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Updated on May 28, 2017, 7:10 pm

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28 May: @ 18:57:24 Re: *Lesser Nighthawk- Lord Stirling or Hillsborough [Larry Scacchetti]
27 May: @ 19:47:19 Re: *Lesser Nighthawk- Lord Stirling or Hillsborough [mike hiotis]
27 May: @ 16:11:38  Gloucester county breeders [Sandra Keller]
27 May: @ 05:28:31 Re: Lesser Nighthawk, Somerset County [Susan Treesh]
27 May: @ 05:26:40 Re: Lesser Nighthawk, Somerset County [Susan Treesh]
26 May: @ 21:34:50  Serendipity [Albert, Steven]
26 May: @ 18:48:48  Orchard oriole [Michael Perlin]
26 May: @ 15:30:43  Lesser Nighthawk, Somerset County [Samuel Galick]
26 May: @ 15:28:58  Horseshoe Crabs Liberated [Jim Grieshaber]
26 May: @ 14:32:38  Question on RHWO selection of cavity nest and follow-up post to MC on Hoffman Park. [Yong Kong]
26 May: @ 12:20:34  Hoffman Park, Hunterdon County [CHELEMER, MARC J]
26 May: @ 11:44:33  Clearing Utility Right of Way's [Dave Oster]
26 May: @ 11:04:39  ebird mobile app [Sandra Keller]
26 May: @ 06:10:18  Brown Booby [Harvey Tomlinson]
26 May: @ 06:01:29  Watchung Reservation [David Bernstein]
25 May: @ 21:51:39  Brig impoundment [Yong Kong]
25 May: @ 20:49:50  Monmouth Co - Shark River Inlet Roseate Terns - Request for info on banded bird [Edna Duffy]
25 May: @ 11:18:38 Re: Heislerville water levels [Eric Stiles]
25 May: @ 11:07:40 Re: Heislerville water levels [Eric Stiles]
25 May: @ 09:12:42  Heislerville water levels [Harvey Tomlinson]
25 May: @ 08:01:30  NE Jersey birding suggestions [Kyle Chelius]
25 May: @ 06:42:51 Re: Heislerville water levels [Diane C Louie]
25 May: @ 05:58:02  Heislerville water levels [Harvey Tomlinson]
24 May: @ 19:36:19  Looking for Brandon Reo and his photos of Alaska peeps, and Fred V’s opinion [Yong Kong]
24 May: @ 19:07:10  shorebirds in Cumberland [Sandra Keller]
24 May: @ 19:06:05 Re: Fred V and his Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments [Fred Vir]
24 May: @ 17:52:40  Grand Snag Succumbs to Saw... [Jim Grieshaber]
24 May: @ 15:52:45  Fred V and his Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments [Yong Kong]
24 May: @ 09:47:54  (9) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County [Samuel Galick]
24 May: @ 08:30:51 Re: Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments [Susie R.]
24 May: @ 03:53:46  Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments [Fred Vir]
23 May: @ 23:31:29 No Subject [nancy arbitblit]
23 May: @ 19:28:00 Re: Traveling birder website [Bill Elrick]
23 May: @ 19:10:10  On Kites in Cape May [Sandra Keller]
23 May: @ 19:08:14  In response to Mike B.’s post about his Olive-sided Flycatcher in JC [Yong Kong]
23 May: @ 17:30:21 Re: Traveling birder website [David Lapuma]
23 May: @ 17:13:31 Re: Pequannock Watershed [Bill Elrick]
23 May: @ 17:12:46  Traveling birder website [Eric Stiles]
23 May: @ 11:35:36  Pequannock Watershed [CHELEMER, MARC J]
22 May: @ 17:43:07  Brig [Bill Elrick]
22 May: @ 14:57:13  Flooded field birding - Camden - nothing [Sandra Keller]
22 May: @ 10:52:35 Re: Blind question [Davis, Christina]
21 May: @ 11:15:39  Forsythe [JOHN VOTTA]
21 May: @ 07:05:42  Fwd: RE: [JERSEYBI] Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders [DC Louie]
20 May: @ 18:03:09  Negative bird report but you just gotta try to trump Cape May birding [Yong Kong]
20 May: @ 16:48:58  East Brunswick Spring Birding Day [Albert, Steven]
20 May: @ 16:31:45  Olive-sided Flycatcher in JC [Michael Britt]
20 May: @ 14:15:27 Re: Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders [DC Louie]
20 May: @ 14:08:29 Re: Blind question [DC Louie]
20 May: @ 11:52:43  Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders [Sandra Keller]





Subject: *Lesser Nighthawk- Lord Stirling or Hillsborough
Date: Sun May 28 2017 18:57 pm
From: larrybird4134 AT gmail.com
 
Wow, one of the snobbiest douche things I've ever heard in birding.  How about instead of an asterisk, you just mind your own damn business and let people enjoy their hobby the way they want to.  Cool?  Awesome!  Happy Memorial Day all!

Larry Scacchetti
Montvale, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 27, 2017, at 8:47 PM, mike hiotis wrote:
>
> A short story from the Great Swamp X-mas count a few years back. A similar
> situation transpired as the Raptor Trust had rehabbed a Golden Eagle and
> released the bird in Great Swamp a day or two before the count. The count
> compiler of 30+ years smiled upon our finding it and calmly said, " Since
> this bird was not originally found in the Swamp I do not feel it should be
> counted.Had this been the spot where it was first found we could in all
> fairness give it a tick".The Eagle was very close to where it was
> released. We moved on. A rather honorable count that was. In this instance
> I believe the sole person or persons who found the bird should be the only
> sole/s to check it off their NJ list. I would wager if someone volunteered
> to drive this bird back to Florida it may have been arranged. As I added in
> the subject title of this post consider putting an asterisk before a
> rather weakly justified sighting for those of us who did not find the
> bird....Just kidding!?
>
> Mike Hiotis
> Martinsville NJ
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
> or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
> List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...


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Subject: *Lesser Nighthawk- Lord Stirling or Hillsborough
Date: Sat May 27 2017 19:47 pm
From: mchhiotis AT gmail.com
 
A short story from the Great Swamp X-mas count a few years back. A similar
situation transpired as the Raptor Trust had rehabbed a Golden Eagle and
released the bird in Great Swamp a day or two before the count. The count
compiler of 30+ years smiled upon our finding it and calmly said, " Since
this bird was not originally found in the Swamp I do not feel it should be
counted.Had this been the spot where it was first found we could in all
fairness give it a tick".The Eagle was very close to where it was
released. We moved on. A rather honorable count that was. In this instance
I believe the sole person or persons who found the bird should be the only
sole/s to check it off their NJ list. I would wager if someone volunteered
to drive this bird back to Florida it may have been arranged. As I added in
the subject title of this post consider putting an asterisk before a
rather weakly justified sighting for those of us who did not find the
bird....Just kidding!?

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ


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Subject: Gloucester county breeders
Date: Sat May 27 2017 16:11 pm
From: sandrakeller AT verizon.net
 
The dvoc trip today enjoyed good listens and good looks of most of the expected
breeders in Glassboro Woods and elsewhere. Prothonotary, Hooded, Acadian,
Worm-eating, etc. No Scarlet Tanagers singing. What was that about?!
And no Kentuckys alas - thats worrisome. A lone Broad winged Hawk overhead was
nice. To be expected, but not a given. I would have preferred a Kite.....
Wood Thrushes were singing everywhere at one spot. And none earlier at another
spot. Go figure.....
Louisiana Waterthrush put on a show at one spot. They can be difficult at this time
of year.

A trip report will be on the dvoc web site within the week for those interested.

Butterfly notes - Red-spotted Purple and Summer Azures around.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Lesser Nighthawk, Somerset County
Date: Sat May 27 2017 5:28 am
From: sktreesh AT comcast.net
 
Oops, it's STIRLING

not sterling


On 5/27/2017 6:26 AM, Susan Treesh wrote:
> Jerseybirders, just want to pass along that Jeff Ellerbush sent a text
> message to North NJ Birds early this morning that a lesser nighthawk
> had been received by the Raptor Trust on May 14, and released May 21.
> The Raptor Trust is within a mile of the Lord Sterling location where
> the current lesser nighthawk, found by Ben Barkley, is located.
> Thanks, Jeff, for checking. I never would have thought a nighthawk
> could be successfully rehabbed.
>
> That said, the nighthawk was picked up originally in Hillsborough.
> I'm not sure that there is any more information on its origin than
> that - so it will be up to the Records Committee to make a determination.
>
> And, good news, the bird was reported back sleeping on the path this
> morning. You will never find an easier lesser nighthawk to see in NJ,
> that at least is certain! Just turn in to the main entrance of Lord
> Sterling (the Environmental Center, 190 Lord Sterling Road, Basking
> Ridge). Park, walk a short distance back along main path, and the
> bird is in plain view. Thanks, Ben!
>
> Susan Treesh
> Somerset
>
>
> On 5/26/2017 4:30 PM, Samuel Galick wrote:
>> Ben Barkley just passed along great photos of a Lesser Nighthawk at
>> Lord Stirling Park current location is here:
>>
>> 4041'45.5"N 7431'13.7"W
>> 40.695981,-74.520480
>> https://goo.gl/maps/wFgD2NTjfd...
>>
>> Good birding!!
>>
>> Sam
>>
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
> List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...
>



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Subject: Lesser Nighthawk, Somerset County
Date: Sat May 27 2017 5:26 am
From: sktreesh AT comcast.net
 
Jerseybirders, just want to pass along that Jeff Ellerbush sent a text
message to North NJ Birds early this morning that a lesser nighthawk had
been received by the Raptor Trust on May 14, and released May 21. The
Raptor Trust is within a mile of the Lord Sterling location where the
current lesser nighthawk, found by Ben Barkley, is located. Thanks,
Jeff, for checking. I never would have thought a nighthawk could be
successfully rehabbed.

That said, the nighthawk was picked up originally in Hillsborough. I'm
not sure that there is any more information on its origin than that - so
it will be up to the Records Committee to make a determination.

And, good news, the bird was reported back sleeping on the path this
morning. You will never find an easier lesser nighthawk to see in NJ,
that at least is certain! Just turn in to the main entrance of Lord
Sterling (the Environmental Center, 190 Lord Sterling Road, Basking
Ridge). Park, walk a short distance back along main path, and the bird
is in plain view. Thanks, Ben!

Susan Treesh
Somerset


On 5/26/2017 4:30 PM, Samuel Galick wrote:
> Ben Barkley just passed along great photos of a Lesser Nighthawk at Lord Stirling Park current location is here:
>
> 4041'45.5"N 7431'13.7"W
> 40.695981,-74.520480
> https://goo.gl/maps/wFgD2NTjfd...
>
> Good birding!!
>
> Sam
>



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Subject: Serendipity
Date: Fri May 26 2017 21:34 pm
From: Steven.Albert AT aecom.com
 
You just never know what will turn up.  And no, I am not talking about the gallinule, or the terns, or the nighthawk.

Instead, I started the day in what's become my almost daily regime, in the dark about hour before dawn in the Meadowlands. Today, it was the Kane tract, trying to hear over the adjacent warehouse's fire alarm and then the emergency vehicle sirens. Highlights were Semipalmated plovers, Green heron and Black skimmers. Two actually skimming, and then a flyby of a flock of 25. Two hours later, mostly in the lingering rain, we were pleasantly surprised that we'd identified 38 species.

Next stop was evaluating a small wetland and while doing paperwork, sitting in the car in some random manufacturer's parking lot, I hear the call of a Blackpoll warbler above the car. I jump out. I see that there a numerous warblers hopping around in a small locust tree. I aim the camera. I am in click now/identify later mode. I have five minutes until I have to pop back into the car for a conference call. Half-hour call, then back out. They're still around!

When all was said and done, this little locust tree contained male and female Blackpolls, female Redstarts and Black and White and Yellow warblers. In a little random tree in a parking lot in Carlstadt! Who'da thunk it? I've posted some of the photos here:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...




And then I returned to work from home for the rest of the day. And ...... a Gray-cheeked thrush in the backyard out my window.

An excellent day. Makes up for all those days that are not at all this successful. You just never know. That's why I love this madness.

SA


Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager, EHS Management
D +1-732-564-3601
M +1-732-832-6195
steven.albert@aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road
Suite 520
Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
T +1-732-564-3600
aecom.com

Built to deliver a better world

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Subject: Orchard oriole
Date: Fri May 26 2017 18:48 pm
From: mlperlin AT gmail.com
 
Sitting on some dead branches of an otherwise-live tree for about ten
minutes this afternoon. At the confluence of Lake Carnegie, the Millstone
river and the Delaware-Raritan Canal off Mapleton Road just off Route 1 in
Princeton (or maybe West Windsor?), just after the Ruby Tuesday's coming
south.

Certainly my FOY in NJ this year.. I don't think any others have been
reported here?

Best,
Michael Perlin
Trenton NJ


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Subject: Lesser Nighthawk, Somerset County
Date: Fri May 26 2017 15:30 pm
From: sam.galick AT gmail.com
 
Ben Barkley just passed along great photos of a Lesser Nighthawk at Lord Stirling Park current location is here:

4041'45.5"N 7431'13.7"W
40.695981,-74.520480
https://goo.gl/maps/wFgD2NTjfd...

Good birding!!

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick@gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/s...

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Subject: Horseshoe Crabs Liberated
Date: Fri May 26 2017 15:28 pm
From: 000003f94418c696-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu
 
I visited Raritan Bay Waterfront Park in South Amboy hopingto see egrets, again. No luck.-- However, I was able to rescue and return to the water 10stranded horseshoe crabs which was gratifying.-- Apparently, a higher than normaltide with last nights storm deposited the horseshoe crabs far back on thebeach.--https://www.flickr.com/photos/... Grieshaber--Somerset County


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Subject: Question on RHWO selection of cavity nest and follow-up post to MC on Hoffman Park.
Date: Fri May 26 2017 14:32 pm
From: yklitespeed AT comcast.net
 
Perhaps a beginner birder and an expert birding machine MC do think alike. What do I mean by that ?

I too went in search of GRSP this morning to see if they have arrived in my birding places. First order was to visit a referenced site where they do breed and GRSP is usually a give-me-bird. This morning was no exception as several insect-like buzz calls were originating from several different places at once, confirming multiple birds.

I then drove around looking for every grassland habitat patch in Pomona-Galloway Township that is similar to my referenced site to see if more has arrived and can be found elsewhere. I bombed. But my excuses may be I was birding by ear by driving slow as to not to freak out the local residents. But my kind of birding, all that adrenaline thinking-hoping I would find a new GRSP breeding habitat within the Pomona-Galloway Township border as I have done before.

Time to ask for a birding question. I also saw a RHWO in flight (No question as to the ID). When I arrived at the location where the bird landed it was no where to be found, but I did find a nest cavity. The cavity opening I saw seemed bit small and also the snag was still covered with bark.

I remember someone telling me in the past or reading somewhere the preferred RHWO nest cavity is bark-less tree/snag. Is this true ?

Photo of the nest cavity on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Yong Kong
Camden County







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Subject: Hoffman Park, Hunterdon County
Date: Fri May 26 2017 12:20 pm
From: mc2496 AT att.com
 
Jerseybirders,

This morning I visited this nice park just south of Route 78 near exit 11. I felt like I owed this old stomping ground of Vince Capp a look-see, as I'd been here just once before but remember Vince's posts about it as well. Bill Boyle's book suggests that it's good for Bobolinks and Grasshopper Sparrows, among other things.

Yes on the first, no on the second. One male Bobolink sat in the topmost branch of a great tree just inside the entrance, singing his impossibly complex and layered song. What a beautiful sound. Another male was visible further in, singing and displaying with the species' wings-below-the-horizontal flight style. The open areas had all the usual other species singing and establishing territory: Yellow and Prairie Warblers, Yellowthroat, Willow Flycatcher, Orchard Oriole, Kingbird, Warbling Vireo. A squawking Green Heron flyover was very nice, as was the pair of two Red-shouldered Hawks, looking quite bedraggled (they are in molt) wheeling away from being chased by the aforementioned passerines.

Hoffman also has a really nice woodlot below the lake, and I strolled through it. Ovenbird, Wood Thrush, Eastern Wood-Pewee, and other sylvan species sang amidst the stately tall trees. At one point, I heard a song I've sought since late April but, until today, have not heard: the jumbled loud "chick uppity per wickety" rolling notes of a Canada Warbler. What a thrill it was even to see the bird far off in tangles, but even more so to stand still and just let it forage its way closer. It eventually jumped into the open and offered a long and satisfying view of its necklace, eye ring, and steely blue-gray mantle. It was one of those moments that make birding so meaningful: encountering this small, vibrant living creature, engaged its own life's process-seeking food and singing "happily," mindless of its own uniqueness in that place (and its status on my yearly list). Such existential events between observer and observed brings such joy to us birders, no matter how many Canada Warblers we'll eventually see or hear.

Good birding to all over the long weekend,

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly



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Subject: Clearing Utility Right of Way's
Date: Fri May 26 2017 11:44 am
From: 000004150120c36e-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu
 
Some recent posts have discussed herbicide spraying and removal of brush/trees along power line cuts.
When left undisturbed these areas do provide great habitat for species like golden-winged, and I always regret seeing a right of way that has been cut or sprayed back. However it is the Board of Public Utilities that mandates the allowable height of vegetation under the towers and the distance that must be maintained to the wooded edge.

So the utility companies are basically complying with BPU regulations, although its always possible (probable?) that clearing and spraying can be overly aggressive. I'm sure its more cost-effective to whack it down to the ground rather than maintain the BPU allowed height. A better ROW management plan might be developed, but it would take sufficient pressure from concerned parties (like us) to make it so.


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Subject: ebird mobile app
Date: Fri May 26 2017 11:04 am
From: sandrakeller AT verizon.net
 
Has just undergone an upgrade. Great new feature there! Update as soon as you can!


Sandra Keller
sandrakeller@verizon.net

Sent from my Imac





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Subject: Brown Booby
Date: Fri May 26 2017 6:10 am
From: oddbirdsin AT gmail.com
 
Hi Jersey Birders,
Yesterday I was watching the ocean from Stone Harbor Point ( 1pm-2pm-ish)
when I saw what I thought was an adult Brown Booby.
The fog was tough but this bird was feeding for sometime.
Unfortunately a dense fog rolled in and I couldn't see past the breakers so
I packed up and left
I have almost no experience with Pelagic birds as just saying the word gets
me sea sick so I was unsure of my ID
I sent Linda Widdop and Steve Glynn a text asking about Gannets this time
of year and followed up with an email to them and Yong.
This morning I see BRBO flew past Cape May point around 4pm
Below is the email I sent to the above friends after pouring over guides
and horrific pics
"Friends,
I spent some time at Stone Harbor Point watching the Ocean and am convinced
the bird I saw was an Adult Brown Booby.
The are only 2 reports of Gannet since 5-20-17 and prior not so many.
Gannet should be gone from our waters.
That means the Odds of a BRBO are about the same as NOGA. And since the
storms came in from the South and not the North driving a Booby our way
increases the odds. I tried to get some pics but they are worthless. The
fog was tough.
One of the things this bird did was fly fairly low to the water and then
just dive in. Unlike Gannets who go for the high dives.
It was all brown on top and close enough I should have been able to see the
white tail coverts.
Underneath it was Bright white from the neck to the base of the tail and
into the wings. Did I mention Bright white and not gray?
There were also Wilson's Storm Petrels and large pods of Dolphins. Bunker
must be running."
There was also a Alt plumage Red-throated Loon feeding in the rough surf.
I should have Telegramed the sighting of BRBO but I wasn't confident enough.
Steve told me I should anyway just in case.
Should have taken his advice.
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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Subject: Watchung Reservation
Date: Fri May 26 2017 6:01 am
From: jackstraw1963 AT gmail.com
 
Morning folks,

With migration winding down a bit, I thought I would sum up my month at this Union County hotspot. In addition to birding solo, and a morning with Louis Bizzarro, I led three Wednesday trips for New Jersey Audubon's All Things Bird. The trips seemed to be very well received so I will do it again next year.

Ninety eight species were identified so far this May including twenty five species of Warbler. Mourning, multiple Tennessee, both Waterthrush, Prothonotary, Canada and Wilson's. Other highlights included both Cuckoo, Olive sided Flycatcher, Red shouldered Hawk and Grey cheeked Thrush. The Audubon trips covered the Deserted Village area. Other spots I covered solo were Surprise Lake, Trailside Nature Center, Seely's Pond and the Skytop Picnic Area.

I'll conclude with a bit of good news relating to this jewel of a park. A proposal to install nineteen miles of mountain biking trails through the Reservation was recently rejected by the Union County Freeholders. A victory for the birds, other creatures and the people who watch them.

Good birding!

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ

Sent from my iPad


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Subject: Brig impoundment
Date: Thu May 25 2017 21:51 pm
From: yklitespeed AT comcast.net
 
Just to follow up on HTs opinion about Hville impoundment, I took a vacation time this afternoon to head over to Brig in search of shorebirds. Not productive.

Impoundment was full even during the low tide, and shorebirds were non-existent , except bit of high ground in scattered areas. Managed to find a very-low-energy SBDO, and some interesting little peeps that I ended up going home as SESA.

Can someone explain the highest number of WESA I have ever encountered at Brig as others have ? Some reported 122, some 75, some 50s.

For me ? I have no patience in counting birds.

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: Monmouth Co - Shark River Inlet Roseate Terns - Request for info on banded bird
Date: Thu May 25 2017 20:49 pm
From: marshwren AT comcast.net
 
Around 2:45 this afternoon, a text went out about Arctic, Roseate and Black terns being seen in the nesting colony of least and common terns on the beach along the south jetty of Shark River Inlet this afternoon.  By the time I got down there after 4:30, I was told the Black Terns had moved on, I couldn't make out any arctics, but I did get looks at at least two Roseate Terns.  After reviewing my pictures at home, I realized that one of these terns had leg bands.  It appears to be black code on yellow band, I think the code may be B15 or B1S.  If anyone who was there today got pics of the terns and can read the band, please reply off list as I like to keep track of these things.


Ebird list with 3 cropped pic of the banded bird:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


Ray Duffy

Secaucus, NJ


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Subject: Heislerville water levels
Date: Thu May 25 2017 11:18 am
From: eric.stiles AT njaudubon.org
 
Dear All:

We just got off of the phone with Dr. David Mizrahi who is banding at Heislerville with a team from Briazil . He confirmed (as one of the world's leading shorebird experts) that the Division of Fish and Wildlife is properly managing the water levels at Heislerville. The current water depth is due to a combination of high rains (some of which may take a day or two to reach the impoundments) and the higher tides linked to lunar cycles and not being caused by mismanagement of the impoundment water level. David communicates directly with the Division biologists throughout migration to make fine tune adjustments as needed.

This is a great example of Jersey Birds watching conditions and trust that this answer addresses your concerns. The Division of Fish and Wildlife has been incredibly pro-active in working with NJ Audubon and other conservation groups to create prime conditions for shorebirds on the Delaware Bay.

Happy Birding to all!

Best,
Eric Stiles, President & CEO
New Jersey Audubon Society

11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
Phone: 908.396.6369 Fax: 908.766.7775

Website: www.njaudubon.org
Connect with us:

Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

-----Original Message-----
From: Eric Stiles
Sent: Thursday, May 25, 2017 11:54 AM
To: 'Harvey Tomlinson' ; JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: RE: [JERSEYBI] Heislerville water levels

Dear Harvey et al.,

Thanks for bringing this to our attention. NJ Audubon will look into the matter further and we will send an update shortly. Since NJ Audubon's VP for Research David Mizrahi is conducting his shorebird research onsite, he should have insights into current water level management.

Over a decade ago, NJ Audubon worked closely with the Division of Fish and Wildlife to manage the Heislerville impoundments for shorebirds during spring migration. We also worked closely with federal officials (funding), partners and NJDEP to ensure the Division had resources to rapidly repair the impoundments and water control structures post-Sandy.

Happy Birding!

Best,
Eric Stiles, President & CEO
New Jersey Audubon Society

11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
Phone: 908.396.6369 Fax: 908.766.7775

Website: www.njaudubon.org
Connect with us:

Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Thursday, May 25, 2017 6:58 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Heislerville water levels

Hi Jersey Birders,
On Tuesday morning I went to Heislerville only to find the main pool full of water.
There was a birder from New York there and he said on Monday night he was birding the pool and it was mostly mud flats. Tuesday am it was full. He asked if it was tidal.
It didn't rain Monday night so I'm thinking the season is over and their filling the pool back up.
I saw Sandra's post that the pool was still filled which further confirms this notion.
For the folks who may be travelling to see the spectacle of Heislerville we locals who visit should try to post water level information.
And if anyone knows who to contact to ask about the water levels let me know and I'll do the foot work.
It seems early to have flooded the pool, but if the banding is over there would be no reason to keep it pulled down...except of course to accommodate the shorebird stragglers.
There were still a lot of birds around on Tuesday but they were all pushed to the remaining dry spots.
I wonder what it would take to have them drain it for the fall migration?
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Heislerville water levels
Date: Thu May 25 2017 11:07 am
From: eric.stiles AT njaudubon.org
 
Dear Harvey et al.,

Thanks for bringing this to our attention. NJ Audubon will look into the matter further and we will send an update shortly. Since NJ Audubon's VP for Research David Mizrahi is conducting his shorebird research onsite, he should have insights into current water level management.

Over a decade ago, NJ Audubon worked closely with the Division of Fish and Wildlife to manage the Heislerville impoundments for shorebirds during spring migration. We also worked closely with federal officials (funding), partners and NJDEP to ensure the Division had resources to rapidly repair the impoundments and water control structures post-Sandy.

Happy Birding!

Best,
Eric Stiles, President & CEO
New Jersey Audubon Society

11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
Phone: 908.396.6369 Fax: 908.766.7775

Website: www.njaudubon.org
Connect with us:

Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Thursday, May 25, 2017 6:58 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Heislerville water levels

Hi Jersey Birders,
On Tuesday morning I went to Heislerville only to find the main pool full of water.
There was a birder from New York there and he said on Monday night he was birding the pool and it was mostly mud flats. Tuesday am it was full. He asked if it was tidal.
It didn't rain Monday night so I'm thinking the season is over and their filling the pool back up.
I saw Sandra's post that the pool was still filled which further confirms this notion.
For the folks who may be travelling to see the spectacle of Heislerville we locals who visit should try to post water level information.
And if anyone knows who to contact to ask about the water levels let me know and I'll do the foot work.
It seems early to have flooded the pool, but if the banding is over there would be no reason to keep it pulled down...except of course to accommodate the shorebird stragglers.
There were still a lot of birds around on Tuesday but they were all pushed to the remaining dry spots.
I wonder what it would take to have them drain it for the fall migration?
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Heislerville water levels
Date: Thu May 25 2017 9:12 am
From: oddbirdsin AT gmail.com
 
Hi Jersey Birders,
With a tip from Brian Kushner and Diane Louie I contacted Jason with the
NJDEP. Jason was an absolute pleasure to talk to. Last week when the water
levels in the main pool were very low a board was removed from the dike to
help let in a small amount of water as per request.
Then the spring tides hit and just inundated the main pool. Even if the
board had not been removed the tides still would have crested the the dike
system and flooded the pool.
Jason offered to go out there and see if he could get the levels down a bit.
It's a holiday weekend and the tides are still high so I wouldn't expect
too much of a drop but just him saying he would try to help was a breath of
fresh air.
Kudos to the man.
I then brought up how nice it would be to pull the pool down for the
shorebirds in the fall with the caveat I could get some volunteers together
to help with the task. He said that fall is a hot season for another user
group...Crabbers. He tries to accommodate all the user groups of
Heislerville but said he would mull it over.
Wow.
To not just categorically say No just furthered my opinion of Jason.
Someone who is willing to listen is a rare thing these days.
Being honest with ourselves we have to admit draining Heislerville would be
more for us birders than the birds. It's easy to get to and easy to bird.
Sure the birds would have another place to fatten up but without it they
will still do fine. Still, not knowing Brigantine's water management plans,
a fall back birding location would be wonderful.
If you have compelling reasons to drain Heislerville in the fall Please
send them off to me.
I am going to stay on top of this w/ out being to pushy and maybe ...just
maybe we can find a compromise.
There are a few more weeks left for Spring birding at Heislerville.
Enjoy them. And damn we need to find a Curlew Sandpiper. This would be the
first spring in many years one didn't show up here.
Good Birding
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: NE Jersey birding suggestions
Date: Thu May 25 2017 8:01 am
From: ganglerisson AT hotmail.com
 
Hi everyone -


Im going to be dropping my wife off at the Bayonne terminal on Sunday morning and Ill have the rest of the day for birding.



Looking for suggestions on where to go.



Two spots Ive looked into are Dekorte Park and Great Swamp NWR.



Thanks in advance,



Kyle





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List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: Heislerville water levels
Date: Thu May 25 2017 6:42 am
From: dclouie AT optonline.net
 
My understanding is that Matts Landing as part of the Heislerville WMA is under the management of NJDEP FWS.
This is supported by the information in the link: http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw... ,
but if anybody knows better, please correct me.

Besides shorebirds, other wildlife like crabs, fish and waterfowl including corms and waders,
use the WMA. I suppose what with the understaffing typical of any government agency
that day to day, the water levels are not actively monitored nor adjusted accordingly, at least not as frequently
as we birders would like. This plus the diversity of wildlife under consideration and the respective, sometimes competing interests
of their human stakeholders, leads me to guess that when the water levels ARE adjusted it is not
necessarily specifically for the benefit of the migrating shorebirds (and their birders).

Perhaps we JBers can help to move the needle toward more active management of the Matts Landing
shorebird mudflat feeding grounds during peak migration season. For example, I am confident that
many birders could be trusted to provide, as volunteer citizen scientists, reliable and frequent monitoring of the water levels
on the mudflat feeding grounds used by the shorebirds during their narrow migration seasons.

Diane Louie (back in Madison)





On May 25, 2017, at 6:57 AM, Harvey Tomlinson wrote:

Hi Jersey Birders,
On Tuesday morning I went to Heislerville only to find the main pool full
of water.
There was a birder from New York there and he said on Monday night he was
birding the pool and it was mostly mud flats. Tuesday am it was full. He
asked if it was tidal.
It didn't rain Monday night so I'm thinking the season is over and their
filling the pool back up.
I saw Sandra's post that the pool was still filled which further confirms
this notion.
For the folks who may be travelling to see the spectacle of Heislerville we
locals who visit should try to post water level information.
And if anyone knows who to contact to ask about the water levels let me
know and I'll do the foot work.
It seems early to have flooded the pool, but if the banding is over there
would be no reason to keep it pulled down...except of course to accommodate
the shorebird stragglers.
There were still a lot of birds around on Tuesday but they were all pushed
to the remaining dry spots.
I wonder what it would take to have them drain it for the fall migration?
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Heislerville water levels
Date: Thu May 25 2017 5:58 am
From: oddbirdsin AT gmail.com
 
Hi Jersey Birders,
On Tuesday morning I went to Heislerville only to find the main pool full
of water.
There was a birder from New York there and he said on Monday night he was
birding the pool and it was mostly mud flats. Tuesday am it was full. He
asked if it was tidal.
It didn't rain Monday night so I'm thinking the season is over and their
filling the pool back up.
I saw Sandra's post that the pool was still filled which further confirms
this notion.
For the folks who may be travelling to see the spectacle of Heislerville we
locals who visit should try to post water level information.
And if anyone knows who to contact to ask about the water levels let me
know and I'll do the foot work.
It seems early to have flooded the pool, but if the banding is over there
would be no reason to keep it pulled down...except of course to accommodate
the shorebird stragglers.
There were still a lot of birds around on Tuesday but they were all pushed
to the remaining dry spots.
I wonder what it would take to have them drain it for the fall migration?
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Looking for Brandon Reo and his photos of Alaska peeps, and Fred V’s opinion
Date: Wed May 24 2017 19:36 pm
From: yklitespeed AT comcast.net
 
My biggest apologies for multi-posting and using JBirds to trying to connect with Brandon Reo for my own personal interest as I do not have his contact info.

Brandon, do you have any photos of stints (little, red-necked, and long-toed) and sharp-tailed sandpiper taken during April to June during your travels ?

And since I opened my mouth, perhaps, Fred V can shed some light on the most likely encounter of these species in coming months in NJ, especially during and after certain weather events ?

Yong Kong
Camden County


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List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: shorebirds in Cumberland
Date: Wed May 24 2017 19:07 pm
From: sandrakeller AT verizon.net
 
Had a pleasant afternoon enjoying Cumberland shorebirds. Wanted to witness
the Red Knots - so chose Moores Beach today. Low tide, plenty of sand, plenty of
birds feeding! Although am told that the shorebirds are late, that the Horseshoe crabs
haven't really laid their eggs in great numbers yet. Hopefully, the rest of the shorebirds
will arrive when the rest of the eggs are laid. This timing is critical. A few Red Knots were
in basic plumage still. At this point I would say they won't be breeding this year. A few of
the Dunlin were still in mainly basic - winter - plumage also. Not all the shorebirds will
attain full breeding plumage every year. They might be sick, underfed, etc.

On the Kites - I checked "Explore a region", plugged in Cape May, sorted the birds
taxonomically, and checked under Kite. 60 seconds later I realized 5/21 was the last
day of that event. Sigh.... I thought it would last. So I didn't rush down! Am told
cicadas are emerging down to our south. The birds know somehow. Maybe thats
why they all left right away.

The shorebird pool at Heislerville was flooded with that recent rain. It's a lot of water!
Not sure how long it will take to evaporate. The boardwalk at Bivalve is being replaced!
It was destroyed by Sandy however long ago that was. Yea! Except that the High St.
area of Bivalve is closed off until done. That is also a great shorebird spot. Well,
it will be ready for the fall! Strawberry Ave. doesn't have much mud left. The grass
has been growing in.

Butterfly notes - Monarchs, Dun Skippers, Little Wood-satyrs.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Fred V and his Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments
Date: Wed May 24 2017 19:06 pm
From: avtrader AT comcast.net
 
Hello YK, yes was gone from the local patch but not from the planet-- we
were fortunate to have visited some of the most complex, biodiverse and
ancient forests known. That must be where I get my old fashioned ideas
as you quipped. lol

Now to get back to what was asked rather than your admirable attempt to
spread out into a myriad of good subjects e.g., the benefits of fire
ecology---- which we mostly agree on.

I asked "Not sure where all these advocates for the increase of early
successional habitat by "thinning" intact forests areas have been,
perhaps YK can explain."

More specifically where were all those owners of wooded lots that
evidently needed thinning in return for timber dollars, closely
shouldered by environmental consultants to do the needed formal
harvest/habitat plans, and certain non-profit groups, when we lost the
thousands of N NJ acres of the subject, early successional powerline
habitat?

Couldn't of this now gone N NJ habitat asset (sprayed with
chemicals/mowed) been managed better for the critical bird community
these people, special interests and some of us say that we should have?
And lets contextual recall that the aforementioned groups want to create
open habitat by eliminating some NJ primary forest that certainly
already had a decent bird community.

good birding?

Fred Virrazzi
Secaucus



On 5/24/2017 4:52 PM, Yong Kong wrote:
> Who knew FV who rattled my bird brain on the continue existence of Ivory Woodpecker is still live and well up in N Jersey somewhere. I learned long ago this JBirds is not a bird-forum to talk about what Fred V. and I enjoy the most, which is avian ecology, then second, the bird identification.
>
> But since FV started this wildfire, I will respond to FV, which is Daniel B. Botkins new book,
>
> https://www.google.com/?gws_rd...
>
> Most of the folks I have met here are bird-identifiers, except FV and HT. Hopefully, I did not offend anyone by my statement. I have birded with FV on a few occasions, but not recently. Reason ?
>
> His thinking and talk of birds and their habitat ecology is over my head and I feel so inadequate when I am with him birding. So I am boning-up on the subject so I could stand side-by-side with him the next time we get together. However, his current thinking may be an old school, based on my glimpse of Daniel B. Botkins new book, and my own experience.
>
> I do not want to brag. What I am doing at my tiny wooded lot is my own forestry experiment to benefit birds and their habitat. Also, to minimize my bird driving miles. Just to demonstrate to FV, I posted couple of photos of my forestry project that I would call a man-made stand replacement project, which is to convert pitch pine forest to mixed pitch pine and deciduous forest. No trees lost here is the end result and goal.
>
> Sad thing is I stopped my experiment as every place I dig my shovel into the forest floor to advance my project (tree planting and acorn planting, etc.), the same area would explode with invasive species, Japanese Stilt Grass.
>
> Some photos on my Flickr for those who wants to be an armature ecologist like me, or pro like FV.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Yong Kong
> Camden County
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
> or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
> List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
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List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Grand Snag Succumbs to Saw...
Date: Wed May 24 2017 17:52 pm
From: 000003f94418c696-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu
 
I returned to aparticular spot to get some photos of Red-bellied Woodpeckers entering andexiting nest holes.. The tree was no longerstanding.. I understand that at times, trees (living or snags) must betaken down (liability).. However, it always saddens me.. https://www.flickr.com/photos/... Jim Grieshaber. Somerset County


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Subject: Fred V and his Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments
Date: Wed May 24 2017 15:52 pm
From: yklitespeed AT comcast.net
 
Who knew FV who rattled my bird brain on the continue existence of Ivory Woodpecker is still live and well up in N Jersey somewhere. I learned long ago this JBirds is not a bird-forum to talk about what Fred V. and I enjoy the most, which is avian ecology, then second, the bird identification.

But since FV started this wildfire, I will respond to FV, which is Daniel B. Botkins new book,

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd...

Most of the folks I have met here are bird-identifiers, except FV and HT. Hopefully, I did not offend anyone by my statement. I have birded with FV on a few occasions, but not recently. Reason ?

His thinking and talk of birds and their habitat ecology is over my head and I feel so inadequate when I am with him birding. So I am boning-up on the subject so I could stand side-by-side with him the next time we get together. However, his current thinking may be an old school, based on my glimpse of Daniel B. Botkins new book, and my own experience.

I do not want to brag. What I am doing at my tiny wooded lot is my own forestry experiment to benefit birds and their habitat. Also, to minimize my bird driving miles. Just to demonstrate to FV, I posted couple of photos of my forestry project that I would call a man-made stand replacement project, which is to convert pitch pine forest to mixed pitch pine and deciduous forest. No trees lost here is the end result and goal.

Sad thing is I stopped my experiment as every place I dig my shovel into the forest floor to advance my project (tree planting and acorn planting, etc.), the same area would explode with invasive species, Japanese Stilt Grass.

Some photos on my Flickr for those who wants to be an armature ecologist like me, or pro like FV.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: (9) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County
Date: Wed May 24 2017 9:47 am
From: sam.galick AT gmail.com
 
Greg Prelich reports:

"9 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks on Shunpike pond this morning."

West Cape May:

38.949550, -74.935369

Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick@gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/s...


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Subject: Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments
Date: Wed May 24 2017 8:30 am
From: njt456 AT gmail.com
 
I've been told that the cutting/spraying is "scorched earth" so that
"terrorists" bent on destroying part of the power grid can't hide in the
undergrowth. This I was told in all seriousness.

Susie R.


On Wed, May 24, 2017 at 2:59 AM, Fred Vir wrote:

> The Passaic County powerline cuts' herbicide spraying was obvious and
> comprehensive. Specific areas of early successional habitat where the
> avian biomass of birds was impressive are now a sickly, crispy brown, with
> no live stems or leaves.
>
> This habitat has been repeatedly damaged in recent years by overly
> aggressive (too low) bush hogging. The few spared areas on slopes was
> dominated by annuals and herbaceous shrubs that would have never reached a
> height damaging to powerlines. Even the various tree species, in these
> often, poor rocky strips, take decades to reach an "emergency" level. If
> anyone has a utility contact of who might know how this decision was made
> please email me.
>
> Connected to this, these cuts, even when not over hogged and/or sprayed
> are unfortunately places where pure GWWA go to have their progeny's
> genotype destroyed. These right of ways are in general population sinks and
> not sources.; I have found numerous hybrids including a nest packed with
> fledglings in cuts. Who knowst what the extent of the negative impact is
> to the few NJ, NY, PA, etc. GGWA left in nearby natural habitats as these
> numerous, cut hybrids gradually spread. I will stop here before making a
> premature and startlingly assertion.
>
> Regardless these non-sprayed strips supported many plant, insect,
> herptile, avian and mammalian species including bears. This biodiversity
> certainly supported important ecotonal species. Destruction of land
> obligated to be early succesional habitat incrementally damages forest edge
> and forest interior communities.
>
> Not sure where all these advocates for the increase of early successional
> habitat by "thinning" intact forests areas have been, perhaps YK can
> explain.
>
> On the somewhat assumed subpar and /or Northerly microhabitat the pair of
> KEWA have chosen...............the male may have had a better eye than us
> upon this years unusual conditions. Caution is best when questioning
> behavior shaped over hundreds of thousands of years. Flowing or vernal
> surface waters in most NJ areas seems low; insect biomass is not as
> homogeneous as is typical for spring. Together with those few seasonally
> hots days followed by weeks of cloudy, cool weather means that optimal
> insect density can be very localized.
>
> The chosen area is very close and downwind from a stream and the exact,
> "best" SE corner, of a large reservoir. Its been windy this year often
> with a W or N component..the male has chosen an insect funnel. The
> immediate territory was rich in insects and birds.
>
> The female has also likely selected that nest site by detecting the W NW
> slopes block chilling winds. As far as this being a N site or rare site I
> see the point but historically there has been a conspicuous NE pointing
> tongue of the KEWA range that extends ~ 40 miles into NY, reaching S
> Duchess County.
>
> good birdin'
>
> Fred Virrazzi
> Secaucus NJ
>
> On 5/23/2017 6:13 PM, Bill Elrick wrote:
>
>> Hi Just a reminder that spraying herbicide in the water collection area
>> for
>> northern NJ is probably illegal, but they do it every year.
>> Deplorable that they get away with it.
>>
>> Bill
>> On Tue, May 23, 2017 at 12:35 PM CHELEMER, MARC J wrote:
>>
>>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see ting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
> List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...
>


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Subject: Herbicide, Golden-winged and Kentucky Warbler comments
Date: Wed May 24 2017 3:53 am
From: avtrader AT comcast.net
 
The Passaic County powerline cuts' herbicide spraying was obvious and
comprehensive. Specific areas of early successional habitat where the
avian biomass of birds was impressive are now a sickly, crispy brown,
with no live stems or leaves.

This habitat has been repeatedly damaged in recent years by overly
aggressive (too low) bush hogging. The few spared areas on slopes was
dominated by annuals and herbaceous shrubs that would have never reached
a height damaging to powerlines. Even the various tree species, in
these often, poor rocky strips, take decades to reach an "emergency"
level. If anyone has a utility contact of who might know how this
decision was made please email me.

Connected to this, these cuts, even when not over hogged and/or sprayed
are unfortunately places where pure GWWA go to have their progeny's
genotype destroyed. These right of ways are in general population sinks
and not sources.; I have found numerous hybrids including a nest packed
with fledglings in cuts. Who knowst what the extent of the negative
impact is to the few NJ, NY, PA, etc. GGWA left in nearby natural
habitats as these numerous, cut hybrids gradually spread. I will stop
here before making a premature and startlingly assertion.

Regardless these non-sprayed strips supported many plant, insect,
herptile, avian and mammalian species including bears. This biodiversity
certainly supported important ecotonal species. Destruction of land
obligated to be early succesional habitat incrementally damages forest
edge and forest interior communities.

Not sure where all these advocates for the increase of early
successional habitat by "thinning" intact forests areas have been,
perhaps YK can explain.

On the somewhat assumed subpar and /or Northerly microhabitat the pair
of KEWA have chosen...............the male may have had a better eye
than us upon this years unusual conditions. Caution is best when
questioning behavior shaped over hundreds of thousands of years.
Flowing or vernal surface waters in most NJ areas seems low; insect
biomass is not as homogeneous as is typical for spring. Together with
those few seasonally hots days followed by weeks of cloudy, cool
weather means that optimal insect density can be very localized.

The chosen area is very close and downwind from a stream and the exact,
"best" SE corner, of a large reservoir. Its been windy this year often
with a W or N component..the male has chosen an insect funnel. The
immediate territory was rich in insects and birds.

The female has also likely selected that nest site by detecting the W
NW slopes block chilling winds. As far as this being a N site or rare
site I see the point but historically there has been a conspicuous NE
pointing tongue of the KEWA range that extends ~ 40 miles into NY,
reaching S Duchess County.

good birdin'

Fred Virrazzi
Secaucus NJ

On 5/23/2017 6:13 PM, Bill Elrick wrote:
> Hi Just a reminder that spraying herbicide in the water collection area for
> northern NJ is probably illegal, but they do it every year.
> Deplorable that they get away with it.
>
> Bill
> On Tue, May 23, 2017 at 12:35 PM CHELEMER, MARC J wrote:
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
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Subject:
Date: Tue May 23 2017 23:31 pm
From: gardenlady823 AT msn.com
 
Male Bobolink at Bayonne Military Ocean Terminal this afternoon. What an interesting song - sounds like a toy robot. Life bird for me!

https://flic.kr/p/V77GrV


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
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Subject: Traveling birder website
Date: Tue May 23 2017 19:28 pm
From: belrick AT gmail.com
 
It used to be run by a guy from Toronto who kept it up to date with emails
and phone numbers. He gave it up and the new owners have done very little
to enhance it.
It now cost $10.00 to get a password to see the people listed and you then
wait for a reply from people who have moved or changed phone numbers.
I guess it may still work but much harder to get a reply and a connection.
I used it many times in the past but nothing in the last few years.

Bill Elrick.
Wyckoff.

On May 23, 2017 6:30 PM, "David Lapuma" wrote:

> Birdingpal.com
>
> ________________________
> David A. La Puma, PhD
> Director, Cape May Bird Observatory
> New Jersey Audubon
> 600 Route 47 North
> Cape May Court House, NJ 08210
> p: 609.400.3833 (internal use: ext 922)
> c: 732.447.4894
> f: 609.861.1651
>
> w: http://birdcapemay.org
> w: http://www.njaudubon.org
> Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897
>
> Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldnt be done. - Amelia
> Earhart
> ________________________________
> From: JerseyBirds on behalf of Eric Stiles
>
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:12:40 PM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Traveling birder website
>
> [This sender failed our fraud detection checks and may not be who they
> appear to be. Learn about spoofing at http://aka.ms/LearnAboutSpoofi...
>
> Dear All:
>
> I recall reading a posting in the last 6 months mentioning a website where
> you can connect to local birders when travelling to get tips about places
> to bird and perhaps even garner a local to join you.
>
> Thanks in advance to the person(s) who can share this with me. Feel free
> to respond offline.
>
> Happy birding!
>
> Best,
> Eric Stiles, President & CEO
> New Jersey Audubon Society
>
> 11 Hardscrabble Road
> Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
> Phone: 908.396.6369 Fax: 908.766.7775
>
> Website: www.njaudubon.org
>
> Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see reporting-rare-birds/ >>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
> List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
> List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
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Subject: On Kites in Cape May
Date: Tue May 23 2017 19:10 pm
From: sandrakeller AT verizon.net
 
Any sightings today? I checked ebird real quick. 5-21 I think was the last. I think.

I have all day tomorrow free and am heading south.


Sandra Keller
sandrakeller@verizon.net

Sent from my Imac





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Subject: In response to Mike B.’s post about his Olive-sided Flycatcher in JC
Date: Tue May 23 2017 19:08 pm
From: yklitespeed AT comcast.net
 
Before I start rambling, to clear up on one of my last post comment I wrote on 5-20-17, I love Cape May birding and envy so much of local birders there. I did not mean any negative connotations about Cape.  I am just a deek jealous birder who is bent on finding birds in local patch where there are no or very little action most of times I am out.

In referenced to above subject line, I too have to been trying for the past 5 years around the home yard and the adjacent homewoods powerline habitat in search of OSFL during their migration route. To be clear, I am not a nut-job birder as I have documented one about 6 years ago at the same location/habitat. Why am I keep trying again ?

If there is a Habitat Suitability Index model for OSFL, I believe my yard and Homewood's power line habitat may fit to perfection as to the habitat description of preferred migratory habitat for OSFL. Reason why I have been trying every year during OSFL peak migration.

https://scholar.google.com/sch...

Today, after work doing the poor-mans-birding-after workday-hours, I was lucky enough to find one. About the same location as I had observed one about 6 years ago. BTW, this fly never did its beer song.

Some photos on my Flickr for those who may be interested. If you are an ebird lister, I do not recommend my type of birds because most of the times you would bomb and your ebird list would be less than 8 species.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Yong Kong
Camden County




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or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Traveling birder website
Date: Tue May 23 2017 17:30 pm
From: david.lapuma AT njaudubon.org
 
Birdingpal.com

________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Director, Cape May Bird Observatory
New Jersey Audubon
600 Route 47 North
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210
p: 609.400.3833 (internal use: ext 922)
c: 732.447.4894
f: 609.861.1651

w: http://birdcapemay.org
w: http://www.njaudubon.org
Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldnt be done. - Amelia Earhart
________________________________
From: JerseyBirds on behalf of Eric Stiles
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:12:40 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Traveling birder website

[This sender failed our fraud detection checks and may not be who they appear to be. Learn about spoofing at http://aka.ms/LearnAboutSpoofi...

Dear All:

I recall reading a posting in the last 6 months mentioning a website where you can connect to local birders when travelling to get tips about places to bird and perhaps even garner a local to join you.

Thanks in advance to the person(s) who can share this with me. Feel free to respond offline.

Happy birding!

Best,
Eric Stiles, President & CEO
New Jersey Audubon Society

11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
Phone: 908.396.6369 Fax: 908.766.7775

Website: www.njaudubon.org

Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897



How to report NJ bird sightings: see >
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Pequannock Watershed
Date: Tue May 23 2017 17:13 pm
From: belrick AT gmail.com
 
Hi Just a reminder that spraying herbicide in the water collection area for
northern NJ is probably illegal, but they do it every year.
Deplorable that they get away with it.

Bill
On Tue, May 23, 2017 at 12:35 PM CHELEMER, MARC J wrote:

> Jerseybirders,
>
> Today, Louis Bizzarro was kind enough to take me birding in "his" area:
> the Pequannock Watershed. Between 6:00 and 9:15, we covered Mud Pond Road,
> the Holland Mountain Road power-line cut, and several stops along Clinton
> Road. We found one singing male Golden-winged Warbler along the power line
> cut, despite the vegetation having been sprayed with a herbicide, thereby
> creating a long path of brown and dead shrubbery. The grasses have
> survived, however, and a couple of "groves" of low trees escaped the
> killing power of the chemical; it was near one of those micro-groves that
> we found the Golden-winged. It is one of my favorite Parulidae.
>
> Along Clinton Road, the improbable male Kentucky Warbler first identified
> by Chris Payne last week was singing loudly in the same area it's been
> frequenting-the intersection of Clinton and Schoolhouse Cove Road. We got
> a great look at it when it flew up to an exposed perch, foraged for a
> moment or two, and sang loudly. Nearby, a Hooded Warbler male also
> "weeta-wee-tee-oh'd" loudly from its exposed perch, each bird, it appeared
> for a moment, trying to out-sing the other.
>
> All the other "ordinary" Pequannock Watershed birds were present-many
> warbler species, YT Vireo, two Black-billed Cuckoos (heard only), Acadian
> Flycatcher (ditto), except for Cerulean Warbler. Louis and I had birded a
> couple of these spots last year looking for the same species; I appear to
> be a jinx, since he has seen or heard them in the area we covered every
> time he visits, except for when I am around! Nevertheless, a wonderful
> morning. The ticks were so numerous at the first two locations that I am
> still finding them on my clothes, despite very careful check-overs we each
> did hours ago. And the mosquitoes were whining loudly among the
> evergreens. Nature's abundant food sources, but also the bane of non-Off
> sprayed birders!
>
> Good birding,
>
> Marc J. Chelemer
> Tenafly, NJ
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
> List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Traveling birder website
Date: Tue May 23 2017 17:12 pm
From: eric.stiles AT njaudubon.org
 
Dear All:

I recall reading a posting in the last 6 months mentioning a website where you can connect to local birders when travelling to get tips about places to bird and perhaps even garner a local to join you.

Thanks in advance to the person(s) who can share this with me. Feel free to respond offline.

Happy birding!

Best,
Eric Stiles, President & CEO
New Jersey Audubon Society

11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
Phone: 908.396.6369 Fax: 908.766.7775

Website: www.njaudubon.org

Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897



How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Pequannock Watershed
Date: Tue May 23 2017 11:35 am
From: mc2496 AT att.com
 
Jerseybirders,

Today, Louis Bizzarro was kind enough to take me birding in "his" area: the Pequannock Watershed. Between 6:00 and 9:15, we covered Mud Pond Road, the Holland Mountain Road power-line cut, and several stops along Clinton Road. We found one singing male Golden-winged Warbler along the power line cut, despite the vegetation having been sprayed with a herbicide, thereby creating a long path of brown and dead shrubbery. The grasses have survived, however, and a couple of "groves" of low trees escaped the killing power of the chemical; it was near one of those micro-groves that we found the Golden-winged. It is one of my favorite Parulidae.

Along Clinton Road, the improbable male Kentucky Warbler first identified by Chris Payne last week was singing loudly in the same area it's been frequenting-the intersection of Clinton and Schoolhouse Cove Road. We got a great look at it when it flew up to an exposed perch, foraged for a moment or two, and sang loudly. Nearby, a Hooded Warbler male also "weeta-wee-tee-oh'd" loudly from its exposed perch, each bird, it appeared for a moment, trying to out-sing the other.

All the other "ordinary" Pequannock Watershed birds were present-many warbler species, YT Vireo, two Black-billed Cuckoos (heard only), Acadian Flycatcher (ditto), except for Cerulean Warbler. Louis and I had birded a couple of these spots last year looking for the same species; I appear to be a jinx, since he has seen or heard them in the area we covered every time he visits, except for when I am around! Nevertheless, a wonderful morning. The ticks were so numerous at the first two locations that I am still finding them on my clothes, despite very careful check-overs we each did hours ago. And the mosquitoes were whining loudly among the evergreens. Nature's abundant food sources, but also the bane of non-Off sprayed birders!

Good birding,

Marc J. Chelemer
Tenafly, NJ



How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Brig
Date: Mon May 22 2017 17:43 pm
From: belrick AT gmail.com
 
Hi I had 2 Moorhens and 5 white rumps today. Some Red knot and Tricolored
on great Bay.
Bill Elrick
Wyckoff.


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Subject: Flooded field birding - Camden - nothing
Date: Mon May 22 2017 14:57 pm
From: sandrakeller AT verizon.net
 
I had a couple hours this late morning before my birding mobile in for its
60,000 mile servicing. What to do?? Nothing like exploring for stuff on
newly flooded fields! It was still heavy rain when I left to head east. Does reduce
visiblity a lot, but ibis, herons, and egrets would be showing. If around.....
Nothing but mixed blackbird flocks and Mallards. The Wynham Hill pumping
station was completely flooded. Swallows feeding over it in the rain. Juvenile
Barn mainly. Explains why I had swallows in groups at dusk a couple days ago.
They have already bred! Seems earlier....

Anyway, nothing else. I will hit here again in a few days. I also need to camp
out at Damblys for a Raven!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
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Subject: Blind question
Date: Mon May 22 2017 10:52 am
From: Christina.Davis AT dep.nj.gov
 
Thanks very much to everyone who replied to my blind question -- your answers are being passed along to the site designers.


Appreciate it!


Kashi Dave,

Cape May Point, NJ



Christina Davis
Endangered and Nongame Species Program
NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife
2201 County Route 631
Woodbine, NJ 08270

o.609.628.1919
c.609.960.6614
f. 609.628.2734
________________________________
From: Davis, Christina
Sent: Saturday, May 20, 2017 11:39:14 AM
To: Jersey Birds
Subject: Blind question

Birder poll -- tell me what you think the ideal blind size (in terms of number of people it can hold) ? Think of this in terms of blinds around what may one day be an impoundment around Pond Creek at Higbees WMA. There will be multiple ones, so different sizes ok/encouraged. Our thought was larger near parking lot and smaller the further you go -- perhaps from ~20 ppl to ~8? What would you, the birding public we wish to serve, like?

Thanks!
Kashi Davis
Cape May Point, NJ


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Subject: Forsythe
Date: Sun May 21 2017 11:15 am
From: wadda101 AT verizon.net
 
Common Gallinule at Gull Pond tower @ 11am... in and out of reeds


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Subject: Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders
Date: Sun May 21 2017 7:05 am
From: dclouie AT optonline.net
 
Subject: RE: [JERSEYBI] Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders
Apologies i misspoke again-- should be ST kite. Diane


Sent via my Samsung Galaxy, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: DC Louie Date: 5/20/17 3:18 PM (GMT-05:00) To: Sandra Keller , JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU Cc: Diane Louie Subject: RE: [JERSEYBI] Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders
Not to make you feel bad, side by sidesoaring Mississippi and FT kites seen @Lighthouse Pt during Mark Garland's Cmbo Spring Fest walk this a.m.--Diane Louie , Madison (writing from Cape May).


Sent via my Samsung Galaxy, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Sandra Keller Date: 5/20/17 12:52 PM (GMT-05:00) To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU Subject: [JERSEYBI] Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders
Hello,
The AWS trip this morning had hardly any migrants. 2 Swainson's Thrushes
being it. The breeders put on a show though! We enjoyed a Robin trying to
catch a Red-banded Hairstreak that was low to the ground in the cold weather.
The Hairstreak survived! A GB Heron was seen catching a fish - then flying off
with it to feed young I would imagine. Thats one species that isn't confirmed for
an area as carrying food - feeding young - as they will fly great distances with
food back to a nest. I will add that category though with notes in the comments.
A couple Cooper's Hawks. One was 1/10 of a second look. But it called! You have
to use what you can with poor accipiter looks. It's getting very late for Sharpie
now also. Although I always like to be sure.

A Solitary Sandpiper was on a muddy area along the creek. That would be a
migrant.

Good birding all. Keep looking up! I have been the past several days hoping
for a Kite in Camden County. No such luck!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Negative bird report but you just gotta try to trump Cape May birding
Date: Sat May 20 2017 18:03 pm
From: yklitespeed AT comcast.net
 
Today is one of those rare occasions that a Jbirder has invited me to a birding trip. But as a deek birder I declined. Reason ?

With the recent invasion of Kites down at Cape May, and the sudden change in the wind direction from the northeast and from the Atlantic was intriguing enough to the point that I turned into a nut-job birder, and set up a MIKI watch on my driveway.

Of course I bombed. Strong smell of wildfire smoke blowing all the way from Shamong Township, Burlington County (about 12 miles northeast from my house) to over my home sky was a fantastic sign that potential MIKI movement in Camden County was very possible. No regret for not taking the MIKI trip to Cape May, especially finding out that a beginner birder (that would be me) and the expert birder, Sandra, do predict hope-bird movement in a similar way.

Distant Red-tailed or an bald eagle that I was unable to ID to perfection. Also, I put photos of another raptor on my Flickr to prove a point that photo ID has its limitations, especially by those who did not take the photo.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: East Brunswick Spring Birding Day
Date: Sat May 20 2017 16:48 pm
From: Steven.Albert AT aecom.com
 
Today I led East Brunswick's Spring EB Birding Day around town.  We shortened things as it rained and even though it stopped by late morning, the wind and gloom put a damper on things. But, the good news is that our visits to Dallenbach's, Heavenly Farms and Edgeboro Landfill yielded over 60 species. We didn't beat last year's 64, but given the day, not too shabby. We missed some ordinary locals like Mallards, and House Finches, and didn't hear or see Grasshopper Sparrows at Heavenly Farms. And overall it seems we heard more than we saw. Not too many migrants. But we identified six warblers, including a Blackburnian, Scarlet Tanager, Indigo Bunting, both Orioles, and Willow and Great-crested flycatchers. No complaints!!

Good birding.

SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert@aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122



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Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher in JC
Date: Sat May 20 2017 16:31 pm
From: sootyshear AT gmail.com
 
I got a phonecall from Ed Borowik, late morning on Wednesday (5/17). He
found my "county nemisis" at Lincoln Park West in Jersey City. In an
interesting exercise, take a look at the eBird bar charts and you can see a
direct line of flight (recent sightings within a three day window) through
Staten Island to Lincoln Park. It's interesting to wonder if the Sandy Hook
birds jump over to the other four boroughs (Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, &
Bronx) and if the Staten Island birds take that more inland route through
Middlesex county, before making the water crossing? Staten Island birds can
certainly be from The Hook too. Being a species with high site fidelity in
regards to stopover habitat selection (seen on exact snags during
migration), I'd bet that the species is annual here spring and fall...it
was in a sheltered part of the park (barring the noise from Rt. 440 & 1&9)
with lots of insect activity. Only time will tell. Any thoughts are
welcomed.

eBird bar charts:

http://ebird.org/ebird/map/ols... 17&env.minX=-75.568&env.minY8.93&env.maxX=-73.894&env.maxYA.358&gp=true

eBird checklist with pics:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders
Date: Sat May 20 2017 14:15 pm
From: dclouie AT optonline.net
 
Not to make you feel bad, side by sidesoaring Mississippi and FT kites seen @Lighthouse Pt during Mark Garland's Cmbo Spring Fest walk this a.m.--Diane Louie , Madison (writing from Cape May).


Sent via my Samsung Galaxy, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Sandra Keller Date: 5/20/17 12:52 PM (GMT-05:00) To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU Subject: [JERSEYBI] Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders
Hello,
The AWS trip this morning had hardly any migrants. 2 Swainson's Thrushes
being it. The breeders put on a show though! We enjoyed a Robin trying to
catch a Red-banded Hairstreak that was low to the ground in the cold weather.
The Hairstreak survived! A GB Heron was seen catching a fish - then flying off
with it to feed young I would imagine. Thats one species that isn't confirmed for
an area as carrying food - feeding young - as they will fly great distances with
food back to a nest. I will add that category though with notes in the comments.
A couple Cooper's Hawks. One was 1/10 of a second look. But it called! You have
to use what you can with poor accipiter looks. It's getting very late for Sharpie
now also. Although I always like to be sure.

A Solitary Sandpiper was on a muddy area along the creek. That would be a
migrant.

Good birding all. Keep looking up! I have been the past several days hoping
for a Kite in Camden County. No such luck!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Blind question
Date: Sat May 20 2017 14:08 pm
From: dclouie AT optonline.net
 
I like your notion of at least 1 large blind near the lot for birding groups and environmental education. The Rspb blinds Ive visited in the UK have good designs including portable benches for children, folks who need assistance or just the tired. I like the raisable louvres at the Northwoods Cmbo Center's DeWitt Garden blind vs the fixed slits at the blind at the Great Swamp. ( I am vertically challenged and can't find a good view at GS without sliding around the blind like Goldilocks.) For photographers a ledge would be good for steadying elbows. 
Diane Louie, Madison (writing from Cape May)

Sent via my Samsung Galaxy, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "Davis, Christina" Date: 5/20/17 11:39 AM (GMT-05:00) To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU Subject: [JERSEYBI] Blind question
Birder poll -- tell me what you think the ideal blind size (in terms of number of people it can hold) ? Think of this in terms of blinds around what may one day be an impoundment around Pond Creek at Higbees WMA. There will be multiple ones, so different sizes ok/encouraged. Our thought was larger near parking lot and smaller the further you go -- perhaps from ~20 ppl to ~8? What would you, the birding public we wish to serve, like?

Thanks!
Kashi Davis
Cape May Point, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
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How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...



Subject: Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants and breeders
Date: Sat May 20 2017 11:52 am
From: sandrakeller AT verizon.net
 
Hello,
The AWS trip this morning had hardly any migrants. 2 Swainson's Thrushes
being it. The breeders put on a show though! We enjoyed a Robin trying to
catch a Red-banded Hairstreak that was low to the ground in the cold weather.
The Hairstreak survived! A GB Heron was seen catching a fish - then flying off
with it to feed young I would imagine. Thats one species that isn't confirmed for
an area as carrying food - feeding young - as they will fly great distances with
food back to a nest. I will add that category though with notes in the comments.
A couple Cooper's Hawks. One was 1/10 of a second look. But it called! You have
to use what you can with poor accipiter looks. It's getting very late for Sharpie
now also. Although I always like to be sure.

A Solitary Sandpiper was on a muddy area along the creek. That would be a
migrant.

Good birding all. Keep looking up! I have been the past several days hoping
for a Kite in Camden County. No such luck!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
or e-mail to njbrcreport@gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request@lists.princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cg...


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