ABA's Birding News >> Oregon

Oregon bird news by date

Updated on December 14, 2019, 8:30 am

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


14 Dec: @ 08:06:28  More on raptor strategies [Lars Norgren]
14 Dec: @ 00:46:52  The most unusual TV I've seen [cgates326]
13 Dec: @ 20:59:31  Re: Cooper's Hawk Behavior [Larry McQueen]
13 Dec: @ 20:52:13  Mandarin Duck and OBA Photo Contest.... [Zia Fukuda]
13 Dec: @ 20:24:50  Re: Mandarin Ducks-- treatment in eBird [Wayne Weber]
13 Dec: @ 20:17:10  Counting the "uncountable" [Lars Norgren]
13 Dec: @ 19:49:34  Re: Decades-scale lessons from a north-central Oregon CBC [clearwater]
13 Dec: @ 19:43:32  Cooper's Hawk Behavior [Roy Gerig]
13 Dec: @ 16:36:09  WA Rustic Bunting YES [Robert Lockett]
13 Dec: @ 15:46:37  Re: Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North America [whoffman]
13 Dec: @ 15:37:07  Re: Mandarin Ducks [Robert O'Brien]
13 Dec: @ 15:04:18  Re: Mandarin Ducks [Wayne Weber]
13 Dec: @ 13:34:35  Snow Buntings and Snowy Plovers [Kathleen Krall]
13 Dec: @ 13:14:51  Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North America [Robert O'Brien]
13 Dec: @ 12:26:10  Bald eagle vs. [Robert O'Brien]
13 Dec: @ 11:59:57  Snow Goose-K.R. Nielsen Rd., Lane Co. [Dan Heyerly]
13 Dec: @ 11:15:24  Re: Woodie or Mandarin? [Robert O'Brien]
13 Dec: @ 11:09:48  Re: Woodie or Mandarin? [Roy Lowe]
13 Dec: @ 11:06:47  Woodie or Mandarin? [Robert O'Brien]
13 Dec: @ 10:06:19  Re: Woodie or Mandarin? [Roy Lowe]
13 Dec: @ 07:20:23  Fwd: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Teresa Hertzel]
12 Dec: @ 21:30:05  Decades-scale lessons from a north-central Oregon CBC [clearwater]
12 Dec: @ 20:11:17  good weather predicted for Upper Nestucca CBC Tues. Dec. 17! [Linda Fink]
12 Dec: @ 19:14:19  Re: Woodie or Mandarin? [whoffman]
12 Dec: @ 19:10:47  Re: Woodie or Mandarin? [Andy Thomas]
12 Dec: @ 19:06:29  Re: Woodie or Mandarin? [Shawneen Finnegan]
12 Dec: @ 18:53:33  Woodie or Mandarin? [Roy Lowe]
12 Dec: @ 11:08:13  Don't miss the Mandarin [Lars Norgren]
12 Dec: @ 10:42:10  Rustic Bunting YES [Hannah Buschert]
12 Dec: @ 07:20:50  Fwd: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Teresa Hertzel]
12 Dec: @ 03:02:03  Sauvie Island CBC is this coming Sunday, 12/15/2019 [Karen Bachman]
11 Dec: @ 22:37:48  Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 12/11/2019 [Wink Gross]
11 Dec: @ 22:17:19  Re: East of Cascade range for Hutton's [Alan Contreras]
11 Dec: @ 22:12:06  Fwd: East of Cascade range for Hutton's [jmeredit]
11 Dec: @ 18:25:37  [COBOL] Hatfield, Sawyer Park, Bend Pine Nursery - HUTTON'S YES [jmeredit]
11 Dec: @ 18:02:10  Toledo Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Continues on 12/11 [Range Bayer]
11 Dec: @ 16:08:20  Wed morning, Eugene [Larry McQueen]
11 Dec: @ 15:44:07  Re: Wheeler County in Winter [clearwater]
11 Dec: @ 15:15:37  Re: Wheeler County in Winter [Alan Contreras]
11 Dec: @ 15:13:08  Re: Wheeler County in Winter [clearwater]
11 Dec: @ 15:05:40  Re: Wheeler County in Winter [clearwater]
11 Dec: @ 14:49:46  RUSTIC Bunting, Yes! - still at Cape Disappointment SP, WA Campground [Ben Davis]
11 Dec: @ 14:42:42  Bend Huttons Vireo cont. Wed morning for CBC count week [Courtney Kelly Jett]
11 Dec: @ 13:32:05  Eugene Birders Night (SWOC) Dec 16 with “Birding Northcentral India’s National Parks” [Ellen Cantor]
11 Dec: @ 13:10:27  Re: RUSTIC bunting now [Susan Norris]
11 Dec: @ 13:05:01  Rustic Bunting YES [Robert Lockett]
11 Dec: @ 12:28:56  Bend - Alfalfa Raptor Survey [KIM BODDIE]
11 Dec: @ 11:44:37  Re: Warbler foraging behaviors [Tim Rodenkirk]
11 Dec: @ 11:15:46  Solstice CBC--come join us! [Matthew G Hunter]
11 Dec: @ 10:36:55  Wheeler County in Winter [adamus7]





Subject: More on raptor strategies
Date: Sat Dec 14 2019 8:06 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
Doug Robinson told me Goshawks are scarce in the Coast Range because they hunt a lot on the ground, and underbrush is a huge deterrent. I grew up thinking of Accipiters as designed for tight turns on the wing chasing prey through stems and branches. But those short wings and long counterbalancing tail are highly reminiscent of a Towhee.   My father was doing a consultation on land in Marion County when a pheasant flew by a few feet off the ground. It was followed by a Cooper's Hawk. The pheasant entered a blackberry patch on the wing. The hawk landed and walked in. My father heard a struggle and never saw either bird come back into the open. A pheasant is nearly three times heavier than a Cooper's Hawk. I know my father could distinguish Cooper's from Gos.   Last year on the regular weekly bird song walk at Sellwood Park/Oaks Bottom we were standing in the parking lot finishing the day's checklist when l saw something fall straight to the ground in the middle of an oak about to leaf out. The object on the bark dust beside the sidewalk turned out to be an immature Cooper's on top of a Flicker. The hawk was holding the woodpecker from the back and the struggle appeared a very equal match. After several minutes someone parked their car a few feet away and got out. The hawk didn't flee, but seemed to take the precaution of rising off the ground and getting under a shrub, also not leafed out. It seems like the struggle lasted ten minutes and the flicker eventually escaped. Far from being an inspiring National Geographic moment where Cheetah has gazelle for lunch, it was as gruesome an experience as l can recall in six decades of outdoor activities.



Subject: The most unusual TV I've seen
Date: Sat Dec 14 2019 0:46 am
From: cgates326 AT gmail.com
 
Last week while helping with the Bandon Winter Raptor Survey, our team found a Turkey Vulture with a broken wing. TVs arent all that uncommon down there in winter and all bird species have individuals with broken wings so why the OBOL post? Well this one was different. We located this bird on the wing. It was flying with 5 other TVs and doing just fine as it soared along. The wing, though seriously deformed, was producing enough lift for flight. First time Ive ever seen a flying bird with a broken wing.
Photo at https://ebird.org/checklist/S6...
Chuck Gates
Prineville Bird Club
Crooked River Wetlands Volunteer
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Central Oregon Oregon Birding Site Guide
http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
Oregon County Checklists
http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...



Subject: Re: Cooper's Hawk Behavior
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 20:59 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
 
Roy,

We know that accipiters have a great variety of hunting skills, and need them. I suspect that many catching techniques are learned in the process of trial and error. I also suspect that your bird once found a wounded or dead bird in the underneath part of a vehicle, or chased a bird that took to the chassis. Im always amazed at bird behavior that looks like intelligence.

Larry

> On Dec 13, 2019, at 5:42 PM, Roy Gerig wrote:
>
> I got in my car this morning and then saw an adult COOPER"S HAWK in front of me, across the narrow street where two guys park their high off the ground pickups in the daytime
>
> It watched and then flew down under one of those pickups, and walked around underneath it for a minute or more, looking up into the wheel wells and on the ground. Then it flew back up to a perch behind the pickup from me and watched some more, then down underneath for the same routine...over and over about 4 times before it finally flew over my head toward somewhere else in the neighborhood
>
> I have not seen this behavior before
> Roy Gerig, Salem OR
>
>

<-W
[email protected] %8j!?j!%
j%^hy



Subject: Mandarin Duck and OBA Photo Contest....
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 20:52 pm
From: zialeefukuda AT gmail.com
 
Hello all,I've recieved multiple submissions of the beautiful Mandarin that has been hanging out up north. He's beautiful, but unfortunately he does not qualify for the OBA monthly photo contest because (as a current thread points out) because they are all considered exotic escapees. Maybe down the road at some point they'll be countable if they become established in the state, but for now he will have to be content to just be beautiful, and not a beauty contestant.Cheers,Zia FukudaOBA Photo Contest Coordinator
Ps. If you were planning on submitting a photo of the Mandarin, you can still change your submission to a different species and send it my way by Dec.14th at 5:00 pm!



Subject: Re: Mandarin Ducks-- treatment in eBird
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 20:24 pm
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
Robert and Oregon Birders,
You and others may not understand the eBird rules about how reports of escaped birds should be treated. Reports of known or strongly suspected recent escapees are supposed to be considered invalid, so they will not appear on eBird maps. They are treated as valid only if the species has maintained a persistent population (not necessarily established). However, some eBird editors seem unaware of these rules, and treat all Mandarin Duck sightings as valid records, so that they appear on maps.
The 1980s records of Mandarin Ducks around Vancouver are all in the eBird database, but have been treated as invalid. You can find them by doing a search of all eBird records of Mandarin Duck for BC, which will return both valid and invalid sightings. In addition, there is one Mandarin Duck which has been present at Burnaby Lake near Vancouver for over a year, but all these sightings do not appear in the public database. I frequently get eBird alerts about this bird because I get alerts for anything I havent seen in the current year around Vancouver.
So it is important to realize that looking at eBird maps of sightings may not give you the whole picture, in part because of inconsistent treatment by eBird regional editors.
Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
[email protected]
From: Robert O'Brien [mailto:[email protected]]
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2019 1:40 PM
To: [email protected]
Cc: OBOL2
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Mandarin Ducks
Thanks for the info Wayne. Your email prompted me to check eBird reports for the west coast.
British Columbia zero
Washington zero (?)
Oregon quite a few around Portland, a few Medford and north a little ways. Finally Yaquina Bay 2016 CBC
California Lots around SF Bay Area & LA
Bob OBrien
On Fri, Dec 13, 2019 at 1:04 PM Wayne Weber <[email protected]> wrote:
Robert and Oregon Birders,

Yes, it is true that the Mandarin Duck has never been known to establish breeding populations in North America. However, it is quite commonly kept in captivity by hobbyist waterfowl breeders (of whom there are more than you might suspect), and escapee Mandarins may be expected almost anywhere in settled North America.

For the record, during the 1980s, there was a small population of Mandarin Ducks in the Vancouver, BC area, and it was suspected (but never proven) that they might have been breeding in the area. Observers were reporting numbers as high as 12 Mandarins in a day, mostly from Lost Lagoon in Vancouvers Stanley Park, where they associated with the more numerous Wood Ducks. They would generally disappear in the summer and reappear in September, and it was suspected that they were breeding, or attempting to breed, at an unknown locality or localities. However, this population did not become established, but died out within 10 years or so. In recent years, we continue to get reports of singleton Mandarin Ducks around Vancouver, which are presumably recent escapees.

However, Mandarin ducks have escaped and become established in several parts of Europe. From eBird data, they appear to be well established and probably spreading around London and Manchester in England, Berlin and Dresden in Germany, Warsaw in Poland, Paris in France, and possibly other areas. The same could easily happen in future in the US or southern Canada.

The possibility that Mandarin Ducks COULD become established is the reason why escaped individuals of this species should be reported to eBird. All of the non-native bird species in North America which eventually became established exotics began as small populations which were not countable for years, and which many observers chose to ignore and not report. The early history of many now well-established species is poorly documented because of this unwillingness to record and report. If observers who use eBird can get into the habit of reporting even obvious recent escapees, the history of many introduced species will be better documented in future. As we speak, there are several species which are increasing and are on the verge of being declared established exotics by the ABA. As much as many of us (myself included) dislike seeing more and more exotic bird species becoming established in North America, and even if we try to prevent it, it is almost a certainty that more and more such species will become established in the future possibly including Mandarin Duck.

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC, Canada
[email protected]




From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Robert O'Brien
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2019 11:14 AM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North America

On the subject of Mandarin Duck it seems to be universally accepted that every such occurrence is a captive escapee. It isn't on the ABA checklist . But if one was going to show up in the US Oregon would be a very likely spot.
But it does seem unlikely - see the attached URL which shows that its range is not very wide nor very far north, and its migratory path is short . There are no records from Attu since there are no ABA records at all.
It's also highly unlikely that a Common Scoter would ever show up in Oregon. Hmmmm?
Bob obrien Carver Oregon
https://www.birds-of-north-ame...



Subject: Counting the "uncountable"
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 20:17 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
Thanks to both Waynes for explaining why we should document the occurence of species that don't count on most lists, yet. For many decades pigeons, starlings, and English sparrows were not included in CBCs. I assume it was official policy, but l'm only aware of it through oral tradition.



Subject: Re: Decades-scale lessons from a north-central Oregon CBC
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 19:49 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Continuing with part 2 on lessons from nearly 2 decades of data at the Antone CBC (mainly in Wheeler County, plus a sliver of westernmost Grant County west of Dayville), here I'll look at changes between the first decade of this count (2000s) and the second decade (2010s).

Before I get too far into the weeds on the data, I should mention David Schas' help in keeping this count going around the end of the last decade, including a couple of years when I couldn't make it and he did the main organizational work. Before that, Steve Shunk committed his extraordinary energy to recruiting and cajoling volunteers especially from the Bend/Sisters area.

CHANGES IN EFFORT AND WEATHER

The first question in making comparisons between decades is whether the level of effort has been reasonable consistent. During the 2000s we completed 10 counts with a mean date of Dec. 19th. In the 2010s we've completed 8 counts with a mean date of Dec 21.
The average number of participants dropped from 10.6 to 8.9, but our average daytime party hours per count went up slightly from 26.2 to 29.2 hours. How did we pull that off? In the early years we fielded a few really big parties of 5 or more people with more "beginning" birders, but lately we've mostly had groups of 2 or 3.

The weather as recorded locally on count day hasn't changed noticeably. The mean daily temperature in the first decade was 32.4 F; in the second decade this was 32.6 F. Precipitation has been consistently scant, except on the afternoon of our very first count in December of 2000 when we had heavy rain.

The average number of species found per count has dwindled slightly, from 47.9 in the first decade to 46.4 in the second decade. That slight decrease seems to be mainly due to a loss of enthusiasm for nocturnal owling: Lately no one has made a serious effort for small owls, but with more effort we used to pick up Western Screech-Owl with some regularity, and Northern Saw-whet Owl and Long-eared Owl occasionally. We still find Great Horned Owls as daytime birds and occasionally as late afternoon hooters.

CHANGES IN NUMBERS OF "REGULAR" SPECIES

The following 13 species have been found on every count in these two decades: Golden Eagle, Cooper's Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, Northern Flicker, American Kestrel, Northern Shrike, Black-billed Magpie, Common Raven, Canyon Wren, Townsend's Solitaire, American Robin, Dark-eyed Junco, Song Sparrow.
Another 9 species have been missed just once: Mallard, Great Blue Heron, Bald Eagle, Mountain Chickadee, Bushtit, American Dipper, Ruby-crowned Kinglet
European Starling, White-crowned Sparrow.
Four species have been missed just 2 or 3 times: California Quail, Belted Kingfisher, Common Merganser, American Goldfinch.

Of these "regular" species, only a five show significant changes in detected numbers, between the two decades.

European Starling has increased by 130% (statistically significant at the p = 6% level based on a 2-tailed t-test).
Black-billed Magpie has increased by 59% (p = 11%)
Red-tailed Hawk has increased by 45% (p = 15%)
Great Blue Heron has decreased by 30% (p = 11%)Bushtit has decreased by 37% (p%)
Black-billed Magpie numbers seem to correlate with Common Ravens (even though the increase in the latter isn't significant, compared with overall variability). Along with Bald Eagles, numbers seem to be connected to the timing of calving on the local cattle ranches, as all of these birds scavenge placenta.

Our most common regular species, American Robin, bounces all over the place. On five counts we had numbers in the thousands (with a maximum of 9380 in 2010), on seven counts we had numbers in the hundreds, and on the remaining six counts we had fewer than 100, with three counts as low as 10 or 11.

In the early years of this count, we thought that American Robin numbers might be correlated to Townsend's Solitaire numbers, because in high-robin years we often find both species together in the junipers, making use of good juniper-berry crops. However the correlation is weak at best, and solitaire numbers are more stable from year to year. The largest flocks of robins tend to be found in pastures or hay fields with thawed ground, sometimes with 2000 or more in a single contiguous area of pastures. So although juniper berries seem to be important for at least some wintering robins in harsh winters, large incursions seem to be drawn or driven by other causes.

INCREASING SPECIES NOT FOUND CONSISTENTLY IN FIRST DECADE

A few species have gone from scarce to regular:

Canada Goose (first found in 2004, no counts higher than 12 until 2012), increased by 1090% between decades (p = 1%)Wild Turkey (first found in 2008) increased by 636% (p = 8%)House Finch increased by 486% (p = 15%) mainly due to large incursions in 2015 and 2017.

Considering waterfowl as a general category, numbers and diversity have increased in the second decade. We suspect this is due to ice-free conditions lasting longer into winter on scattered reservoirs and ponds around the region.

DECREASING SPECIES FOUND LESS OFTEN IN SECOND DECADE
A few species have gotten harder to find:

Golden-crowned Kinglet, found in 13 out of 18 years, has decreased by 85% (p = 5%)Mountain Quail, found in 10 out of 18 years, has decreased by 70% (p = 15%)
Northern Pygmy-Owl, also found in 10 out of 18 years, has decreased by 73% (p = 6%)

The last one, Northern Pygmy-Owl, seems to be correlated to Mountain Chickadee numbers which have registered a decline of 44% between decades (though significant only at the p = 35% level, because they are so highly variable between years).

Our highest Mountain Chickadee and Golden-crowned Kinglet counts come in years when either (a) large number of Mountain Chickadees and kinglets move downslope off of the Ochoco Mountains and/or (b) we manage to get 1 or 2 parties up into the highest elevations of this circle due to good road conditions -- which for this count usually means cold weather that freezes dirt roads, combined with not too much snow depth. Both of these situations are related to relatively cold weather conditions.

RARE SPECIES ASSOCIATED WITH WARMER WEATHER

A few insectivore species have only been found once:

Say's Phoebe (count-week bird in 2018 was seen by NPS staff up until the day before the count).
Barn Swallow (4 found in Dec 2006)
Western Meadowlark (1 found in 2003)
Red-winged-Blackbird (2 found in 2017)

Not sure we can draw any patterns from that, based on the sample represented by this one count. But rare occurrences of Barn Swallows and Say's Phoebes east of the Cascades may be an increasing phenomenon.
--
Joel Geier
Antone CBC compiler, 2000-present



Subject: Cooper's Hawk Behavior
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 19:43 pm
From: roygerig AT gmail.com
 
I got in my car this morning and then saw an adult COOPER"S HAWK in front of me, across the narrow street where two guys park their high off the ground pickups in the daytime
It watched and then flew down under one of those pickups, and walked around underneath it for a minute or more, looking up into the wheel wells and on the ground. Then it flew back up to a perch behind the pickup from me and watched some more, then down underneath for the same routine...over and over about 4 times before it finally flew over my head toward somewhereelse in the neighborhood
I have not seen this behavior beforeRoy Gerig, Salem OR



Subject: WA Rustic Bunting YES
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 16:36 pm
From: robert.s.lockett AT gmail.com
 
At campsite 118 at 2:10 this afternoon. In the usual flock of ground-feeding TOWA, RBNU, DEJU.

Sent from my iPhonePOST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North America
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 15:46 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Hi, Bob -
Unlike "Common" Scoters, Mandarin Ducks are pretty common in captivity, and documented escapes are pretty common. Also compared to "Common" Scoters, their native range is further south and their migrations are much shorter, which makes them less likely intercontinental vagrants.
The real issue here is whether enough of these escapees have fared well enough in the wild, and enough have found each other, to be successfully reproducing outside of captivity.
Wayne
From: "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
To: "obol" <[email protected]>
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2019 2:14:15 PM
Subject: [obol] Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North America

On the subject of Mandarin Duck it seems to be universally accepted that every such occurrence is a captive escapee. It isn't on the ABA checklist . But if one was going to show up in the US Oregon would be a very likely spot.But it does seem unlikely - see the attached URL which shows that its range is not very wide nor very far north, and its migratory path is short . There are no records from Attu since there are no ABA records at all.
It's also highly unlikely that a Common Scoter would ever show up in Oregon. Hmmmm?Bob obrien Carver Oregon

https://www.birds-of-north-ame...



Subject: Re: Mandarin Ducks
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 15:37 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Thanks for the info Wayne. Your email prompted me to check eBird reports for the west coast.British Columbia zeroWashington zero (?)Oregon quite a few around Portland, a few Medford and north a little ways. Finally Yaquina Bay 2016 CBCCalifornia  Lots around SF Bay Area & LABob OBrien

On Fri, Dec 13, 2019 at 1:04 PM Wayne Weber <[email protected]> wrote:
Robert and Oregon Birders,Yes, it is true that the Mandarin Duck has never been known to establish breeding populations in North America. However, it is quite commonly kept in captivity by hobbyist waterfowl breeders (of whom there are more than you might suspect), and escapee Mandarins may be expected almost anywhere in settled North America.For the record, during the 1980s, there was a small population of Mandarin Ducks in the Vancouver, BC area, and it was suspected (but never proven) that they might have been breeding in the area. Observers were reporting numbers as high as 12 Mandarins in a day, mostly from Lost Lagoon in Vancouvers Stanley Park, where they associated with the more numerous Wood Ducks. They would generally disappear in the summer and reappear in September, and it was suspected that they were breeding, or attempting to breed, at an unknown locality or localities. However, this population did not become established, but died out within 10 years or so. In recent years, we continue to get reports of singleton Mandarin Ducks around Vancouver, which are presumably recent escapees.However, Mandarin ducks have escaped and become established in several parts of Europe. From eBird data, they appear to be well established and probably spreading around London and Manchester in England, Berlin and Dresden in Germany, Warsaw in Poland, Paris in France, and possibly other areas. The same could easily happen in future in the US or southern Canada.The possibility that Mandarin Ducks COULD become established is the reason why escaped individuals of this species should be reported to eBird. All of the non-native bird species in North America which eventually became established exotics began as small populations which were not countable for years, and which many observers chose to ignore and not report. The early history of many now well-established species is poorly documented because of this unwillingness to record and report. If observers who use eBird can get into the habit of reporting even obvious recent escapees, the history of many introduced species will be better documented in future. As we speak, there are several species which are increasing and are on the verge of being declared established exotics by the ABA. As much as many of us (myself included) dislike seeing more and more exotic bird species becoming established in North America, and even if we try to prevent it, it is almost a certainty that more and more such species will become established in the future possibly including Mandarin Duck.Wayne C. WeberDelta, BC, [email protected]: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Robert O'Brien
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2019 11:14 AM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North AmericaOn the subject of Mandarin Duck it seems to be universally accepted that every such occurrence is a captive escapee. It isn't on the ABA checklist . But if one was going to show up in the US Oregon would be a very likely spot.But it does seem unlikely - see the attached URL which shows that its range is not very wide nor very far north, and its migratory path is short . There are no records from Attu since there are no ABA records at all.
It's also highly unlikely that a Common Scoter would ever show up in Oregon. Hmmmm?Bob obrien Carver Oregonhttps://www.birds-of-north-ame...



Subject: Re: Mandarin Ducks
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 15:04 pm
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
Robert and Oregon Birders,
Yes, it is true that the Mandarin Duck has never been known to establish breeding populations in North America. However, it is quite commonly kept in captivity by hobbyist waterfowl breeders (of whom there are more than you might suspect), and escapee Mandarins may be expected almost anywhere in settled North America.
For the record, during the 1980s, there was a small population of Mandarin Ducks in the Vancouver, BC area, and it was suspected (but never proven) that they might have been breeding in the area. Observers were reporting numbers as high as 12 Mandarins in a day, mostly from Lost Lagoon in Vancouvers Stanley Park, where they associated with the more numerous Wood Ducks. They would generally disappear in the summer and reappear in September, and it was suspected that they were breeding, or attempting to breed, at an unknown locality or localities. However, this population did not become established, but died out within 10 years or so. In recent years, we continue to get reports of singleton Mandarin Ducks around Vancouver, which are presumably recent escapees.
However, Mandarin ducks have escaped and become established in several parts of Europe. From eBird data, they appear to be well established and probably spreading around London and Manchester in England, Berlin and Dresden in Germany, Warsaw in Poland, Paris in France, and possibly other areas. The same could easily happen in future in the US or southern Canada.
The possibility that Mandarin Ducks COULD become established is the reason why escaped individuals of this species should be reported to eBird. All of the non-native bird species in North America which eventually became established exotics began as small populations which were not countable for years, and which many observers chose to ignore and not report. The early history of many now well-established species is poorly documented because of this unwillingness to record and report. If observers who use eBird can get into the habit of reporting even obvious recent escapees, the history of many introduced species will be better documented in future. As we speak, there are several species which are increasing and are on the verge of being declared established exotics by the ABA. As much as many of us (myself included) dislike seeing more and more exotic bird species becoming established in North America, and even if we try to prevent it, it is almost a certainty that more and more such species will become established in the future possibly including Mandarin Duck.
Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC, Canada
[email protected]
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Robert O'Brien
Sent: Friday, December 13, 2019 11:14 AM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North America
On the subject of Mandarin Duck it seems to be universally accepted that every such occurrence is a captive escapee. It isn't on the ABA checklist . But if one was going to show up in the US Oregon would be a very likely spot.
But it does seem unlikely - see the attached URL which shows that its range is not very wide nor very far north, and its migratory path is short . There are no records from Attu since there are no ABA records at all.
It's also highly unlikely that a Common Scoter would ever show up in Oregon. Hmmmm?
Bob obrien Carver Oregon
https://www.birds-of-north-ame...



Subject: Snow Buntings and Snowy Plovers
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 13:34 pm
From: krallfamily AT comcast.net
 
Mike and I easily refound the beautiful Snow Buntings close to beach access 23 at Nehalem Bay State Park today. It was sunny, too! On the way back (keeping a wary eye on the surf, as it was approaching high tide), we practically stepped on 29 Snowy Plovers that were hunkered down in the middle of the beach access path.

Thanks to those who previously reported the Snow Buntings.

Kathy Krall
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Mandarin Duck - North American Birds - Birds of North America
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 13:14 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
On the subject of Mandarin Duck it seems to be universally accepted that every such occurrence is a captive escapee. It isn't on the ABA checklist . But if one was going to show up in the US Oregon would be a very likely spot.But it does seem unlikely - see the attached URL which shows that its range is not very wide nor very far north, and its migratory path is short . There are no records from Attu since there are no ABA records at all.
It's also highly unlikely that a Common Scoter would ever show up in Oregon. Hmmmm?Bob obrien Carver Oregon

https://www.birds-of-north-ame...



Subject: Bald eagle vs.
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 12:26 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
A few years ago there were a few posts on OBOL about bald eagles re: birds turning the tables on c*ts. Now I realize this is getting close to a verboten topic..Rest assured there are no mammals in this url.Bob obrien Carver


https://www.cnn.com/2019/12/12...



Subject: Snow Goose-K.R. Nielsen Rd., Lane Co.
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 11:59 am
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
Obolinks,
A large flock of Cackling Geese (5k or more) are in the grass field right next to the East-west section of K.R.N. Rd.
One lone SNOW GOOSE is with them. Further south along K.R.N. Rd is a group of approximately 30 Greater White-fronted Geese.
Dan Heyerly
daheyerly at yahoo.com

Sent from my iPhone
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 11:15 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Okay I get it now. This is likely the first occurrence there. Bob

On Friday, December 13, 2019, Roy Lowe <[email protected]> wrote:
Yes there have, but I didnt remember seeing any reports prior to my November 13th visit although I could have overlooked them.
Roy

On Dec 13, 2019, at 9:06 AM, Robert O'Brien <[email protected]> wrote:
Haven't there been multiple reports of Mandarin ducks from Crystal Springs in recent weeks on OBOL?Bob O'Brien Carver Oregon

On Thursday, December 12, 2019, Roy Lowe <[email protected]> wrote:
On November 13th I stopped byCrystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I was in Portland. Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.
I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird. I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with mandarin ducks than I do.
Thanks,
Roy Lowe

<145A9180sg.jpg>
<145A9184sd.jpg>



Subject: Re: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 11:09 am
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
Yes there have, but I didnt remember seeing any reports prior to my November 13th visit although I could have overlooked them.
Roy

On Dec 13, 2019, at 9:06 AM, Robert O'Brien <[email protected]> wrote:Haven't there been multiple reports of Mandarin ducks from Crystal Springs in recent weeks on OBOL?Bob O'Brien Carver Oregon

On Thursday, December 12, 2019, Roy Lowe <[email protected]> wrote:
On November 13th I stopped byCrystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I was in Portland. Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.
I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird. I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with mandarin ducks than I do.
Thanks,
Roy Lowe

<145A9180sg.jpg>
<145A9184sd.jpg>



Subject: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 11:06 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Haven't there been multiple reports of Mandarin ducks from Crystal Springs
in recent weeks on OBOL?
Bob O'Brien Carver Oregon

On Thursday, December 12, 2019, Roy Lowe wrote:

> On November 13th I stopped by Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I
> was in Portland. Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.
>
> I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a
> hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed
> grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched
> on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past
> near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my
> instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder
> wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen
> no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I
> didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the
> question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird.
> I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with
> mandarin ducks than I do.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Roy Lowe
>
>
>
>



Subject: Re: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 10:06 am
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
Thanks to Brodie, Karen, Shawneen, Andy, Wayne and Sylvia for replying to my question regarding ID of the female duck.  It is without a doubt a female mandarin duck.  In addition to the mandarin features noted by others this bird also shows the fine streaking of feather on the face/neck below the post ocular white line.

Cheers,

Roy

> On Dec 12, 2019, at 4:52 PM, Roy Lowe wrote:
>
> On November 13th I stopped by Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I was in Portland. Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.
>
> I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird. I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with mandarin ducks than I do.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Roy Lowe
>
>
> <145A9180sg.jpg>
>
> <145A9184sd.jpg>


POST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Oregon Rare Bird Alert
Date: Fri Dec 13 2019 7:20 am
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
*** Species Summary:


Anna's Hummingbird (1 Wallowa)

Golden Eagle (1 Multnomah)

Red-shouldered Hawk (2 Harney)

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (1 Lincoln)

Hutton's Vireo (2 Deschutes)

Blue Jay (1 Deschutes)

Northern Mockingbird (1 Clatsop)

Purple Finch (1 Union)

Purple Finch (Western) (1 Union)

Snow Bunting (1 Lincoln)

Grasshopper Sparrow (1 Clatsop)

Harris's Sparrow (1 Clatsop)

Black-throated Gray Warbler (1 Clatsop)


---------------------------------------------

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated


Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna) (1)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 07:00 by Scott O'Donnell

- Speywater Lodge, Wallowa, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Cont."


Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 16:14 by Nick Mrvelj

- Sea Scout Base, Multnomah, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "One juvenile (1st year) GOEA seen well, but at some distance away ( &gt;1000 meters). I saw a large, dark raptor soaring that caught my eye. Admittedly, it was on the Washington Side of the River, seemingly above land. Following eBird protocol, I feel comfortable listing it in Multnomah County as thats where I was physically present at the time. The wingspan was rather large, and the wings were held at a slight dihedral. The proportion of the wingspan to tail length seemed to rule out any similarly plumaged Buteos. There was a thick white subterminal band on an otherwise dark brown tail, a feature which was very distinct. About half, or slightly more than half of the tail was white and the other half was dark brown. This white band was best seen on the dorsal side. On the ventral side, the bird was mostly dark brown, with a two whitish windows on each wing centered around the primaries/secondaries. This same feature was not as apparent on the upper wing, if at all. I was not able to make out the coloration of the nape, but the size of the head and the bill did not appear as large as on a BAEA. I watched the bird soar for a few minutes, slowly heading east, before eventually losing it as it flew north and out of sight."


Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 13:25 by Joan Suther

- (42.8639,-118.8903) CPR Bridge Cr to Steens Loop Rd, Harney, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Perched high in large cottonwoods at P-Ranch entrance. After 10 seconds it flew thru the grove of trees to the east into the open and then turned back towards the Long Barn where we lost it. Juv. Small hawk, fast wing beats, white crescents in wings. observed by both of us. This bird or possibly another, (since several are suspected in the Basin with numerous fall observations from Burns to Roaring Springs Ranch) has been observed at P-Ranch or a few miles to the north to Knox pond area on CPR more than anywhere else since about April. It is also more secretive than other birds observed at Roaring Springs and Burns, where it was observed easily in the open. No photo opportunities."


Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 13:25 by Rick Vetter

- (42.8639,-118.8903) CPR Bridge Cr to Steens Loop Rd, Harney, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Perched high in large cottonwoods at P-Ranch entrance. After 10 seconds it flew thru the grove of trees to the east into the open and then turned back towards the Long Barn where we lost it. Juv. Small hawk, fast wing beats, white crescents in wings. observed by both of us. This bird or possibly another, (since several are suspected in the Basin with numerous fall observations from Burns to Roaring Springs Ranch) has been observed at P-Ranch or a few miles to the north to Knox pond area on CPR more than anywhere else since about April. It is also more secretive than other birds observed at Roaring Springs and Burns, where it was observed easily in the open. No photo opportunities."


Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) (1)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 10:53 by William Tice

- Chick Philos house, Lincoln, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 3 Photos

- Comments: "Continuing Rarity"


Hutton's Vireo (Vireo huttoni) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 13:50 by Steve Kornfeld

- Sawyer Park, Deschutes, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "No photos today but definitive looks and call heard. Pale lores, vireo bill,Wing bars without black bar distal."


Hutton's Vireo (Vireo huttoni) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 13:50 by Evan Thomas

- Sawyer Park, Deschutes, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Located by Courtney in the neighborhood north of the Park. Continuing bird."


Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) (1)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 08:18 by Cindy Armstrong

- stakeout Blue Jay, Couch Market Rd. (2019), Deschutes, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 2 Photos

- Comments: "Continuing. First found by Peter Low 3 weeks ago. Photos."


Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) (1)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 10:50 by J. Micheal Patterson

- Warrenton Dr and 13th, Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus) (2)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 07:13 by Susan Daugherty

- Daugherty's Homestead, Union, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 3 Photos

- Comments: "Nice curved culmen on the female."


Purple Finch (Western) (Haemorhous purpureus californicus) (2) CONFIRMED

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 10:00 by Michael Daugherty

- MDaugherty Homestead, Union, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "recurring bird but with a lady friend this time"


Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) (8)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 12:00 by William Tice

- Base of North Jetty, Newport, Lincoln, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "Continuing rare birds"


Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) (1)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 10:50 by J. Micheal Patterson

- Warrenton Dr and 13th, Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


Harris's Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) (1)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 09:55 by J. Micheal Patterson

- Wireless Rd (336), Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


Black-throated Gray Warbler (Setophaga nigrescens) (1)

- Reported Dec 12, 2019 11:21 by Rachel Hudson

- Warrenton Waterfront Trail, Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "Black and white stripy Warbler with yellow spots at base of bill."


***********


You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Oregon Rare Bird Alert


Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts



Subject: Decades-scale lessons from a north-central Oregon CBC
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 21:30 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Since this is the 20th year of the Antone CBC, even though this year's count is in question it seems like a good time to review the lessons learnt. We often hear about very large-scale interpretations of aggregated CBC results, but there are also useful lessons when we consider them individually. So here are a few notes:

ORIGINS AND GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION:

Steve Shunk and I got the idea to add this count in fall of 2000. At the time, it seemed to fill a gaping hole in Oregon's CBC map. The closest counts were John Day (40 miles ESE), Burns (75 miles SSE), Prineville (50 miles WSW), and Antelope (55 miles WNW). If you went straight north or south, it was closer to 100 miles before you'd run into the Columbia Hills - Klickitat or Summer Lake circles.

Since 2000, a few other counts have sprouted up in central Oregon (Redmond, Madras, and Tygh Valley) but none of them come any closer than the previous counts. The informal Gilliam County count (centered on Condon about 50 miles north of Antone) ran for three years, 2013-2015.

INSIGHTS INTO BIRD DISTRIBUTION

Alan Conteras' book "Northwest Birds in Winter" (OSU Press, 1996) was fairly fresh off the press, so of course we were keen to prove him wrong, in terms of the winter bird distribution maps that he presented based on a region-wide analysis of prior CBC data. Our only significant finding relative to Alan's distribution maps, as I recall, was that Ruby-crowned Kinglets are regular in winter in this region.

TEMPORAL CHANGES (TO BE CONTINUED)

Tomorrow I'll post a comparison of the results for the past decade (2000-2009) versus the current decade. This is where it gets interesting, perhaps.

Spoiler alert: The most common species are mostly stable in numbers, with the notable exception of one species that is wildly episodic, so much so that even a 10-year average with consistent coverage doesn't provide a stable estimate.

--
Joel Geier
Antone CBC compiler, 2000-present



Subject: good weather predicted for Upper Nestucca CBC Tues. Dec. 17!
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 20:11 pm
From: linda AT fink.com
 
The forecast for next Tuesday's Upper Nestucca CBC is now cloudy with no
precipitation. (I told you it would be good weather, Alan!) There is
still room for more counters in the beautiful Coast Range just outside
Willamina. Please contact Don Albright if
you'd like to join us on Tuesday, Dec. 17!

Linda Fink

--

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 19:14 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Hi, Roy -

Based on the plates in Reeber's waterfowl guide, this seems to be a female Mandarin.

Points that favor Mandarin include the following:

1. On Woodie the bill should have a sharper angle in front of the eye
2. Wooodie would have larger white eye ring/patch, Mandarin has longer postocular white line
3. Overall paler, more gray head plumage

White on throat-neck seems a bit more like Woodie, but that is pretty equivocal

Wayne



From: "Roy Lowe"
To: "obol"
Sent: Thursday, December 12, 2019 7:52:37 PM
Subject: [obol] Woodie or Mandarin?

On November 13th I stopped by Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I was in Portland. Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.

I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird. I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with mandarin ducks than I do.

Thanks,

Roy Lowe



Subject: Re: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 19:10 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
I have no expertise in either Wood Ducks or Mandarins, but my online search indicates that this is a Mandarin. Wood Ducks have a blue speculum and a white eye ring with a shorter stripe.

On Thursday, December 12, 2019, 4:53:36 PM PST, Roy Lowe wrote:

On November 13th I stopped byCrystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I was in Portland. Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.
I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird. I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with mandarin ducks than I do.
Thanks,
Roy Lowe



Subject: Re: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 19:06 pm
From: shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com
 
Roy,
I am away from a field guide but found this online. She is a Mandarine given the pale nail on the bill, etc.
https://www.fws.gov/lab/idnote...
Shawneen

Sent from my iPhone
On Dec 12, 2019, at 4:53 PM, Roy Lowe <[email protected]> wrote:

On November 13th I stopped byCrystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I was in Portland. Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.
I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird. I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with mandarin ducks than I do.
Thanks,
Roy Lowe

<145A9180sg.jpg>
<145A9184sd.jpg>



Subject: Woodie or Mandarin?
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 18:53 pm
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
On November 13th I stopped by Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden while I was in Portland.  Always enjoy visiting there and seeing waterfowl close-up.

I obtained some decent photos of interaction between wood ducks and a hooded merganser and got some mega close-ups of a forage pied-billed grebe. As I was leaving I photographed a female wood duck that was perched on a wall with mallards where Ive seen people feeding ducks in the past near the north end of the footbridge. I posted one of these photos on my instagram account today and received a reply from a Portland birder wondering if my female wood duck was actually a mandarin duck! Having seen no recent previous reports of Mandarins there and not seeing a male I didnt pay close attention. In looking at the photos I can see why the question arose. Attached are the only two photos of I have of this bird. I would appreciate any opinions from those who have more experience with mandarin ducks than I do.

Thanks,

Roy Lowe



Subject: Don't miss the Mandarin
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 11:08 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
I went to Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden with one of my sons yesterday after work. There were 100 Wood Ducks east of the boardwalk. but dedicated scanning with binocular revealed no Mandarin. Linus saw something big fly into the tall D-firs on the north peninsula. I'd forgotten to tell him there's a Bald Eagle nest in this garden. The main pond was unusually free of birds, but a pair of Gadwall at close range provided an easy lesson. For me as well. "Gadwall" brings to mind Beowulf and a host of other archaic nouns from the preliterate and heroic past. "Gray Duck" is distinctive.descriptive, and easilyremembered. Ditto for "Baldpate" of which there were many in Wood Duck Bay. My less experienced birding companion was duly impressed by the wigeon, which really rival the Wood Duck for beauty when viewed at close range.  Rounding the curving shoreline of the south penninsula we came upon the other half of the Eagle pair swooping repeatedly over the same point in the pond. I worry that some people are put off by a) the name "garden" attached to this location, b) the notion that these Mandarins aren't wild. I saw my f first Mandarin in a brushy backwater three or four or five hours drive north of Vladivostock, which still left me two degrees of longitude south of Portland Oregon..It was the third of May but the landscape was still dead as February, not a green sprout of anything to be seen. But the lush banks of Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden have the same accumulation of woody debris on their banks as that back water in Starra Vavarovka. Pimorsky Krai. There were tigers in the woods very nearby. And the eagle swooping over the waters adjacent to Eastmoreland Municipal Golf Course? It was as far from my son and I as the house across a normal city street.   This is the best Rhododendron garden in the world. Most major cities are much too cold or too hot to grow a wide variety of species. And Crystal Springs is birdier than many official wildlife refuges. When I went to the gardens alone last week someone was feeding grain to the ducks and the male Mandarin hopped up on the bank a few feet from me. It still took my breath away. This species is being reported at four or five locations in western Oregon lowlands. There were no reports over the summer or early fall. Some locations have had detections in mid autumn, early winter for several years now. The main library in Hillsboro may have hosted them half a decade ago. To be sure, they are not a native species, but neither is the California Quail in most of our state. Apparently the swooping eagle perched, and three Wood Ducks flew north in the gloom. I don;t know if they were expressing irritation or terror. We walked back north and when we reached the boardwalk Linus immediately spotted the male Mandarin at the far end of the embayment, half hidden in cattails or the like. I notice on eBird that Sylvia Maulding saw a pair in this spot. Through the binocular Linus was at least as stunned as i had been last week. I ran back to the car to get the scope. Upon my return it had swum out into the open but darkness made the scope superfluous. Then it took wing and against the sky I saw it had a companion.



Subject: Rustic Bunting YES
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 10:42 am
From: hannahbuschert AT gmail.com
 
Just had a brief viewing of the Rustic Bunting around Yurt 61 about 8:22am at Cape Disappointment feeding with Townsends Warblers and Dark-eyed Juncos. 

Rain coming down in waves, if you plan to go chase it make sure to have your rain gear!

Happy Birding!

Hannah BuschertCo-host ofHannah and Erik Go BirdingManager at theSea Breeze Court, Offering a Birder Discount since 2018



Subject: Oregon Rare Bird Alert
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 7:20 am
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
*** Species Summary:


Mandarin Duck (3 Multnomah)

Pacific Loon (1 Jackson)

Red-shouldered Hawk (1 Wallowa)

Say's Phoebe (1 Lane)

Hutton's Vireo (1 Deschutes)

Northern Mockingbird (1 Clatsop)

Grasshopper Sparrow (1 Clatsop)

Clay-colored Sparrow (1 Clatsop)

Harris's Sparrow (1 Benton, 1 Clatsop)

Vesper Sparrow (1 Columbia)

Tricolored Blackbird (2 Benton)

Black-and-white Warbler (1 Columbia)

Black-throated Gray Warbler (1 Clatsop)


---------------------------------------------

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated


Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 09:10 by Jack Holley

- Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, Multnomah, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 2 Photos

- Comments: "I saw a male behind the bushes with Wood Ducks."


Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) (1)

- Reported Dec 09, 2019 12:00 by Janet Phillips

- Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, Multnomah, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 2 Photos

- Comments: "Returned to get a better photo but the male would not come out of the brush; I finally found him fairly well hidden by his rufous and white head"


Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) (2)

- Reported Dec 09, 2019 09:46 by Sylvia Maulding

- Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, Multnomah, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 9 Photos

- Comments: "pair, photos"


Pacific Loon (Gavia pacifica) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 11:42 by Jon Cox

- Emigrant Lake Park, Jackson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Continuing. Seen way back somewhat by north dam. Thanks to Alex Lamoreaux for sharing."


Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 13:39 by Mike Hansen

- Weaver Pond, Wallowa, Oregon, US (45.596, -117.577), Wallowa, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Heard a series of 3 keeeyear calls in response to an overflight by a young red-tailed hawk. When I walked to the area I thought the calls had originated from I could not find the bird visually."


Say's Phoebe (Sayornis saya) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 14:42 by John Sullivan

- BowTech, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "Continuing. Brown flycatcher with cinnamon-Buffy underparts, faint, pale wing bar, dark tail."


Hutton's Vireo (Vireo huttoni) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 13:50 by judy meredith

- Sawyer Park, Deschutes, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "No photos today but definitive looks and call heard. Pale lores, vireo bill,Wing bars without black bar distal."


Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) (1)

- Reported Dec 10, 2019 10:01 by David C. Bailey

- NW 13th Street East End Circle & Youngs Bay overlook, Warrenton, Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Continuing. White patches in wings and on tail corners. Gray bird with black bill and black lores and black tsil."


Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) (1)

- Reported Dec 10, 2019 10:01 by David C. Bailey

- NW 13th Street East End Circle & Youngs Bay overlook, Warrenton, Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Continuing bird. Large dark pink conical bill. Creamy central crown stripe defined by thick dark lateral crown stripes. Unstreaked warm straw-colored unstreaked underparts. Creamy complete eye-ring. Narrow pointed retricies, with pale outer tail feathers at least along the outer edge of the outermost."


Clay-colored Sparrow (Spizella pallida) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 10:20 by Steve Nord

- Wireless Rd., Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 2 Photos

- Comments: "continuing rarity"


Harris's Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 07:52 by Will Wright

- Philomath Sewage Ponds, Benton, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Continuing at mid seed patch"


Harris's Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 10:20 by Steve Nord

- Wireless Rd., Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "continuing rarity"


Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) (1)

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 08:57 by Wink Gross

- Sauvie Island--Rentenaar Rd., Columbia, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Media: 3 Photos

- Comments: "On N side of road west of crossroads. In small tree with Savannah Sparrows. Larger, bolder eyering, white outer tail feathers."


Tricolored Blackbird (Agelaius tricolor) (3) CONFIRMED

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 09:06 by Hendrik Herlyn

- Philomath Sewage Ponds, Benton, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "2 adult, one immat males"


Tricolored Blackbird (Agelaius tricolor) (2) CONFIRMED

- Reported Dec 11, 2019 07:52 by Will Wright

- Philomath Sewage Ponds, Benton, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Continuing"


Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) (1)

- Reported Dec 05, 2019 11:47 by Mary Lynn "Em" Scattaregia

- stakeout Black-and-white Warbler, Columbia, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Continuing rarity. Small warbler with bold black and white stripes on mantle, a pale belly, and faint streaks on the flanks. Distinctive white median stripe on crown. It was foraging on the ground and low down on tree trunks. It moved quickly from tree to tree never staying in one place for long."


Black-throated Gray Warbler (Setophaga nigrescens) (1)

- Reported Dec 10, 2019 10:01 by David C. Bailey

- NW 13th Street East End Circle & Youngs Bay overlook, Warrenton, Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

- Comments: "Subadult male? Incomplete black chin and throat. Yellow loral spot. Black white and gray plumage. Associated with junco flock that worked it's way around open lot."


***********


You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Oregon Rare Bird Alert


Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts



Subject: Sauvie Island CBC is this coming Sunday, 12/15/2019
Date: Thu Dec 12 2019 3:02 am
From: pppahooie AT comcast.net
 
Your participation is welcomed.

For those of you that do not already have an assigned area, a pre-count meeting will be 7:00 AM at the Linnton Community Center, 10614 NW St Helen's Rd (Hwy 30 in Linnton.)

End of day "compare your birds" get-together will be at 4 PM at the Lighthouse Inn, 10808 NW St Helen's Rd (Hwy 30 in Linnton).

Let the questions roll

My contact information is:
Karen Bachman
[email protected]
971-207-7754 I'll turn my ringer on for a change.



Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 12/11/2019
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 22:37 pm
From: winkg AT hevanet.com
 
Here is the summary of my morning walks from NW Seblar Terrace
to the Pittock Mansion for the week 12/5/19 to 12/11/19.Species neither heard nor seen in the previous week are inALL CAPS.
Additional information about my walkmay be found at
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/d...

The sightings are also in eBird.

I did the walk 5 days this week. The walk on Dec 9 was in the,much less birdy, afternoon.
Species # days found (peak #, date)
CACKLING GOOSE 1 (?[heard only], 12/8)
Annas Hummingbird 5 (3)
HAIRY WOODPECKER 3 (1)
Pileated Woodpecker 1 (1, 12/10)
Northern Flicker 5 (3)
Steller's Jay 3 (3)
American Crow 5 (10)
Black-capped Chickadee 5 (12, 12/8)

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 2 (6)
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 (2, 12/8)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4 (1)
Red-breasted Nuthatch 4 (7)
Pacific Wren 3 (1)
Bewicks Wren 3 (1)
Varied Thrush 1 (1[!], 12/5)
American Robin 5 (6, 12/5)
House Finch 5 (5)
Fox Sparrow 2 (2, 12/7)
Dark-eyed Junco 3 (5)
Song Sparrow 5 (4)

Spotted Towhee 4 (3)
In the neighborhood but not found on walk: Downy Woodpecker,BrownCreeper
Wink Gross
Portland



Subject: Re: East of Cascade range for Hutton's
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 22:17 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Central Oregon and Malheur have had very good coverage for decades. I dont think Huttons have been overlooked. A couple, sure, but in general, no. Just too many birders in those areas.
I dont have any great theories on why the birds are showing up more often. Changes in habitat - where?

Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com
During the period December 15-January 15, responses to e-mail may be slow and irregular owing to workload and deadlines.



On Dec 11, 2019, at 8:11 PM, [email protected] wrote:Obol,

So for a long time hasn't the collective thinking been that they don't come to the east side? I recall that others had a convincing bird at Deschutes Rec area along the Columbia river 1.5 yrs ago. Then the gray (stephanii) bird(s)at Malheur in September that many of us saw. Now Peter Low found/posted that he found a greenish yellow Hutton 's at a park near Bend. Many locals have attached good photos to their ebird reports and it has been seen daily. What is happening? is range expansion happening? Or have we overlooked them because we believed they could not be here on the East side of the Cascades? I welcome discussion. Judy



Subject: Fwd: East of Cascade range for Hutton's
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 22:12 pm
From: jmeredit AT bendnet.com
 
Obol,


So for a long time hasn't the collective thinking been that they don't come to the east side? I recall that others had a convincing bird at Deschutes Rec area along the Columbia river 1.5 yrs ago. Then the gray (stephanii) bird(s)at Malheur in September that many of us saw. Now Peter Low found/posted that he found a greenish yellow Hutton 's at a park near Bend. Many locals have attached good photos to their ebird reports and it has been seen daily. What is happening? is range expansion happening? Or have we overlooked them because we believed they could not be here on the East side of the Cascades? I welcome discussion. Judy



Subject: Hatfield, Sawyer Park, Bend Pine Nursery - HUTTON'S YES
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 18:25 pm
From: jmeredit AT bendnet.com
 
OBOL,
-------- Original Message --------

Subject:
[COBOL] Hatfield, Sawyer Park, Bend Pine Nursery - HUTTON'S YES
Date:
2019-12-11 16:06
From:
[email protected]
To:
[email protected]
Wednesday birding report. Finished at Sawyer. We returned in pm after no sighting in the morning. We went back after Courtney had seen it in a nearby neighborhood. We were able to relocate it and most of us had good views finally, in the rain. It may have come closer due to Northern Pygmy Owl tooting tape? I think the park is still the best place to search because in a private neighborhood, you can't walk around and follow calling birds etc. It seemed to go back down into the junipers in the park when we last saw it. Unfortunately, not everyone had the best look but some of us had fine looks, although brief. At least it is a count week bird for the BEND CBC. Thanks Courtney.


We started the morning at Hatfield with really no sparrows, see waterfowl list below. First pond only, back pond is frozen. Bend Pine Nursery did have a few Golden-crowned Sparrows. Thanks to Nancy Boever for ebirding the first part of the day. Birders today: Aaron Jenkins, David Sowards-Emmerd, Nancy Boever, Gorden Wetzel, Curtis Wilson, Steve Kornfeld, Toni Morozumi, Howard Horvath, Evan Thomas, Joel Tinsley, David Smith, and cameos by Dave Tracy, Courtney Jett and Jerry Lear. Report was mailed for Judy Meredith by http://birdnotes.net

Canada Goose
American Wigeon
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-Winged Teal
Redhead - single bird
Ring-necked Duck
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Ruddy Duck
California Quail - Sawyer
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
American Coot - single, Hatfield
Rock Dove
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Northern Flicker
Western Scrub-Jay
Black-billed Magpie
American Crow
Common Raven
HUTTON'S VIREO - still is with a flock a lot of the time, mainly Pygmy Nuts but also Chickadees around that area today.
Mountain Chickadee
Pygmy Nuthatch
Townsend's Solitaire
American Robin
Song Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow - Bend Pine Nursery
House Finch
Red Crossbill
House Sparrow
Total number of species seen: 33
Next week, Wednesday Birding goes to Madras CBC. Let Mike Golden know if you are participating. Good birding, Judy


--
Judy Meredith, [email protected]
_._,_._,_
Groups.io Links:
You receive all messages sent to this group.
View/Reply Online (#1458) | Reply To Sender | Reply To Group | Mute This Topic | New Topic

Your Subscription | Contact Group Owner | Unsubscribe [[email protected]]
_._,_._,_



Subject: Toledo Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Continues on 12/11
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 18:02 pm
From: range.bayer AT gmail.com
 
Hi,

Chuck Philo said that the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker continues to visit
his suet feeder in Toledo. It has been there several times this
afternoon.

Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon.
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Wed morning, Eugene
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 16:08 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
 
Our rather short list of 31 species is due to early fog and gloom in the small area of Bloomberg Park that we covered in a short period of time. In fact, the wooded areas were unproductive.  We also took in the resident feeders along Bloomberg Street, which made the list worth reporting.

Canada Goose 2
California Quail 1 heard
Wild Turkey 1
Rock Pigeon 40
Eurasian Collared Dove 1
Bald Eagle 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 2 (a pair)
Northern Flicker 6
Stellers Jay 10
California Scrub-Jay 3
Black-capped Chickadee 5
Bushtit small flock
Pacific Wren 1
Bewicks Wren 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5
Wrentit 1
American Robin scattered throughout
Varied Thrush 1
European Starling 4
House Sparrow 2
House Finch 14
American Goldfinch 8
Spotted Towhee 6
Fox Sparrow 5
Song Sparrow 8
White-crowned Sparrow 8
Golden-crowned Sparrow 10
Dark-eyed Junco 30
Red-winged Blackbird few

Dennis Arendt, Randy Sinnott, Judy Franzen, Scott McNeeley, Jim Regali, Tom Cable, Sylvia Maulding, Kit Larsen, Sue Hutchinson, Jim Mitchell, and Larry McQueen



Subject: Re: Wheeler County in Winter
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 15:44 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
P.P.S. One more correction: The list at the end of my posting should be labeled as "birds that have been recorded in Wheeler County for December, in the BirdNotes database" (not in eBird).



Subject: Re: Wheeler County in Winter
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 15:15 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Joel makes a point that seems to need re-making about every three months. eBird is a good source of data but it is very rarely the only data for a region or frequently-visited site. And it never will be the only source because not everyone will use eBird and not all older data will be put into eBird.
Relying on eBird as the sole source for status and distribution information outside very specialized situations such as Oregon 2020 sites is simply laziness on the part of the researcher.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com
Attending Christmas Bird Counts with good weather forecasts.

On Dec 11, 2019, at 1:04 PM, [email protected] wrote:Hi all,

As Paul knows, I've had mixed feelings about this project of trying to plug holes in
the eBird map, especially in and around CBC season when many counts (especiallyeast of the Cascades) could use more volunteers.

My suggestion to Paul privately has been that it could be better to encourage eBirdusers to visit CBC circles that are lacking in reports outside of the CBC season. I doubt that we learn much new from a few widely scattered eBird checklists just a few days
before the CBC season. However counts focused within established CBC circles, two to four weeks before/after the CBC season, might shed light on how well CBC data represent bird populations over a longer stretch of winter.

About the Antone CBC which Paul referred to, the circle is actually mainly (87%) in
Wheeler County, and all but two counts have been during the period Dec 14th-22nd.
This winter's count would have be the 19th year of data (I'm working on some ideasto reschedule, but it will probably need to be after New Year).
So we actually have quite a lot of data on southern Wheeler County in mid-December, just from this one count.
Prairie Falcon and Mountain Bluebird are both regular in Wheeler County in December (recorded on at least half of our counts). Cedar Waxwings are less regular (only found
on about 1 in 4 counts). Red-breasted Sapsucker is rare, found just once on the Antone
CBC (two miles over the line into Grant County but within 8 miles of where Donna
Lusthoff found one in se. Wheeler Co. in the 1990s).

Besides the Antone CBC, there have also been a few resident birders/ornithologists who've kept an eye on birds in Wheeler County year-round, including December.

Brian Sharp lived on Stone Cabin Rd. just outside Fossil. Brian was (maybe still is?) a member of Western Field Ornithologists, reported notable sightings regularly to WFO and North American Birds, and even published a few articles on the local avifauna.
He recorded the first known Western (California) Scrub-Jay during October 1995 through March 1996.

More recently (early 2000s), Mark Berryman was the resident habitat manager for theWarm Springs Tribes' Pine Creek Preserve near Clarno. He hiked extensively in the
area south of there (some of it now designated wilderness) and was the first to record
Pinyon Jays in the county.
I seem to recall, a young fellow by the name of Paul Sullivan also did a stint or two
as an interpreter at the Painted Hills, and reported his finds to Oregon Birds. In the early/mid 2000s we also had a resident ranger at Painted Hills, Jennifer DeLuca, keeping an eye on birds through the winter before she moved into Fossil.

In the mid-1990s Donna Lusthoff and a few friends (Dave Anderson et al.) took an interest in Wheeler County and visited multiple times in every month of the year. Donnamade connections with a couple of ranching families who would let her know if they saw something interesting (including the first county record for Great Egret).

Craig and Judy Corder (formerly based in Umatilla) also birded the county extensively for several years around the same time. Later on Steve Shunk and I, while setting up the Antone CBC in 1999-2000, made several scouting trips in late Nov/early Dec. On one of those early December trips I detoured up into the Ochocos and found a Boreal Owl calling at one of Donna's old spots, which prompted a visit by the Bend Birding Club the next night.

The more noteworthy finds by these various people were generally recorded in Oregon Birds and/or North American Birds. Some of the more common birds made it into the
BirdNotes database (www.birdnotes.net) and can still be accessed there. And of course,
everything recorded for the Antone CBC is in the Audubon CBC database, aggregated
for a circle with center point in Wheeler County.

I know Paul would prefer to have all of those data in eBird and perhaps they will be someday. But meanwhile, it's good to remember that not everything that's been recorded is necessarily in eBird. Just because there's an apparent gap in eBird doesn't necessarily mean there's a lack of data regarding winter bird distributions in the region.

Again, it would be better to try to coordinate efforts like this with the long-running CBC
effort, especially in a season when several compilers have reported being short on
volunteers for upcoming counts.

Joel

P.S. Here's a quick list of birds that have been recorded in Wheeler County for December, in the eBird database. This doesn't include all of the CBC data.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)
Chukar (Alectoris chukar)
Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)
Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus)
California Quail (Callipepla californica)
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus)
Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus)
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus)
Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)
American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)
Merlin (Falco columbarius)
Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus)
Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola)
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)
Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) [now Wilson's Snipe]
Western Screech-Owl (Otus kennicottii)
Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)
Northern Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium gnoma)
Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)
Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus)
Boreal Owl (Aegolius funereus)
Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)
Belted Kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon)
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)
Northern Shrike (Lanius excubitor)
Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)
Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) [now California Scrub-Jay]
Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)
Black-billed Magpie (Pica pica)
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)
Common Raven (Corvus corax)
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)
Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli)
Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)
Pygmy Nuthatch (Sitta pygmaea)
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)
Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus)
Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris)
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana)
Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides)
Townsend's Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi)
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)
White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (Leucosticte tephrocotis)
House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)
Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra)
Common Redpoll (Carduelis flammea)
Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus)
American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)
Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus)

--
Joel Geier
Compiler, Antone CBC (2000-present)



Subject: Re: Wheeler County in Winter
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 15:13 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
[apologies for the formatting issues with the previous version, hopefully this one will be more readable after switching to plain-text]

Hi all,

As Paul knows, I've had mixed feelings about this project of trying to plug holes in the eBird map, especially in and around CBC season when many counts (especially east of the Cascades) could use more volunteers.

My suggestion to Paul privately has been that it could be better to encourage eBird users to visit CBC circles that are lacking in reports outside of the CBC season. I doubt that we learn much new from a few widely scattered eBird checklists just a few days before the CBC season. However counts focused within established CBC circles, two to four weeks before/after the CBC season, might shed light on how well CBC data represent bird populations over a longer stretch of winter.

About the Antone CBC which Paul referred to, the circle is actually mainly (87%) in Wheeler County, and all but two counts have been during the period Dec 14th-22nd. This winter's count would have be the 19th year of data (I'm working on some ideas to reschedule, but it will probably need to be after New Year).

So we actually have quite a lot of data on southern Wheeler County in mid-December, just from this one count.

Prairie Falcon and Mountain Bluebird are both regular in Wheeler County in December (recorded on at least half of our counts). Cedar Waxwings are less regular (only found on about 1 in 4 counts). Red-breasted Sapsucker is rare, found just once on the Antone CBC (two miles over the line into Grant County but within 8 miles of where Donna Lusthoff found one in se. Wheeler Co. in the 1990s).

Besides the Antone CBC, there have also been a few resident birders/ornithologists who've kept an eye on birds in Wheeler County year-round, including December.

Brian Sharp lived on Stone Cabin Rd. just outside Fossil. Brian was (maybe still is?) a member of Western Field Ornithologists, reported notable sightings regularly to WFO and North American Birds, and even published a few articles on the local avifauna.
He recorded the first known Western (California) Scrub-Jay during October 1995 through March 1996.

More recently (early 2000s), Mark Berryman was the resident habitat manager for the Warm Springs Tribes' Pine Creek Preserve near Clarno. He hiked extensively in the area south of there (some of it now designated wilderness) and was the first to record
Pinyon Jays in the county.

I seem to recall, a young fellow by the name of Paul Sullivan also did a stint or two as an interpreter at the Painted Hills, and reported his finds to Oregon Birds. In the early/mid 2000s we also had a resident ranger at Painted Hills, Jennifer DeLuca, keeping an eye on birds through the winter before she moved into Fossil.

In the mid-1990s Donna Lusthoff and a few friends (Dave Anderson et al.) took an interest in Wheeler County and visited multiple times in every month of the year. Donna made connections with a couple of ranching families who would let her know if they saw
something interesting (including the first county record for Great Egret).

Craig and Judy Corder (formerly based in Umatilla) also birded the county extensively for several years around the same time. Later on Steve Shunk and I, while setting up the Antone CBC in 1999-2000, made several scouting trips in late Nov/early Dec. On one of those early December trips I detoured up into the Ochocos and found a Boreal Owl calling at one of Donna's old spots, which prompted a visit by the Bend Birding Club the next night.

The more noteworthy finds by these various people were generally recorded in Oregon Birds and/or North American Birds. Some of the more common birds made it into the BirdNotes database (www.birdnotes.net) and can still be accessed there. And of course, everything recorded for the Antone CBC is in the Audubon CBC database, aggregated for a circle with center point in Wheeler County.

I know Paul would prefer to have all of those data in eBird and perhaps they will be someday. But meanwhile, it's good to remember that not everything that's been recorded is necessarily in eBird. Just because there's an apparent gap in eBird doesn't necessarily mean there's a lack of data regarding winter bird distributions in the region.

Again, it would be better to try to coordinate efforts like this with the long-running CBC effort, especially in a season when several compilers have reported being short on volunteers for upcoming counts.

Joel

P.S. Here's a quick list of birds that have been recorded in Wheeler County for December, in the eBird database. This doesn't include all of the CBC data.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)
Chukar (Alectoris chukar)
Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)
Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus)
California Quail (Callipepla californica)
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus)
Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus)
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus)
Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)
American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)
Merlin (Falco columbarius)
Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus)
Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola)
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)
Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) [now Wilson's Snipe]
Western Screech-Owl (Otus kennicottii)
Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)
Northern Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium gnoma)
Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)
Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus)
Boreal Owl (Aegolius funereus)
Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)
Belted Kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon)
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)
Northern Shrike (Lanius excubitor)
Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)
Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) [now California Scrub-Jay]
Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)
Black-billed Magpie (Pica pica)
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)
Common Raven (Corvus corax)
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)
Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli)
Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)
Pygmy Nuthatch (Sitta pygmaea)
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)
Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus)
Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris)
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana)
Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides)
Townsend's Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi)
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)
White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (Leucosticte tephrocotis)
House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)
Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra)
Common Redpoll (Carduelis flammea)
Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus)
American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)
Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus)

--
Joel Geier
Compiler, Antone CBC (2000-present)

----- Original Message -----
From: "clearwater"
To: "Oregon Birders OnLine"
Cc: "Paul Adamus"
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 1:04:55 PM
Subject: Re: Wheeler County in Winter

Hi all,

As Paul knows, I've had mixed feelings about this project of trying to plug holes in the eBird map, especially in and around CBC season when many counts (especially
east of the Cascades) could use more volunteers.

My suggestion to Paul privately has been that it could be better to encourage eBird users to visit CBC circles that are lacking in reports outside of the CBC season. I doubt that we learn much new from a few widely scattered eBird checklists just a few days
before the CBC season. However counts focused within established CBC circles, two
to four weeks before/after the CBC season, might shed light on how well CBC data
represent bird populations over a longer stretch of winter.

About the Antone CBC which Paul referred to, the circle is actually mainly (87%) in
Wheeler County, and all but two counts have been during the period Dec 14th-22nd.
This winter's count would have be the 19th year of data (I'm working on some ideas
to reschedule, but it will probably need to be after New Year).

So we actually have quite a lot of data on southern Wheeler County in mid-December,
just from this one count.

Prairie Falcon and Mountain Bluebird are both regular in Wheeler County in December
(recorded on at least half of our counts). Cedar Waxwings are less regular (only found
on about 1 in 4 counts). Red-breasted Sapsucker is rare, found just once on the Antone
CBC (two miles over the line into Grant County but within 8 miles of where Donna
Lusthoff found one in se. Wheeler Co. in the 1990s).

Besides the Antone CBC, there have also been a few resident birders/ornithologists
who've kept an eye on birds in Wheeler County year-round, including December.

Brian Sharp lived on Stone Cabin Rd. just outside Fossil. Brian was (maybe still is?) a
member of Western Field Ornithologists, reported notable sightings regularly to WFO
and North American Birds, and even published a few articles on the local avifauna.
He recorded the first known Western (California) Scrub-Jay during October 1995
through March 1996.

More recently (early 2000s), Mark Berryman was the resident habitat manager for the
Warm Springs Tribes' Pine Creek Preserve near Clarno. He hiked extensively in the
area south of there (some of it now designated wilderness) and was the first to record
Pinyon Jays in the county.

I seem to recall, a young fellow by the name of Paul Sullivan also did a stint or two
as an interpreter at the Painted Hills, and reported his finds to Oregon Birds. In the
early/mid 2000s we also had a resident ranger at Painted Hills, Jennifer DeLuca,
keeping an eye on birds through the winter before she moved into Fossil.

In the mid-1990s Donna Lusthoff and a few friends (Dave Anderson et al.) took an
interest in Wheeler County and visited multiple times in every month of the year. Donna
made connections with a couple of ranching families who would let her know if they saw
something interesting (including the first county record for Great Egret).

Craig and Judy Corder (formerly based in Umatilla) also birded the county extensively
for several years around the same time. Later on Steve Shunk and I, while setting up
the Antone CBC in 1999-2000, made several scouting trips in late Nov/early Dec. On
one of those early December trips I detoured up into the Ochocos and found a Boreal
Owl calling at one of Donna's old spots, which prompted a visit by the Bend Birding Club
the next night.

The more noteworthy finds by these various people were generally recorded in Oregon
Birds and/or North American Birds. Some of the more common birds made it into the
BirdNotes database ( [ http://www.birdnotes.net/ | www.birdnotes.net ] ) and can still be accessed there. And of course,
everything recorded for the Antone CBC is in the Audubon CBC database, aggregated
for a circle with center point in Wheeler County.

I know Paul would prefer to have all of those data in eBird and perhaps they will be
someday. But meanwhile, it's good to remember that not everything that's been
recorded is necessarily in eBird. Just because there's an apparent gap in eBird doesn't
necessarily mean there's a lack of data regarding winter bird distributions in the region.

Again, it would be better to try to coordinate efforts like this with the long-running CBC
effort, especially in a season when several compilers have reported being short on
volunteers for upcoming counts.

Joel

P.S. Here's a quick list of birds that have been recorded in Wheeler County for
December, in the eBird database. This doesn't include all of the CBC data.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)
Chukar (Alectoris chukar)
Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)
Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus)
California Quail (Callipepla californica)
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus)
Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus)
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus)
Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)
American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)
Merlin (Falco columbarius)
Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus)
Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola)
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)
Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) [now Wilson's Snipe]
Western Screech-Owl (Otus kennicottii)
Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)
Northern Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium gnoma)
Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)
Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus)
Boreal Owl (Aegolius funereus)
Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)
Belted Kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon)
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)
Northern Shrike (Lanius excubitor)
Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)
Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) [now California Scrub-Jay]
Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)
Black-billed Magpie (Pica pica)
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)
Common Raven (Corvus corax)
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)
Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli)
Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)
Pygmy Nuthatch (Sitta pygmaea)
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)
Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus)
Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris)
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana)
Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides)
Townsend's Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi)
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)
White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (Leucosticte tephrocotis)
House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)
Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra)
Common Redpoll (Carduelis flammea)
Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus)
American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)
Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus)

--
Joel Geier
Compiler, Antone CBC (2000-present)


POST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Wheeler County in Winter
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 15:05 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Hi all,

As Paul knows, I've had mixed feelings about this project of trying to plug holes in
the eBird map, especially in and around CBC season when many counts (especiallyeast of the Cascades) could use more volunteers.

My suggestion to Paul privately has been that it could be better to encourage eBirdusers to visit CBC circles that are lacking in reports outside of the CBC season. I doubt that we learn much new from a few widely scattered eBird checklists just a few days
before the CBC season. However counts focused within established CBC circles, two to four weeks before/after the CBC season, might shed light on how well CBC data represent bird populations over a longer stretch of winter.

About the Antone CBC which Paul referred to, the circle is actually mainly (87%) in
Wheeler County, and all but two counts have been during the period Dec 14th-22nd.
This winter's count would have be the 19th year of data (I'm working on some ideasto reschedule, but it will probably need to be after New Year).
So we actually have quite a lot of data on southern Wheeler County in mid-December, just from this one count.
Prairie Falcon and Mountain Bluebird are both regular in Wheeler County in December (recorded on at least half of our counts). Cedar Waxwings are less regular (only found
on about 1 in 4 counts). Red-breasted Sapsucker is rare, found just once on the Antone
CBC (two miles over the line into Grant County but within 8 miles of where Donna
Lusthoff found one in se. Wheeler Co. in the 1990s).

Besides the Antone CBC, there have also been a few resident birders/ornithologists who've kept an eye on birds in Wheeler County year-round, including December.

Brian Sharp lived on Stone Cabin Rd. just outside Fossil. Brian was (maybe still is?) a member of Western Field Ornithologists, reported notable sightings regularly to WFO and North American Birds, and even published a few articles on the local avifauna.
He recorded the first known Western (California) Scrub-Jay during October 1995 through March 1996.

More recently (early 2000s), Mark Berryman was the resident habitat manager for theWarm Springs Tribes' Pine Creek Preserve near Clarno. He hiked extensively in the
area south of there (some of it now designated wilderness) and was the first to record
Pinyon Jays in the county.
I seem to recall, a young fellow by the name of Paul Sullivan also did a stint or two
as an interpreter at the Painted Hills, and reported his finds to Oregon Birds. In the early/mid 2000s we also had a resident ranger at Painted Hills, Jennifer DeLuca, keeping an eye on birds through the winter before she moved into Fossil.

In the mid-1990s Donna Lusthoff and a few friends (Dave Anderson et al.) took an interest in Wheeler County and visited multiple times in every month of the year. Donnamade connections with a couple of ranching families who would let her know if they saw something interesting (including the first county record for Great Egret).

Craig and Judy Corder (formerly based in Umatilla) also birded the county extensively for several years around the same time. Later on Steve Shunk and I, while setting up the Antone CBC in 1999-2000, made several scouting trips in late Nov/early Dec. On one of those early December trips I detoured up into the Ochocos and found a Boreal Owl calling at one of Donna's old spots, which prompted a visit by the Bend Birding Club the next night.

The more noteworthy finds by these various people were generally recorded in Oregon Birds and/or North American Birds. Some of the more common birds made it into the
BirdNotes database (www.birdnotes.net) and can still be accessed there. And of course,
everything recorded for the Antone CBC is in the Audubon CBC database, aggregated
for a circle with center point in Wheeler County.

I know Paul would prefer to have all of those data in eBird and perhaps they will be someday. But meanwhile, it's good to remember that not everything that's been recorded is necessarily in eBird. Just because there's an apparent gap in eBird doesn't necessarily mean there's a lack of data regarding winter bird distributions in the region.

Again, it would be better to try to coordinate efforts like this with the long-running CBC
effort, especially in a season when several compilers have reported being short on
volunteers for upcoming counts.

Joel

P.S. Here's a quick list of birds that have been recorded in Wheeler County for December, in the eBird database. This doesn't include all of the CBC data.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)
Chukar (Alectoris chukar)
Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)
Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus)
California Quail (Callipepla californica)
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus)
Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus)
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus)
Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)
American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)
Merlin (Falco columbarius)
Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus)
Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola)
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)
Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) [now Wilson's Snipe]
Western Screech-Owl (Otus kennicottii)
Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)
Northern Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium gnoma)
Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)
Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus)
Boreal Owl (Aegolius funereus)
Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)
Belted Kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon)
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)
Northern Shrike (Lanius excubitor)
Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)
Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) [now California Scrub-Jay]
Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)
Black-billed Magpie (Pica pica)
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)
Common Raven (Corvus corax)
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)
Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli)
Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)
Pygmy Nuthatch (Sitta pygmaea)
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)
Canyon Wren (Catherpes mexicanus)
Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris)
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)
Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana)
Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides)
Townsend's Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi)
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)
White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (Leucosticte tephrocotis)
House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)
Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra)
Common Redpoll (Carduelis flammea)
Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus)
American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)
Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus)

--
Joel Geier
Compiler, Antone CBC (2000-present)



Subject: RUSTIC Bunting, Yes! - still at Cape Disappointment SP, WA Campground
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 14:49 pm
From: bendavis2 AT gmail.com
 
Continuing RUSTIC BUNTING was spotted by another group just North of campsite 86 at 10am today (Dec 11) and viewed by 8 birders. With Townsend and RBNU. I saw it at 12:20 today on the east side of site 68, with juncos. Two other birders confirmed.
Picture and description on ebird:https://ebird.org/checklist/S6...



Subject: Bend Huttons Vireo cont. Wed morning for CBC count week
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 14:42 pm
From: ckjannabirds AT gmail.com
 
20270 Sawyer Reach Court12:40p
after dozens of us looked in Sawyer Park unsuccessfully this morning .
I couldnt post on local listserve because I was banned from it,so I hope the locals still looking can see this(David Smith, Jerry Lear, theyre still in sawyer park please let them know)

Courtney Kelly Jett,Bend, OregonSent from a phone that is all brevity, no wit
Sent from a phone low on wits, high on bits



Subject: Eugene Birders Night (SWOC) Dec 16 with “Birding Northcentral India’s National Parks”
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 13:32 pm
From: ellencantor AT gmail.com
 
The
next Eugene Birders Night (SWOC) meeting will be held Monday, Dec 16, 2019, 7
pm at the McNail-Riley house, 601 W 13th Ave, Eugene. The McNail-Riley House is
the restored historic house at the NW corner of W. 13th Ave. and Jefferson St.
The parking area, located immediately west of the McNail-Riley House, can be
accessed from 13th St, by turning left (north) shortly before Jefferson
St. It may also be accessed by Jefferson St. via the driveway located
immediately north of the M-R House. We are allowed to park only in the 5 spaces
closest to the M-R house. If these spaces are full, you can take the west exit
from the M-R parking lot on to 13 Ave, then go directly across 13th to enter
and park in the Fairgrounds parking lot.

After
initial introductions, well share recent sightings and discuss birding
connected topics. Then UO Biology
Professor Emeritus Bitty Roy and Michael Wherley will take
us on a tour of four national parks and a few places between, such as the
lovely park around the Taj Mahal.

Nature in India is surprisingly rich, despite its large population. Most people do not eat meat. Many animals and birds are thought to be blessed
by the gods, and trees are essential for shade. There are many endemic birds and animals because India has been isolated from other regions
by the Himalayas and the sea for a very long time. A few highlights: several critically endangered vultures, Desert White throats,
Blue-capped Rock Thrush, Indian Paradise-flycatcher, Plum-headed Parakeets. As well as some cool antelope, monkeys and large cats.



No
entrance fees! All are welcome!

[email protected]
further information



Subject: Re: RUSTIC bunting now
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 13:10 pm
From: norris6158 AT gmail.com
 
This flock including Rustic Bunting was seen between 3-4:30pm on Tuesday, Dec. 10th. It was in the same general area around the large blue recycle bin as noted in previous messages; mostly close to campsite 82. The RBNU will be hard to pinpoint if up in the trees, but the flock seemed to come to the ground frequently. Light is terrible in this weather. They will likely be heard first.
Susan [email protected]


On Tue, Dec 10, 2019 at 1:27 PM Lars Norgren <[email protected]> wrote:
Seen well by many at campsites 114,115,118 etc. It's a paved circle immediately behind(through bushes)blue recycling bin. A huge flock of Chestnut-backed chicks, TOWA, RBNU (!), and 40 juncos are feeding on the ground. The Juncos come and go from the Chickadees.



Subject: Rustic Bunting YES
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 13:05 pm
From: robert.s.lockett AT gmail.com
 
The bunting was at campsite 86, Cape Disappointment State Park, Washington a few minutes ago. With Townsends, juncos, CB Chickadees.

Sent from my iPhonePOST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Bend - Alfalfa Raptor Survey
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 12:28 pm
From: kcboddie AT bendbroadband.com
 
Cherry Williams joined me yesterday on the Bend - Alfalfa Raptor Survey.  We drove 75 mile under p. cloudy skies, light sw winds and temps. between 30 and 36 degrees.  We counted 95 raptors as shown below.  Many of the road segments in and around Bend have changed dramatically over the 16 years I have doing the survey, especially in and around Bend.  Both traffic and development have increased.  I even have a new high school going up in one of the good Red-tail haunts.  With all these changes, the overall route raptor numbers have been going up over the last few years.

Raptors counted:
Red-tailed Hawk 63
American Kestrel 10
Northern Harrier 8
Bald Eagle 6 A, 1 S
Rough-legged Hawk 5
Great-horned Owl 2

Kim Boddie
Bend

_._,_._,_

Groups.io Links:

You receive all messages sent to this group.




View/Reply Online (#1456) |


Reply To Sender

| Reply To Group



|



Mute This Topic


| New Topic

Your Subscription |
Contact Group Owner |

Unsubscribe

[[email protected]]
_._,_._,_



Subject: Re: Warbler foraging behaviors
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 11:44 am
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
I am not saying Myrtle Warblers never feed on the ground just that when I see bluebird flocks out in open areas in southern Coos and Curry often on warm sunny days, the Yellow-rumps I see with them are invariably Audubon's or mostly Audubon.s. The Palm Warbleres also are commonly found with these flocks on the ranchlands in Curry. Also when I see lone Yellow-rumps like in the open habitat at theNorth Bend airport latyely (been checking for Palms), they seem to almost always be Audubon's. Anyhow, if they do split this species, I think habitat can help one find one or the other species in many cases at least here in my neighborhood on the south coast.
During really crappy weather, all sorts of birds can forage out in the open and on the ground in habitats they would not been seen in during decent weather.
Happy CBCing!Tim RodenkirkCoos Bay

On Wed, Dec 11, 2019 at 7:11 AM Mike Patterson <[email protected]> wrote:
Yesterday, I saw what was easily 15 Townsend's Warblers feeding on

the ground along with 20+ Chestnut-backed Chickadees and a nuthatch

(and a Rustic Bunting). The day before that I saw 2 Myrtle Warblers

feeding on the ground with bluebirds.


I suspect that a proper t-test based on properly protocoled data

collection would find that there is no significant difference between

foraging strategies when it comes to birds adventitiously looking

for food, especially on really crappy weather days...


> I agree. I've often seen Myrtle warblers foraging on the ground on

> the East Coast. I guess a few thousand miles makes a difference.?

> Bob O'Brien Carver Oregon On Tuesday, December 10, 2019,

> [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:

>

> Interesting... back East, I regularly saw Myrtle Warblers foraging

> on the ground with bluebirds and House Finches.

>

> Craig TumerPortland

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

> On Dec 9, 2019, at 9:10 PM, Alan Contreras <[email protected]>

> wrote: David Fix pointed out to me years ago that Audubons Warblers

> are far more likely to forage on the ground with bluebirds, pipits

> etc. than are Myrtles.


--

Mike Patterson

Astoria, OR

Lies, Damned Lies and Statistical Significance
http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...

POST: Send your post to [email protected]

UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol

Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Solstice CBC--come join us!
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 11:15 am
From: matthewghunter AT gmail.com
 
I don't know how I got so lucky to be the ONLY OREGON CBC on the Winter Solstice, but hey, that's cool!
I'd like to invite a few eager birders down to the "Hundred Valleys of the Umpqua" for the ROSEBURG-SUTHERLIN CBC on DECEMBER 21, 2019!
We've got a great variety of habitats, very friendly fellow birders, and some great food at the end of the day to reward your hard work!!! :-) We've easily accessed, right off I-5.

Check info on this year's count, as well as results from many previous years here:www.umpquabirds.org/cbc
Give me a call or email and I hope to see a few of you!Thank-you,Matt [email protected]



Subject: Wheeler County in Winter
Date: Wed Dec 11 2019 10:36 am
From: adamus7 AT comcast.net
 
After noticing in eBird that Wheeler County is the ONLY county in Oregon
that hasn't been birded in early December, I headed out there on Sunday.
Later in the month the southern part of the county gets some coverage from
the Antone CBC, but eBird showed no data for the northern parts. I stayed 2
nights at the only motel in Fossil, which was satisfactory, and mostly
birded along the John Day River between Kimberly and Fossil, then north into
Gilliam and Sherman Counties, focusing on Oregon2020 squares and eBird
hotspots. For eBird, I submitted 48 lists for Wheeler, 16 for Sherman, and
9 for Gilliam. Highlights were a Red-breasted Sapsucker in Fossil, Mountain
Bluebird west of Condon, a flock of 50+ Cedar Waxwings along the John Day,
and Prairie Falcons at 2 locations.

In Sherman County at the John Day Dam on the Columbia River, 4 White
Pelicans (previously reported) were still present and a Northern Shrike
chased 4 flickers in the park. Along the Biggs-Rufus Road, a Great Egret
(also previously reported) was still present, and the Rufus sewage ponds
(scoped from Industrial Drive) hosted 20 Northern Shovelers and a couple of
Barrow's Goldeneye. Sewage ponds in Condon were completely ice-covered and
those in Fossil, mostly so. Driving conditions were good throughout except
for some fog between Condon and Mayville on Monday.

Paul Adamus
Corvallis

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
UNSUBSCRIBE: //www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]




Tony Fitzpatrick

Enjoy this celebration of birding with great food, music, and art while helping the ABA help birds and birders!


At this afternoon party, we will announce the species, and unveil the painting of the 2020 ABA Bird of the Year, by Chicago icon and prominent American artist Tony Fitzpatrick.


Click here for more info and tickets




American Birding Podcast


 




ABA Recommended

ABA Book Reviews







ABA's FREE Birder's Guide. Get the most recent issue now >>




Contact us.