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Updated on May 18, 2018, 7:55 am

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18 May: @ 07:45:39  Thrasher identification [Jason A Wilder]
11 May: @ 13:11:03 Re: Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References [Anthony J. Lauro]
10 May: @ 16:44:15 Re: Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References [Tony Leukering]
10 May: @ 16:28:37  Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References [Lisa Berger]
07 May: @ 15:59:44 Re: Oriole ID help [Jason A Wilder]
07 May: @ 11:43:18 Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Oriole ID help [Lethaby, Nick]
07 May: @ 09:02:30 Re: Oriole ID help [Steve Hampton]
07 May: @ 00:48:05 Re: Oriole ID help [David Irons]
06 May: @ 21:50:56  Oriole ID help [Jason A Wilder]
24 Apr: @ 09:33:03 Re: Audio ID Help Needed [Bates Estabrooks]
24 Apr: @ 07:59:09 Re: Audio ID Help Needed [Bates Estabrooks]
24 Apr: @ 06:43:54  Audio ID Help Needed [Bates Estabrooks]





Subject: Thrasher identification
Date: Fri May 18 2018 7:45 am
From: Jason.Wilder AT nau.edu
 
A thrasher seen this week at Meteor Crater, AZ has generated a lot of interesting discussion on the "Arizona Birding" Facebook page. Bendire's Thrasher is the expected species in this area northern Arizona, though it tends to be a skulkier beast than the lawn-loving thrasher in question. A fair summary of the Facebook conversation is that this confusing bird may be either a Bendire's or an immature Curve-billed Thrasher (and, if the latter, is it an eastern or western bird?).

https://flic.kr/s/aHsmbZbaPN

Jason
Flagstaff, AZ


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References
Date: Fri May 11 2018 13:11 pm
From: tonpat AT optonline.net
 
If you call acquire the wisdom and knowledge available in  the latest Sibley guide,
you will be one the the best birders in America.
The advanced guides contain minutiae one doesn™t really.
This from a birder with 60 years of experience and 1,000 bird books.



Anthony J. Lauro
Cutchogue, New York
> On May 10, 2018, at 5:43 PM, Tony Leukering <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Lisa:
>
>
> While the Pyle guides (1997 and 2008) are certainly aimed at banders, they contain a host of info very useful in field ID. Serious birders should own the set. [I have no financial interest in these books.]
>
>
> There are a lot of online sources for various bits and pieces. Here are some sites that I use, which are all ABA-Area relevant.
>
>
>
> Earbirding.com is spectacular.
>
>
> The Sibley Guide blog has some good stuff.
>
>
> In The Scope
>
>
> I'm sure that others will chime in with other websites. I hope that these are the sorts of things that you seek.
>
>
> Good luck,
>
>
> Tony
>
>
> Tony Leukering
> currently Guymon, OK
> ID columns
>
> eBird blog
> Photo quiz
> Photos
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lisa Berger
> To: BIRDWG01
> Sent: Thu, May 10, 2018 4:29 pm
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References
>
> Hi All,
>
> I would like to learn about the variety and availability of reference materials used for advanced bird identification, not specifically directed toward banders. Any suggestions appreciated.
>
> Lisa Berger
> [email protected]
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References
Date: Thu May 10 2018 16:44 pm
From: 000000b797e8dae8-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
Lisa:


While the Pyle guides (1997 and 2008) are certainly aimed at banders, they contain a host of info very useful in field ID. Serious birders should own the set. [I have no financial interest in these books.]


There are a lot of online sources for various bits and pieces. Here are some sites that I use, which are all ABA-Area relevant.



Earbirding.com is spectacular.


The Sibley Guide blog has some good stuff.


In The Scope


I'm sure that others will chime in with other websites. I hope that these are the sorts of things that you seek.


Good luck,


Tony


Tony Leukering
currently Guymon, OK
ID columns

eBird blog
Photo quiz
Photos





-----Original Message-----
From: Lisa Berger
To: BIRDWG01
Sent: Thu, May 10, 2018 4:29 pm
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References

Hi All,

I would like to learn about the variety and availability of reference materials used for advanced bird identification, not specifically directed toward banders. Any suggestions appreciated.

Lisa Berger
[email protected]

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Beyond Advanced Avian Identification References
Date: Thu May 10 2018 16:28 pm
From: goshawk AT att.net
 
Hi All,

I would like to learn about the variety and availability of reference materials used for advanced bird identification, not specifically directed toward banders. Any suggestions appreciated.

Lisa Berger
[email protected]

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Oriole ID help
Date: Mon May 7 2018 15:59 pm
From: Jason.Wilder AT nau.edu
 
Hi all,
Thanks all for the oriole input. Size on this bird was tough to judge, as it tended to be a bit of a loner relative to the other orioles around. The next best thing I have to a side-by side picture showing the oriole in the same frame with any other bird is a House Wren that was taken in the same tree from approximately the same position. From these pics you can get a sense of the relative size of the two birds against the leaves and flowers. Here are the uncropped and untouched raw pictures:
House Wren: https://flic.kr/p/25yikvg
Oriole: https://flic.kr/p/24b6BB3
I'm not sure this proves much, except that the House Wren is definitively the smaller of the two birds ;-)
Thanks again!

Jason



-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Steve Hampton
Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 7:01 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Oriole ID help

I had the opposite reaction-- I thought the bill seemed small relative to the rest of the bird-- and I've been looking at Hoodeds all weekend at my mom's hummingbird feeder. I thought the tail too hard to judge given the angles. But really I had a hard time figuring out exactly how big or small this bird was. Since you saw it with other orioles, my rule of thumb is that if your first reaction was "warbler!" then it was an Orchard.

The pics highlight a problem-- overly cropped and zoomed images make size perspective hard to evaluate. Pics panned back a little bit, with some more leaves, etc. could yield more information. We have this problem all the time with gull photos-- a cropped head-shot of an Iceland could make it look beefy-- so it's best to keep any neighboring gulls in the pic for comparison.



On Sun, May 6, 2018 at 10:47 PM, David Irons wrote:

> Jason,
>
> I agree that the bill length and curvature suggest Hooded Oriole. The
> tail doesn't look that short to my eye and in a couple of the images
> it seems to have pretty rounded corners.
>
> I would call this a Hooded Oriole.
>
> Dave Irons
> Beaverton, OR
> ________________________________
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification <
> BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> on behalf of Jason A Wilder <
> [email protected]>
> Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 2:49 AM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Oriole ID help
>
> I'm looking for help identifying an oriole that was found at Meteor
> Crater, AZ, which is a productive migrant/vagrant trap in Northern Arizona.
> It was in a mixed-flock of orioles that contained 7+ Bullock's
> Orioles, 1 Scott's Oriole and 1 Baltimore Oriole. I'm undecided
> between female Orchard versus Hooded Oriole. The bird appeared small
> and rather short tailed, unlike Hooded, which often seem quite lanky
> to me. The bird seems to have quite a bit of bill for Orchard, which is my main hesitation.
> Unfortunately, it did not vocalize.
>
> Pictures here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAHsLX7
>
> Thanks,
> Jason
> Flagstaff, AZ
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Oriole ID help
Date: Mon May 7 2018 11:43 am
From: 000003fc6e73b46b-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
All,

I would go with Hooded here. Certainly if I saw this bird on the south California coast in spring where I live, I would call it a Hooded, but that is partially based on just going with the common species unless it looks unambiguously like the rare one.

I do agree with Steve that given it was seen with other orioles, in many cases, size would make the identification obvious. My experience is that a decent % of Orchard Orioles give an instantaneous 'warbler' impression. These are presumably females. However males are a bit larger and overlap a bit with female Hoodeds (at least that is my recollection from looking this up in Pyle).

I am not sure the bill shape here rules out Orchard, as some can show a slight curvature to the bill (based on seeing a lot in Mexico in winter).

Nick

-----Original Message-----
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [mailto:BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Steve Hampton
Sent: Monday, May 07, 2018 7:01 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDWG01] Oriole ID help

I had the opposite reaction-- I thought the bill seemed small relative to
the rest of the bird-- and I've been looking at Hoodeds all weekend at my
mom's hummingbird feeder. I thought the tail too hard to judge given the
angles. But really I had a hard time figuring out exactly how big or small
this bird was. Since you saw it with other orioles, my rule of thumb is
that if your first reaction was "warbler!" then it was an Orchard.

The pics highlight a problem-- overly cropped and zoomed images make size
perspective hard to evaluate. Pics panned back a little bit, with some more
leaves, etc. could yield more information. We have this problem all the
time with gull photos-- a cropped head-shot of an Iceland could make it
look beefy-- so it's best to keep any neighboring gulls in the pic for
comparison.



On Sun, May 6, 2018 at 10:47 PM, David Irons wrote:

> Jason,
>
> I agree that the bill length and curvature suggest Hooded Oriole. The tail
> doesn't look that short to my eye and in a couple of the images it seems to
> have pretty rounded corners.
>
> I would call this a Hooded Oriole.
>
> Dave Irons
> Beaverton, OR
> ________________________________
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification <
> BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> on behalf of Jason A Wilder <
> [email protected]>
> Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 2:49 AM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Oriole ID help
>
> I'm looking for help identifying an oriole that was found at Meteor
> Crater, AZ, which is a productive migrant/vagrant trap in Northern Arizona.
> It was in a mixed-flock of orioles that contained 7+ Bullock's Orioles, 1
> Scott's Oriole and 1 Baltimore Oriole. I'm undecided between female Orchard
> versus Hooded Oriole. The bird appeared small and rather short tailed,
> unlike Hooded, which often seem quite lanky to me. The bird seems to have
> quite a bit of bill for Orchard, which is my main hesitation.
> Unfortunately, it did not vocalize.
>
> Pictures here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAHsLX7
>
> Thanks,
> Jason
> Flagstaff, AZ
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Oriole ID help
Date: Mon May 7 2018 9:02 am
From: stevechampton AT gmail.com
 
I had the opposite reaction-- I thought the bill seemed small relative to
the rest of the bird-- and I've been looking at Hoodeds all weekend at my
mom's hummingbird feeder. I thought the tail too hard to judge given the
angles. But really I had a hard time figuring out exactly how big or small
this bird was. Since you saw it with other orioles, my rule of thumb is
that if your first reaction was "warbler!" then it was an Orchard.

The pics highlight a problem-- overly cropped and zoomed images make size
perspective hard to evaluate. Pics panned back a little bit, with some more
leaves, etc. could yield more information. We have this problem all the
time with gull photos-- a cropped head-shot of an Iceland could make it
look beefy-- so it's best to keep any neighboring gulls in the pic for
comparison.



On Sun, May 6, 2018 at 10:47 PM, David Irons wrote:

> Jason,
>
> I agree that the bill length and curvature suggest Hooded Oriole. The tail
> doesn't look that short to my eye and in a couple of the images it seems to
> have pretty rounded corners.
>
> I would call this a Hooded Oriole.
>
> Dave Irons
> Beaverton, OR
> ________________________________
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification <
> BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> on behalf of Jason A Wilder <
> [email protected]>
> Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 2:49 AM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Oriole ID help
>
> I'm looking for help identifying an oriole that was found at Meteor
> Crater, AZ, which is a productive migrant/vagrant trap in Northern Arizona.
> It was in a mixed-flock of orioles that contained 7+ Bullock's Orioles, 1
> Scott's Oriole and 1 Baltimore Oriole. I'm undecided between female Orchard
> versus Hooded Oriole. The bird appeared small and rather short tailed,
> unlike Hooded, which often seem quite lanky to me. The bird seems to have
> quite a bit of bill for Orchard, which is my main hesitation.
> Unfortunately, it did not vocalize.
>
> Pictures here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAHsLX7
>
> Thanks,
> Jason
> Flagstaff, AZ
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>



--
Steve Hampton
Davis, CA

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Oriole ID help
Date: Mon May 7 2018 0:48 am
From: llsdirons AT msn.com
 
Jason,

I agree that the bill length and curvature suggest Hooded Oriole. The tail doesn't look that short to my eye and in a couple of the images it seems to have pretty rounded corners.

I would call this a Hooded Oriole.

Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR
________________________________
From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Jason A Wilder
Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 2:49 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Oriole ID help

I'm looking for help identifying an oriole that was found at Meteor Crater, AZ, which is a productive migrant/vagrant trap in Northern Arizona. It was in a mixed-flock of orioles that contained 7+ Bullock's Orioles, 1 Scott's Oriole and 1 Baltimore Oriole. I'm undecided between female Orchard versus Hooded Oriole. The bird appeared small and rather short tailed, unlike Hooded, which often seem quite lanky to me. The bird seems to have quite a bit of bill for Orchard, which is my main hesitation. Unfortunately, it did not vocalize.

Pictures here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAHsLX7

Thanks,
Jason
Flagstaff, AZ




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...

Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Oriole ID help
Date: Sun May 6 2018 21:50 pm
From: Jason.Wilder AT nau.edu
 
I'm looking for help identifying an oriole that was found at Meteor Crater, AZ, which is a productive migrant/vagrant trap in Northern Arizona. It was in a mixed-flock of orioles that contained 7+ Bullock's Orioles, 1 Scott's Oriole and 1 Baltimore Oriole. I'm undecided between female Orchard versus Hooded Oriole. The bird appeared small and rather short tailed, unlike Hooded, which often seem quite lanky to me. The bird seems to have quite a bit of bill for Orchard, which is my main hesitation. Unfortunately, it did not vocalize.

Pictures here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAHsLX7

Thanks,
Jason
Flagstaff, AZ




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID Help Needed
Date: Tue Apr 24 2018 9:33 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Nick,

From the feedback I'm receiving from several different forums, the consensus appears to be that all four vocalisations are Brown-headed cowbird.

Thanks again.

Bates

Get Outlook for Android

________________________________
From: Nicholas Komar
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 10:29:08 AM
To: Bates Estabrooks
Subject: Re: [BIRDWG01] Audio ID Help Needed

Hi Bates,
I believe the second mystery is Brown-headed Cowbird. The first mystery could be cowbird or starling.

Nick Komar
Fort Collins CO

> On Apr 24, 2018, at 6:58 AM, Bates Estabrooks wrote:
>
> Joe,
>
> So far I've had a few suggestions of Brown-headed Cowbird for both of my "puzzlers". That suggestion has merit. We'll see if others offer something else.
>
> Thank you for your compliment of my photographic and audio captures.
>
> For the photographs I am using a Panasonic Lumix G5 micro four-thirds camera, with a 100 to 300 lens.
>
> For the audio, I use a Zoom h4n Pro recorder. I used to use an Olympus LS-P2 recorder. I think I actually may prefer the Olympus due to its much more convenient size.
>
> Thanks again.
>
> Bates
>
> Get Outlook for Android
>
>
>
> From: Poston, Joseph P
> Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 8:50 AM
> Subject: Re: Audio ID Help Needed
> To: Bates Estabrooks
>
>
> I'm not sure about the ID. I look forward to hearing what others have to say.
>
> What equipment are you using for audio and photo captures? You've got great samples of both on this checklist!
>
> Joe Poston
>
>
> From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Bates Estabrooks
> Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 7:42 AM
> To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDWG01] Audio ID Help Needed
>
> I need some audio ID help with two puzzling vocalizations. I have uploaded a recording to passerine sp. in an eBird checklist:
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> The first puzzler occurs at ~2.5 secs. and 15.5 secs., and consists of a quickly down-slurred whistle, from ~11KHz down to ~7KHz. Looking at Pieplows book (p. 503), it could be a SEER from a Tufted Titmouse or any of several catharus thrushes. A review of these species in the book and on Macaulay recordings doesnt lead me to any firm conclusion.
>
> The second puzzler occurs at ~12 secs. and 19 secs., and consists of a two-stepped quick up-slurred whistle. I have no ideas on this one.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Bates Estabrooks
> Tennessee
>
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...
>
>
>
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID Help Needed
Date: Tue Apr 24 2018 7:59 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Joe,

So far I've had a few suggestions of Brown-headed Cowbird for both of my "puzzlers". That suggestion has merit. We'll see if others offer something else.

Thank you for your compliment of my photographic and audio captures.

For the photographs I am using a Panasonic Lumix G5 micro four-thirds camera, with a 100 to 300 lens.

For the audio, I use a Zoom h4n Pro recorder. I used to use an Olympus LS-P2 recorder. I think I actually may prefer the Olympus due to its much more convenient size.

Thanks again.

Bates

Get Outlook for Android



From: Poston, Joseph P
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 8:50 AM
Subject: Re: Audio ID Help Needed
To: Bates Estabrooks


I'm not sure about the ID. I look forward to hearing what others have to say.

What equipment are you using for audio and photo captures? You've got great samples of both on this checklist!

Joe Poston


From: NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification on behalf of Bates Estabrooks
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 7:42 AM
To: BIRDWG01 AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDWG01] Audio ID Help Needed

I need some audio ID help with two puzzling vocalizations. I have uploaded a recording to passerine sp. in an eBird checklist:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

The first puzzler occurs at ~2.5 secs. and 15.5 secs., and consists of a quickly down-slurred whistle, from ~11KHz down to ~7KHz. Looking at Pieplows book (p. 503), it could be a SEER from a Tufted Titmouse or any of several catharus thrushes. A review of these species in the book and on Macaulay recordings doesnt lead me to any firm conclusion.

The second puzzler occurs at ~12 secs. and 19 secs., and consists of a two-stepped quick up-slurred whistle. I have no ideas on this one.

Thanks.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...



Subject: Audio ID Help Needed
Date: Tue Apr 24 2018 6:43 am
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
I need some audio ID help with two puzzling vocalizations.  I have uploaded a recording to “passerine sp.” in an eBird checklist:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

The first puzzler occurs at ~2.5 secs. and 15.5 secs., and consists of a quickly down-slurred whistle, from ~11KHz down to ~7KHz. Looking at Pieplow’s book (p. 503), it could be a “SEER” from a Tufted Titmouse or any of several catharus thrushes. A review of these species in the book and on Macaulay recordings doesn’t lead me to any firm conclusion.

The second puzzler occurs at ~12 secs. and 19 secs., and consists of a two-stepped quick up-slurred whistle. I have no ideas on this one.

Thanks.

Bates Estabrooks
Tennessee




Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdw...


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