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Updated on November 20, 2017, 10:00 pm

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20 Nov: @ 21:47:58  Pacific Golden-Plover, seen from Fern Ridge dam [Barbara Combs]
20 Nov: @ 19:51:34  Virginia's Warbler continues [obol-bounce]
20 Nov: @ 18:50:13  Pretty late Barn Swallows and adult Golden Eagle, Ankeny NWR 11/20/17 [Roy Gerig]
20 Nov: @ 17:59:13  Florence birds [Alan Contreras]
20 Nov: @ 15:17:20  Sandhills Cranes Migrating [johnpam]
20 Nov: @ 14:27:39  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Jeff Gilligan]
20 Nov: @ 14:19:17  articles about Harlan's hawks [Will RIsser]
20 Nov: @ 14:14:42  Re: Apostrophes and weird symbols [Jane Westervelt]
20 Nov: @ 14:14:04  Virginia warbler -- show off! [Abby Haight]
20 Nov: @ 13:39:14  Re: Apostrophes and weird symbols [Mark Greenfield]
20 Nov: @ 13:27:52  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Andy Frank]
20 Nov: @ 13:19:45  Apostrophes [Mark Greenfield]
20 Nov: @ 12:39:38  Virginia Warbler [Mark Greenfield]
20 Nov: @ 11:39:44  Interrupted bird count story [Beverly Hallberg]
20 Nov: @ 11:04:55  Virginia's Warbler--YES [Patricia Brent]
20 Nov: @ 10:56:21  Two birders meet at a marsh... [Paul Sullivan]
20 Nov: @ 09:50:58  Re: A quick thank you [David Irons]
20 Nov: @ 09:35:51  Re: A Quick Thank You [Mike Patterson]
20 Nov: @ 09:09:01  Re: A quick thank you [dawn v]
20 Nov: @ 03:17:57  Re: A quick thank you [David Irons]
20 Nov: @ 02:05:08  Harrisburg-Coburg Raptor Survey [Barbara Combs]
20 Nov: @ 00:23:32  Fwd: Benton County Pelicans, LEWO [Pam Otley]
20 Nov: @ 00:14:45  Virginia's Warbler photos from today [Owen Schmidt]
19 Nov: @ 23:50:50  Benton County Pelicans, LEWO [Pam Otley]
19 Nov: @ 23:24:38  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Robert O'Brien]
19 Nov: @ 23:17:30  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Bob Archer]
19 Nov: @ 22:58:26  Broughton Beach gulls [Will Risser]
19 Nov: @ 22:53:34  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Jeff Gilligan]
19 Nov: @ 22:49:37  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Nels Nelson]
19 Nov: @ 21:37:38  Re: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post [David Irons]
19 Nov: @ 21:32:18  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Robert O'Brien]
19 Nov: @ 21:25:12  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [philliplc]
19 Nov: @ 21:24:42  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Robert O'Brien]
19 Nov: @ 21:24:32  Re: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post [Lars Per Norgren]
19 Nov: @ 21:16:51  Re: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post [Jack Williamson]
19 Nov: @ 21:06:24  Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post [Jack Williamson]
19 Nov: @ 20:53:07  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [philliplc]
19 Nov: @ 20:48:31  Re: Dark RTHA [Lars Per Norgren]
19 Nov: @ 20:40:22  Re: Sherman County Monster Song Sparrow? [Lars Per Norgren]
19 Nov: @ 19:53:04  A quick thank you. [David Lantz]
19 Nov: @ 19:17:53  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [Andy Frank]
19 Nov: @ 19:01:47  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [David Irons]
19 Nov: @ 18:58:35  Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [pnitens]
19 Nov: @ 18:46:00  It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November [David Irons]
19 Nov: @ 18:21:42  Coos/Curry Birds of late [Tim Rodenkirk]
19 Nov: @ 17:55:39  Coquille Valley CBC [HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE]
19 Nov: @ 17:13:33  Re: Virginia's Warbler - please use eBird hotspot [David Irons]
19 Nov: @ 16:55:57  Re: Paul and Carol's suet recipe also YES, with comments [Gerard Lillie]
19 Nov: @ 16:00:40  Dallas CBC will be held Wednesday, December 27th [Caleb Centanni]
19 Nov: @ 15:15:01  Dark RTHA [Carol]





Subject: Pacific Golden-Plover, seen from Fern Ridge dam
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 21:47 pm
From: bcombs232 AT gmail.com
 
Late this afternoon I stood in the Fern Ridge dam parking area and scoped through a large flock of Black-bellied Plovers on the beach at Richardson Park.  I found one that was not like the other ones.  It was a little smaller and had a substantial bill, among other things, so I concluded that it must be a Pacific Golden-Plover.

See my description on eBird in checklist S40634663, or visit the Fern Ridge Dam hotspot on eBird and find the checklist there.

Barbara Combs
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Subject: Virginia's Warbler continues
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 19:51 pm
From: obol-bounce AT freelists.org
 
I was at the Virginia's Warbler Stakeout mid- afternoon. Several other birders came and went. The Virginia's Warbler made short visits about every 20 minutes mainly to the back suet feeder, flitting around yard, with quick perches on the elderberry bushes, then leaving the yard after a few minutes. I did get a few photos which I will post to ebird later this evening.
Good birdingEllen Cantor



Subject: Pretty late Barn Swallows and adult Golden Eagle, Ankeny NWR 11/20/17
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 18:50 pm
From: roygerig AT gmail.com
 
Over the field/marsh across from Eagle Marsh were at least 4 BARN SWALLOWS in the midday faint sun. They were still around when I came back later.
At the railroad tracks I almost thought I saw a Turkey Vulture soaring on a dihedral but it wasn't. It was an adult GOLDEN EAGLE. It flew around in a graceful flight, a half giant circle over Mohoff Pond and behind Eagle.
Roy Gerig Salem OR



Subject: Florence birds
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 17:59 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
I managed a rainless day in warm, breezy Florence today. Mid-day was almost calm. Highlights:
MOCKingbird continues south of Lot 4 on s jetty Rd.
At least two and maybe three NORTHern Shrikes along s jetty Rd.
Late OSPREY over s jetty Rd.
I had hoped for some decent gullwads after recent weather. I got some. About 150 Herring Gulls were in the area along with maybe 500 Californias. An adult Ringbill at the crabdock cove and two more at the port were not usual for the outer coast of Lane County in winter. They are more commonly upriver. One surprise was zero Thice Gulls, which often come in with storms. Maybe they are mostly to the north still? Very few Western and Gwing, too.
Large numbers of robins and myrtles; the shrikes have plenty to eat in the warbler-kinglet zone out there.
Not much raptor action. Merlin at Baker Beach Rd snags (it seems to have settled in) and the usual Red-shoulder and a couple of harriers out the jetty rd.


Alan Contrerasacontrer56@gmail.com
Eugene, Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



Subject: Sandhills Cranes Migrating
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 15:17 pm
From: johnpam AT mtangel.net
 
Sandhills  noisily going over at 12:30 this afternoon. Hidden by trees so couldn't get a count.

John Thomas
5 mi NE of Silverton

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Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 14:27 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
Interestinghe indicates that ti the occasional male that gets large. I have seen a few of those big ones, but assumed they were females.
Jeff Gilligan

On Nov 20, 2017, at 11:27 AM, Andy Frank <andydfrank@gmail.com> wrote:Many thanks to everyone's comments. I became convinced it was a Bonaparte's, but decided to get one more opinion so I wouldn't be left wondering. I asked Amar Ayyash, a gull expert, who graciously and promptly replied with this:
"There™s is the occasional large Bonaparte™s (presumably males) that defies expectations. I think your bird is fine for BOGU. Some individuals take on a pale bill base early in life. See the images here, for example:

http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...
Thanks, Andy



Subject: articles about Harlan's hawks
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 14:19 pm
From: wlrisser AT gmail.com
 
In Neah Bay, WA, Jan and I saw the dark-phase Harlan™s hawk seen earlier by others. It inspired me to look up some articles that I remembered.
Here they are in case that you are interested.
William Clark the hawk expert wrote a wonderful discussion of the amazing variability of the tail pattern of Harlan™s hawk in the ABA's magazine Birding, with photos. If
you have online or other access to old issues of Birding, the reference is 2009, volume 41, pages 30-36.
William Clark has another interesting article that I found by searching for
"Is HARLAN'S HAWK a subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk?" I used Google Scholar.



Subject: Re: Apostrophes and weird symbols
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 14:14 pm
From: jwestervelt AT live.com
 
It's related to the type of program you use for email, and the program that others use to read your email.  For some programs, the apostrophe is rendered as an image as opposed to a symbol, which the reader's program may or may not recognize.  This is related to the formatting type your or your reader's program uses: plain text, rich text, or html, etc. There are some other similar reasons, too.


Among other things, it's why some people get a capital J instead of a smiley face with some postings. ˜

Jane

________________________________
From: obol-bounce@freelists.org on behalf of Mark Greenfield
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2017 11:38 AM
To: Carol Voeller
Cc: OBOL
Subject: [obol] Re: Apostrophes and weird symbols

This is really interesting. When I check the OBOL digest, some posts (like mine) do not show the apostrophes. For instance, Message 5 from Kathleen Krall in Digest V6 #364 from yesterday was like this. Message 2 in yesterday™s Digest (Paul Sullivan) was a bunch of letters and numbers and symbols , some with umlauts above them and some like b (squared) that are unintelligible. Dave Iron™s message #8 had both the apostrophe messed up in the subject line, followed by the odd letters, numbers and symbols in the message itself. Yet this was not the case in his messages #16 and #19, where the apostrophes and messages were clear. Is anyone else experiencing these oddities?

Mark Greenfield
14745 NW Gillihan Road
Sauvie Isand, Oregon 97231
503-227-2979




On Nov 20, 2017, at 11:23 AM, Carol Voeller > wrote:

They're showing up fine in this message. What's different?

[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/image... Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 11:19 AM, Mark Greenfield > wrote:
I cannot type apostrophes in my OBOL messages and have them show up correctly when posted. Hence, I cannot write Virginia™s warbler (looks fine on my screen, but not when I see it published), or Bewick™s wren, or Wilson™s warbler, etc. I see that others have the same problem. Does anyone have a solution? I either just put an s without the apostrophe, or leave the s off entirely, but either way it looks odd. Suggestions?

Mark Greenfield
14745 NW Gillihan Road
Sauvie Isand, Oregon 97231
503-227-2979



Subject: Virginia warbler -- show off!
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 14:14 pm
From: abhaight AT gmail.com
 
The Virginia warbler was very present at 9:30-10 this morning. It fed on suet, hopped to a nearbyrhody to preen and chased juncos. Lots of continuous looks. Maybe it's becoming used to being a star



Subject: Re: Apostrophes and weird symbols
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 13:39 pm
From: markgreenfield333 AT gmail.com
 
This is really interesting. When I check the OBOL digest, some posts (like mine) do not show the apostrophes. For instance, Message 5 from Kathleen Krall in Digest V6 #364 from yesterday was like this. Message 2 in yesterday™s Digest (Paul Sullivan) was a bunch of letters and numbers and symbols , some with umlauts above them and some like b (squared) that are unintelligible. Dave Iron™s message #8 had both the apostrophe messed up in the subject line, followed by the odd letters, numbers and symbols in the message itself. Yet this was not the case in his messages #16 and #19, where the apostrophes and messages were clear. Is anyone else experiencing these oddities?

Mark Greenfield14745 NW Gillihan RoadSauvie Isand, Oregon 97231503-227-2979

On Nov 20, 2017, at 11:23 AM, Carol Voeller <cwvoeller@gmail.com> wrote:They're showing up fine in this message. What's different?

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 11:19 AM, Mark Greenfield <markgreenfield333@gmail.com> wrote:
I cannot type apostrophes in my OBOL messages and have them show up correctly when posted. Hence, I cannot write Virginia™s warbler (looks fine on my screen, but not when I see it published), or Bewick™s wren, or Wilson™s warbler, etc. I see that others have the same problem. Does anyone have a solution? I either just put an s without the apostrophe, or leave the s off entirely, but either way it looks odd. Suggestions?

Mark Greenfield14745 NW Gillihan RoadSauvie Isand, Oregon 97231503-227-2979



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 13:27 pm
From: andydfrank AT gmail.com
 
Many thanks to everyone's comments. I became convinced it was a Bonaparte's, but decided to get one more opinion so I wouldn't be left wondering. I asked Amar Ayyash, a gull expert, who graciously and promptly replied with this: 
"There™s is the occasional large Bonaparte™s (presumably males) that defies expectations. I think your bird is fine for BOGU. Some individuals take on a pale bill base early in life. See the images here, for example:

http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...
Thanks, Andy



Subject: Apostrophes
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 13:19 pm
From: markgreenfield333 AT gmail.com
 
I cannot type apostrophes in my OBOL messages and have them show up correctly when posted. Hence, I cannot write Virginia™s warbler (looks fine on my screen, but not when I see it published), or Bewick™s wren, or Wilson™s warbler, etc. I see that others have the same problem. Does anyone have a solution? I either just put an s without the apostrophe, or leave the s off entirely, but either way it looks odd. Suggestions?

Mark Greenfield14745 NW Gillihan RoadSauvie Isand, Oregon 97231503-227-2979



Subject: Virginia Warbler
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 12:39 pm
From: markgreenfield333 AT gmail.com
 
The Warbler is back this morning. Saw it fly in and out a number of times between 9:30 and 10:30.

Mark Greenfield
Sauvie Island
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Subject: Interrupted bird count story
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 11:39 am
From: mapsout AT comcast.net
 
Hi all,
The other day I was scoping the HUGE flock of over 200 mixed waterfowl off Hayden Island, I was trying to count the Horned Grebes scattered throughout the mixed flock - not easy - when I heard a voice yell from about 25 yards away, "EXCUSE MEEEE." Not wanting to interrupt my count, and not sure if someone was even addressing me, I didn't look up or engage. When the woman and her friend were right next to me, she said it again, "EXCUSE MEEEEE. I thought you might want to know there's an eagle perched over there" as she pointed behind me. I dropped the count, looked up and smiled and said, "Oh cool." And then went back to my scoping. When she walked away, she yelled back in the snootiest voice I have heard - that is since my mother-in-law was alive and I have husband's permission to say that! - "Of course, unless you PREFER to look at Grebes." I thought this was the funniest line I had ever heard, told my husband and laughed all the way home. Yes, I admit it, I love grebes, their sounds, antics and looking at waterfowl flocks. Incidentally, their was a White-Winged Scoter mixed in with the usual small flock of Surf Scoters there yesterday. NOT JUST GREBES!
Also, the other day at Sauvie Island, a bunch of us were watching the waterfowl at the Reeder Rd. shelter. A beginning birder with binoculars asked what the duck was with white below and white on the head. Dwight and I scratched our heads not quite knowing what she was referring to. Did it have a stripe - was it a Pintail? No. So we shrugged and kept looking at the birds, everyone trying to call out what they were seeing. It was a very congenial group of birders. And then I saw a Bufflehead! Bingo. I went and found her and said, "I think it was a Bufflehead! Did it have a white and black head - kind of a like a helmet?" And then she learned what a Bufflehead was. Yay!
I agree with Dave, that if beginning birders are using binoculars and using a field guide, we will be more than happy to help you out if you have a question.
Best, Beverly



Subject: Virginia's Warbler--YES
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 11:04 am
From: pdbrent AT gmail.com
 
Still at N. Portland location at 0900. Was seen at the front feeder, then flew away to the north.

Patti Brent
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Subject: Two birders meet at a marsh...
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 10:56 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Two birders meet at a marsh (or on a birding list). They don™t know each other.
One says hello and asks a question.
Chances are one of them knows a whole lot about birds. Chances are one of them doesn™t know as much.
In response to the question, the responder has three options:
A. The responder may be very shy or preoccupied (counting or studying). The response may be gruff, curt, or dismissive.
B. The responder may be gregarious and come out with a long-winded, full-blown lecture that is way more than the questioner asked for.
C. The responder can be cordial and affable and give the other person helpful information, reading the facial expression of the other person to gauge how much information to share. (This is not possible on-line, which makes birding lists fraught with problems. Too much information. Too little information.)
Let me suggest that responses A and B don™t work too well for the questioner. Response C works much better.
Let me also suggest that responses A and B don™t work too well for the responder either, and that response C works better for the responder as well.
No matter who you are or where you™re coming from, courtesy and amiability work better.
Good birding, everyone,
Paul Sullivan



Subject: Re: A quick thank you
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 9:50 am
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Thanks Dawn. I remember Mike™s blog. It offered some highly insightful into what it is like when you are considered to be the local
expert. You become a de facto docent anywhere you go birding.

It is sort of like doing a seawatch at Boiler Bay. Every third person who drives up asks, have you seen any whales, or what are you taking pictures of? Then, when you tell them you are watching birds they insist on advising you about where you can go to see a Bald Eagle, as if such help is needed.

When others are recreating, I purposely avoid approaching them
with questions about what they might be doing and I certainly don™t offer them advice. Even when I encounter other birders I will not always ask them what they are seeing, particularly when I notice that they are avoiding eye contact and not saying anything to me.

On the reverse side, if I see someone looking at s field guide and then looking at a bird and then repeating the process, I will often ask, what are you trying to sort out, maybe I can help.

Dave Irons

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 20, 2017, at 7:08 AM, dawn v > wrote:

Dave,

I've been on field trips lead by you and can attest to what you say about being helpful, knowledgable, and patient (and I tend to be high-maintenance on birding trips - my thirst to see and know everything can be irritating). I'm grateful for your and other trip leader's patience and willingness to voluntarily share their expertise with me and others.

Reading your email immediately reminded me of an article Mike Patterson wrote on his blog a few years ago about the three Mike Pattersons. It's entirely true, being a birder doesn't obligate anyone to constantly engage anymore than being a doctor obligates one to diagnose my latest ailment at a party. (I'd post a link if I thought I could find it). We could all do to remember that everyone is human.

dawn v
Lincoln City/Nelscott



Subject: Re: A Quick Thank You
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 9:35 am
From: celata AT pacifier.com
 
If you think Dave's a grumpy birder, then you clearly have a low
threshold of grumpy tolerance....

It may be time to rerun this....

http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...

--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
That question...
http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
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Subject: Re: A quick thank you
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 9:09 am
From: d_villa AT mail.com
 
Dave,



I've been on field trips lead by you and can attest to what you say about being helpful, knowledgable, and patient (and I tend to be high-maintenance on birding trips - my thirst to see and know everything can be irritating). I'm grateful for yourand other trip leader's patience and willingness to voluntarily share their expertise with me and others.



Reading your email immediately reminded me of an articleMike Patterson wrote on his blog a few years ago about the three Mike Pattersons.It's entirely true, being a birder doesn't obligate anyone to constantly engageanymore than being a doctor obligates one to diagnose my latest ailment at a party. (I'd post a link if I thought I could find it). We could all do to remember that everyone is human.



dawn v

Lincoln City/Nelscott



Subject: Re: A quick thank you
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 3:17 am
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Greetings all,


David Lantz' post earlier tonight hits a little too close to home, as I was the utterly unhelpful soul who didn't drop what I was doing to show him ducks at Koll Wetlands today (not Knoll Parkway). Here are a few things that Mr. Lantz may have failed to
consider.





My wife Shawneen and I are fresh off a nine-day trip to the Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival last Monday. During the five-day festival I led six field trips and she led five.
Even on our "off" days before the festival we were generally at busy birding venues where we were often amongthe most experienced and knowledgeable birders on site, thus many birders approached uswith questions or inneed of help finding life birds. My job with Schwan's Food Company requires me to interact with anywhere from 40 to60 customers per day in their homes. I work 10-hour days five days a week. This week we worked Saturday to cover routes that would normally be run on Thanksgiving Day.Today was my one an only day off this week before I head back to work tomorrow. Over the last 14 days I have been required to be mostly "on" in the sense that other people's needs and concerns had to come before my own. I love leading field trips and and
I very much enjoy my job, but I also very much enjoy getting to choose how I spend my limiteddiscretionary time. When I am birding in a non field trip leading capacity, that is MY TIME and I will choose how I spend it.

Shawneen and I were quietly scoping the lake at Koll, making careful counts of the ducks and other species present when Mr. Lantz arrived. He pulled his car up close to where I was scoping and got out with no bins or scope. He approached me and asked what
we were seeing. Without looking up from my scope (this should have provided a clue) I said that there was a Redhead, to which he replied "I saw that last week." I thought to myself, "then you don't need my help." He did not ask me to point it out and if he
had I certainly would have obliged. I continued scoping and calling out species and counts to Shawneen who was a few yards away warming up in the car. Meanwhile, Mr. Lantz lingered about attempting to initiate conversation, first about a smaller goose thathe
had seen being bullied by large race Canadas and then telling meabout a supposed Mallard X Harlequin Duck hybrid (I don't know of this cross ever occurring)that he had seen at Dawson Creek Park. I continued on with what I was doingwithout ever stepping
away or looking upfrom my scope and fully engaging Mr. Lantz. I was hoping that he might recognizethat I wasn't interested in stopping whatI was doing to chat. Eventually, what conversation we were having ended and he left. Clearly, he left with a bad taste
in his mouth....is he so entitled?


In my view, my birding expertise does not obligate me to be "on" every time I am birding in a public place. While birding is in a sense a social hobby, it also provides me with an opportunity to quietly go about pursuing my interests without interacting
with others, something I get plenty of in my professional and recreational life. Mr Lantz's presumption that I or any other birder he encounters should be expected to drop what they are doing to answer his questions and meet his needs fails to consider the
needs of those who he might be interrupting.


Mr. Lantz, We have never met before today. You don'tknowme. You don't know whatmy daily life looks like. And it would seem that none of that was taken into consideration when you approached me today. You never asked mefor help locating any birds. When
I made mention ofone interesting bird I had seen,you told me you had already seen it. You also didn't seem to beactively looking forbirds yourself. You seemed mostly interested in a conversation. Frankly, at that moment in time a conversation wasn't something
that I was interested in. If you come on a field trip that I'm leading sometime I canguarantee you that you'll find me to be exceedingly helpful, knowledgeable and more than willing to share myknowledge. The Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival has invited
me back as a leader eight years in a row and paid my way to and from south Texas. PerhapsI'm notthat jerk you attempted to portray in your post.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



Subject: Harrisburg-Coburg Raptor Survey
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 2:05 am
From: bcombs232 AT gmail.com
 
On Saturday, November 18, Kai Williams and I conducted the Harrisburg-Coburg
Raptor Survey. We covered 66.9 miles in 3 hours and 1 minute. The day started
out rather foggy, which impaired our ability to see in some parts of the early segments
of the route, but it soon cleared up enough so we could see as far as we needed to.
After a couple of down years for the November survey, totals were close to 2014 levels.
The birds:
24 Red-tailed Hawk28 American Kestrel 3 Northern Harrier 2 Bald Eagle (both adults; apparently a pair) 1 Cooper's Hawk


--
Barbara Combs obie '70
Lane County, OR



Subject: Fwd: Benton County Pelicans, LEWO
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 0:23 am
From: pamo1954 AT gmail.com
 
Correction: Pelican count is actually 23, not 21 as I had originally posted.
:-) Pam

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Pam Otley <pamo1954@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 9:50 PM
Subject: Benton County Pelicans, LEWO
To: obol@freelists.org


Hi all,
I birded around the William Finley Refuge area in Benton County today. I had an unexpected sighting of a flock of 21 American White Pelicans flying south past McFadden Marsh. I also found a Lewis' Woodpecker on McFarland Rd, just south of the bridge over Muddy Creek.
I went to the Prairie Overlook platform on Finley Rd at dusk and at 5:02 the previously reported Short-eared Owls made their entrance from the south to a far away field to the east. There were 3 of them flying amongst the (at least) 12 Northern Harriers that were soaring around the prairie!
Pictures of Pelicans on eBird list:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
Happy birding!
Pam Otley



Subject: Virginia's Warbler photos from today
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 0:14 am
From: oschmidt AT att.net
 
http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmi...

Cheers!

oschmidt@att.net
Sunday, November 19, 2017


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Subject: Benton County Pelicans, LEWO
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 23:50 pm
From: pamo1954 AT gmail.com
 
Hi all,
I birded around the William Finley Refuge area in Benton County today. I had an unexpected sighting of a flock of 21 American White Pelicans flying south past McFadden Marsh. I also found a Lewis' Woodpecker on McFarland Rd, just south of the bridge over Muddy Creek.
I went to the Prairie Overlook platform on Finley Rd at dusk and at 5:02 the previously reported Short-eared Owls made their entrance from the south to a far away field to the east. There were 3 of them flying amongst the (at least) 12 Northern Harriers that were soaring around the prairie!
Pictures of Pelicans on eBird list:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
Happy birding!
Pam Otley



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 23:24 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
"While BHGU has a larger amount of dark in the wing tips than BOGU, I
wouldn't call it a striking dark underwing. I think you are thinking of
Little Gull"

No I meant B-H Gull. But thanks, Hendrik for giving me an opening for yet
another Birding story.
(As you know it doesn't take much).

When my two older sons graduated from High School in consecutive years
(they were big-time fishermen).
I took them both on Alaska 'fishing' trips. As you might guess this was
not my only motive for the trips.

We made the transit from Anchorage to Denali, then the Denali Highway east
to loop back to Anchorage.
There is a lot of daylight in June and we weren't getting much sleep. As
he were about 100 miles from
Anchorage, heading south but from the east, my eldest son was driving and I
was intermittently dozing
in the passenger seat. As I briefly opened my eyes, I saw a flock of
Bonaparte's Gulls flying over the
road just overhead but in front of the car. I instantly came awake. One
of them had dark underwings.
*Stop, stop. Turn around, * As luck would have it, the flock had landed on
a small roadside lakeshore. I got out
the telescope and sure enough there was the larger, Common Black-headed
Gull landed on the shore among them.
Not only that, it was banded!. Probably in Siberia. That was a lifer for
me. Literally, my dreams had come true.

Bob OBrien

PS You are right about the relative 'blackness' of course, but compared to
Bonaparte's Gull, there is no comparison.
From the Web:




On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 9:16 PM, Robert O'Brien wrote:

> No I meant B-H Gull. But thanks, Hendrik for giving me an opening for yet
> another Birding story.
> (As you know it doesn't take much).
>
> When my two older sons graduated from High School in consecutive years
> (they were big-time fishermen).
> I took them both on Alaska 'fishing' trips. As you might guess this was
> not my only motive for the trips.
>
> We made the transit from Anchorage to Denali, then the Denali Highway east
> to loop back to Anchorage.
> There is a lot of daylight in June and we weren't getting much sleep. As
> he were about 100 miles from
> Anchorage, heading south but from the east, my eldest son was driving and
> I was intermittently dozing
> in the passenger seat. As I briefly opened my eyes, I saw a flock of
> Bonaparte's Gulls flying over the
> road just overhead but in front of the car. I instantly came awake. One
> of them had dark underwings.
> *Stop, stop. Turn around, * As luck would have it, the flock had landed
> on a small roadside lakeshore. I got out
> the telescope and sure enough there was the larger, Common Black-headed
> Gull landed on the shore among them.
> Not only that, it was banded!. Probably in Siberia. That was a lifer for
> me. Literally, my dreams had come true.
>
> Bob OBrien
>
> PS You are right about the relative 'blackness' of course, but compared
> to Bonaparte's Gull, there is no comparison.
> From the Web:
>
>
>
> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:59 PM, Hendrik Herlyn
> wrote:
>
>> While BHGU has a larger amount of dark in the wing tips than BOGU, I
>> wouldn't call it a striking dark underwing. I think you are thinking of
>> Little Gull, Bob. :)
>>
>> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:31 PM, Robert O'Brien wrote:
>>
>>> Of course, if it is refound, the striking dark underwings of B-H gull
>>> would answer the question immediately, especially if photographed.
>>> Bob OBrien
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:24 PM, wrote:
>>>
>>>> FWIW photos of a couple first cycle Bony's here showing
>>>> color at the bill base with something at least bordering on
>>>> reddish tones -
>>>>
>>>> http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...
>>>> onapartes-gull.html
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> __________________________
>> Hendrik G. Herlyn
>> Corvallis, OR
>>
>>
>> *"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*
>>
>
>



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 23:17 pm
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
Hi:

I do not see legs that look much longer, the gray nape, about same gray
shade on back. Bonnies can have red in bill. Leg color is perfect for
Bonnies. And when you look just at the body, (block out head and feet),
not sure if I see a bird that is that much bigger. If AF says it was
bigger then I accept that. Looks like a Bonnie to me, a big one is fine
with me.

Bob Archer



On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 8:53 PM, Jeff Gilligan
wrote:

> Nels - the photos you linked show much more red on the bill than the
> subject bird. In any case, I think the leg color is important too.
>
> Jeff Gilligan
>
>
>
>
> On Nov 19, 2017, at 8:49 PM, Nels Nelson wrote:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> For comparison, here's an excellent photo of a Black-headed gull taken by
> Oliver Burton Nov. 5, 2017 in Belgium. Lot's of red on the bill and a dark
> underwing showing on this bird.
> I found by clicking on the photo (after opening the link) it brings the
> bird up a lot closer for better viewing.
>
> I'm almost ashamed to show the photo I took of the Black-headed Gull at
> McNary Dam Jan. 6, 2015. Although not in focus, it shows a similar amount
> of red on the bill, with a black tip.
>
> I'm not experienced enough with gulls to offer any opinion on the subject
> gull at Broughton Beach, but thought these photos might contribute
> something to the discussion.
>
> Nels Nelson
> Hillsboro
>
>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
>
>
> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:59 PM, Hendrik Herlyn
> wrote:
>
>> While BHGU has a larger amount of dark in the wing tips than BOGU, I
>> wouldn't call it a striking dark underwing. I think you are thinking of
>> Little Gull, Bob. :)
>>
>> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:31 PM, Robert O'Brien wrote:
>>
>>> Of course, if it is refound, the striking dark underwings of B-H gull
>>> would answer the question immediately, especially if photographed.
>>> Bob OBrien
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:24 PM, wrote:
>>>
>>>> FWIW photos of a couple first cycle Bony's here showing
>>>> color at the bill base with something at least bordering on
>>>> reddish tones -
>>>>
>>>> http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...
>>>> onapartes-gull.html
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> __________________________
>> Hendrik G. Herlyn
>> Corvallis, OR
>>
>>
>> *"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*
>>
>
>
>



Subject: Broughton Beach gulls
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 22:58 pm
From: wlrisser AT gmail.com
 
The bigger gull appears to me to have a gray nape. I believe that black-headed gulls have a white nape.
Will Risser, Portland

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Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 22:53 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
Nels - the photos you linked show much more red on the bill than the subject bird.  In any case, I think the leg color is important too.

Jeff Gilligan




> On Nov 19, 2017, at 8:49 PM, Nels Nelson wrote:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> For comparison, here's an excellent photo of a Black-headed gull taken by Oliver Burton Nov. 5, 2017 in Belgium. Lot's of red on the bill and a dark underwing showing on this bird.
> I found by clicking on the photo (after opening the link) it brings the bird up a lot closer for better viewing.
>
> I'm almost ashamed to show the photo I took of the Black-headed Gull at McNary Dam Jan. 6, 2015. Although not in focus, it shows a similar amount of red on the bill, with a black tip.
>
> I'm not experienced enough with gulls to offer any opinion on the subject gull at Broughton Beach, but thought these photos might contribute something to the discussion.
>
> Nels Nelson
> Hillsboro
>
> Virus-free. www.avast.com
>
> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:59 PM, Hendrik Herlyn > wrote:
> While BHGU has a larger amount of dark in the wing tips than BOGU, I wouldn't call it a striking dark underwing. I think you are thinking of Little Gull, Bob. :)
>
> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:31 PM, Robert O'Brien > wrote:
> Of course, if it is refound, the striking dark underwings of B-H gull
> would answer the question immediately, especially if photographed.
> Bob OBrien
>
>
> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:24 PM, > wrote:
> FWIW photos of a couple first cycle Bony's here showing
> color at the bill base with something at least bordering on
> reddish tones -
>
> http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...
>
>
>
> --
> __________________________
> Hendrik G. Herlyn
> Corvallis, OR
>
> "Nature is not a place to visit. It is home."
> -- Gary Snyder
>



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 22:49 pm
From: nelsnelson7 AT gmail.com
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

For comparison, here's an excellent photo of a Black-headed gull taken by
Oliver Burton Nov. 5, 2017 in Belgium. Lot's of red on the bill and a dark
underwing showing on this bird.
I found by clicking on the photo (after opening the link) it brings the
bird up a lot closer for better viewing.

I'm almost ashamed to show the photo I took of the Black-headed Gull at
McNary Dam Jan. 6, 2015. Although not in focus, it shows a similar amount
of red on the bill, with a black tip.

I'm not experienced enough with gulls to offer any opinion on the subject
gull at Broughton Beach, but thought these photos might contribute
something to the discussion.

Nels Nelson
Hillsboro


Virus-free.
www.avast.com

<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:59 PM, Hendrik Herlyn wrote:

> While BHGU has a larger amount of dark in the wing tips than BOGU, I
> wouldn't call it a striking dark underwing. I think you are thinking of
> Little Gull, Bob. :)
>
> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:31 PM, Robert O'Brien wrote:
>
>> Of course, if it is refound, the striking dark underwings of B-H gull
>> would answer the question immediately, especially if photographed.
>> Bob OBrien
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:24 PM, wrote:
>>
>>> FWIW photos of a couple first cycle Bony's here showing
>>> color at the bill base with something at least bordering on
>>> reddish tones -
>>>
>>> http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...
>>> onapartes-gull.html
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> __________________________
> Hendrik G. Herlyn
> Corvallis, OR
>
>
> *"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*
>



Subject: Re: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 21:37 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
There are also a number of records of Virginia's Warbler from Canada.


Dave Irons



From: obol-bounce@freelists.org <obol-bounce@freelists.org> on behalf of Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2017 3:15 AM
To: OBOL Oregon Birders Online
Subject: [obol] Re: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post



I realize now that there is an accepted eBird record slightly north of ours in Montana in August of 2016 here:45.8858416,-111.6801062

Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon



On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:05 PM, Jack Williamson
<jack.williamson.jr@gmail.com> wrote:


The Virginia's Warbler is an uncommon visitor to Oregon. It has only been recorded in the state 15 times previous to its appearance this week in a residential neighborhood in north Portland. Thisvisit is unique in that it represents the northern-most
observation of the species.


Which is exciting to witness on the one hand and then again not on the other.


Much time, energy, and effort went into assuring this rare visitor would make itself available to the throngs of birders crowding the sidewalk with the hope of getting a brief glimpse and or photo of it.


A local suet recipe is being credited for bringing the otherwise flighty bird into extended views for all of theanxious folks in attendance.



Paul Sulivan & Carol Karlen's soon to be famous recipe follows!


2 cups cornmeal
2 cups quick oats
1 cup flour
1 cup lard (I upped it to 1 1/2 cups lard and melted it in the microwave for ease of mixing)
1 cup chunky peanut butter


Stir all together and spread out in some sort of container to about 1/2 thickness. Freeze it, then cut it up to the desired size.



If you want a lot of birds to visit your feeders, then this suet is a must-have component.



A few pictures of the warbler are here.




Jack Williamson
West Linn, Oregon



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 21:32 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Of course, if it is refound, the striking dark underwings of B-H gull
would answer the question immediately, especially if photographed.
Bob OBrien


On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:24 PM, <philliplc@charter.net> wrote:
FWIW photos of a couple first cycle Bony's here showingcolor at the bill base with something at least bordering onreddish tones -
http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 21:25 pm
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
FWIW photos of a couple first cycle Bony's here showingcolor at the bill base with something at least bordering onreddish tones -
http://www.anythinglarus.com/2...


@gmail.com>



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 21:24 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
I'll vote with Dave Irons.  This bird looks, just, well, a lot bigger in
all aspects to me.
Attached is a photo I took (many years ago) at Point Pelee, Canada during
spring migration
where Little Gull (not all that rare there). was being reported. No one
else was
around and I found a Black-headed Gull in the Bonaparte's flock as well
(quite rare there, as here,
although I didn't know that at the time).

I entered it into the sightings log with just my name but was not believed
so I guess
it was not seen by anyone else. Years later I happened to post this photo
on ID Frontiers
in another context, whereupon they found my entry of years earlier and
believed this time.

I've indicated the relative size of these three species with red dashes.
which represent the B-H Gull. Notice also the apparently all dark bill of
the B-H Gull
even though it has developed the dark hood.

As to size, the Broughton gull appeared 'too big' to me even for a B-H Gull
at first glance, but
Howell & Dunn,* Gulls*, indicate that the west Asian race *L.R. Sibiricus*
is larger and
longer billed than the nominate (European) race.so I'm comfortable with the
size.

Bob OBrien


On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 6:52 PM, wrote:

> No expertise claimed on this ID problem, but these 2 birds
> look virtually identical to me in plumage and leg color. And
> other than the bill they seem very close in size and structure
> if you compensate for the more upright posture and higher
> perch of the bird in question.
>
> Also like Jeff mentioned apparently young Bony's at least can
> show a bit of color at the bill base with the potential to look
> reddish.
>
> The bill does look large for Bony, but I'm not sure it's
> large enough to be obviously beyond their normal
> range of appearance. Would need to study that more.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Phil
>



Subject: Re: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 21:24 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
*
The species breeds in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Cassin'sKingbird also goes far to the north on the western Great Palins.
On Nov 19, 2017, at 7:15 PM, Jack Williamson wrote:I realize now that there is an accepted eBird record slightly north of ours in Montana in August of 2016 here:45.8858416,-111.6801062Jack WilliamsonWest Linn, Oregon

On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:05 PM, Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr@gmail.com> wrote:
The Virginia's Warbler is an uncommon visitor to Oregon. It has only been recorded in the state 15 times previous to its appearance this week in a residential neighborhood in north Portland. Thisvisit is unique in that it represents the northern-most observation of the species.
Which is exciting to witness on the one hand and then again not on the other.
Much time, energy, and effort went into assuring this rare visitor would make itself available to the throngs of birders crowding the sidewalk with the hope of getting a brief glimpse and or photo of it.
A local suet recipe is being credited for bringing the otherwise flighty bird into extended views for all of theanxious folks in attendance.
Paul Sulivan & Carol Karlen's soon to be famous recipe follows!
2 cups cornmeal2 cups quick oats1 cup flour1 cup lard (I upped it to 1 1/2 cups lard and melted it in the microwave for ease of mixing)1 cup chunky peanut butter
Stir all together and spread out in some sort of container to about 1/2 thickness. Freeze it, then cut it up to the desired size.
If you want a lot of birds to visit your feeders, then this suet is a must-have component.

A few pictures of the warbler are here.
Jack WilliamsonWest Linn, Oregon



Subject: Re: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 21:16 pm
From: jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com
 
I realize now that there is an accepted eBird record slightly north of ours in Montana in August of 2016 here:45.8858416,-111.6801062Jack WilliamsonWest Linn, Oregon

On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 7:05 PM, Jack Williamson <jack.williamson.jr@gmail.com> wrote:
The Virginia's Warbler is an uncommon visitor to Oregon. It has only been recorded in the state 15 times previous to its appearance this week in a residential neighborhood in north Portland. Thisvisit is unique in that it represents the northern-most observation of the species.
Which is exciting to witness on the one hand and then again not on the other.
Much time, energy, and effort went into assuring this rare visitor would make itself available to the throngs of birders crowding the sidewalk with the hope of getting a brief glimpse and or photo of it.
A local suet recipe is being credited for bringing the otherwise flighty bird into extended views for all of theanxious folks in attendance.
Paul Sulivan & Carol Karlen's soon to be famous recipe follows!
2 cups cornmeal2 cups quick oats1 cup flour1 cup lard (I upped it to 1 1/2 cups lard and melted it in the microwave for ease of mixing)1 cup chunky peanut butter
Stir all together and spread out in some sort of container to about 1/2 thickness. Freeze it, then cut it up to the desired size.
If you want a lot of birds to visit your feeders, then this suet is a must-have component.

A few pictures of the warbler are here.
Jack WilliamsonWest Linn, Oregon



Subject: Virginia's Warbler - A friends and family post
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 21:06 pm
From: jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com
 
The Virginia's Warbler is an uncommon visitor to Oregon. It has only been recorded in the state 15 times previous to its appearance this week in a residential neighborhood in north Portland. Thisvisit is unique in that it represents the northern-most observation of the species.
Which is exciting to witness on the one hand and then again not on the other.
Much time, energy, and effort went into assuring this rare visitor would make itself available to the throngs of birders crowding the sidewalk with the hope of getting a brief glimpse and or photo of it.
A local suet recipe is being credited for bringing the otherwise flighty bird into extended views for all of theanxious folks in attendance.
Paul Sulivan & Carol Karlen's soon to be famous recipe follows!
2 cups cornmeal2 cups quick oats1 cup flour1 cup lard (I upped it to 1 1/2 cups lard and melted it in the microwave for ease of mixing)1 cup chunky peanut butter
Stir all together and spread out in some sort of container to about 1/2 thickness. Freeze it, then cut it up to the desired size.
If you want a lot of birds to visit your feeders, then this suet is a must-have component.

A few pictures of the warbler are here.
Jack WilliamsonWest Linn, Oregon



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 20:53 pm
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
No expertise claimed on this ID problem, but these 2 birdslook virtually identical to me in plumage and leg color. Andother than the bill they seem very close in size and structureif you compensate for the more upright posture and higher perch of the bird in question.
Also like Jeff mentioned apparently young Bony's at least canshow a bit of color at the bill base with the potential to lookreddish.
The bill does look large for Bony, but I'm not sure it'slarge enough to be obviously beyond their normalrange of appearance. Would need to study that more.
Cheers,
Phil
@gmail.com>




@gmail.com>



Subject: Re: Dark RTHA
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 20:48 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
*I saw just such a bird at the south end of Seaside this time of year a few yearsback- steely gray, quite cool-toned. I assume there's some place up north thatspecializes in their production. lpn
On Nov 19, 2017, at 1:14 PM, Carol wrote:



While driving Finley Road out of Finley Refuge on Friday, we saw a hawk
sitting on a utility pole. The hawk was not a dark brown but a dark
gray. The entire head, back, and chest were dark gray and not a hint of a
bib on the chest. It did not fly off as most RTHAs do when you stop your
vehicle near where they are perched. After watching it through our binocs
for about 5 minutes, it flew, and we got a split-second glimpse of the underside
which was just slightly lighter. We knew it was a RTHA because of the
obvious rusty tail in flight. Of the hundreds of Red-Tailed Hawks weve
seen over the years, we have never seen a hawk this dark.

Does this sound more like a dark morph RTHA or possibly a Harlans?
We would love to hear thoughts from fellow birders.

Thanks, and happy birding.

Carol and Jim Hiler
N. Albany



Subject: Re: Sherman County Monster Song Sparrow?
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 20:40 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
*
Kenai moose were at one time reputed to be the world's largest.lpn
On Nov 19, 2017, at 10:02 AM, Mike Patterson wrote:

> Fun fact: Song Sparrows migrate.
>
> The resident dark Song Sparrow is _Melospiza melodia morphna_ which is
> described as "medium large" in Pyle. There a four additional subspecies
> in this "Northwest Coastal Pacific" clad collectively called Rusty
> Song Sparrows. All of these occur to the north of us and migrate
> south into Oregon and Washington in the winter. The largest of these
> is _M.m.kenaiensis_ which averages 12% larger (emphasis on the averages).
>
> Two other large Song Sparrows are _rufina_ which should not have the
> impressively large bill apparent in your photo and _caurina_ which
> is described as having a long, but narrow bill.
>
> So, you bird is and winter visitor from the Great White North.
>
>
> --
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> That question...
> http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
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>

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Subject: A quick thank you.
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 19:53 pm
From: lantz503 AT gmail.com
 
Over the years I have met some extremely nice and helpful people while out birding. Including some of the most prominent people on OBOL. There are people that have been very encouraging and had the patience to take a moment to teach. Those moments mean a lot. Around 10 days ago the name most if you would recognize helped me find the red headed duck at Knoll Parkway oh, it was for me so it was exciting. Today an individual said it was there but didn't try point it out. Sometimes I can be a bit disheartening. Shrug. One person that has been invaluable helping me learn calls has been a godsend. I have told a few stories about him and usually get a good laugh, his knowledge is amazing. One of the nicest people I know, so thank you very much.
David Lantz



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 19:17 pm
From: andydfrank AT gmail.com
 
Many thanks to Dave Irons for reviewing OBOL photos and concluded that the bird Tait and I saw November 17 was a Black-headed Gull. I have updated my eBird report that includes photos by both Tait and myself. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

My apologies for not getting the word out sooner, but as Dave explained we did not make the ID then. Tait and I were struck by the size of the bill and larger size of the bird in comparison with nearby Bonaparte's (there were 8 Bonies with it, along with about 200 other gulls), but in the field the bill appeared all black. We later that day shared our photos with a very experienced local birder, who was also puzzled by the larger bill size but thought a Black-headed would have more red on the bill. Unfortunately Tait and I never saw the underwing.
Andy Frank



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 19:01 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
In looking at Tait's series of images, I think photos number 6 and 7 in his gallery are most telling. Not only do they show the red at the base of the bill quite nicely, but they also offer a nice comparison of the bill size and shape between the putative
Black-headed Gull and a typical Bonaparte's Gull.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



From: pnitens@qfwfq.org <pnitens@qfwfq.org>
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2017 12:58 AM
To: LLSDIRONS@msn.com; OBOL Oregon Birders Online
Subject: Re: [obol] It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November


My shots:

http://qfwfq.org/broughton-bea...


Tait

Portland



----- Original Message -----

From:
LLSDIRONS@msn.com

To:
"OBOL Oregon Birders Online" <obol@freelists.org>
Cc:

Sent:
Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:45:32 +0000

Subject:
[obol] It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November



Greetings all,


While viewing the Virginia's Warbler this morning, Andy Frank casually mentioned a confounding "giant" Bonaparte's Gull that he and Tait Anderson had seen at Broughton Beach (along the Columbia Rivernear the Portland Airport) this past Friday (17 November).
The bird was with Bonaparte's Gulls and dwarfed them. In the field, the bird's bill appeared to be all-dark with no red, which led them to conclude (begrudgingly) that it was probably just an oddly oversized Bony. Gulls can vary in size quite a bit, with males
often beingconsiderably larger than females.


Just now I was surfing through Oregon's recent eBird photos and came across images of their bird. I was instantly taken aback when I looked at their bird standing side-by-side with a Bonaparte's Gull.In Andy's photos, you can clearly see somered at the
base of the bill, albeit far less red and not as conspicuous as one would expect on a Black-headed Gull at this season. The bird appears to be about 50% larger than the Bony and has a much longer and thicker bill than any Bonaparte's that I've seen. To my
eye, the structure of the bill is perfect for Black-headed. Bonaparte's Gulls never show anything but an all-black bill and they have a far shorter and more delicate bill than Andy and Tait's bird.


After spending a couple minutes studying thephotos and thenlooking at some online images of Black-headed Gull, I called Andy to get more details. He told me that he would ask Tait to send me some of his photos. They don't have any flight shots on images
showing the underwings of the bird, but from what I've seen alreadyI am pretty confident that the bird is a Black-headed Gull. Andy was out at Broughton Beach againthis morning and
did not see the Bonaparte's Gull flock that this bird was with, but the birds could certainly still be in the area. Other gull roosts along the river should be checked in the coming days. It's hard to know if these birds were moving up or downriver,
but any gull roost between Hood River and the mouth of the Columbia River could potentially collect these birds. For those who have never been there, the log booms at the Port of Kalama (Washington) is a great place to find hundreds of roosting gulls. A couple
years back both Lesser Black-backed Gull and Black-legged Kittiwake were found there.


Obviously, the trail is a couple days cold on this bird, but I thought it would be worth getting the word out. If you wish to see the photos. Go to eBird, then click on "Explore Data" then click on the "Search Photos and Sounds" link. Then click on "Location"
in blue type. Type in Oregon and you will see a gallery of all recent eBird photos from Oregon. You will have to scroll through about 30 photos or so before you come to it.


Yet another great find here in Oregon.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



Subject: Re: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 18:58 pm
From: pnitens AT qfwfq.org
 
My shots:
http://qfwfq.org/broughton-bea...

Tait
Portland


----- Original Message -----
From: LLSDIRONS@msn.com
To:"OBOL Oregon Birders Online" <obol@freelists.org>
Cc:
Sent:Mon, 20 Nov 2017 00:45:32 +0000
Subject:[obol] It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November



Greetings all,


While viewing the Virginia's Warbler this morning, Andy Frank casually mentioned a confounding "giant" Bonaparte's Gull that he and Tait Anderson had seen at Broughton Beach (along the Columbia Rivernear the Portland Airport) this past Friday (17 November).
The bird was with Bonaparte's Gulls and dwarfed them. In the field, the bird's bill appeared to be all-dark with no red, which led them to conclude (begrudgingly) that it was probably just an oddly oversized Bony. Gulls can vary in size quite a bit, with males
often beingconsiderably larger than females.


Just now I was surfing through Oregon's recent eBird photos and came across images of their bird. I was instantly taken aback when I looked at their bird standing side-by-side with a Bonaparte's Gull.In Andy's photos, you can clearly see somered at the
base of the bill, albeit far less red and not as conspicuous as one would expect on a Black-headed Gull at this season. The bird appears to be about 50% larger than the Bony and has a much longer and thicker bill than any Bonaparte's that I've seen. To my
eye, the structure of the bill is perfect for Black-headed. Bonaparte's Gulls never show anything but an all-black bill and they have a far shorter and more delicate bill than Andy and Tait's bird.


After spending a couple minutes studying thephotos and thenlooking at some online images of Black-headed Gull, I called Andy to get more details. He told me that he would ask Tait to send me some of his photos. They don't have any flight shots on images
showing the underwings of the bird, but from what I've seen alreadyI am pretty confident that the bird is a Black-headed Gull. Andy was out at Broughton Beach againthis morning and
did not see the Bonaparte's Gull flock that this bird was with, but the birds could certainly still be in the area. Other gull roosts along the river should be checked in the coming days. It's hard to know if these birds were moving up or downriver,
but any gull roost between Hood River and the mouth of the Columbia River could potentially collect these birds. For those who have never been there, the log booms at the Port of Kalama (Washington) is a great place to find hundreds of roosting gulls. A couple
years back both Lesser Black-backed Gull and Black-legged Kittiwake were found there.


Obviously, the trail is a couple days cold on this bird, but I thought it would be worth getting the word out. If you wish to see the photos. Go to eBird, then click on "Explore Data" then click on the "Search Photos and Sounds" link. Then click on "Location"
in blue type. Type in Oregon and you will see a gallery of all recent eBird photos from Oregon. You will have to scroll through about 30 photos or so before you come to it.


Yet another great find here in Oregon.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



Subject: It's a cold trail, but an apparent BLACK-HEADED GULL was at Broughton Beach on Friday 17 November
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 18:46 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Greetings all,


While viewing the Virginia's Warbler this morning, Andy Frank casually mentioned a confounding "giant" Bonaparte's Gull that he and Tait Anderson had seen at Broughton Beach (along the Columbia Rivernear the Portland Airport) this past Friday (17 November).
The bird was with Bonaparte's Gulls and dwarfed them. In the field, the bird's bill appeared to be all-dark with no red, which led them to conclude (begrudgingly) that it was probably just an oddly oversized Bony. Gulls can vary in size quite a bit, with males
often beingconsiderably larger than females.


Just now I was surfing through Oregon's recent eBird photos and came across images of their bird. I was instantly taken aback when I looked at their bird standing side-by-side with a Bonaparte's Gull.In Andy's photos, you can clearly see somered at the
base of the bill, albeit far less red and not as conspicuous as one would expect on a Black-headed Gull at this season. The bird appears to be about 50% larger than the Bony and has a much longer and thicker bill than any Bonaparte's that I've seen. To my
eye, the structure of the bill is perfect for Black-headed. Bonaparte's Gulls never show anything but an all-black bill and they have a far shorter and more delicate bill than Andy and Tait's bird.


After spending a couple minutes studying thephotos and thenlooking at some online images of Black-headed Gull, I called Andy to get more details. He told me that he would ask Tait to send me some of his photos. They don't have any flight shots on images
showing the underwings of the bird, but from what I've seen alreadyI am pretty confident that the bird is a Black-headed Gull. Andy was out at Broughton Beach againthis morning and
did not see the Bonaparte's Gull flock that this bird was with, but the birds could certainly still be in the area. Other gull roosts along the river should be checked in the coming days. It's hard to know if these birds were moving up or downriver,
but any gull roost between Hood River and the mouth of the Columbia River could potentially collect these birds. For those who have never been there, the log booms at the Port of Kalama (Washington) is a great place to find hundreds of roosting gulls. A couple
years back both Lesser Black-backed Gull and Black-legged Kittiwake were found there.


Obviously, the trail is a couple days cold on this bird, but I thought it would be worth getting the word out. If you wish to see the photos. Go to eBird, then click on "Explore Data" then click on the "Search Photos and Sounds" link. Then click on "Location"
in blue type. Type in Oregon and you will see a gallery of all recent eBird photos from Oregon. You will have to scroll through about 30 photos or so before you come to it.


Yet another great find here in Oregon.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



Subject: Coos/Curry Birds of late
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 18:21 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
On Friday the 17th I was down in SW Curry in the mountains NE of Brookings in the area that burned during this summer™shuge Chetco Barfire. I was up at 2,000™ in a forestedarea that was totally black and I saw a lone GRAY JAY, a rarity in Curry.
This morning (Sunday)Pip and I went down to Floras Lake, Curry. Highlights included three PALM WARBLERS on drive in along road in several locations. At the lake wefound 3 SWAMP SPARROWS, one vocal at boat ramp and two quiet ones in willows north of lake. Also one very dark Savannah Sparrow I wanted to pass off as a Vesper but didn™t.North of lake at New River there were 5 BONIE GULLS; there have been quite a few around lately. I did a short ocean scope from the beach at the New River bend and saw mostly gulls headed south- lots of Herrings as well as CAs and Mews. Best birds were two ANCIENT MURRELETS.
On the way back north we stopped in Bandon, Coos. It was high tide and we checked the rockpiper flock behind the Coast Guard station. About 75 Black Turnstones, 35 Surfbirds, and two RUDDY TURNSTONES. Hopefully the latter will stay around for the CBC. Over at the sewage treatment plant there was a few hundred gulls almost all CAs.
Nice weekend- now back to our normal soggy November weather!Enjoy,Tim RCoos Bay



Subject: Coquille Valley CBC
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 17:55 pm
From: ninerharv2 AT msn.com
 
Finish out the old year on the balmy Southern Oregon Coast. The Coquille Valley CBC (Bandon to Coquille) will be held on Saturday, December 30. If interested, reply offline or call or text 541-297-2342.


Harv Schubothe
Bandon



Subject: Re: Virginia's Warbler - please use eBird hotspot
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 17:13 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Something else to consider...I just submitted a written report and some of my photos to the OBRC. I heard back immediately from OBRC Treesa Hertzel letting me know that my report is the only one that she has received thus far. There is an easy-to-use online
form on the OBRC website under "report sightings."


Please take the time to send photos and written documentation of this record to the OBRC. I know that this bird has now been seen by dozens of birders. At least 30 came and went while Shawneen and I were there this morning.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



From: obol-bounce@freelists.org <obol-bounce@freelists.org> on behalf of Adrian Hinkle <adrian.hinkle@gmail.com>
Sent: Sunday, November 19, 2017 7:32 PM
To: obol@freelists.org
Subject: [obol] Virginia's Warbler - please use eBird hotspot



Hi all,


Please place your eBird reports on the hotspot "stakeout Virginia's Warbler, Portland (2017)" located at 8th and Bryant. This keeps the records more organized, and is respectful of the homeowner's
privacy.


Read more about eBird hotspots here:http://help.ebird.org/customer...




All About: Hotspots | eBird

help.ebird.org

Hotspots are an integral part of the way that eBirders submit observations. Many of the locations that you go birding at are classified as "eBird Hotspots."






Thanks!
Adrian



Subject: Re: Paul and Carol's suet recipe also YES, with comments
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 16:55 pm
From: gerardlillie AT outlook.com
 
Bird crack, but in a good way!





Gerard Lillie

Portland, OR







From: obol-bounce@freelists.org <obol-bounce@freelists.org> on behalf of Steve Jaggers <sjjag@comcast.net>
Sent: Saturday, November 18, 2017 7:52 PM
To: OBOL; andydfrank@gmail.com
Subject: [obol] Paul and Carol's suet recipe also YES, with comments




Adding to Andy's suet comments, we love it and so does nearly every bird in the neighborhood even the Juncos, I have even seen a Towhee hanging/hovering at a feeder, and all the usual suspects!





Andy mentioned microwaving the lard, throwing in the peanut butter with it makes it even easier to blend. We add 1/2 cup of Chick-feed purchased at local farm store (inexpensive and done as apparently in breeding blue birds, reliance on the mix mentioned is
not a sufficiently balanced diet)




We also do a double batch as the birds are eating a cake in one or two days right now. Starlings, Jays, Red Winged black birds can be voracious.






Best,


Steve and Linda

On November 18, 2017 at 1:31 PM Andy Frank <andydfrank@gmail.com> wrote:


After spending much of the past week not finding the Virginia's Warbler, and then today seeing it repeatedly come to the suet feeder now containing suet made according to Paul and Carol's
recipe, I am a believer in their suet!


Hopefully this won't sound too much like an Oscar acceptance speech, but I'd like to thank Casey both for finding and identifying the bird and for allowing guests, to Nick M for notifying
me this morning that the bird was seen again, and to Paul and Carol as it seems like their suet is what did the trick.


I personally have not yet made it (but plan to do so soon), but here's the recipe I saved as posted previously by Gerard Lillie.


Cornmealandquickoatscanbeboughtinthebulkfoodisle.2cupscornmeal2cupsquickoats1cupflour1cuplard(Iuppeditto11/2cupslardandmelteditinthemicrowaveforeaseofmixing)1cupchunkypeanutbutterStiralltogetherandspreadoutinsomesortofcontainertoabout1/2thickness.Cool/freeze(Ifreezeit)thencutupintodesiredsize.Workslikeacharm.


Andy Frank



Subject: Dallas CBC will be held Wednesday, December 27th
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 16:00 pm
From: caleb AT centanni.com
 
Hi folks,
This year's Dallas CBC is set for December 27th. We will meet at 7 AM at the Dallas Safeway that morning. We can use as many volunteers as are interested.
Dallas offers a lot of opportunities as a CBC. We need volunteers to scour the raptor- and sparrow-rich valley floor, to count mixed flocks in the forest, and to hike or bike gravel roads up into the coast range. We have the productive Monmouth and Independence Sewage Ponds and Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge in our circle. We almost always tally well over a hundred species. Whether searching residential streets for a rare waxing or warbler, pishing up 50 assorted sparrows from the blackberries, or counting pintails on a windy marsh is your thing, we have space for you.
We are still working out our countdown spot, but it will be a warm location, with warm food included to help us celebrate the day and count species.
Hope to see you there!
Cheers,
Caleb Centanni, Compiler



Subject: Dark RTHA
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 15:15 pm
From: imcaroling AT comcast.net
 
While driving Finley Road out of Finley Refuge on Friday, we saw a hawk
sitting on a utility pole. The hawk was not a dark brown but a dark
gray. The entire head, back, and chest were dark gray and not a hint of a
bib on the chest. It did not fly off as most RTHA™s do when you stop your
vehicle near where they are perched. After watching it through our binocs
for about 5 minutes, it flew, and we got a split-second glimpse of the underside
which was just slightly lighter. We knew it was a RTHA because of the
obvious rusty tail in flight. Of the hundreds of Red-Tailed Hawks we™ve
seen over the years, we have never seen a hawk this dark.

Does this sound more like a dark morph RTHA or possibly a Harlan™s?
We would love to hear thoughts from fellow birders.

Thanks, and happy birding.

Carol and Jim Hiler
N. Albany


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