bird was clearly heard giving "whit" calls by all
observers, and two observers later heard it giving several repeated phrases
of "chebenk." The song was immediately compared in the field to that of
Least Flycatcher, and matched exactly.

Brian Fitch
San Francisco

On Sat, May 6, 2017 at 10:15 AM, Dominik Mosur <00000295f877fad1-dmarc-
request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> Looking to learn more about Empidonax ID so I can better fulfill my duties
> as eBird reviewer in my area, would anyone care to comment on the bird in
> this checklist?:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> Are the photos good enough to get down to
> Species?
>
> Dominik Mosur
> San Francisco
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid in San Francisco
Date: Sat May 6 2017 12:16 pm
From: 00000295f877fad1-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Looking to learn more about Empidonax ID so I can better fulfill my duties as eBird reviewer in my area, would anyone care to comment on the bird in this checklist?:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Are the photos good enough to get down to
Species?

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


Sent from my iPhone
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid tail-pumper
Date: Sat May 6 2017 9:53 am
From: llsdirons AT msn.com
 
Matt,

I agree with Tim and would call this a Dusky. The lazy and slightly ambiguous tail wag tail is something I have seen Duskies do many times. I would add that the primary projection looks just right for Dusky and too short for Gray. Finally, I think the bill is too short for a Gray.

Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 5, 2017, at 12:47 PM, Tim Janzen wrote:
>
> Dear Matt,
> I don't see anything on this bird that makes me think Gray Flycatcher. The tail appears to be fairly long, which is good for Dusky Flycatcher. The bird has white on the outer tail feathers, which is good for Dusky Flycatcher. The video seems to show the bird flicking its tail up, which in my experience is a good ID point for Dusky Flycatcher. Gray Flycatchers slowly move their tail down, very unlike the bird in the video. The underbill isn't seen well in the photos, but the lower mandible is relatively dark, which is consistent with Dusky Flycatcher. The coloration on the back is relatively green, which is also consistent with Dusky Flycatcher. So I can see why you had trouble calling this a Gray Flycatcher.
> Sincerely,
> Tim Janzen
> Portland, OR
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew G Hunter
> Sent: Friday, May 5, 2017 11:44 AM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Empid tail-pumper
>
> Hi Folks,
> A week ago while sitting in my car near Umpqua Community College, SW
> Oregon, I heard an empid "whit" call. This time of year and location and
> the relatively quiet type of "whit" usually means Gray or Dusky Flycatcher.
> I was hoping for Gray, as I had not seen one in a while. In my first glance
> I thought I saw downward dipping of the tail, but got my camera. Photos and
> video in this checklist....
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> What confuses me about this bird is mainly what it is doing with its tail.
> I've been paying a lot of attention to herps and plants and bugs recently,
> so perhaps my empid memory is fading, but ... I don't recall ever seeing
> Dusky Flycatcher do this much "slow" pumping of its tail; what I recall is
> more flicking, sometimes with wings sometimes without. For Gray, the
> classic movement I recall is a downward dip and then rising back up. This
> may be proceeded by a nearly imperceptible uptick, but the "big movement" I
> recall is down then up. However, the speed on the tail movement of this
> bird jives with my Gray Fly recollection.
>
> But then looking at the plumage and bill. This bird seems rather greenish
> for a Gray Flycatcher, more like Dusky. The lower mandible is completely
> horn colored, which seems to be a more common variation for Dusky. My
> recollection of Grays is most always a more pale lower mandible with a
> sharper black tip. So, the bill looks like Dusky.
>
> So, I called it Dusky for now, but ... the tail-wagging bugs me. Is this
> odd, or has it just been a while since I've watched a Dusky. Or am I
> missing something else?
> :-)
>
> Thanks,
>
> Matt Hunter
> SW Oregon
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid tail-pumper
Date: Fri May 5 2017 14:47 pm
From: tjanzen AT comcast.net
 
Dear Matt,
I don't see anything on this bird that makes me think Gray Flycatcher. The tail appears to be fairly long, which is good for Dusky Flycatcher. The bird has white on the outer tail feathers, which is good for Dusky Flycatcher. The video seems to show the bird flicking its tail up, which in my experience is a good ID point for Dusky Flycatcher. Gray Flycatchers slowly move their tail down, very unlike the bird in the video. The underbill isn't seen well in the photos, but the lower mandible is relatively dark, which is consistent with Dusky Flycatcher. The coloration on the back is relatively green, which is also consistent with Dusky Flycatcher. So I can see why you had trouble calling this a Gray Flycatcher.
Sincerely,
Tim Janzen
Portland, OR

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Matthew G Hunter
Sent: Friday, May 5, 2017 11:44 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Empid tail-pumper

Hi Folks,
A week ago while sitting in my car near Umpqua Community College, SW
Oregon, I heard an empid "whit" call. This time of year and location and
the relatively quiet type of "whit" usually means Gray or Dusky Flycatcher.
I was hoping for Gray, as I had not seen one in a while. In my first glance
I thought I saw downward dipping of the tail, but got my camera. Photos and
video in this checklist....

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

What confuses me about this bird is mainly what it is doing with its tail.
I've been paying a lot of attention to herps and plants and bugs recently,
so perhaps my empid memory is fading, but ... I don't recall ever seeing
Dusky Flycatcher do this much "slow" pumping of its tail; what I recall is
more flicking, sometimes with wings sometimes without. For Gray, the
classic movement I recall is a downward dip and then rising back up. This
may be proceeded by a nearly imperceptible uptick, but the "big movement" I
recall is down then up. However, the speed on the tail movement of this
bird jives with my Gray Fly recollection.

But then looking at the plumage and bill. This bird seems rather greenish
for a Gray Flycatcher, more like Dusky. The lower mandible is completely
horn colored, which seems to be a more common variation for Dusky. My
recollection of Grays is most always a more pale lower mandible with a
sharper black tip. So, the bill looks like Dusky.

So, I called it Dusky for now, but ... the tail-wagging bugs me. Is this
odd, or has it just been a while since I've watched a Dusky. Or am I
missing something else?
:-)

Thanks,

Matt Hunter
SW Oregon

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Empid tail-pumper
Date: Fri May 5 2017 13:45 pm
From: matthewghunter AT gmail.com
 
Hi Folks,
A week ago while sitting in my car near Umpqua Community College, SW
Oregon, I heard an empid "whit" call. This time of year and location and
the relatively quiet type of "whit" usually means Gray or Dusky Flycatcher.
I was hoping for Gray, as I had not seen one in a while. In my first glance
I thought I saw downward dipping of the tail, but got my camera. Photos and
video in this checklist....

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

What confuses me about this bird is mainly what it is doing with its tail.
I've been paying a lot of attention to herps and plants and bugs recently,
so perhaps my empid memory is fading, but ... I don't recall ever seeing
Dusky Flycatcher do this much "slow" pumping of its tail; what I recall is
more flicking, sometimes with wings sometimes without. For Gray, the
classic movement I recall is a downward dip and then rising back up. This
may be proceeded by a nearly imperceptible uptick, but the "big movement" I
recall is down then up. However, the speed on the tail movement of this
bird jives with my Gray Fly recollection.

But then looking at the plumage and bill. This bird seems rather greenish
for a Gray Flycatcher, more like Dusky. The lower mandible is completely
horn colored, which seems to be a more common variation for Dusky. My
recollection of Grays is most always a more pale lower mandible with a
sharper black tip. So, the bill looks like Dusky.

So, I called it Dusky for now, but ... the tail-wagging bugs me. Is this
odd, or has it just been a while since I've watched a Dusky. Or am I
missing something else?
:-)

Thanks,

Matt Hunter
SW Oregon

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: BIRDWG01 Digest - 25 Apr 2017 to 2 May 2017 (#2017-46)
Date: Wed May 3 2017 7:15 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Patty,

Thanks for the suggestion. Could be a GB Heron. I had someone on the Xeno-Canto Forum suggest nesting Roseate Spoonbill.

Bates

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Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: BIRDWG01 Digest - 25 Apr 2017 to 2 May 2017 (#2017-46)
Date: Wed May 3 2017 5:41 am
From: plm108 AT comcast.net
 
Here's a guess on the first recording, assuming the target is the rapid kek-kek-kek sounds. Great Blue Heron on a nest. Could be young or adults.
Patty, Atlanta GA

-------- Original message --------
From: BIRDWG01 automatic digest system
Date: 05/03/2017 1:07 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: BIRDWG01 Digest - 25 Apr 2017 to 2 May 2017 (#2017-46)

There is 1 message totaling 38 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Audio ID Helps Needed

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 2 May 2017 09:51:41 +0000
From: Bates Estabrooks
Subject: Audio ID Helps Needed

All,


I need ID help with these two recordings:


Polk County Florida:

http://www.xeno-canto.org/3672...



Campbell County Tennessee:

http://www.xeno-canto.org/3665...


The specifics of the ID needed are given in the "Remarks from the Recordist" section.

Thanks very much.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee
USA


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

------------------------------

End of BIRDWG01 Digest - 25 Apr 2017 to 2 May 2017 (#2017-46)
*************************************************************


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID Helps Needed
Date: Tue May 2 2017 4:52 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
All,


I need ID help with these two recordings:


Polk County Florida:

http://www.xeno-canto.org/3672...



Campbell County Tennessee:

http://www.xeno-canto.org/3665...


The specifics of the ID needed are given in the "Remarks from the Recordist" section.

Thanks very much.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee
USA


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Odd Zonotrichia pt 2
Date: Tue Apr 25 2017 12:03 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Could be a back-cross to Golden-crowned?
I saw a 'full' hybrid many decades ago on the San Francisco Peninsula.
It had a clear white strip as well as the Golden Crown.
Bob OBrien Carver OR

On Sat, Apr 22, 2017 at 12:33 AM, Michael Park wrote:

> I added another image with the bird facing forward, rather than facing to
> its left.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/gp/7475...
>
> Michael Park
> Berkeley, CA
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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