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Updated on February 20, 2018, 1:35 pm

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20 Feb: @ 13:28:19  Robins [David Heath]
20 Feb: @ 13:07:31  Thoughts on swallows [Bill Tice]
20 Feb: @ 13:02:03  Big day waterfowl consideration? [Bill Tice]
20 Feb: @ 10:15:18  Early Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Albany, Linn County [[email protected]]
20 Feb: @ 03:53:33  Snowy Owl invasion (not Oregon) [Paul Sullivan]
19 Feb: @ 23:44:32  More photos of the Slaty-backed Gull at Rainier [Nels Nelson]
19 Feb: @ 23:07:39  FYI on Slaty-backed [Aaron Beerman]
19 Feb: @ 19:46:00  Golden Eagle over Coburg Hills [Kristin]
19 Feb: @ 18:49:35  Crested Longspur [Jacob Mathison]
19 Feb: @ 17:59:17  Slaty-backed Gull (Rainier) - Yes [Aaron Beerman]
19 Feb: @ 12:01:15  Emperor Goose location [Tye Jeske]
19 Feb: @ 11:07:13  Re: Feeder when move [Marlowe Kissinger]
19 Feb: @ 09:06:00  Re: American Robin migration [Robert O'Brien]
19 Feb: @ 07:52:22  Re: American Robin migration [Lars Per Norgren]
19 Feb: @ 01:16:29  American Robin migration [Nathaniel Wander]
19 Feb: @ 00:19:13  Bend Emperor Goose Still Present [Charles Gates]
18 Feb: @ 23:55:21  Harrisburg-Coburg Raptor Survey February 17 [Barbara Combs]
18 Feb: @ 23:29:45  Re: Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County [philliplc]
18 Feb: @ 23:21:33  Cliff Swallow in Clatsop County [Nicholas Mrvelj]
18 Feb: @ 22:58:32  Re: Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County [Nicholas Mrvelj]
18 Feb: @ 22:40:15  Feeder when move [Marlowe Kissinger]
18 Feb: @ 22:22:33  Re: Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County [Philip Kline]
18 Feb: @ 21:25:36  Signs of Spring: Not Robins, Mallards. [Robert O'Brien]
18 Feb: @ 21:03:19  Re: robins [Mark Nikas]
18 Feb: @ 20:22:24  Re: robins [Caleb Centanni]
18 Feb: @ 19:57:26  Re: robins [Alan Contreras]
18 Feb: @ 19:51:36  Re: robins [David Irons]
18 Feb: @ 19:36:06  I want my slaty-back slaty-back slaty-back ... [Bill Shanahan]
18 Feb: @ 19:32:44  Klamath basin and Crescent City [Wayne Hoffman]
18 Feb: @ 19:10:24  robins [Alan Contreras]
18 Feb: @ 18:02:41  Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County [Nicholas Mrvelj]
18 Feb: @ 17:02:18  Nashville Warbler and 3 swallow species at Brownsmead [Mike Patterson]
18 Feb: @ 15:02:53  Herring [Roy Lowe]
18 Feb: @ 13:54:14  Matching Gift [Paul Sullivan]
18 Feb: @ 10:45:59  Eugene Birders Night Monday, Feb 19 with Birds of San Blas, Mexico Presentation [Ellen Cantor]
18 Feb: @ 10:15:12  Re: new list? [Robert O'Brien]
18 Feb: @ 09:41:10  new list? [Paul Sullivan]
18 Feb: @ 09:25:31  perception of falling snow - off topic on a snowy day [Paul Sullivan]
17 Feb: @ 22:44:17  Herring in Yaquina Bay [Roy Lowe]
17 Feb: @ 18:56:43  SANDHILL CRANE Lincoln County [J Rothe]
17 Feb: @ 17:42:15  Clark, Washington snowy egret [Bill Shanahan]
17 Feb: @ 17:35:37  possible Rdshoulder Hawk, Ontario Or Any subscribers to Idaho listserve? [Lars Per Norgren]
17 Feb: @ 14:52:06  3rd North Grants Pass Raptor survey [Dennis Vroman]
17 Feb: @ 14:34:32  Herring [Roy Lowe]
17 Feb: @ 14:15:05  Benton County FOY Band-tailed Pigeon [Karan Fairchild]
17 Feb: @ 11:02:56  Re: Armchair Gulling--Sauvie Is. Pellet Plant 1993 redux #2h [Jeff Gilligan]
17 Feb: @ 09:43:33  Great Backyard Bird Count - 2018 [Mike Patterson]
17 Feb: @ 09:39:44  Turvey Vultures in Gorge Feb 16 [cjflick]
17 Feb: @ 03:25:53  Re: ebird throws out the baby with the bath water... [Evan Centanni]
16 Feb: @ 22:22:08  Herring, or the lack of, Update [Roy Lowe]





Subject: Robins
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 13:28 pm
From: drheath82 AT frontier.com
 
There has been a thread recently about Robins in Oregon. Well, right now
there are at least a dozen foraging on the ground behind my condo.

David Heath
Cedar Mill, WashCo

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Subject: Thoughts on swallows
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 13:07 pm
From: ticebill7 AT gmail.com
 
I must be somewhat bored sitting in my kitchen watching the snow fall.  So we now have 5 of our 7 swallows reported for February.  Seeing Barn, Tree and VGs by now is no surprise, but Cliff and NRWs are.  Wouldn™t it be cool if a Martin and a Bank Swallow would show by the end of the month ?   That would be a February to remember.

Bill TicePOST: Send your post to [email protected]
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Subject: Big day waterfowl consideration?
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 13:02 pm
From: ticebill7 AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,  With the present Eider, Emperor Goose, Cinnamon and Blue Winged Teal in the state, it may be another opportunity to do a big day for waterfowl.  I think the record is 36.   With the 4 mentioned and all the regular possibilities, I count 37.   If the Marion County mute swan was wild, it would make it even easier.  If there were a tufted duck and something else rare, it would help. Anyone ambitious enough to tackle such?   Tis a long drive from Bend to Seaside or vis versa....   I suppose one could take a plane over the Cascades to worship the emperor if time was an issue and it was needed to break the record.

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Subject: Early Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Albany, Linn County
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 10:15 am
From: jeffharding AT centurytel.net
 
Bill Tice noticed a Northern Rough-Winged Swallow at Talking Water Gardens, a wetlands-based water treatment facility in Albany, Linn County last week.Others have also found one there in the last few days, and I saw one yesterday.It was flying with a flock of two dozen Tree Swallows and at least one Barn Swallow. It was smaller than the Tree Swallows, and soared less when banking, flapping almost continuously. The light brown back, off-white belly, and darker throat and chin contrasted with adjacent Tree Swallows.The Blue-winged Teal is still there, hanging with Cinnamon and Green-winged Teal in one of the back ponds.Soras volunteered their whinneys, and a Virginia Rail responded with grunts. Marsh wrens were singing.
Wild plum trees are blooming, but I have not yet seen a Rufous Hummingbird.Good spring birding,Jeff
Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE Smartphone



Subject: Snowy Owl invasion (not Oregon)
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 3:53 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
FYI 
This winter™s Snowy Owl invasion has brought 200 birds to Wisconsin, and four birds are wearing $3000 transmitters to track their movements.
https://www.projectsnowstorm.o...
Paul Sullivan



Subject: More photos of the Slaty-backed Gull at Rainier
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 23:44 pm
From: nelsnelson7 AT gmail.com
 
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
I'm not meaning to pile on top of Aaron Beerman's good report, but Don Cogswell asked me to post some of my photos to OBOL. So, here's some of my photos Don (more below).
Nels NelsonHillsborohttps://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Virus-free. www.avast.com



Subject: FYI on Slaty-backed
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 23:07 pm
From: aaron.beerman AT gmail.com
 
For those contemplating a trip to see the Slaty-backed, it might be worth mentioning that it was absent most of today. From what I gathered from speaking to another birder, the gull arrived only shortly before 3:30pm. Apparently, few gulls where present during the low tide in the morning and early afternoon. There was, however, a large group of gulls on the distant mud flats on the Washington side, near the mouth of the Cowlitz river. When I arrived nearer high tide most of the gulls including the SBGU where back on the docks. I™m not sure if this is a daily pattern for this bird but it™s worth considering.
Also, if you have bread to spare the Slaty may thank you with good photo views.
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
Good birding,Aaron B.



Subject: Golden Eagle over Coburg Hills
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 19:46 pm
From: nristik AT gmail.com
 
I took a walk in the snow way up in the Coburg Hills Monday and stopped to look down on the valley about 3pm. Noticed a huge bird and thought it must be a TV off in the distance over Harrisburg. If there was even the slightest doubt as to what the bird was, it obliged by souring not only up and in front of me but then took a turn North and flew about 10 feet over my head.  Breathtaking.



Subject: Crested Longspur
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 18:49 pm
From: jacobmathison1 AT gmail.com
 
Or Cardinal Longspur. Or, if you want the real, boring name, Lapland
Longspur. Still at the base of the North jetty in Newport, by the dune on
the jetty. https://www.ebird.org/pnw/view...

Jacob Mathison
jacobmathison1.wixsite.com/nature-photography


"If you keep a green tree in your heart, perhaps a singing bird will
come." ~Chinese Proverb



Subject: Slaty-backed Gull (Rainier) - Yes
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 17:59 pm
From: aaron.beerman AT gmail.com
 
The SB Gull is continuing at Rainier docks as of 4:00 pm.

Cheers,
Aaron B.
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Subject: Emperor Goose location
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 12:01 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
Just to let people know going to look for Emperor goose, I saw it this mourning on NE Butler Market Road. I tried getting a view on Repine where it's usually seen but the flock seems to be in a slight slant where you can't see it from Repine. Unfortunately this isn't the best place as the bird was far away and the traffic is bad and there really isn't a good place to pull over. But the flock might move.

Good Birding
Tye J.

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: Feeder when move
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 11:07 am
From: rosebudgurl AT msn.com
 
Thank you for the information. Very helpful knowing they will be ok. I figured they would find another food source. Im glad Im not leaving in winter. Im looking forward to finding new birds in southern Oregon.
Marlowe

________________________________________
From: Dan Gleason
Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2018 10:37:45 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: Re: [obol] Feeder when move

While it may seem harse, you really dont need to worry too much about the birds welfare. Feeders actually account for only about 15% or less of their diet. They are mostly dependenet on wild food sources. Your feeders are an easy and reliable source but they quickly find other sources if the feeders are.not available. Even winter hummingbirds (Annas) are not as dependent on feeders as we tend to believe. During really cold spells when temperatures fall and stay below freezing, our feeders only account for about 20% of the diet and only about 12% during normal conditions. The hummingbirds come first thing in the morning because it is a quick source of energy and then again just before dusk when a large amount of nectar is quickly converted to fat for survival during overnight torpor. During the day they seek sources of natural food (small insects, spiders and their eggs) that provide their needed protein.

If you wish to do so, you could taper off the amount of food offered to encourage them to seek more natural sources more often. It may make the tranistion a bit easier (especialy for your peace of mind), but they will do fine either way.

We have also had a couple of customers come into our store to buy a bag 20 lb. bag of seed to leave behind along with their feeders to help encourage the new owners to continue feeding the birds. Of course, doing so also usually also means an investment in new feeders for your new location.

There are some studies now which show increased health in populations of birds attending feeders over several years (most recent was a 5 year study). The population with no feeders in the same habitat did well and had no negative effects, but those at feeders showed somewhat better health. When the firs,t portion of the study ended, the feeders were removed to see what happened. The birds immediately turned to natural food aources with no negative effects observed. When their health was examined, it soon returned to that of the wild population, but no less. This study concluded that there were only positive affects from feeding birds (providing that feeders were kept clean and good quality food was provided) and no negative results were found by stopping feeding by feeders.

Rest easy and know that you will do no harm whatever tou decide to do.


Dan Gleason
Owner, Wild Birds Unlimited of Eugene
Ornithology Instructor, University of Oregon
[email protected]


> On Feb 18, 2018, at 8:39 PM, Marlowe Kissinger wrote:
>
> I am moving to southern Oregon in June. I have a lot of feeders in my back yard. How should I handle leaving my birds with no food? Should I start tapering now or keep the same amount and just leave them cold turkey (seems cruel) . I have black oil seed, socks for the goldfinches, hummingbird feeders, suet and general seed on the ground.
> I dont want to leave but have to.
>
> Thanks, Marlowe

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Subject: Re: American Robin migration
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 9:06 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
We have a normal complement here of Robins that I think will be breeders.
Just a few and chortling. This Is Not Unusual here. What was unusual happened about 15 years ago. I worked downtown and went by the Schnitzer Auditorium on my way back and forth to work
There was a recently fledged juvenile Robin with a very short tail in that area. So that Robin pair had nested in an urban heat island in early December
I only saw that once over a period of30 years

On Monday, February 19, 2018, Lars Per Norgren <[email protected]> wrote:
> I've lived just inside the Coast Range forest for 25 years, 25miles
> nw of Portland. I notice that Robins cease to be present here in
> late October and reappear in late February. I used to think it was
> an extremely local event. Then some posts on Obol a year or two
> ago made me realize it is all over the NW . In 2002 I drove to Wallowa
> Lake at this time of year and spent the weekend there. There were
> Robins there, simultaneous to my home 350 miles to the west.
> There was a Robin at our house one day in January this year,
> but today (2/19) there is plenty of snow. lpn
> On Feb 19, 2018, at 12:15 AM, Nathaniel Wander wrote:
>
> I too noticed robins on my NW Portland patch this afternoon for the first time since fall.
> I'm not sure exactly how this works out in terms of who ends up breeding where, but I believe that American Robins are leap-frog migrators. That is to say, northernmost populations over-leap middle latitude ones in to travel to their wintering grounds and middle-latitude breeders similarly over-leap the most southerly breeders.
> Nathaniel Wander
> Portland, OR
> Max Planckis supposed to have said:
> A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and
> makingthem see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die
> and a newgeneration grows up that is familiar with it.
> Andreas Wagnerobserved of Planck's remark:
> Science, like nature, advances one funeral at a time. (Arrival of the Fittest, p.197)
>



Subject: Re: American Robin migration
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 7:52 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
I've lived just inside the Coast Range forest for 25 years, 25milesnw of Portland. I notice that Robins cease to be present here inlate October and reappear in late February. I used to think it wasan extremely local event. Then some posts on Obol a year or twoago made me realize it is all over the NW . In 2002 I drove to WallowaLake at this time of year and spent the weekend there. There wereRobins there, simultaneous to my home 350 miles to the west.   There was a Robin at our house one day in January this year,but today (2/19) there is plenty of snow. lpn
On Feb 19, 2018, at 12:15 AM, Nathaniel Wander wrote:I too noticed robins on my NW Portland patch this afternoon for the first time since fall.
I'm not sure exactly how this works out in terms of who ends up breeding where, but I believe that American Robins are leap-frog migrators. That is to say, northernmost populations over-leap middle latitude ones in to travel to their wintering grounds and middle-latitude breeders similarly over-leap the most southerly breeders.
Nathaniel WanderPortland, OR
Max Planckis supposed to have said: A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and makingthem see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die and a newgeneration grows up that is familiar with it.Andreas Wagnerobserved of Planck's remark: Science, like nature, advances one funeral at a time. (Arrival of the Fittest, p.197)



Subject: American Robin migration
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 1:16 am
From: nw105 AT columbia.edu
 
I too noticed robins on my NW Portland patch this afternoon for the first time since fall.
I'm not sure exactly how this works out in terms of who ends up breeding where, but I believe that American Robins are leap-frog migrators. That is to say, northernmost populations over-leap middle latitude ones in to travel to their wintering grounds and middle-latitude breeders similarly over-leap the most southerly breeders.
Nathaniel WanderPortland, OR
Max Planckis supposed to have said: A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and makingthem see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die and a newgeneration grows up that is familiar with it.Andreas Wagnerobserved of Planck's remark: Science, like nature, advances one funeral at a time. (Arrival of the Fittest, p.197)



Subject: Bend Emperor Goose Still Present
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 0:19 am
From: cgates326 AT gmail.com
 
This is old news to the locals here in Central Oregon but I thought the
rest of you might like to know that the Emperor Goose is still being
seen just about daily in Bend. It has moved around quite a bit since it
was first found on clear back on November 26. Not only is this the
first record for Central Oregon, I would bet it holds the record for the
longest stay in one location. I could be wrong. Has there ever been an
Oregon Emperor Goose that stayed in the same location for more than 12
weeks?

--
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.
Mark Twain

Chuck Gates
Prineville Bird Club
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Central Oregon
Oregon Birding Site Guide
http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
Oregon County Checklists
http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...

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Subject: Harrisburg-Coburg Raptor Survey February 17
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 23:55 pm
From: bcombs232 AT gmail.com
 
Kai Williams and I did the Harrisburg-Coburg raptor survey on Saturday, February 17.

Temperatures were within a few degrees of 50 for the day.
There was quite a bit of wind, often around 10-20 mph, with some gusts
that had us holding on to our hats. The sky was usually cloudy. In and
around Coburg we experienced some light rain and limited visibility. Early in the day there were some very light sprinkles in the northern section of the route.

The birds:

3 Turkey Vulture (arrived early this year)
18 Red-tailed Hawk
18 American Kestrel (including a pair sheltering together in a small bush)
1 Northern Harrier
16 Bald Eagle (one pair was showing interest in their already gigantic nest)
1 Merlin
1 Cooper's Hawk
--
Barbara Combs obie '70
Lane County, OR



Subject: Re: Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 23:29 pm
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
Great find. It looks like the legs as well as the bill are atypicallybright and somewhat shifted toward orange, so something oddmay be going on with diet or possibly enzyme release affectingthe bare parts. The occasional Western or other species will showsimilarly hyper-colored/orangeish bare parts
It also appears to have a largely dark or possibly damaged rightiris even though the left appears typical.
Phil
@gmail.com>

@gmail.com>



Subject: Cliff Swallow in Clatsop County
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 23:21 pm
From: nickmrvelj AT gmail.com
 
Hello again all,
Colby Neumann and I found a very early CLIFF SWALLOW today in Brownsmead. It's tawny rump was very distinct among the more numerous TREE and BARN SWALLOWS. It did not show a white forehead however, and caused us to have pipe dreams of a certain look-a-like swallow that would be extremely rare. However, we rubbished this idea and concluded that this bird was in fact a CLIFF SWALLOW that was perhaps retaining some juvenile feathers around the head. We are open to suggestions as to the lack of a cream/white triangular patch on the forehead.
A quick search of eBird shows that there are no previous records for Cliff Swallow in February in the state of Oregon. Knowing that eBird is far from the end all be all of Oregon records, I'm wondering what other early arrival records for the species are out there?
Good birding,-Nick Mrvelj



Subject: Re: Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 22:58 pm
From: nickmrvelj AT gmail.com
 
Great photos Philip! Here is our checklist with a flight shot attached. What a wonderful and timely bird. Hope it sticks around for others to see.
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
Good birding,-Nick Mrvelj

On Sun, Feb 18, 2018 at 8:22 PM Philip Kline <[email protected]> wrote:
Thanks to Nick's speedy post, I was able to get up to Rainier to see the Slaty-backed Gull. I managed some pretty good photos in the fading light (see ebird checklist at the bottom). This was a large, heavy-billed slaty-backed in my opinion (my experience is very limited, but judging from references and Bob O'Brien's recent posts). It's bill was also quite orange, but all other features seemed to check the boxes for slaty-backed. Nick has some flight shots too, which he can add later.
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Philip Kline.
On Feb 18, 2018 4:02 PM, "Nicholas Mrvelj" <[email protected]> wrote:
Hello all,
Colby Neuman just spotted an adult SLATY-BACKED GULL in the town of Rainier. It's currently sitting on a dock in the company of about 100 other gulls. Best viewed behind the restaurants off of E A Street where it meets E 2nd Street.
Cheers,-Nick Mrvelj



Subject: Feeder when move
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 22:40 pm
From: rosebudgurl AT msn.com
 
I am moving to southern Oregon in June. I have a lot of feeders in my back yard. How should I handle leaving my birds with no food? Should I start tapering now or keep the same amount and just leave them cold turkey (seems cruel) . I have black oil seed, socks
for the goldfinches, hummingbird feeders, suet and general seed on the ground.

I dont want to leave but have to.


Thanks, Marlowe



Subject: Re: Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 22:22 pm
From: pgeorgekline AT gmail.com
 
Thanks to Nick's speedy post, I was able to get up to Rainier to see the Slaty-backed Gull. I managed some pretty good photos in the fading light (see ebird checklist at the bottom). This was a large, heavy-billed slaty-backed in my opinion (my experience is very limited, but judging from references and Bob O'Brien's recent posts). It's bill was also quite orange, but all other features seemed to check the boxes for slaty-backed. Nick has some flight shots too, which he can add later.
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Philip Kline.
On Feb 18, 2018 4:02 PM, "Nicholas Mrvelj" <[email protected]> wrote:
Hello all,
Colby Neuman just spotted an adult SLATY-BACKED GULL in the town of Rainier. It's currently sitting on a dock in the company of about 100 other gulls. Best viewed behind the restaurants off of E A Street where it meets E 2nd Street.
Cheers,-Nick Mrvelj



Subject: Signs of Spring: Not Robins, Mallards.
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 21:25 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
There are 2-3 broods with ~1/3 grown ducklings in a new wetland near
Carver.
Has anyone ever found any duck breeding this early?
Attached is a bar graph from the Oregon Breeding Bird Atlas, ~1996.
I wasn't able to find individual records very easily, nor a larger version
of
the thumbnail graph. But according to the graph and all my previous
experience with Mallard nesting here, this is _really_ early.

It will be interesting to see how they will fare in the upcoming 5-day cold
spell during which the shallow lake could freeze over, at least partially.

Bob OBrien Carver OR

PS If someone knows how to extract actual dates without reading through
the long text of all observations, please let me know.
Notice I dared not mention global
warming................................................



Subject: Re: robins
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 21:03 pm
From: elepaio AT gmail.com
 
I live west of Eugene near Fern Ridge Res and we get a large influx of Robins every year between about Feb 10 and Mar 10. Most are overflights. We are apparently on a flight path to some huge roost to the south. We regularly have 100's pass over the last half hour of the day during this period with peaks occurring the last week of Feb. I've had over 1000 a few times and over 2000 at least once. Peak count so far this year has been 200. I'll be counting Apapanes and Iiwis the end of Feb this year so will miss the big numbers of Robins at home.
Mark Nikas


On Sun, Feb 18, 2018 at 5:51 PM, David Irons <[email protected]> wrote:







Alan,


Most western Oregon birders probably don't much think of American Robins as spring migrants since they are residents and common year-around, but there is almost always a perceptible movement through the Willamette Valley
in mid-to-late February. About a decade ago (when I was still living in Eugene), I spent a late Feb. daybirding up north of Eugene between Coburg and Halsey. As I drove the country roads the fence lines, short-grass fields and tilled fields were essentially
carpeted with American Robins. I saw thousands that day. There was no weather event that precipitated this incursion. As chance would have it, we were in Eugene earlier today visiting with the Heyerlys. There were robins all over their neighborhood, enough
so that Dan mentioned the influx, which gave me reason to share the story told above. We've alsobeen seeing more robins in our Beaverton neighborhood for the last week or so.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



Subject: Re: robins
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 20:22 pm
From: caleb AT centanni.com
 
Hi all,
I've also noticed the February Robin movement. Last Sunday I saw about 400 of the birds one if Fishback Hill's ridges where there are usually none.
Good birding,
Caleb
On Feb 18, 2018 5:10 PM, "Alan Contreras" <[email protected]> wrote:
Robins are hard to come by in winter on my street in sw Eugene, so I noticed several chortling away yesterday. Some kind of movement no doubt offended by the fact that it busy snowing here just now.


Alan Contreras

Eugene, Oregon

[email protected]

www.alanlcontreras.com



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Subject: Re: robins
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 19:57 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
I get that movement here every early spring. For some reason robins don™t use this neighborhood much except in migration, mostly in spring.

Alan ContrerasEugene, Oregon
[email protected]
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Feb 18, 2018, at 5:51 PM, David Irons <[email protected]> wrote:




Alan,


Most western Oregon birders probably don't much think of American Robins as spring migrants since they are residents and common year-around, but there is almost always a perceptible movement through the Willamette Valley
in mid-to-late February. About a decade ago (when I was still living in Eugene), I spent a late Feb. daybirding up north of Eugene between Coburg and Halsey. As I drove the country roads the fence lines, short-grass fields and tilled fields were essentially
carpeted with American Robins. I saw thousands that day. There was no weather event that precipitated this incursion. As chance would have it, we were in Eugene earlier today visiting with the Heyerlys. There were robins all over their neighborhood, enough
so that Dan mentioned the influx, which gave me reason to share the story told above. We've alsobeen seeing more robins in our Beaverton neighborhood for the last week or so.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



From: [email protected] <[email protected]> on behalf of Alan Contreras <[email protected]>
Sent: Monday, February 19, 2018 1:09 AM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] robins



Robins are hard to come by in winter on my street in sw Eugene, so I noticed several chortling away yesterday. Some kind of movement no doubt offended by the fact that it busy snowing here just now.


Alan Contreras

Eugene, Oregon

[email protected]

www.alanlcontreras.com




Alan L. Contreras | Writer and Publisher - Oregon Review Books

www.alanlcontreras.com

Site for Alan L. Contreras, writer and publisher of Oregon Review Books. Alan writes primarily on natural history and higher education.







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Subject: Re: robins
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 19:51 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Alan,


Most western Oregon birders probably don't much think of American Robins as spring migrants since they are residents and common year-around, but there is almost always a perceptible movement through the Willamette Valley
in mid-to-late February. About a decade ago (when I was still living in Eugene), I spent a late Feb. daybirding up north of Eugene between Coburg and Halsey. As I drove the country roads the fence lines, short-grass fields and tilled fields were essentially
carpeted with American Robins. I saw thousands that day. There was no weather event that precipitated this incursion. As chance would have it, we were in Eugene earlier today visiting with the Heyerlys. There were robins all over their neighborhood, enough
so that Dan mentioned the influx, which gave me reason to share the story told above. We've alsobeen seeing more robins in our Beaverton neighborhood for the last week or so.


Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR



From: [email protected] <[email protected]> on behalf of Alan Contreras <[email protected]>
Sent: Monday, February 19, 2018 1:09 AM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] robins



Robins are hard to come by in winter on my street in sw Eugene, so I noticed several chortling away yesterday. Some kind of movement no doubt offended by the fact that it busy snowing here just now.


Alan Contreras

Eugene, Oregon


[email protected]

www.alanlcontreras.com




Alan L. Contreras | Writer and Publisher - Oregon Review Books

www.alanlcontreras.com

Site for Alan L. Contreras, writer and publisher of Oregon Review Books. Alan writes primarily on natural history and higher education.







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Subject: I want my slaty-back slaty-back slaty-back ...
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 19:36 pm
From: iamshanahan AT gmail.com
 
Gull. Still there. Columbia county, Rainier, docks north of east 2nd and A.
On Feb 18, 2018 4:02 PM, "Nicholas Mrvelj" <[email protected]> wrote:
Hello all,
Colby Neuman just spotted an adult SLATY-BACKED GULL in the town of Rainier. It's currently sitting on a dock in the company of about 100 other gulls. Best viewed behind the restaurants off of E A Street where it meets E 2nd Street.
Cheers,-Nick Mrvelj



Subject: Klamath basin and Crescent City
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 19:32 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Hi -
I birded again yesterday in the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake refuges and surroundings. The highlight was again "Blue" Geese. From the first 3 flocks I scanned, I picked out total of 10. I talked to an employee at the refuge HQ and he told me that 15 years ago they figured 1 blue per 10,000 Snow Geese, and 5 years ago they revised to 1 per 5,000 snows. We agreed that it now seems to be more than 1 per 1,000.
Other things of interest included a Say's Phoebe about a mile from Petroglyph Point, 2 Praiie Falcons at the point already acting territorial, and a female Merlin on Lower Klamath.
I flushe a flock of sparrow=sized birds off a side road off Township Road, and immediately thought longspurs! but when they landed they transformed into House Finches.
Today I got up to see an inch of snow on my car, and more coming so headed over to Medford and then down to Crescent City, where after 2 hours of searching I was rewarded by hearing from another birder the location of the continuing Black-tailed Gull. This is a beautiful bird, and people are getting better at relocating it. Basically, the story is many thousand gulls are there attending spawning herring. They feed, then go roost for a while in bg roosts at several places, then go back and feed some more. Today the main spawning action was in the ocan among rocks and kelp just north of the lighthouse (viewed from the west end of 3rd St. In the morning the gull roosted in a flock on the beach at the base of the fishing pier at the end of B st, just west of the sewage treatment plant. This afternoon, when I was there it was relocated in the north-east corner of the bay, at the mouth of Elk Creek. This is just behind the Chamber of Commerce Visitors' Center, for those whi know Crescent City,
The mix of gulls here is quite different from Newort, with lots of Herrings, few Glaucous-winged, and huge numbers of Mew.
Wayne



Subject: robins
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 19:10 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Robins are hard to come by in winter on my street in sw Eugene, so I noticed several chortling away yesterday. Some kind of movement no doubt offended by the fact that it busy snowing here just now.

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

[email protected]

www.alanlcontreras.com


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Subject: Slaty-backed Gull in Columbia County
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 18:02 pm
From: nickmrvelj AT gmail.com
 
Hello all,
Colby Neuman just spotted an adult SLATY-BACKED GULL in the town of Rainier. It's currently sitting on a dock in the company of about 100 other gulls. Best viewed behind the restaurants off of E A Street where it meets E 2nd Street.
Cheers,-Nick Mrvelj



Subject: Nashville Warbler and 3 swallow species at Brownsmead
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 17:02 pm
From: celata AT pacifier.com
 
I found a NASHVILLE WARBLER consorting with a very grey-headed
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER at Pentilla Rd (Brownsmead) near the big
barn. The NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was heard by others earlier in
the day, but remained silent for me.

There were lots of TREE SWALLOWS along with at least three
BARN SWALLOWS and at least one VOILET-GREEN SWALLOW.

https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...

--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
That question...
http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
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Subject: Herring
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 15:02 pm
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
The herring school and attendant gulls and sea lions are currently about 1/4 mile downstream from Sawyer™s Landing.

Roy

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Subject: Matching Gift
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 13:54 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Good news! An anonymous donor has volunteered a Matching Gift to anyone who sends in Listing Results in the last week of our drive. Your list will be matched bird-for-bird. If you report now, you can double your list.
[Well, not really. It doesn™t work that way.]
For historical perspective, we carry forward the list results of birders who have stropped birding or moved away.
However, there are folks out there who are still birding but not contributing their listing results. Your numbers from 5,6,.. 8 years ago are not current. Make the GIFT of reporting, so that your published list MATCHES what you™ve really seen. That™s the MATCHING GIFT.
Oregon Listing Results will be publicized by the Oregon Birding Association.
The gates for submission of your numbers as of Dec. 31, 2017, are open. There are four ways you can submit.
1. Use the online form at www.orbirds.org/2017/2017/2017.html
2. Go to the OBA website and click on the blue box Send in your 2017 Listing Results These will automatically come to me.
3. Fill out the form at the bottom of this email and email it back to me at [email protected]
4. Print the form at the bottom of this email and mail it to me at Paul T. Sullivan, 1014 SE Rummel St.,
McMinnville, OR 97128
Lists should conform to the ABA code for listing.
I look forward to receiving your numbers.
Thanks for participating.
Paul T. Sullivan
-----------------------------------
Oregon Listing Results Form for 2017
Listing results will be compiled by Paul Sullivan for publication on the OBA website. A summary will appear in the spring issue of Oregon Birds.
The deadline for submission of data is the end of February.
Use the form below to submit your lists as of December 31, 2017. Lists should conform to the ABA Listing Rules.
The thresholds for publication are as follows:

Oregon State Life List: 300 or more
Western or Eastern Oregon State Life List: 200 or more
Oregon State Year List: 250 or more
Any County Life List: 100 or more
Any County Year List: 100 or more
Oregon Motorless Life List: 100 or more
Oregon Motorless Year List: 100 or more
Birds Photographed in Oregon Life List: 100 or more
Local Circle Life List: 100 or more
Local Circle Year List: 100 or more
Your Yard List: No limit
Your Favorite Refuge: 100 or more
Your Favorite Spot: 100 or more
Your name ________________________________________
Your email ________________________________________

Oregon State
______ Life List as of Dec 31, 2017
______ Year List for 2017
______ Life List for 18 Western Oregon Counties as of Dec 31, 2017
______ Life List for 18 Eastern Oregon Counties as of Dec 31, 2017
Oregon Counties

Life Lists as of Dec 31, 2017

______ Baker Life List
______ Benton Life List
______ Clackamas Life List
______ Clatsop Life List
______ Columbia Life List
______ Coos Life List
______ Crook Life List
______ Curry Life List
______ Deschutes Life List
______ Douglas Life List
______ Gilliam Life List
______ Grant Life List
______ Harney Life List
______ Hood River Life List
______ Jackson Life List
______ Jefferson Life List
______ Josephine Life List
______ Klamath Life List
______ Lake Life List
______ Lane Life List
______ Lincoln Life List
______ Linn Life List
______ Malheur Life List
______ Marion Life List
______ Morrow Life List
______ Multnomah Life List
______ Polk Life List
______ Sherman Life List
______ Tillamook Life List
______ Umatilla Life List
______ Union Life List
______ Wallowa Life List
______ Wasco Life List
______ Washington Life List
______ Wheeler Life List
______ Yamhill Life List

2017 Year Lists

______ Baker 2017 list
______ Benton 2017 list
______ Clackamas 2017 list
______ Clatsop 2017 list
______ Columbia 2017 list
______ Coos 2017 list
______ Crook 2017 list
______ Curry 2017 list
______ Deschutes 2017 list
______ Douglas 2017 list
______ Gilliam 2017 list
______ Grant 2017 list
______ Harney 2017 list
______ Hood River 2017 list
______ Jackson 2017 list
______ Jefferson 2017 list
______ Josephine 2017 list
______ Klamath 2017 list
______ Lake 2017 list
______ Lane 2017 list
______ Lincoln 2017 list
______ Linn 2017 list
______ Malheur 2017 list
______ Marion 2017 list
______ Morrow 2017 list
______ Multnomah 2017 list
______ Polk 2017 list
______ Sherman 2017 list
______ Tillamook 2017 list
______ Umatilla 2017 list
______ Union 2017 list
______ Wallowa 2017 list
______ Wasco 2017 list
______ Washington 2017 list
______ Wheeler 2017 list
______ Yamhill 2017 list
Oregon Motorless Birding List

______ your Oregon motorless life list
______ your Oregon motorless 2017 list

Birds Photographed in Oregon

______ Life List
Local 15-mile diameter Circle Counts (describe your circle) ______________
(Sample descriptions: Clatsop County, from Saddle Mtn. to Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach
Lane County, Eugene CBC circle)

______ your circle life list
______ your circle 2017 list

Your yard lists (name nearest city)

______ Yard list #1 ______________
______ Yard list #2 ______________

Your favorite Wildlife Refuge List (name the refuge)

______ Refuge #1 ______________
______ Refuge #2 ______________

Your favorite birding spot (name the spot)

______ Spot #1 ______________
______ Spot #2 ______________



Subject: Eugene Birders Night Monday, Feb 19 with Birds of San Blas, Mexico Presentation
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 10:45 am
From: ellencantor AT gmail.com
 
The next Eugene Birders Night (SWOC) meeting will be held Monday, Feb 19, 2017 at 7 pm at the McNail-Riley house, 601 W 13th Ave, Eugene. The McNail-Riley House is the restored historic house at the NW corner of W. 13th Ave. and Jefferson St. The parking area, located immediately west of the McNail-Riley House, can be accessed from 13th St, by turning left (north) shortly before Jefferson St. It may also be accessed by Jefferson St. via the driveway located immediately north of the M-R House. We are allowed to park only in the 5 spaces closest to the M-R house. If these spaces are full, you can take the west exit from the M-R parking lot on to 13 Ave, then go directly across 13th to enter and park in the Fairgrounds parking lot.
After initial introductions, we™ll share recent sightings and discuss birding connected topics. Then Stephen Franzen will present photographs and tales of his recent birding trip with his wife Judy to San Blas and surrounding area. As a result of its high diversity of habitats, the San Blas region hosts 300 species of birds, which include 30 country endemics. These habitats include coastline and estuaries (including the San Cristbal and El Pozo mangrove estuaries); sustainable coffee plantations, and primary forest.No entrance fees! All are [email protected] further information



Subject: Re: new list?
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 10:15 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
It's chances would be about the same as one in you-know-where.

On Sunday, February 18, 2018, Paul Sullivan <[email protected]> wrote:
> In case there is keen interest in the trajectory of falling snow, maybe we could take the discussion off OBOL and form a new list. I suggest the name SNOBOL ;-)
>
>
>
> Paul Sullivan



Subject: new list?
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 9:41 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
In case there is keen interest in the trajectory of falling snow, maybe we could take the discussion off OBOL and form a new list. I suggest the name SNOBOL ;-)
Paul Sullivan



Subject: perception of falling snow - off topic on a snowy day
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 9:25 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Yeah, I know. I™m the guy who nags about OBOL getting way off in the weeds
It is 35 degrees here in McMinnville right now, at 6:45 AM, Feb 18, 2018. I looked out my patio door and saw streaks of snow falling past the outdoor light, disappearing as they hit the ground.
What I saw was white dots falling in a straight line, then jogging laterally 1-2, then continuing to fall in a line parallel to the original trajectory.
I™ll try to diagram the trajectory that I observed, repeatedly. I™ll use the format of a text document, and hope it comes through:
- l- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- l - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- l - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- \ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - \ \ \ \- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - \- - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - l- - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - l - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - l - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - l - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - l - - - - - - - - - - - -
My hypothesis is that the snow flake crystal falls edge-wise , then flips into a plane where it sails like a Frisbee for a moment before falling edge-wise again. The angle between the vertical and almost-horizontal trajectories is about 110 degrees.
An added twist to the observation: The bright new, enclosed light installed on the patio by the landlord appears to be a strobe. I see the falling snow as a series of dashes. I checked this carefully. I went out under the compact fluorescent light at the garage and was able to see falling flakes as continuous streaks, but still making the lateral jog.
I apologize for not including birds in this post. I didn™t see any during this observation.

Paul Sullivan



Subject: Herring in Yaquina Bay
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 22:44 pm
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
Herring were back in the bay today around high tide. They were concentrated on the east end of the Port of Newport Commercial Dock and the sea lions and gulls were working them over in the small cove there. At the peak there were over 120 California sea lions, a few harbor seals, and lots of gulls. I arrived at 12:25pm and the action was ongoing. It continued until 2:00pm then started to decline as the tide was ebbing. I departed at 3:00pm and foraging was continuing but was greatly reduced. I didn't see any sign of spawning although there could have been some. It was cold, blustery, and rainy.
I have posted a few photos a video herehttps://www.flickr.com/photos/...
The first few photos were taken on sunny Tuesday and the rest this afternoon between showers or from the shelter of the car.
Roy



Subject: SANDHILL CRANE Lincoln County
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 18:56 pm
From: jennifer.a.rothe AT gmail.com
 
On North Beaver Creek Road well past the visitor center, 2.1 miles from 101. Past the first house on the west side of the road. In flooded field directly west of small grassy pull off (can see tire marks), in company of several Canada geese.
Was still present when we left at 1640.
Jen Rothe and Stephen Rossiter



Subject: Clark, Washington snowy egret
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 17:42 pm
From: iamshanahan AT gmail.com
 
End of Lower River Road. First pond on east bound trail.



Subject: possible Rdshoulder Hawk, Ontario Or Any subscribers to Idaho listserve?
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 17:35 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
>
> Last night and this morning I saw what I think is a Red-shouldered Hawk. I don't have a
> scope with me. Morton Island is in Oregon, accessible by East Island Rd. The hawk was on both
> Or and ID banks last night just after sunset. On the ID shore this morning, where E Island Rd is
> right on the banks of the Snake. I assume this is not an easy species to find in ID at the moment.
> If someone can put it on the ID list it might help some one out. Lars

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Subject: 3rd North Grants Pass Raptor survey
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:52 pm
From: dpvroman AT budget.net
 
The 3rd North Grants Pass Raptor survey was accomplished today (02-17-18)

Distance traveled: 38.0 miles; Survey time: 3.25 hours
Weather: Overcast

Results:

Red-tailed Hawk - 4
American Kestrel - 5
Bald Eagle - 2 (adult)
Red-shouldered Hawk - 5

This might be the first time more Red-shouldered Hawks were observed then Red-tails. Good number of Tree Swallows found at several locations. A Say's Phoebe was seen along Hunt Lane. Otherwise, pretty much expected birds.

Dennis

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Subject: Herring
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:34 pm
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
Sea lions and gulls are on herring at the Port of Newport commercial dock just to the west of the LNG tank.

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Subject: Benton County FOY Band-tailed Pigeon
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:15 pm
From: alderspr AT peak.org
 
Hi All-

Our first BAND-TAILED PIGEON of 2018 showed up on a platform feeder today, towering over the mourning doves.

Karan Fairchild
6 mi SW Philomath, Benton County



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Subject: Re: Armchair Gulling--Sauvie Is. Pellet Plant 1993 redux #2h
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 11:02 am
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
I agree, it is a Slaty-backed Gull. The bill™s gonydeal angle is moderate, the bill thickens only slightly from base to distal end, the back dark, and the dark coloring around the eye are good for that species.
Jeff Gilligan

On Feb 16, 2018, at 12:51 PM, Robert O'Brien <[email protected]> wrote:Here is another non-controversial one, illustratingwhat I meant by fierce or evil appearance/jizz.
This is a fairly large bird with a large bill, but note thatthe bill is pretty linear with little or no bulge.This one has the 'evil eye', pink legs, a dark mantlebut with the wing tips darker still. Note the very wide,white trailing edge to the inner wing feathers (secondaries).
I'm trying to avoid posting the same bird twice so ifanyone is paying close attention let me know.If there are several similar photos in my numericalgrouping it's easy to tell if they are all of the same birdbecause they were taken on the same day.But, it the photo was taken on a later date and istherefore later in sequence I might not recognize thatbird from previous photos. I'm hoping to get a total count.
Bob OBrien

<SBGU75&79.jpg>



Subject: Great Backyard Bird Count - 2018
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 9:43 am
From: celata AT pacifier.com
 
Looks like we're in for a blustery and possibly snowy President's
Day Weekend. Seems like a good time to make a vat of Hot Cocoa
and watch the bird feeders...

http://gbbc.birdcount.org/


--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
That question...
http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
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Subject: Turvey Vultures in Gorge Feb 16
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 9:39 am
From: flick AT gorge.net
 
Two Turkey Vultures seen teetering together in the windy Gorge near the Columbia River south shoreline on Feb 16th at milepost 27.7, I-84 at 5 pm.



Subject: Re: ebird throws out the baby with the bath water...
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 3:25 am
From: evan AT centanni.com
 
Some good points here about how to improve eBird's new sensitive
species protection scheme. Unless someone from Cornell is a regular
here on OBOL, I hope someone is sending these comments to the eBird
team. I don't see any reason they wouldn't be appreciative of the
ideas, provided that they're phrased constructively and politely.


-Evan



--

Evan Centanni
www.polgeonow.com


On 1/12/2018 6:12 PM, Joel Geier wrote:


Lest Mike Patterson's original point gets lost -- that this eBird
"innovation" is unnecessarily hiding reports that are decades old -- I'd
like to return to that.

Noah Strycker's comment was in the same vein.

I also second Lars Norgren's comment about Burrowing Owls being far more
in need of this kind of protection in Oregon than, say, Painted
Buntings.

My own comment was aimed at pointing out that this innovation also seems
to be ineffective at preventing excessive attention for the handful of
species that it takes into consideration.

Although I'm supportive of the general idea of shielding sensitive birds
from disturbance, I hope that there will be better regional and temporal
calibration, taking into account both the views of state/county editors
and wildlife professionals and organizations who are working on
conservation of these species.

Certainly for Gyrfalcons in Oregon it should be OK to reveal sightings
within a month or two after the report. For Painted Buntings, I can't
imagine that the survival of the species could hinge on postings of
vagrants in Oregon. For other species (especially owls) both on and off
the list, there could be a reasonable justification for obscuring the
detailed locations on a longer-term basis.

Speaking as a reasonably proficient computer programmer, this kind of
thing is not rocket science. They already have my card.



Subject: Herring, or the lack of, Update
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 22:22 pm
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
The only sighting I am aware of birds and mammals pursuing herring at Yaquina Bay yesterday was a group of approximately 80 sea lions with a minor cloud of gulls over them. The fish eaters were mid-channel between Port Dock One and the HMSC dock but it was a strong ebb tide and the animals moved rapidly west following the herring out of the bay.
Today, in the drizzle at midday during a higher tide I did a circuit of Yaquina Bay and I saw no action that looked like herring were being pursed. There was a lot of gull feeding action off the LNG tank area where herring had been observed earlier in the week but the gulls were feeding on something small and did even have land to feed. No mammals or diving ducks in the area.
So it looks like we're on pause for herring action.
Roy


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