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Updated on February 19, 2018, 1:15 pm

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19 Feb: @ 13:10:09 Re: Field Trip to the Wichita's on Feb 24th [Jennie Brooks]
19 Feb: @ 12:35:43 Another round of photos added to my website [Jim Arterburn]
18 Feb: @ 21:35:28 Today's Birds [Bill Carrell]
18 Feb: @ 21:02:55 Re: Midwest City Woodcockery [Mia Revels]
18 Feb: @ 20:47:47 Tonight's Woodcock Report [Mia Revels]
18 Feb: @ 19:24:47 Midwest City Woodcockery [Jimmy Woodard]
18 Feb: @ 19:13:43 Field Trip to the Wichita's on Feb 24th [Kurt Meisenzahl]
18 Feb: @ 17:06:38 Re: McCurtain County Ringed Kingfisher update [Tal Roberts]
18 Feb: @ 16:35:37 McCurtain County Ringed Kingfisher update [David Arbour]
18 Feb: @ 02:34:53 Re: American Woodcock update for Cherokee County: [Mary Peterson]
17 Feb: @ 22:11:42 American Woodcock update for Cherokee County: [Mia Revels]
17 Feb: @ 17:53:14 Ringed Kingfisher update - McCurtain County [David Arbour]
17 Feb: @ 14:08:32 Ringed Kingfisher [Sandy Berger]
16 Feb: @ 07:49:36 Photos added to PBase website [Jim Arterburn]
15 Feb: @ 19:38:21 The Feather Atlas [NATHAN KUHNERT]
14 Feb: @ 21:52:40 Oklahoma American Woodcocks are displaying here in Tahlequah! [Mia Revels]
14 Feb: @ 21:10:11 Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 14 [David Arbour]
14 Feb: @ 13:49:55 FW: eBird Report - Oklahoma, Feb 14, 2018 [Jimmy Woodard]
14 Feb: @ 13:48:36 FW: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Feb 14, 2018 [Jimmy Woodard]
13 Feb: @ 18:27:03 Re: Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest [[email protected]]
13 Feb: @ 12:17:32 Re: Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest [Sandy Berger]
13 Feb: @ 11:58:19 Re: Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest [Dan Reinking]
13 Feb: @ 11:53:18 Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest [Sandy Berger]
11 Feb: @ 14:31:05 Ice on the ground [Bob annd Nancy]
11 Feb: @ 11:58:50 Nickel Preserve Winter Bird Count Results [Mia Revels]
10 Feb: @ 07:49:14 Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell [HAROLD YOCUM]
09 Feb: @ 18:56:24 Eagles nest at Sequoyah wild life refuge [C Pickern]
09 Feb: @ 15:21:52 Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell [Scott Loss]
09 Feb: @ 12:02:41 Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell [Curtis, Tom]
09 Feb: @ 11:58:06 Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell [EUGENE YOUNG]
09 Feb: @ 11:42:41 NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell [Scott Loss]
09 Feb: @ 09:30:15 Least Grebe - Lake Carl Blackwell (tentative retraction of sighting) [Scott Loss]
09 Feb: @ 09:19:18 FW: eBird Report - Okemah Lake, Feb 8, 2018 [Jimmy Woodard]
09 Feb: @ 08:50:54 Least Grebe - Lake Carl Blackwell [Scott Loss]
08 Feb: @ 20:52:11 FW: eBird Report - Okfuskee County, OK, US, Feb 8, 2018 [Jimmy Woodard]
07 Feb: @ 21:41:40 Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 7 [David Arbour]
07 Feb: @ 17:52:18 FW: eBird Report - Prague Lake City Park, Feb 7, 2018 [Jimmy Woodard]
07 Feb: @ 17:48:44 FW: eBird Report - Meeker Lake, Feb 7, 2018 [Jimmy Woodard]
07 Feb: @ 15:27:33 Re: Wichita Falls area [Lynn Romine]
07 Feb: @ 08:09:45 From National Geographic: The Epic Journeys of Migratory Birds [email]
06 Feb: @ 20:05:15 Re: Wichita Falls area [Larry Mays]
06 Feb: @ 17:30:40 Wichita Falls area [Jennie Brooks]
06 Feb: @ 13:55:09 Re: Canton Lake [HAROLD YOCUM]
06 Feb: @ 09:15:09 Re: Canton Lake [Jennie Brooks]
06 Feb: @ 03:12:29 Re: Canton Lake [Harold A. Yocum]
06 Feb: @ 00:32:44 Re: Canton Lake [Steve Davis]
05 Feb: @ 13:58:41 Re: White winged dove [Linda Adams]
05 Feb: @ 13:29:01 Re: White winged dove [Hollis Price]
05 Feb: @ 13:13:19 Re: White winged dove [Jennifer Kidney]
05 Feb: @ 12:10:51 Re: White winged dove [Nick LoLordo]





Subject: Re: Field Trip to the Wichita's on Feb 24th
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 13:10 pm
From: 2014birder AT gmail.com
 
Wonderful. We had a conflict on the 24th. Derek and I are hoping to attend on the 3rd. Will confirm before the 3rd.Kurt - we went on our first group trip with Larry Mays on Feb 3rd. Had a great time and looking forward to our second.Thank you.Jennie Brooks
On Sun, Feb 18, 2018 at 7:13 PM, Kurt Meisenzahl <[email protected]> wrote:
I have to move the field trip currently scheduledon Feb 24thto the Wichita Mountains to Saturday, March 3rd.Meeting time and place are the same.
Just 2 responses so far - and I have contacted those folks about the change. See correct email address below.

Kurt MeisenzahlLawton, [email protected]



Subject: Another round of photos added to my website
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 12:35 pm
From: JIMARTERBURN AT cox.net
 
OKBirds,
I have added more photos to my website. Some of the species added include Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Blue Jay, Cedar Waxwing, Eastern Bluebird, a leucistic Great Blue Heron, Golden-crowned Kinglet, House Finch including a yellow-orange variant, Northern Harrier, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Red Crossbill, several hawk species and others. The new photos are at the beginning of my "Recent Birds" gallery at the link below.
http://www.pbase.com/oklahomab...
Jim Arterburn



Subject: Today's Birds
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 21:35 pm
From: cyanocitta.tachopteryx AT gmail.com
 
Hello All,
Passed on pursuing the kingfisher today, but did find a couple of species that I had not seen in more than ten years: Red-Necked Grebe at Lake Hefner, and Long-Eared Owl at Waurika. Only one of the latter, about 50 ft from the edge of the road. Probably more were there, I suspect that the wind had pushed them back further into the trees. Kind of amazing how well they blend in with the trunks of the Honey Locusts. Also, at least five Long-Tailed Ducks were still hanging around behind the dam at Waurika. No Scoters though.
Good Birding,
Bill CarrellTulsa, OK



Subject: Re: Midwest City Woodcockery
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 21:02 pm
From: 0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request AT lists.ou.edu
 
Jimmy,
DEFINITELY COUNTS!
Mia

On Sun, Feb 18, 2018 at 7:24 PM, Jimmy Woodard <[email protected]> wrote:
This morning at 6:50AM, I heard a Woodcock doing the twittering flight display just to the west of our house in Midwest City. This is a new bird for our yard list. I was standing in our yard when I heard it so it counts, right? Jimmy Woodard Midwest City, OK

--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.Professor of BiologyNortheastern State University611 Grand Ave.Tahlequah, Oklahoma(918) [email protected]

**CONFIDENTIALITY**-This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.



Subject: Tonight's Woodcock Report
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 20:47 pm
From: 0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request AT lists.ou.edu
 
We flushed two American Woodcocks from the brush this afternoon while taking a "shortcut" to our roost. Then, after we were all seated, an early-bird woodcock flew in front of us at 6:08, landed just behind our thicket, peented a few times, then was silent. It was a while before all the other males got to peenting, but we estimated that there were at least 4 (maybe 5/6) males out there tonight. We saw three full displays, two of which were right in front of us - with a row ofgrass between us and the bird. While he was in the air for his last display we scurried over to his lane and sat on the ground. He landed in the same spot again and several of us got good looks before he just sort of strolled into the underbrush at 6:30. As we were packing up and leaving, he blasted back out and flew behind us again. No close calls tonight, but several very nice views. The land owner visited with us on the way out. It was nice to get to thank him in person. He really enjoys seeing people enjoy the land that he takes such good care of. And we really enjoy the privilege!
Mia RevelsTahlequah, OK
--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.Professor of BiologyNortheastern State University611 Grand Ave.Tahlequah, Oklahoma(918) [email protected]

**CONFIDENTIALITY**-This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.



Subject: Midwest City Woodcockery
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 19:24 pm
From: j.woodard AT cox.net
 
This morning at 6:50AM, I heard a Woodcock doing the twittering flight display just to the west of our house
in Midwest City.
This is a new bird for our yard list. I was standing in our yard when I heard it so it counts, right?
Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK



Subject: Field Trip to the Wichita's on Feb 24th
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 19:13 pm
From: meisenzk AT sbcglobal.net
 
I have to move the field trip currently scheduledon Feb 24thto the Wichita Mountains to Saturday, March 3rd.Meeting time and place are the same.
Just 2 responses so far - and I have contacted those folks about the change. See correct email address below.

Kurt MeisenzahlLawton, [email protected]



Subject: Re: McCurtain County Ringed Kingfisher update
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 17:06 pm
From: talrob2 AT sbcglobal.net
 
Sorry to hear it, David. I™ll bet you had a good-sized group.
Was shocked when I heard this guy was up there! Another Hurricane Harvey transplant?
Best,
Tal

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Sunday, February 18, 2018, 4:36 PM, David Arbour <[email protected]> wrote:
We were unable to relocate the Ringed Kingfisher today. The weather was cold with heavy overcast skies and a moderate east wind. Hopefully the bird is nearby on one of the many nearby ponds and will be back when the weather improves. We will keep checking for it. David ArbourDe Queen, AR



Subject: McCurtain County Ringed Kingfisher update
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 16:35 pm
From: arbour AT windstream.net
 
We were unable to relocate the Ringed Kingfisher today. The weather was cold with heavy overcast skies and a moderate east wind. Hopefully the bird is nearby on one of the many nearby ponds and will be back when the weather improves. We will keep checking for it.
David Arbour
De Queen, AR



Subject: Re: American Woodcock update for Cherokee County:
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 2:34 am
From: m_mpeterson AT hotmail.com
 
It was not as exciting as what Mia had, but a group of us gathered several hundred yards north of the gate to the Oxley Nature Center in Tulsa,Saturday evening. The first woodcock started calling about 6:20 and
it was joined by at least 6 others over the next 20 minutes. One landed for about a minute less that 50 feet away.


Mark Peterson
Bartlesville



From: okbirds <OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU> on behalf of Mia Revels <[email protected]>
Sent: Saturday, February 17, 2018 10:11 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] American Woodcock update for Cherokee County:




ATTACK OF THE KILLER WOODCOCK!


Okay, not really, but I did have my closest encounter with an American Woodcock tonight ever in my long history of woodcock adventures. I returned to the
field tonight after nearly 1/2 inch of rain and hiked into the thorny thickets to the spot where I felt certain I knew a male would land. An ornithology student was with me, and we settled into our chairs in the brush with the trees to our backs. After waiting
for the sun to set and the peenting to begin, we were rewarded with lots of male action.


There was peenting, kakaking, flights to and from the shrubbery, spiral battles....and then....We both saw
a male zooming toward us along the path at our eye level. It was headed straight for Josh's head (he later told me that he was seconds away from "fight or flight" when the woodcock changed path). I was completely paralyzed. It missed his head and flew past
my face with only inches to spare. I literally felt the breeze of his passage. I am pretty sure that my heart stopped. The woodcock landed just behind us and we both got good looks of him while he peented and turned, peented and turned, and eventually flew
off a-twittering. We compared notes about how exciting it all was, and how we nearly died, but were immediately distracted by all the woodcock action surrounding us.


There were at least 6 males in our hearing/sight range. Since there was only one in that area last night,
they must have all arrived today and were duking it out over lek sites (maybe?). We did get to witness two full aerial displays in addition to the rest of the social activities. One of the best nights ever for me, given the Close Encounter of the Woodcock
Kind. First Peent was at 6:17 and it wasn't over until 6:43. 23 minutes of Woodcock Love.



Mia Revels
Tahlequah OK
--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Northeastern State University
611 Grand Ave.
Tahlequah, Oklahoma
(918) 444-3824
[email protected]


















**CONFIDENTIALITY**-This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.



Subject: American Woodcock update for Cherokee County:
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 22:11 pm
From: 0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request AT lists.ou.edu
 
ATTACK OF THE KILLER WOODCOCK!
Okay, not really, but I did have my closest encounter with an American Woodcock tonight ever in my long history of woodcock adventures. I returned to the field tonight after nearly 1/2 inch of rain and hiked into the thorny thickets to the spot where I felt certain I knew a male would land. An ornithology student was with me, and we settled into our chairs in the brush with the trees to our backs. After waiting for the sun to set and the peenting to begin, we were rewarded with lots of male action.
There was peenting, kakaking, flights to and from the shrubbery, spiral battles....and then....We both saw a male zooming toward us along the path at our eye level. It was headed straight for Josh's head (he later told me that he was seconds away from "fight or flight" when the woodcock changed path). I was completely paralyzed. It missed his head and flew past my face with only inches to spare. I literally felt the breeze of his passage. I am pretty sure that my heart stopped. The woodcock landed just behind us and we both got good looks of him while he peented and turned, peented and turned, and eventually flew off a-twittering. We compared notes about how exciting it all was, and how we nearly died, but were immediately distracted by all the woodcock action surrounding us.
There were at least 6 males in our hearing/sight range. Since there was only one in that area last night, they must have all arrived today and were duking it out over lek sites (maybe?). We did get to witness two full aerial displays in addition to the rest of the social activities. One of the best nights ever for me, given the Close Encounter of the Woodcock Kind. First Peent was at 6:17 and it wasn't over until 6:43. 23 minutes of Woodcock Love.

Mia RevelsTahlequah OK--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.Professor of BiologyNortheastern State University611 Grand Ave.Tahlequah, Oklahoma(918) [email protected]

**CONFIDENTIALITY**-This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.



Subject: Ringed Kingfisher update - McCurtain County
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 17:53 pm
From: arbour AT windstream.net
 
I got a call from Dr. Chris Butler a little before noon today that he and his Ornithology class had found a Ringed Kingfisher at the OSU Forestry Research Station near Idabel. I got there as fast as I could. When I got there they had the bird in site and showed me. Ford Hendershot and Dennis Wilson were there as well. We watched the bird for an hour and a half as it sat on the same perch the whole time. Then it flew around for a bit calling and we temporarily lost it but it was back at 4:30 this evening. The research station is closed on the weekends but I got permission to take birders in there to see the bird at 10 a.m. in the morning (Sunday). So if you want to see it be there. The station is about 3 miles east of Idabel on Highway 3. If you can™t come tomorrow but want to come on a weekday you must contact the OSU Forestry research station or Dennis Wilson (the Biologist/manager) for permission to enter the site. I don™t have the stations number but here is Dennis™ number: 580-286-8173. If you arrive late, my number is: 870-582-3623.
David Arbour
De Queen, AR



Subject: Ringed Kingfisher
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:08 pm
From: sndbrgr AT gmail.com
 
Reported on ABA rare bird Facebook page"RINGED KINGFISHER - OSU Kiamichi Forestry Research Station in Idabel (McCurtain County) Oklahoma. Private property- ask the station for access
The superintendent of the station is okay with me letting other people know about this sighting."
Sandy B



Subject: Photos added to PBase website
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 7:49 am
From: JIMARTERBURN AT cox.net
 
OKBirds,
I have uploaded some photos to my website. For this update I have added waterfowl photos from this winter. They can be seen at the following link.
http://www.pbase.com/oklahomab...
For those interested I have also added my butterfly photos from last fall as well as photos of Big Horn Sheep, Pronghorn and Mule Deer from Cimarron County from late November. These photos can be seen at the links below.
Mammals -http://www.pbase.com/oklahomab...
Butterflies -http://www.pbase.com/oklahomab...
I hope you enjoy these photos.
Jim Arterburn



Subject: The Feather Atlas
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 19:38 pm
From: nrkuhnert AT sbcglobal.net
 
Dear OK-birders,
I came across a very neat website today on flight feather identification published by the USFWS Forensics Laboratory:
https://www.fws.gov/lab/feathe...

The scanned images are extremely sharp and I found the site easy to navigate and conduct searches.
Sincerely,
Nathan KuhnertNorman, OK



Subject: Oklahoma American Woodcocks are displaying here in Tahlequah!
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 21:52 pm
From: 0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request AT lists.ou.edu
 
Waffle and I went out tonight for "Woodcock Date Night" - our traditional first woodcock trip of the year, on or near Valentine's Day, weather permitting. Our hopes were not high, since it has been so dry these past two years. However, we were treated to full male displays! There was lots of peenting, kakaking, and fly-bys.We also saw males doing some spiral dueling flights. There were at least 3 males out there, maybe more. Came home to filet mignon, cheddar mashed potatoes, and green beans. Life is good. The Woodcockery has begun!
--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.Professor of BiologyNortheastern State University611 Grand Ave.Tahlequah, Oklahoma(918) [email protected]

**CONFIDENTIALITY**-This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.



Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 14
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 21:10 pm
From: arbour AT windstream.net
 
It was calm, overcast, cool, and foggy with on and off misting rain on the bird survey today. 69 species were found. The Neotropic Cormorant continues on Otter Lake and I managed to find a couple wintering King Rails. The rain kept me in my vehicle most of the day birding along the gravel roads. A long break from the rain in the afternoon gave me a chance to walk a mile and a half of a levee that were too wet to drive on, which resulted in lots of rails and wrens. Here is my list for today:
Greater White-fronted Goose “ 15
Ross™ Goose “ 3
Canada Goose “ 2
Wood Duck - 2
Gadwall “ 150
American Wigeon - 3
Mallard - 398
Northern Shoveler - 27
Northern Pintail - 60
Green-winged Teal - 800
Ring-necked Duck “ 422
Hooded Merganser - 26
Ruddy Duck - 6
Pied-billed Grebe “ 1
American White Pelican - 1
Neotropic Cormorant - 1
Double-crested Cormorant - 13
Great-blue Heron - 5
Turkey Vulture - 11
Northern Harrier “ 4
Accipiter species - 1
Red-tailed Hawk “ 7
King Rail - 2
Virginia Rail - 8
American Coot - 264
Killdeer - 2
Greater Yellowlegs - 6
Wilsons Snipe - 2
Rock Pigeon - 2
Mourning Dove - 66
Belted Kingfisher - 5
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 6
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2
Downy Woodpecker - 5
Hairy Woodpecker - 1
Northern Flicker - 6
Eastern Phoebe - 5
Blue Jay - 7
American Crow - 37
Fish Crow - 3
Carolina Chickadee “ 2
Tufted Titmouse “ 2
Carolina Wren “ 6
House Wren - 1
Sedge Wren - 6
Marsh Wren “ 7
Ruby-crowned Kinglet “ 3
Eastern Bluebird “ 1
American Robin - 56
Northern Mockingbird - 1
Brown Thrasher “ 3
Cedar Waxwing - 60
Orange-crowned Warbler - 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler “ 3
Common Yellowthroat - 1
Eastern Towhee - 1
Savannah Sparrow - 26
Fox Sparrow - 8
Song Sparrow “ 37
Swamp Sparrow - 4
White-throated Sparrow “ 9
Harris™ Sparrow - 5
White-crowned Sparrow “ 19
Dark-eyed Junco - 1
Northern Cardinal - 21
Red-winged Blackbird - 114
Eastern Meadowlark - 17
Rusty Blackbird - 20
Common Grackle “ 3
Herps:Cajun Chorus Frogs “ calling
Southern Leopard Frog - calling
Good birding!
David Arbour
De Queen, AR



Subject: FW: eBird Report - Oklahoma, Feb 14, 2018
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 13:49 pm
From: j.woodard AT cox.net
 
Nice to see a city Roadrunner once in awhile. I was kidding with Nadine that perhaps
It escaped from the OKC Zoo since it was about a mile north of there.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK


Oklahoma, Oklahoma, US
Feb 14, 2018 12:15 PM
Protocol: Incidental
Comments: one roadrunner seen on right of way south of I-44 just east of MLK Blvd.
1 species

Greater Roadrunner 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: FW: eBird Report - Lake Hefner, Feb 14, 2018
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 13:48 pm
From: j.woodard AT cox.net
 
Nadine and I did a quick Valentine's Day spin around Lake Hefner. Found some goodies like
Surf Scoter, Eared Grebe and Pacific Loon. Could not find the Red-necked Grebe but perhaps
We didn't walk far enough to the north end.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK


Lake Hefner, Oklahoma, Oklahoma, US
Feb 14, 2018 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
51 species (+1 other taxa)

Cackling Goose 10
Canada Goose 55
Northern Shoveler 10
Gadwall 20
Mallard 50
Northern Pintail 14
Redhead 35
Greater Scaup 40 seen well thru scopes. green, rounded head with very white sides. wide heads with large black nails on tip of bills.
Lesser Scaup 25
Greater/Lesser Scaup 100
Surf Scoter 1 overall dark brown female with white spots between bill and eye and behind the eye. no white wing patch. very large triangular bill. larger that other waterfowl nearby.
Bufflehead 10
Common Goldeneye 12
Common Merganser 4
Red-breasted Merganser 80
Pacific Loon 1 small than several Commons next to it. grayish on neck and head with darker area around the eye. smaller, less blocky head that Commons. white on neck with a hint of collar across the neck.
Common Loon 7
Pied-billed Grebe 40
Horned Grebe 20
Eared Grebe 1 seemed smaller than nearby Horned. dark smudge on face behind and below the eye.
Double-crested Cormorant 70
American White Pelican 36
Great Blue Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 2
Cooper's Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
American Coot 200
Killdeer 3
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Bonaparte's Gull 75
Ring-billed Gull 120
Herring Gull 10
Lesser Black-backed Gull 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 25
Eurasian Collared-Dove 3
American Kestrel 1
Blue Jay 14
American Crow 6
Carolina Chickadee 2
Tufted Titmouse 1
Carolina Wren 1
Eastern Bluebird 4
American Robin 8
Northern Mockingbird 2
American Pipit 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 3
Dark-eyed Junco 4
Northern Cardinal 9
Eastern Meadowlark 6
Great-tailed Grackle 40
House Finch 5
House Sparrow 15

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Re: Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 18:27 pm
From: pickern AT sbcglobal.net
 
I see this so cool

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
On Tue, Feb 13, 2018 at 12:51 PM, Sandy Berger<[email protected]> wrote: Check out suttoncenter.org to view the Bald Eagle nest. Currently two eggs have hatched, and the parents have brought fish and a coot to feed the kids.
Sandy B.



Subject: Re: Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 12:17 pm
From: sndbrgr AT gmail.com
 
Thanks Dan. I started a Friends of Sequoyah Facebook page some time ago. The Sutton Center link is there so non-birders can see the eagle action. It's a great educational tool.
Sandy
On Tue, Feb 13, 2018 at 11:58 AM Dan Reinking <[email protected]> wrote:
Thanks, Sandy.Here is a direct link:http://www.suttoncenter.org/li... put a neat photo of an adult eagle flying in to the nest with two chicks on our Facebook page this morning.www.facebook.com/suttoncenterFollow us on Facebook for updates on our projects!Dan ReinkingSutton avian Research CenterFrom: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 11:53 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Sequoyah NWR BAEG nestCheck out suttoncenter.org to view the Bald Eagle nest. Currently two eggs have hatched, and the parents have brought fish and a coot to feed the kids. Sandy B.



Subject: Re: Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 11:58 am
From: dan AT suttoncenter.org
 
Thanks, Sandy.
Here is a direct link:
http://www.suttoncenter.org/li...
We put a neat photo of an adult eagle flying in to the nest with two chicks on our Facebook page this morning.
www.facebook.com/suttoncenter
Follow us on Facebook for updates on our projects!
Dan Reinking
Sutton avian Research Center
From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 11:53 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest
Check out suttoncenter.org to view the Bald Eagle nest. Currently two eggs have hatched, and the parents have brought fish and a coot to feed the kids.
Sandy B.



Subject: Sequoyah NWR BAEG nest
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 11:53 am
From: sndbrgr AT gmail.com
 
Check out suttoncenter.org to view the Bald Eagle nest. Currently two eggs have hatched, and the parents have brought fish and a coot to feed the kids. 
Sandy B.



Subject: Ice on the ground
Date: Sun Feb 11 2018 14:31 pm
From: blnllaval AT windstream.net
 
Bob
LaVal
20367 Pine Mtn. LP
Heavener, OK 74937
Phone:
918-653-7921



Subject: Nickel Preserve Winter Bird Count Results
Date: Sun Feb 11 2018 11:58 am
From: 0000004e74e60ce3-dmarc-request AT lists.ou.edu
 
Hello OK-birders!The Nickel Preserve Winter Bird Count last weekend was great! For those of you who were unable to attend because of scheduling issues (and my tardy announcement), future Nickel Winter Counts will be on the FIRST SATURDAY OF FEBRUARY for the foreseeable future. We are hoping that will make planning and scheduling easier for everyone.
Eight birders, 6 of them former or current Northeastern State University students, came out to spend the day counting birds this year. Jim Deming made it out as well! The eighth one is me, of course. After a morning of enjoying nature, we gathered at the preserve headquarters to eat hot soup/bread and compare notes. Here are our totals:Nickel Preserve Winter Bird Count - February 3, 20181. Great Blue Heron - 2
2. Black Vulture- 10
3. Turkey Vulture - 4
4. Mallard - 4
5. Golden Eagle - 1
6. Bald Eagle - 15
7. Red-shouldered Hawk - 2
8. Red-tailed Hawk - 4
9. Killdeer - 2
10. Barred Owl - 1
11. Belted Kingfisher - 3
12. Red-headed Woodpecker - 2
13. Red-bellied Woodpecker - 13
14. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1
15. Downy Woodpecker - 1
16. Northern Flicker - 12
17. Pileated Woodpecker - 5
18. Blue Jay - 41
19. American Crow - 20
20. Carolina Chickadee - 15
21. Tufted Titmouse - 5
22. White-breasted Nuthatch - 4
23. Carolina Wren - 7
24. Eastern Bluebirds - 31
25. American Robin - 163
26. Northern Mockingbird - 5
27. European Starling - 5
28. Cedar Waxwing - 185
29. Pine Warbler - 2
30. Fox Sparrow - 1
31. Song Sparrow - 56
32. White-throated Sparrow - 51
33. White-crowned Sparrow - 5
34. Dark-eyed Junco - 182
35. Northern Cardinal - 41
36. Brewer™s Blackbird - 20
37. Eastern Meadowlark - 1
38. American Goldfinch - 51
--
Mia Revels, Ph.D.Professor of BiologyNortheastern State University611 Grand Ave.Tahlequah, Oklahoma(918) [email protected]

**CONFIDENTIALITY**-This e-mail (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and privileged information. Any unauthorized disclosure or use of this information is prohibited.



Subject: Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell
Date: Sat Feb 10 2018 7:49 am
From: drhal2 AT cox.net
 
At least 4 birders from OKC went to Lake Sam Blackwell in the late AM ( 11:00) and searched for the "grebe in question" we saw a grebe that looked like the one pictured. Light was very good and after a lot of discussion we all concluded it was a PBGR, although slightly atypical.Personally , I was satisfied and went on my way to Keystone Dam in search of the red crossbills. Luck was with me as I spotted 6-7 birds in the pines there about 2:30 right along the road about 2/3 of the way toward the next cross street.. The first one to show was a "yellow" variety that flew in to within 10 feet and landed in a small bare tree just to check out my "flock call" ( iBird Pro). More flew over and they spent the next 15 minutes on a large pine with many cones where they had a feeding frenzy. I found it interesting to watch as several of them( all red ones) plucked seeds from the cones. They would pull out a seed, clip off the attached "wing" and eat he seed. I watch one bird in particular for a few minutes. It downed a seed every 3-4 seconds. It was easy ( and interesting ) to count the twirlling "wings " as they fluttered to the ground.Hal Yocum, EdmondOn February 9, 2018 at 4:21 PM Scott Loss <[email protected]> wrote: 

"Early hatching" might have been the wrong term as it probably didn't hatch in 2018. However, this is clearly a juvenile bird as it hasn't attained adult features (bill and body are too small). As suggested by Doug Wood in a comment on the OOS facebook page, this could actually be a late-hatching bird from 2017.

Scott Loss
Stillwater



Hi, Scott

It is likely that your bird is a small, non-breeding pied-bill. A recently hatched bird would likely have the remnants of a striped head.

Have fun,

Tom Curtis


From: okbirds <OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU> on behalf of Scott Loss <[email protected]>

Sent: Friday, February 9, 2018 11:42 AM

To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU

Subject: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell



All,

The bird I previously identified as a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell is actually a very small (and early hatching) juvenile Pied-billed Grebe. I was thrown by the bird's extremely small size, short neck, and tiny bill, as well as what seems like a very

early date for a recently hatched pied-billed. My apologies for the false alarm... and it sounds like at least one group may have headed up to Stillwater so I apologize if the previous retraction was not clear or fast enough!


Some photos of the bird can be found embedded in the eBird checklist below:
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Scott Loss

Stillwater.



Subject: Eagles nest at Sequoyah wild life refuge
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 18:56 pm
From: pickern AT sbcglobal.net
 
Any one know what date the eggs where layed
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject: Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 15:21 pm
From: scottrloss AT gmail.com
 
"Early hatching" might have been the wrong term as it probably didn't hatch in 2018. However, this is clearly a juvenile bird as it hasn't attained adult features (bill and body are too small). As suggested by Doug Wood in a comment on the OOS facebook page, this could actually be a late-hatching bird from 2017.

Scott Loss
Stillwater



Hi, Scott

It is likely that your bird is a small, non-breeding pied-bill. A recently hatched bird would likely have the remnants of a striped head.

Have fun,

Tom Curtis


From: okbirds <OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU> on behalf of Scott Loss <[email protected]>

Sent: Friday, February 9, 2018 11:42 AM

To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU

Subject: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell



All,

The bird I previously identified as a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell is actually a very small (and early hatching) juvenile Pied-billed Grebe. I was thrown by the bird's extremely small size, short neck, and tiny bill, as well as what seems like a very

early date for a recently hatched pied-billed. My apologies for the false alarm... and it sounds like at least one group may have headed up to Stillwater so I apologize if the previous retraction was not clear or fast enough!


Some photos of the bird can be found embedded in the eBird checklist below:
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Scott Loss

Stillwater.



Subject: Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 12:02 pm
From: tom.curtis AT okstate.edu
 
Hi, Scott


It is likely that your bird is a small, non-breeding pied-bill. A recently hatched bird would likely have the remnants of a striped head.


Have fun,
Tom Curtis



From: okbirds <OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU> on behalf of Scott Loss <[email protected]>
Sent: Friday, February 9, 2018 11:42 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell






All,


The bird I previously identified as a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell is actually a very small (and early hatching) juvenile Pied-billed Grebe. I was thrown by the bird's extremely small size, short neck, and tiny bill, as well as what seems like a very
early date for a recently hatched pied-billed. My apologies for the false alarm... and it sounds like at least one group may have headed up to Stillwater so I apologize if the previous retraction was not clear or fast enough!


Some photos of the bird can be found embedded in the eBird checklist below:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


Scott Loss

Stillwater.



Subject: Re: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 11:58 am
From: EUGENE.YOUNG AT noc.edu
 
I don™t believe it™s an early hatch, it simply looks like a winter plumaged Pied-billed to me.








Eugene A. Young






Agriculture, Science & Engineering


Northern Oklahoma College


1220 E. Grand, PO Box 310


Tonkawa, OK, 74653-0310


Phone: 580-628-6482


Fax: 580-628-6209


E-Mail:

[email protected]


Website:

www.noc.edu








From: okbirds [mailto:OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU]

On Behalf Of Scott Loss
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2018 11:43 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: [OKBIRDS] NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell












All,



The bird I previously identified as a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell is actually a very small (and early hatching) juvenile Pied-billed Grebe. I was thrown by the bird's extremely small size, short neck, and tiny bill, as well as what seems like a very

early date for a recently hatched pied-billed. My apologies for the false alarm... and it sounds like at least one group may have headed up to Stillwater so I apologize if the previous retraction was not clear or fast enough!




Some photos of the bird can be found embedded in the eBird checklist below:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...




Scott Loss




Stillwater.



Subject: NOT a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 11:42 am
From: scottrloss AT gmail.com
 
All,

The bird I previously identified as a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell is actually a very small (and early hatching) juvenile
Pied-billed Grebe. I was thrown by the
bird's extremely small size, short neck, and tiny bill, as well as what seems like a very early date for a recently hatched pied-billed. My apologies for the false
alarm... and it sounds like at least one group may have headed up to Stillwater so I apologize if the previous retraction was not clear or fast enough!

Some photos of the bird can be found embedded in the eBird checklist below:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Scott Loss
Stillwater.



Subject: Least Grebe - Lake Carl Blackwell (tentative retraction of sighting)
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 9:30 am
From: scottrloss AT gmail.com
 
All,

I may have gotten over-excited when spotting this bird in the field. It may not be a Least Grebe, as it is dark-eyed and has a bill that looks too thick. However, it is also strange for a pied-billed grebe (seemed too small, too short-necked and too small-billed for a "normal" Pied-billed Grebe, even a juvenile). The jury is still out, but probably don't hop in your cars to drive to Stillwater just yet! I guess it could be a micro-sized/aberrant pied-billed grebe. If you'd like, please check out the photo on the OOS page and provide insight.

Scott



Subject: FW: eBird Report - Okemah Lake, Feb 8, 2018
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 9:19 am
From: j.woodard AT cox.net
 
Nadine and I made a run thru Okemah Lake yesterday. Not much on the water or around the
lake. we only birded the campgrounds so didn't do much woodland birding.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK


Okemah Lake, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, US
Feb 8, 2018 9:30 AM - 10:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
25 species

Canada Goose 14
Gadwall 10
Mallard 30
Ring-necked Duck 2
Pied-billed Grebe 5
Great Blue Heron 2
Turkey Vulture 2
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Ring-billed Gull 4
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker 2
Blue Jay 4
American Crow 4
Carolina Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 1
Carolina Wren 1
Eastern Bluebird 5
American Robin 8
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 6
Cedar Waxwing 4
Yellow-rumped Warbler 2
Dark-eyed Junco 10
Northern Cardinal 4

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Least Grebe - Lake Carl Blackwell
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 8:50 am
From: scottrloss AT gmail.com
 
I just found a Least Grebe at Lake Carl Blackwell. It is very near the point just north of the cabins by the lake store. I posted a photo on the OOS and Payne County Audubon Facebook pages.
Scott LossStillwater



Subject: FW: eBird Report - Okfuskee County, OK, US, Feb 8, 2018
Date: Thu Feb 8 2018 20:52 pm
From: j.woodard AT cox.net
 
Nadine and I were fortunate enough to have a Woodcock fly across I-40 this evening at
6:30PM as we were headed west on I-40 in Okfuskee County.
We had discussed on the way over to Okmulgee this morning of perhaps visiting Lake Stanley
Draper soon some evening to look for Woodcocks. With the drought, we are pessimistic about
finding them this year but maybe there is hope after all.

Jimmy


Okfuskee County, OK, US, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, US Feb 8, 2018 6:30 PM
Protocol: Incidental
1 species

American Woodcock 1 flew across the road directly in front of us with the fading light behind it. silhouetted perfectly. small, chunky bird with long bill and stuttering flight.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 7
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 21:41 pm
From: arbour AT windstream.net
 
It was overcast, cold, and windy on the bird survey this morning, then turning clear, mild, and calm in the afternoon. Ford Hendershot joined me around noon. 71 species were found. Highlights were the continuing Golden Eagle who was seen flushing ducks over unit 40N and a Neotropic Cormorant perched with Double-crested™s on Otter Lake. Here is our list for today:

Greater White-fronted Goose - 14



Gadwall - 69



Mallard - 403



Northern Shoveler - 21



Northern Pintail - 26



Green-winged Teal - 40



Ring-necked Duck “ 905



Bufflehead - 1



Ruddy Duck - 2



Pied-billed Grebe “ 1

Neotropic Cormorant - 1



Double-crested Cormorant - 11



Great-blue Heron - 8



Black Vulture - 41



Turkey Vulture - 42



Northern Harrier - 3



Cooper™s Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 4

Red-tailed Hawk “ 12

Golden Eagle “ 1 adult

American Kestrel “ 1

Merlin - 1

Virginia Rail - 2

American Coot - 275

Killdeer - 5

Greater Yellowlegs - 2

Wilsons Snipe - 1



Rock Pigeon - 1



Eurasian Collared-Dove “ 5

Mourning Dove - 87



Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 5

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 8

Eastern Phoebe - 6

Blue Jay - 8

American Crow - 260

Fish Crow - 1

Carolina Chickadee “ 6

Tufted Titmouse “ 1



Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren “ 3

House Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 5

Marsh Wren “ 3

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 4

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1

Hermit Thrush - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Brown Thrasher “ 3

Cedar Waxwing - 1

Orange-crowned Warbler - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler “ 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 7

Fox Sparrow - 11

Song Sparrow “ 36



Lincoln™s Sparrow - 2

Swamp Sparrow - 11

White-throated Sparrow - 34

White-crowned Sparrow “ 11



Dark-eyed Junco - 13

Northern Cardinal - 29

Red-winged Blackbird - 165

Eastern Meadowlark - 6

Rusty Blackbird - 13

Common Grackle “ 3

American Goldfinch - 2



Good birding!

David Arbour

De Queen, AR



Subject: FW: eBird Report - Prague Lake City Park, Feb 7, 2018
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 17:52 pm
From: j.woodard AT cox.net
 
There was a surprising amount of waterfowl on the lake. the most I've ever found here.
Most of the ducks were in the far southeast end which does not have access to it. They
were spooked by an adult Bald Eagle and kept circling the dam and landing in the sun.
best I could tell was that they were dabbling ducks of some kind.
Thankfully, several groups were in the bays on the west and north end of the lake and
much more viewable.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK

Prague Lake City Park, Lincoln, Oklahoma, US Feb 7, 2018 10:20 AM - 11:05 AM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
30 species (+2 other taxa)

Cackling Goose 70
Canada Goose 120
Gadwall 295
American Wigeon 2
Mallard 116
Northern Pintail 16
Green-winged Teal 24
duck sp. 600
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Double-crested Cormorant 5
Great Blue Heron 1
Bald Eagle 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
Ring-billed Gull 4
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Downy Woodpecker 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 3
American Kestrel 1
Blue Jay 11
American Crow 5
Carolina Chickadee 2
Carolina Wren 1
Eastern Bluebird 5
American Robin 15
Northern Mockingbird 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 7
Dark-eyed Junco 35
Northern Cardinal 6
Western/Eastern Meadowlark 10

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: FW: eBird Report - Meeker Lake, Feb 7, 2018
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 17:48 pm
From: j.woodard AT cox.net
 
Took a jaunt eastward this morning. not much waterfowl on the lake but lots of birds in
the woods on the west side of the lake. I don't think I've ever seen so many Yellow-rumped
Warblers in one place. They were in large groups along the shoreline and moving thru the
trees. Many were landing on a small frozen pond in the woods and walking on the ice or
clinging to the frozen vegetation sticking out of the ice. I'm not sure what they were
doing.

Jimmy Woodard
Midwest City, OK

Meeker Lake, Lincoln, Oklahoma, US
Feb 7, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
29 species

Mallard 14
Hooded Merganser 12
Great Blue Heron 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Killdeer 4
Eurasian Collared-Dove 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker 15
Blue Jay 9
American Crow 5
Carolina Chickadee 4
Carolina Wren 2
Eastern Bluebird 8
American Robin 45
Northern Mockingbird 2
European Starling 30
Cedar Waxwing 95
Yellow-rumped Warbler 65
Field Sparrow 3
Fox Sparrow 3
Harris's Sparrow 2
White-throated Sparrow 2
Northern Cardinal 20
Brown-headed Cowbird 30
American Goldfinch 3
House Sparrow 12

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Re: Wichita Falls area
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 15:27 pm
From: 0000009144775b98-dmarc-request AT lists.ou.edu
 
At Meers, don't forget to load up that cobbler with homemade ice cream for just $1 more after you eat that gigantic longhorn beef burger. Then, roll out the door and drive up the mountain at the refuge, visit the nature center for information on where the beasties and birds are that day, and don't forget to visit Medicine Park and the lake at the foot of the mountain for more birding opportunities. 

On Tuesday, February 6, 2018 8:05 PM, Larry Mays <larrymays1949 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:


You could try Lake Wichita, right in town, for a short hiking trail, that links up with at least one other nearby lake. I've seen some decent waterfowl and shorebirds there. Also nearby is Lake Arrowhead and Lake Arrowhead State Park. Last year there were several Long-eared Owls that had a winter roost there for several months, though most likely they were "loved" a bit too much and have since moved on, BUT you might look around carefully and be the lucky ones who refind them. The lake has a good stand of mesquite so you can look for Ladder-backed Woodpecker, or maybe a Verdin or Pyrrhuloxia. It's a reasonably good birding spot. OR, you could come back to Oklahoma and do the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Good trails to hike, usually lots of birds, and you could even stop at Meers for a Meersburger and some cherry or peach cobbler... That's all I got. Anyone?On Tue, Feb 6, 2018 at 3:30 PM, Jennie Brooks <[email protected]> wrote:We are going to be in Wichita Falls for a concert this Friday night and are wondering if there's anywhere fun to hike and bird on Saturday either in that area, or between there and OKC.Thanks, Jennie



Subject: From National Geographic: The Epic Journeys of Migratory Birds
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 8:09 am
From: email AT addthis.com
 
This National Geographic article offers beautiful photography and insight into birds' migratory feats and challenges.

https://www.nationalgeographic...

To stop receiving any emails from AddThis, please visit: http://www.addthis.com/privacy...



Subject: Re: Wichita Falls area
Date: Tue Feb 6 2018 20:05 pm
From: larrymays1949 AT gmail.com
 
You could try Lake Wichita, right in town, for a short hiking trail, that links up with at least one other nearby lake. I've seen some decent waterfowl and shorebirds there. Also nearby is Lake Arrowhead and Lake Arrowhead State Park. Last year there were several Long-eared Owls that had a winter roost there for several months, though most likely they were "loved" a bit too much and have since moved on, BUT you might look around carefully and be the lucky ones who refind them. The lake has a good stand of mesquite so you can look for Ladder-backed Woodpecker, or maybe a Verdin or Pyrrhuloxia. It's a reasonably good birding spot. 
OR, you could come back to Oklahoma and do the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. Good trails to hike, usually lots of birds, and you could even stop at Meers for a Meersburger and some cherry or peach cobbler...
That's all I got. Anyone?


On Tue, Feb 6, 2018 at 3:30 PM, Jennie Brooks <[email protected]> wrote:
We are going to be in Wichita Falls for a concert this Friday night and are wondering if there's anywhere fun to hike and bird on Saturday either in that area, or between there and OKC.
Thanks, Jennie



Subject: Wichita Falls area
Date: Tue Feb 6 2018 17:30 pm
From: 2014birder AT gmail.com
 
We are going to be in Wichita Falls for a concert this Friday night and are wondering if there's anywhere fun to hike and bird on Saturday either in that area, or between there and OKC.
Thanks, Jennie



Subject: Re: Canton Lake
Date: Tue Feb 6 2018 13:55 pm
From: drhal2 AT cox.net
 
Hi Jennie,Yes the old Nature trail is the same the new named Rough Horsetail Trail.Now the hawk that I am talking about was seen just before we got to Watonga on our way to Red Rocks SP. It was on the RIGHT side of the road sitting atop a cedar tree. The Ferruginious Hawk is a very large hawk( I think the largest hawk ) and is very PALE colored. Check a bird book, or look up on Google. Sorry.HalOn February 6, 2018 at 10:15 AM Jennie Brooks <[email protected]> wrote: 

Hal, when you say old nature trail, are you talking about the Rough Horsetail Trail? Derek and I were there the weekend before and I heard a hooting but never saw an owl.As for the ferruginous hawk, was it on the left side of the road? And was it a dark morph? It stood out to me bc it had the dark front as opposed to all the red tailed hawks with the white spotted front. And if all that's the case, YES, we saw it. Whoop!Jennie
On Tue, Feb 6, 2018 at 3:12 AM, Harold A. Yocum <[email protected]> wrote:
I had been to RRC state Park 2 days before and walked the entire canyon. I flushed the barred owl as I walked up the old nature trail at the north end. It flew to my left a bit and sat in a large cedar tree . It watched me go by and was still there when I came back down the trail 15 minutes later. As I watched it the darn bird called a couple times, but stayed put.My car was at the south end of the park and as I walked south another barred owl started to call from the west side of the canyon. The 2 owls called back and forth a couple times.That was nice to hear .I dipped on the black phoebe that day as well. Did see a couple winter wrens along the creek though.Had a great day on Sat. With 50 species. Brian and I spotted a ferruginous hawk at roadside as we drove to RRSP. Did anybody else catch sight of that?Hal

Sent from my iPhone
On Feb 6, 2018, at 12:32 AM, Steve Davis < spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:

Thanks to Larry for getting us out Saturday, despite the cold and wind. It finally turned into a warmer, sunnier, calmer day by the time we ended the trip at Red Rock Canyon.
And, as is often the case, thanks to those birders who left early, so the "bird of the day"--a Barred Owl--would show up for the rest of us.
--steve d and mary l
On Feb 4, 2018 6:22 AM, "Larry Mays" <[email protected]> wrote:
Twelve of us suffered chilly morning temps and a bitter, biting south wind to bird around Roman Nose State Park, Canton lake, and, later in the day, Red Rock Canyon State Park.
For the most part, the birding was unexceptional (normal? I'm spoiled by a winter of rarities) but we slowly tallied a respectable list.
At Roman Nose we got delightful looks at Fox Sparrows along with robins and waxwings coming in to drink. Picked out Common Yellowthroat and Swamp Sparrow from their snug concealment in the cattails.
Canton Lake started with a small disappointment as the dam, where I had hoped to both freeze and check out the waterfowl, was closed to through traffic, but we consoled ourselves by dropping down to the first campground and getting nice looks at a reasonably cooperative sapsucker. Twitched up a couple Chipping Sparrows, and an expected run of juncos, cardinals and such.
Worked along the east side of the lake a bit and discovered the most abundant species along the shore seemed to be Ring-necked Duck (almost exclusively males, for whatever reason). One lone Lake Guy (or Lonely Lake Guy) from whom I seemed unable to escape, devoured my attention while everyone else got to bird a bit and pick up several more species. Was saved by Steve who called me away, briefly, then finally we just had to disentangle from Lonely Lake Guy's embrace and beat a hasty retreat.
I now know that there are dangerous hogs, a black panther or two, and seedy politicians prowling the area. Good stuff to know, eh?
Back through Canton and over to the west side where, by noon, mercifully, the wind had died down, the sun burst out, and lunch was taken. One cooperative roadrunner later, we stopped for prairie dogs, and a look or two at the lake. Not a lot of birds, but we scraped, scooped, or scoped up some Hooded Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes and a cormorant or two.
On over to Big Bend Campground and the boat ramp where Hal found us our first of two Bald Eagles at such a distance only an eagle-eyed guy like Hal Yokum could locate them. It was Jennie Brooks's first look at an Okie Bald Eagle, and I apologized for the fact that it looked like a tiny black dot topped with a tinier white dot.
We drove a bit west from there hoping for Sandhill Cranes, but dipped on them.
Back through Canton for yet another pit stop and south to...
Red Rock Canyon State Park, where we hoped to possibly relocate a bird that wasn't even there to begin with (someday I will 'splain that--probably make a good Christmas OKCAS story). Red Rock Canyon is really a nice scenic little spot and well deserving of a visit just to hike around some which for a birder would approach blasphemy.
We began here to disband our little caravan with some folks heading off to bars and other important appointments. Those of us remaining were entertained by a very cooperative Barred Owl which allowed us a few decent photos.
I have no idea as to what our final trip count was--around 55 species, more or less, I think, though that's likely open to debate.
Oh, and thanks Hal and Brian for the "thanks".
You're welcome.
Finished up our day at Hideaway Pizza. Food, as everyone knows is a birder's second passion.
Thanks, everyone for following me around all day with such heartwarming obedience. You all rock--truly! We may have to do that again some time, after sufficient rest.
--Larry



Subject: Re: Canton Lake
Date: Tue Feb 6 2018 9:15 am
From: 2014birder AT gmail.com
 
Hal, when you say old nature trail, are you talking about the Rough Horsetail Trail? Derek and I were there the weekend before and I heard a hooting but never saw an owl.As for theferruginous hawk, was it on the left side of the road? And was it a dark morph? It stood out to me bc it had the dark front as opposed to all the red tailed hawks with the white spotted front. And if all that's the case, YES, we saw it. Whoop!Jennie
On Tue, Feb 6, 2018 at 3:12 AM, Harold A. Yocum <[email protected]> wrote:
I had been to RRC state Park 2 days before and walked the entire canyon. I flushed the barred owl as I walked up the old nature trail at the north end. It flew to my left a bit and sat in a large cedar tree . It watched me go by and was still there when I came back down the trail 15 minutes later. As I watched it the darn bird called a couple times, but stayed put.My car was at the south end of the park and as I walked south another barred owl started to call from the west side of the canyon. The 2 owls called back and forth a couple times.That was nice to hear .I dipped on the black phoebe that day as well. Did see a couple winter wrens along the creek though.Had a great day on Sat. With 50 species. Brian and I spotted a ferruginous hawk at roadside as we drove to RRSP. Did anybody else catch sight of that?Hal

Sent from my iPhone
On Feb 6, 2018, at 12:32 AM, Steve Davis <spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:

Thanks to Larry for getting us out Saturday, despite the cold and wind. It finally turned into a warmer, sunnier, calmer day by the time we ended the trip at Red Rock Canyon.
And, as is often the case, thanks to those birders who left early, so the "bird of the day"--a Barred Owl--would show up for the rest of us.
--steve d and mary l
On Feb 4, 2018 6:22 AM, "Larry Mays" <[email protected]> wrote:
Twelve of us suffered chilly morning temps and a bitter, biting south wind to bird around Roman Nose State Park, Canton lake, and, later in the day, Red Rock Canyon State Park.
For the most part, the birding was unexceptional (normal? I'm spoiled by a winter of rarities) but we slowly tallied a respectable list.
At Roman Nose we got delightful looks at Fox Sparrows along with robins and waxwings coming in to drink. Picked out Common Yellowthroat and Swamp Sparrow from their snug concealment in the cattails.
Canton Lake started with a small disappointment as the dam, where I had hoped to both freeze and check out the waterfowl, was closed to through traffic, but we consoled ourselves by dropping down to the first campground and getting nice looks at a reasonably cooperative sapsucker. Twitched up a couple Chipping Sparrows, and an expected run of juncos, cardinals and such.
Worked along the east side of the lake a bit and discovered the most abundant species along the shore seemed to be Ring-necked Duck (almost exclusively males, for whatever reason). One lone Lake Guy (or Lonely Lake Guy) from whom I seemed unable to escape, devoured my attention while everyone else got to bird a bit and pick up several more species. Was saved by Steve who called me away, briefly, then finally we just had to disentangle from Lonely Lake Guy's embrace and beat a hasty retreat.
I now know that there are dangerous hogs, a black panther or two, and seedy politicians prowling the area. Good stuff to know, eh?
Back through Canton and over to the west side where, by noon, mercifully, the wind had died down, the sun burst out, and lunch was taken. One cooperative roadrunner later, we stopped for prairie dogs, and a look or two at the lake. Not a lot of birds, but we scraped, scooped, or scoped up some Hooded Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes and a cormorant or two.
On over to Big Bend Campground and the boat ramp where Hal found us our first of two Bald Eagles at such a distance only an eagle-eyed guy like Hal Yokum could locate them. It was Jennie Brooks's first look at an Okie Bald Eagle, and I apologized for the fact that it looked like a tiny black dot topped with a tinier white dot.
We drove a bit west from there hoping for Sandhill Cranes, but dipped on them.
Back through Canton for yet another pit stop and south to...
Red Rock Canyon State Park, where we hoped to possibly relocate a bird that wasn't even there to begin with (someday I will 'splain that--probably make a good Christmas OKCAS story). Red Rock Canyon is really a nice scenic little spot and well deserving of a visit just to hike around some which for a birder would approach blasphemy.
We began here to disband our little caravan with some folks heading off to bars and other important appointments. Those of us remaining were entertained by a very cooperative Barred Owl which allowed us a few decent photos.
I have no idea as to what our final trip count was--around 55 species, more or less, I think, though that's likely open to debate.
Oh, and thanks Hal and Brian for the "thanks".
You're welcome.
Finished up our day at Hideaway Pizza. Food, as everyone knows is a birder's second passion.
Thanks, everyone for following me around all day with such heartwarming obedience. You all rock--truly! We may have to do that again some time, after sufficient rest.
--Larry



Subject: Re: Canton Lake
Date: Tue Feb 6 2018 3:12 am
From: drhal2 AT cox.net
 
I had been to RRC state Park 2 days before and walked the entire canyon. I flushed the barred owl as I walked up the old nature trail at the north end. It flew to my left a bit and sat in a large cedar tree . It watched me go by and was still there when I came back down the trail 15 minutes later. As I watched it the darn bird called a couple times, but stayed put.My car was at the south end of the park and as I walked south another barred owl started to call from the west side of the canyon. The 2 owls called back and forth a couple times.That was nice to hear .I dipped on the black phoebe that day as well. Did see a couple winter wrens along the creek though.Had a great day on Sat. With 50 species. Brian and I spotted a ferruginous hawk at roadside as we drove to RRSP. Did anybody else catch sight of that?Hal

Sent from my iPhone
On Feb 6, 2018, at 12:32 AM, Steve Davis <spd8109 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:

Thanks to Larry for getting us out Saturday, despite the cold and wind. It finally turned into a warmer, sunnier, calmer day by the time we ended the trip at Red Rock Canyon.
And, as is often the case, thanks to those birders who left early, so the "bird of the day"--a Barred Owl--would show up for the rest of us.
--steve d and mary l
On Feb 4, 2018 6:22 AM, "Larry Mays" <[email protected]> wrote:
Twelve of us suffered chilly morning temps and a bitter, biting south wind to bird around Roman Nose State Park, Canton lake, and, later in the day, Red Rock Canyon State Park.
For the most part, the birding was unexceptional (normal? I'm spoiled by a winter of rarities) but we slowly tallied a respectable list.
At Roman Nose we got delightful looks at Fox Sparrows along with robins and waxwings coming in to drink. Picked out Common Yellowthroat and Swamp Sparrow from their snug concealment in the cattails.
Canton Lake started with a small disappointment as the dam, where I had hoped to both freeze and check out the waterfowl, was closed to through traffic, but we consoled ourselves by dropping down to the first campground and getting nice looks at a reasonably cooperative sapsucker. Twitched up a couple Chipping Sparrows, and an expected run of juncos, cardinals and such.
Worked along the east side of the lake a bit and discovered the most abundant species along the shore seemed to be Ring-necked Duck (almost exclusively males, for whatever reason). One lone Lake Guy (or Lonely Lake Guy) from whom I seemed unable to escape, devoured my attention while everyone else got to bird a bit and pick up several more species. Was saved by Steve who called me away, briefly, then finally we just had to disentangle from Lonely Lake Guy's embrace and beat a hasty retreat.
I now know that there are dangerous hogs, a black panther or two, and seedy politicians prowling the area. Good stuff to know, eh?
Back through Canton and over to the west side where, by noon, mercifully, the wind had died down, the sun burst out, and lunch was taken. One cooperative roadrunner later, we stopped for prairie dogs, and a look or two at the lake. Not a lot of birds, but we scraped, scooped, or scoped up some Hooded Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes and a cormorant or two.
On over to Big Bend Campground and the boat ramp where Hal found us our first of two Bald Eagles at such a distance only an eagle-eyed guy like Hal Yokum could locate them. It was Jennie Brooks's first look at an Okie Bald Eagle, and I apologized for the fact that it looked like a tiny black dot topped with a tinier white dot.
We drove a bit west from there hoping for Sandhill Cranes, but dipped on them.
Back through Canton for yet another pit stop and south to...
Red Rock Canyon State Park, where we hoped to possibly relocate a bird that wasn't even there to begin with (someday I will 'splain that--probably make a good Christmas OKCAS story). Red Rock Canyon is really a nice scenic little spot and well deserving of a visit just to hike around some which for a birder would approach blasphemy.
We began here to disband our little caravan with some folks heading off to bars and other important appointments. Those of us remaining were entertained by a very cooperative Barred Owl which allowed us a few decent photos.
I have no idea as to what our final trip count was--around 55 species, more or less, I think, though that's likely open to debate.
Oh, and thanks Hal and Brian for the "thanks".
You're welcome.
Finished up our day at Hideaway Pizza. Food, as everyone knows is a birder's second passion.
Thanks, everyone for following me around all day with such heartwarming obedience. You all rock--truly! We may have to do that again some time, after sufficient rest.
--Larry



Subject: Re: Canton Lake
Date: Tue Feb 6 2018 0:32 am
From: spd8109 AT gmail.com
 
Thanks to Larry for getting us out Saturday, despite the cold and wind. It finally turned into a warmer, sunnier, calmer day by the time we ended the trip at Red Rock Canyon.
And, as is often the case, thanks to those birders who left early, so the "bird of the day"--a Barred Owl--would show up for the rest of us.
--steve d and mary l
On Feb 4, 2018 6:22 AM, "Larry Mays" <[email protected]> wrote:
Twelve of us suffered chilly morning temps and a bitter, biting south wind to bird around Roman Nose State Park, Canton lake, and, later in the day, Red Rock Canyon State Park.
For the most part, the birding was unexceptional (normal? I'm spoiled by a winter of rarities) but we slowly tallied a respectable list.
At Roman Nose we got delightful looks at Fox Sparrows along with robins and waxwings coming in to drink. Picked out Common Yellowthroat and Swamp Sparrow from their snug concealment in the cattails.
Canton Lake started with a small disappointment as the dam, where I had hoped to both freeze and check out the waterfowl, was closed to through traffic, but we consoled ourselves by dropping down to the first campground and getting nice looks at a reasonably cooperative sapsucker. Twitched up a couple Chipping Sparrows, and an expected run of juncos, cardinals and such.
Worked along the east side of the lake a bit and discovered the most abundant species along the shore seemed to be Ring-necked Duck (almost exclusively males, for whatever reason). One lone Lake Guy (or Lonely Lake Guy) from whom I seemed unable to escape, devoured my attention while everyone else got to bird a bit and pick up several more species. Was saved by Steve who called me away, briefly, then finally we just had to disentangle from Lonely Lake Guy's embrace and beat a hasty retreat.
I now know that there are dangerous hogs, a black panther or two, and seedy politicians prowling the area. Good stuff to know, eh?
Back through Canton and over to the west side where, by noon, mercifully, the wind had died down, the sun burst out, and lunch was taken. One cooperative roadrunner later, we stopped for prairie dogs, and a look or two at the lake. Not a lot of birds, but we scraped, scooped, or scoped up some Hooded Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes and a cormorant or two.
On over to Big Bend Campground and the boat ramp where Hal found us our first of two Bald Eagles at such a distance only an eagle-eyed guy like Hal Yokum could locate them. It was Jennie Brooks's first look at an Okie Bald Eagle, and I apologized for the fact that it looked like a tiny black dot topped with a tinier white dot.
We drove a bit west from there hoping for Sandhill Cranes, but dipped on them.
Back through Canton for yet another pit stop and south to...
Red Rock Canyon State Park, where we hoped to possibly relocate a bird that wasn't even there to begin with (someday I will 'splain that--probably make a good Christmas OKCAS story). Red Rock Canyon is really a nice scenic little spot and well deserving of a visit just to hike around some which for a birder would approach blasphemy.
We began here to disband our little caravan with some folks heading off to bars and other important appointments. Those of us remaining were entertained by a very cooperative Barred Owl which allowed us a few decent photos.
I have no idea as to what our final trip count was--around 55 species, more or less, I think, though that's likely open to debate.
Oh, and thanks Hal and Brian for the "thanks".
You're welcome.
Finished up our day at Hideaway Pizza. Food, as everyone knows is a birder's second passion.
Thanks, everyone for following me around all day with such heartwarming obedience. You all rock--truly! We may have to do that again some time, after sufficient rest.
--Larry



Subject: Re: White winged dove
Date: Mon Feb 5 2018 13:58 pm
From: 000000853e24127e-dmarc-request AT lists.ou.edu
 
Jennifer, don't try to claim the prize too quickly. That sounds about like my yard dove list. Lots of White-Winged, a few Mournings, and and sometimes a couple of Eurasians. I have been having one Eurasian lately that is very dark. I saw him several times before Bill happened to be here at the right time to see him.
Linda AdamsDuncan, OK

From: Jennifer Kidney <[email protected]>
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Sent: Monday, February 5, 2018 1:13 PM
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] White winged dove



I think I get the prize on this one. I routinely have 40 to 60 White-winged Doves in my yard in the winter. To see a Mourning Dove or Eurasian Collared-Dove now constitutes a rare treat.

Jennifer Kidney
middle of Norman

From: okbirds <OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU> on behalf of Nick LoLordo <lord9691 AT GMAIL.COM>Sent: Monday, February 5, 2018 11:59 AMTo: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDUSubject: Re: [OKBIRDS] White winged dove



FWIW, the white-winged is the dominant dove at our feeders this winter: counted 17 in a black walnut tree the other day (SE Norman)
Nick LoLordo
> On Feb 5, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Harold A. Yocum <drhal2 AT COX.NET> wrote:
>
> I get white winged dove , usually a pair , on a very irregular basis that I can in no way predict. But I love to see them in the yard.

> Hal Yocum
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Feb 5, 2018, at 9:28 AM, Hollis Price <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> I have an abundance of mourning doves, but this morning there is a lone white winged dove at my feeders NE if Jones.
>>
>> Hollis Price
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Re: White winged dove
Date: Mon Feb 5 2018 13:29 pm
From: hollis AT pricesrus.net
 
I get one or two pair of Eurasian and this white winged was only my third one in many years.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 5, 2018, at 1:13 PM, Jennifer Kidney wrote:
>
> I think I get the prize on this one. I routinely have 40 to 60 White-winged Doves in my yard in the winter. To see a Mourning Dove or Eurasian Collared-Dove now constitutes a rare treat.
>
> Jennifer Kidney
> middle of Norman
>
>
> From: okbirds on behalf of Nick LoLordo
> Sent: Monday, February 5, 2018 11:59 AM
> To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] White winged dove
>
> FWIW, the white-winged is the dominant dove at our feeders this winter: counted 17 in a black walnut tree the other day (SE Norman)
>
> Nick LoLordo
>
>
> > On Feb 5, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Harold A. Yocum wrote:
> >
> > I get white winged dove , usually a pair , on a very irregular basis that I can in no way predict. But I love to see them in the yard.
> > Hal Yocum
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Feb 5, 2018, at 9:28 AM, Hollis Price wrote:
> >>
> >> I have an abundance of mourning doves, but this morning there is a lone white winged dove at my feeders NE if Jones.
> >>
> >> Hollis Price
> >>
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Re: White winged dove
Date: Mon Feb 5 2018 13:13 pm
From: jenlkidney AT hotmail.com
 
I think I get the prize on this one. I routinely have 40 to 60 White-winged Doves in my yard in the winter. To see a Mourning Dove or Eurasian Collared-Dove now constitutes a rare treat.


Jennifer Kidney
middle of Norman




From: okbirds <OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU> on behalf of Nick LoLordo <lord9691 AT GMAIL.COM>
Sent: Monday, February 5, 2018 11:59 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] White winged dove



FWIW, the white-winged is the dominant dove at our feeders this winter: counted 17 in a black walnut tree the other day (SE Norman)


Nick LoLordo



> On Feb 5, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Harold A. Yocum <drhal2 AT COX.NET> wrote:

>

> I get white winged dove , usually a pair , on a very irregular basis that I can in no way predict. But I love to see them in the yard.


> Hal Yocum

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>> On Feb 5, 2018, at 9:28 AM, Hollis Price <[email protected]> wrote:

>>

>> I have an abundance of mourning doves, but this morning there is a lone white winged dove at my feeders NE if Jones.

>>

>> Hollis Price

>>

>>

>> Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Re: White winged dove
Date: Mon Feb 5 2018 12:10 pm
From: lord9691 AT gmail.com
 
FWIW, the white-winged is the dominant dove at our feeders this winter:  counted 17 in a black walnut tree the other day (SE Norman)

Nick LoLordo


> On Feb 5, 2018, at 11:20 AM, Harold A. Yocum wrote:
>
> I get white winged dove , usually a pair , on a very irregular basis that I can in no way predict. But I love to see them in the yard.
> Hal Yocum
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Feb 5, 2018, at 9:28 AM, Hollis Price wrote:
>>
>> I have an abundance of mourning doves, but this morning there is a lone white winged dove at my feeders NE if Jones.
>>
>> Hollis Price
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone


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