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Updated on July 7, 2020, 5:00 pm

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07 Jul: @ 16:49:52  Re: Mystery Song [Paul Sullivan]
07 Jul: @ 16:43:19  Rose-breasted Grosbeak- Face Rock, Bandon, Coos County [Don Henise]
07 Jul: @ 10:44:56  Guadalupe Fur Seal (off topic) [Thomas Love]
07 Jul: @ 09:36:25  Re: Mystery Song [Gerard Lillie]
06 Jul: @ 22:33:32  Re: Mystery Song [Philip Kline]
06 Jul: @ 20:37:09  Fwd: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Teresa Hertzel]
06 Jul: @ 19:53:07  Re: Mystery Song [Andy Thomas]
06 Jul: @ 18:56:59  Re: Mystery Song [Paul Sullivan]
06 Jul: @ 16:55:41  A singing sore vireo [larspernorgren]
06 Jul: @ 15:16:51  Re: mystery call [Thomas Love]
06 Jul: @ 15:08:04  Re: Mystery Song [Kay Carter]
06 Jul: @ 15:01:12  Re: Mystery Song [Mike Clarke]
06 Jul: @ 14:42:29  Re: Lake County PAC-slope? [David Vick]
06 Jul: @ 11:37:55  Fwd: Re: Re: Mystery Song [Scott O'Donnell]
06 Jul: @ 11:37:07  Re: 100+ murrelets [Nelson, Kim]
06 Jul: @ 11:17:00  Re: Mystery Song [Matthew G Hunter]
06 Jul: @ 09:57:33  Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile? [Colleen McDaniel]
06 Jul: @ 09:32:36  Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile? [Bob Archer]
06 Jul: @ 09:21:11  Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile? [Angela Calabrese]
06 Jul: @ 09:19:51  Re: [ADV] Re: Mystery Song [Bob Archer]
06 Jul: @ 09:13:43  Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile? [Bob Archer]
06 Jul: @ 08:08:09  Re: [ADV] Re: Mystery Song [t4c1x]
06 Jul: @ 02:57:13  Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile? [joy shreyer]
06 Jul: @ 00:09:08  Re: Mystery Song [Kay Carter]
05 Jul: @ 22:34:52  Re: Mystery Song [Paul Sullivan]
05 Jul: @ 21:56:27  Tern ID help [JodAndy Vanderwall]
05 Jul: @ 20:23:26  Newport Nearshore Pelagics [Roy Lowe]
05 Jul: @ 18:29:35  Re: Mystery Song [Robert O'Brien]
05 Jul: @ 17:38:44  Re: Mystery Song [Andy Thomas]
05 Jul: @ 17:08:34  Mystery two tone bird call [larspernorgren]
05 Jul: @ 17:05:25  Re: Mystery Song [Kay Carter]
05 Jul: @ 17:00:46  Purple Finch? Really??? [Kay Carter]
05 Jul: @ 16:56:50  Re: Mystery Song [Quinton Nice]
05 Jul: @ 16:43:15  Re: Mystery Song [Kay Carter]
05 Jul: @ 16:10:22  Re: Lake County PAC-slope? [Tom Crabtree]
05 Jul: @ 15:06:34  Lake County COFL [larspernorgren]
05 Jul: @ 15:05:38  Re: Campground recommendations in Lake County for July [L Minty]
05 Jul: @ 14:43:08  Re: Lake County PAC-slope? [Alan Contreras]
05 Jul: @ 14:35:59  Lake County PAC-slope? [Jack Maynard]
05 Jul: @ 13:46:57  Re: New WT Sparrow Song [Andy Thomas]
05 Jul: @ 12:58:29  Re: Mystery Song [Paul Sullivan]
05 Jul: @ 12:54:26  Re: New WT Sparrow Song [Paul Sullivan]
05 Jul: @ 12:35:30  Re: Mystery Song [Andy Thomas]
05 Jul: @ 12:34:34  New WT Sparrow Song [Tim Rodenkirk]
05 Jul: @ 09:30:22  Re: Mystery Song [larspernorgren]
05 Jul: @ 09:27:11  Re: White goose in Tillamook [larspernorgren]
05 Jul: @ 09:25:05  Mystery Song [Kay Carter]
05 Jul: @ 00:18:55  southern Cascades [Harry Fuller]
04 Jul: @ 20:53:41  White goose in Tillamook [David Bailey]
04 Jul: @ 20:15:17  Fwd: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert [Teresa Hertzel]





Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 16:49 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
FWIW...

After I posted this, I went to Xeno Canto and looked through the whole
library up to page 21 on the webpage. That's a lot of recordings. I opened
and played each recording that said "juvenile" or "begging." I did not find
any example that was even close to Kay Carter's mystery singer.

Has anyone explored Poorwill calls? I know, they're not supposed to be up
in a tree in Canby.

Soras are ventriloquists. I once stood on the road at Killin Wetlands
looking down on the fence line in flooded water. There was one thin strip
of grass. The bird was right THERE, right in front of me, in broad daylight
-- except it wasn't. The SOUND was THERE. The bird was
somewhere......else.

Paul Sullivan

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Sullivan [mailto:paultsullivan@onlinenw.com]
Sent: Monday, July 06, 2020 4:56 PM
To: obol@freelists.org
Cc: 'Kay Carter' ; 'Mike Clarke'
; 'matthewghunter@gmail.com'

Subject: Re: Mystery Song

I once spent most of an hour circling a single dense bush at the P Ranch at
Malheur NWR, trying to see a mystery singer. It gave an repeated call that
I can't say I remember after many years. When I finally found it, it was a
fledgling, speckled Robin, begging, begging, begging.

Paul Sullivan

-------------------------------
Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 11:17 am
From: matthewghunter AT gmail.com

Regarding Kay Carter's mystery song.

That IS a tough one!!! I don't think it is a Hutton's Vireo or a Sora. It
has a thrush quality, and my first guess is an American Robin for whatever
reason doing a single note, but in between several of these notes I can
barely hear a little robin "laughter" or chuckles, consistently right after
the down-up call. The quality matches robin well. If it was in trees, robin
would make sense. A tough one, but that's my guess.

Matt Hunter
Umpqua Basin


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Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak- Face Rock, Bandon, Coos County
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 16:43 pm
From: kiskadee3 AT att.net
 
Tried to send this earlier from my phone, but it bounced.

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak reported on eBird 7/6 by out of state birder
Steve Svedeman was refound thus morning. Young male with redish orange
on breast, black head and back. Breast color circled up around collar.
Both mandibles pale grey. White rump.

It was in bushes at south end of wayside near Beach Loop Road and flew
east toward houses on Strawberry Drive cul-de-sac. We were not able to
refind it.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Don Henise
Myrtle Point, OR
kiskadee3@att.net

--
Don Henise

Myrtle Point, OR
kiskadee3@att.net
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/k...
Audio: http://www.xeno-canto.org/cont...



Subject: Guadalupe Fur Seal (off topic)
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 10:44 am
From: tlove AT linfield.edu
 
Guadalupe Fur Seals are showing up on the Oregon coast this year. There was a report on OBOL latter May about one at 14th St. in northern Lincoln City. The marine mammal stranding maphttps://mmi.oregonstate.edu/om...
a half dozen or more sightings, a majority still alive, with a cluster of sightings in mid-June in mid-coast (Lincoln Co).




I'm keen on seeing one, and since the stranding map is not real-time, I would appreciate a private note if someone finds one alive
that's chaseable.




tlove AT linfield DOT edu




Thanks so much, and apologies for a non-bird post.





Tom




PS: thanks to Roy Lowe and Jim Rice for their assistance.



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 9:36 am
From: gerardlillie AT outlook.com
 
Regarding Hutton's Vireo songs, they can be either upward slurred or downward slurred. They also can either be clearly sung or buzzy. Whatever they choose for a particular song event will be repeated in that song. They then can change it up the next time they sing. They are a very interesting songster.

Gerard Lillie
Portland, OR


________________________________
Subject: [obol] Re: Mystery Song

I am not advocating for any one of the suggestions offered to date -- that is above my pay grade. But the visual similarity between the sonograms of Kay's recording and this HUVI from Macaulay Library is interesting -- to me, at least. That said, they do not sound alike. Kay's mystery song is clear and flutey and the HUVI (which was recorded by Issac Denzer, 17 February 2018, at E.E. Wilson WMA) is more buzzy.

[Inline image]

[Inline image]

Andrew Thomas


On Monday, July 6, 2020, 1:08:05 PM PDT, Kay Carter wrote:



The only alteration I made to the recording was to amplify it some.



I agree with you, Mike, though I hardly have the expertise that you do.



The suggestions of Purple Finch and Robin come much closer to matching the quality of the sound, to my ear.



Kay

@freelists.org



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 22:33 pm
From: pgeorgekline AT gmail.com
 
I had the same experience as Paul in my neighborhood last summer. The same unfamiliar note over and over again until I finally spied the begging juvenile robin up on a Douglas fir limb.
Philip Kline

On Mon, Jul 6, 2020, 4:57 PM Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan@onlinenw.com> wrote:
I once spent most of an hour circling a single dense bush at the P Ranch at

Malheur NWR, trying to see a mystery singer. It gave an repeated call that

I can't say I remember after many years. When I finally found it, it was a

fledgling, speckled Robin, begging, begging, begging.


Paul Sullivan


-------------------------------

Subject: Re: Mystery Song

Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 11:17 am

From: matthewghunter AT gmail.com



Regarding Kay Carter's mystery song.


That IS a tough one!!! I don't think it is a Hutton's Vireo or a Sora. It

has a thrush quality, and my first guess is an American Robin for whatever

reason doing a single note, but in between several of these notes I can

barely hear a little robin "laughter" or chuckles, consistently right after

the down-up call. The quality matches robin well. If it was in trees, robin

would make sense. A tough one, but that's my guess.


Matt Hunter

Umpqua Basin



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Subject: Oregon Rare Bird Alert
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 20:37 pm
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
To: 


*** Species Summary:


Canvasback (4 Lane)

Sharp-shinned Hawk (1 Washington)

Merlin (1 Baker)

Pacific-slope Flycatcher (1 Grant)

Eastern Kingbird (1 Jefferson)

Black-capped Chickadee (2 Crook)

Horned Lark (1 Lane)

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1 Baker)

Bewick's Wren (1 Grant)

California Thrasher (1 Jackson)

Cassin's Finch (1 Lane)

Red Crossbill (Ponderosa Pine or type 2) (2 Linn)

Lincoln's Sparrow (2 Lane)

Northern Waterthrush (3 Lane)

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1 Coos)


---------------------------------------------



Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 14:45 by Charlotte Johnson

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "continuing bird in pond 5"


Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 14:45 by Scott Johnson

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "continuing bird in pond 5"


Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 14:00 by Sally Hill

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Male. Sloping forehead, rusty red head, white back and flanks."


Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 12:07 by John Sullivan

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Continuing, scruffy male. Dingy white back and sides, dark breast, red head and neck, long sloping forehead."


Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) (1)

- Reported Jul 05, 2020 15:55 by Susan Kirkbride

- Scoggins Valley Road, Washington, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "Small accipiter with a squared off tail."


Merlin (Falco columbarius) (1)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 07:42 by Hannah Marston

- 3911139153 Snake River Rd, Huntington US-OR 44.59914, -117.12903, Baker, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Seen from a distance on a hill then flying towards the water & rock cliff."


Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) (1)

- Reported Jul 05, 2020 16:39 by Jimi Soupir

- Malheur National Forest, Prairie City US-OR 44.31013, -118.67806, Grant, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Mostly yellowish overall, with oval eyering pointed behind eye. Heard in dense conifers. Single individual."


Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) (3) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 06:30 by Rima Givot

- E-130 Road, Madras, Oregon, US (44.802, -121.122), Jefferson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Dark back and head, no eye ring, light belly/chest/throat, distinct white edge on tail end contrasting with dark tail, tail had flat end (no wedge or v). Birds were perched on our near tops of trees at river's edge, and flying out over river to catch flies in air."


Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) (2)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 09:39 by Zachary Radmer

- Twin Pillars Trail No. 832, Crook, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Black caps, White"


Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) (2)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 09:39 by Jerrmaine Treadwell

- Twin Pillars Trail No. 832, Crook, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Black caps, White"


Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 12:07 by John Sullivan

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Continuing singing bird on dry pond 6. Familiar with tinkling song."


Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 08:35 by Hannah Marston

- 3911139153 Snake River Rd, Huntington US-OR 44.59924, -117.12906, Baker, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Closest resemblance to what I saw. It was a tiny bird with a blue/gray head and a white breast."


Bewick's Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) (1)

- Reported Jul 05, 2020 14:00 by Jerry Tangren

- Ritter Butte Summit, Grant, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Heard singing in open juniper woodland; buzz followed by several clear notes; was not seen"


California Thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 01, 2020 09:06 by Sameer Apte

- stakeout California Thrasher, Talent (2019), Jackson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Continuing and singing atop a cedar."


Cassin's Finch (Haemorhous cassinii) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 09:05 by Roger Robb

- Taylor Burn Rd. (NFD Rd. 514), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Singing male apx. one mile north of start of NFD 514"


Red Crossbill (Ponderosa Pine or type 2) (Loxia curvirostra (type 2)) (1)

- Reported Jul 05, 2020 05:59 by Nicholas Martens

- Big Lake, Linn, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Audio

- Comments: "Recording"


Red Crossbill (Ponderosa Pine or type 2) (Loxia curvirostra (type 2)) (1)

- Reported Jul 05, 2020 05:59 by Maureen Leong-Kee

- Big Lake, Linn, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Audio

- Comments: "Recording"


Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 05, 2020 11:32 by Forest Tomlinson

- (43.6254,-122.0519), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Singing bird. I assume they breed in the big bear Marilyn Lakes."


Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (2)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 07:20 by Roger Robb

- Gold Lake, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...


Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 08:00 by Linda Gilbert

- Mule Prairie, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "This bird was identified by song which was heard clearly from 100 to 200 feet away. We did not play recordings to get a visual sighting since this is a "stakeout" bird which a number of birders have been and will be trying for. The bird was in an alder thicket next to a slow-moving section of Salt Creek."


Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 06:20 by Roger Robb

- Salt Creek Falls, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Continuing bird at Mule Prairie found by Tom Mickel 7/2. Song clearly heard from road; no sighting."


Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 05, 2020 09:36 by Forest Tomlinson

- Willamette National Forest, Blue River US-OR 43.61286, -122.09014, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Same bird thats been seen at this location. Singing from a distance, maybe 100 yards out. Distinctive loud and clear descending chirping song with trill at the end. Audio will be uploaded."


Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) (1)

- Reported Jul 06, 2020 07:49 by Steve Svedeman

- Face Rock Wayside, Coos, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Singing male. Did not have fully colored head. Red breast, pale beak, black head and back."


***********


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Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 19:53 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
I am not advocating for any one of the suggestions offered to date -- that is above my pay grade. But the visual similarity between the sonograms of Kay's recording and this HUVI from Macaulay Library is interesting -- to me, at least. That said, they do not sound alike. Kay's mystery song is clear and flutey and the HUVI (which was recorded by Issac Denzer, 17 February 2018, at E.E. Wilson WMA) is more buzzy.





Andrew Thomas

On Monday, July 6, 2020, 1:08:05 PM PDT, Kay Carter wrote:


The only alteration I made to the recording was to amplify it some.



I agree with you, Mike, though I hardly have the expertise that you do.



The suggestions of Purple Finch and Robin come much closer to matching the quality of the sound, to my ear.



Kay



From: Mike Clarke
Sent: Monday, July 06, 2020 1:00 PM
To: paultsullivan@onlinenw.com
Cc: OBOL ; KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Mystery Song



Hmmm.....

Having done many years of marsh bird monitoring in the midwest (another region where Sora are common), I've never heard a Sora give it's two-noted call in a fashion like this one. This call is much mellower and more liquid sounding than the Sora's high-pitched "pu-weeep". The timbre and lack of intensity are all wrong for Sora (unless somehow the recording has been edited).



Mike Clarke

Portland



On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:34 PM Paul Sullivan wrote:


Kay,

Thank you for sending me the audio file, and the added information that there is a wetland with Red-winged Blackbirds.

I will say with firm conviction that this is a SORA, and not a Hutton's Vireo. It is two-noted and up-slurred. The initial note is longer. "pooo-WEEEP"

A Hutton's Vireo does a higher pitched, also up-slurred call, but shorter: "s'WEEEP , s'WEEEP. s'WEEEP"

I can imitate both species (I speak the language), and I've had conversations with both of them. I don't know what I'm saying, but I know what they sound like.

Paul Sullivan


------------------------

Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.



Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.

--------------------------
Subject: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:25 am
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but I'm not having any success. Any suggestions? (I'm after the repeated 2-syllable "do-whit" call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



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Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 18:56 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
I once spent most of an hour circling a single dense bush at the P Ranch at
Malheur NWR, trying to see a mystery singer. It gave an repeated call that
I can't say I remember after many years. When I finally found it, it was a
fledgling, speckled Robin, begging, begging, begging.

Paul Sullivan

-------------------------------
Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 11:17 am
From: matthewghunter AT gmail.com

Regarding Kay Carter's mystery song.

That IS a tough one!!! I don't think it is a Hutton's Vireo or a Sora. It
has a thrush quality, and my first guess is an American Robin for whatever
reason doing a single note, but in between several of these notes I can
barely hear a little robin "laughter" or chuckles, consistently right after
the down-up call. The quality matches robin well. If it was in trees, robin
would make sense. A tough one, but that's my guess.

Matt Hunter
Umpqua Basin


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Subject: A singing sore vireo
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 16:55 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
First: We are using different devices to listen to the recording. What we hear is inevitably a little different. We hear a different range of frequencies from person to person; generally losing part of that range in the long run. So sonographs are a bit of a hedge against that limitation.  The cadence is fine for Hutton's Vireo. The length of repetition, the faithful reproduction of that first couplet hundreds of times. It's July, some HUVI could have fledged two months ago. Don't know when HY birds start to sing. But the species is notorious for using DIFFERENT pitches from one monotonous monologue to the next. Some folks may have noticed the final quote in this weekend's White-throated Sparrow article in the NYT: Don Kroodsma , who has been studying bird songs for over fifty years now.  Twice in the past 18 months Don has told me he wants "to park on a Hutton"s Vireo" and try to figure them out. An individual of the species seems to offer deceptively great variation in its song. It's the format that is so different. Does it have a different pitch for different hours of the day? Is more than one male involved? Do females make this two tone song also? Young birds related to the one with established territory?Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Re: mystery call
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 15:16 pm
From: tlove AT linfield.edu
 
Interesting recording (Kay kindly sent me a copy which I couldn't access via the ABA site).




Not sure if I can add much to this rich discussion that's probably run its course.With
the sounds out of habitat and spatial context, it's hard to tell where the "sora-like" call is coming from,
but it does seem to be a bit up in altitude from the Song Sparrow, for example, and Kay thought it was maybe 20-25' up.




I
was leaning Robin, but it's troubling that at 6 seconds in the "sora" calls right on top of the (a) robin.There are clearly AMERICAN ROBINS
(and SONG SPARROWS) in the mix, the sound has a thrushy quality, and they're capable of some strange sounds in the breeding season. I'm with Matt - the
timbre of the "sora-like" two note call seems wrong for SORA, and it also seems off (too clear) for HUTTON'S VIREO.




I'm wondering if it could be a BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE? Though this whistling is more regular than I'm used to, it has that timbre and cadence. Habitat, season
seem right. They can have some really clear whistle notes.



This is fun, thanks Kay.




Tom



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 15:08 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com
 
The only alteration I made to the recording was to amplify it some.

I agree with you, Mike, though I hardly have the expertise that you do.

The suggestions of Purple Finch and Robin come much closer to matching the quality of the sound, to my ear.

Kay

From: Mike Clarke
Sent: Monday, July 06, 2020 1:00 PM
To: paultsullivan@onlinenw.com
Cc: OBOL ; KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Mystery Song

Hmmm.....
Having done many years of marsh bird monitoring in the midwest (another region where Sora are common), I've never heard a Sora give it's two-noted call in a fashion like this one. This call is much mellower and more liquid sounding than the Sora's high-pitched "pu-weeep". The timbre and lack of intensity are all wrong for Sora (unless somehow the recording has been edited).

Mike Clarke
Portland

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:34 PM Paul Sullivan > wrote:
Kay,

Thank you for sending me the audio file, and the added information that there is a wetland with Red-winged Blackbirds.

I will say with firm conviction that this is a SORA, and not a Hutton's Vireo. It is two-noted and up-slurred. The initial note is longer. "pooo-WEEEP"

A Hutton's Vireo does a higher pitched, also up-slurred call, but shorter: "s'WEEEP , s'WEEEP. s'WEEEP"

I can imitate both species (I speak the language), and I've had conversations with both of them. I don't know what I'm saying, but I know what they sound like.

Paul Sullivan


------------------------

Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 15:01 pm
From: transvolcanic AT gmail.com
 
Hmmm.....Having done many years of marsh bird monitoring in the midwest (another region where Sora are common), I've never heard a Sora give it's two-noted call in a fashion like this one. This call is much mellower and more liquid sounding than the Sora's high-pitched "pu-weeep". The timbre and lack of intensity are all wrong for Sora (unless somehow the recording has been edited).
Mike ClarkePortland
On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 8:34 PM Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan@onlinenw.com> wrote:
Kay,


Thank you for sending me the audio file, and the added information that there is a wetland with Red-winged Blackbirds.


I will say with firm conviction that this is a SORA, and not a Hutton's Vireo. It is two-noted and up-slurred. The initial note is longer. "pooo-WEEEP"


A Hutton's Vireo does a higher pitched, also up-slurred call, but shorter: "s'WEEEP , s'WEEEP. s'WEEEP"


I can imitate both species (I speak the language), and I've had conversations with both of them. I don't know what I'm saying, but I know what they sound like.


Paul Sullivan



------------------------


Subject: Re: Mystery Song

Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm

From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com


I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.




Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.


--------------------------

Subject: Mystery Song

Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:25 am

From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com


I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but I'm not having any success. Any suggestions? (I'm after the repeated 2-syllable "do-whit" call.)




Kay Carter


Canby




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Subject: Re: Lake County PAC-slope?
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 14:42 pm
From: or.naturalist AT gmail.com
 
Gee, I can't wait unti they split the Gray and Dusky Flycatchers.  I humbly
suggest that the new names be the Gray Dusky and the Dusky Gray. Should
make field identification a snap but good luck for all you eBirders out
there.

David Vick
Terrebonne

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 2:10 PM Tom Crabtree wrote:

> Jack,
>
>
>
> It trips rare because the default is Pacific-slope x Cordilleran (Western)
> Flycatcher for Lake County. Photos wont do you any good for the species.
> Someone who has studied them for years indicates that he doubts any birds
> North of Arizona/New Mexico are pure birds, there is a lot of admixing
> going on. I have heard birds in Bend alternate Pac-slope and Cordilleran
> calls. I had one this summer that started with a Cordilleran note and then
> go into full Pac-slope mode.
>
>
>
> An article published last year [Linck, E., K. Epperly, P. van Else, G.
> M.. Spellman, R. W. Bryson, Jr., J. E. McCormacks, R. Canales-Del Castillo,
> and J. Klicka. 2019. Dense geographic and genomic sampling reveals
> paraphyly and a cryptic lineage in a classic sibling species complex. Syst.
> Biol. 0(0):111, 2019, DOI:10.1093/sysbio/syz027.] posits that there
> anywhere between one and four species involved in this complex. They favor
> either one species for all of Western North America (including hybrids) or
> two species split with one for the US and one for Mexico. Either would
> eliminate the Pacific-slope/Cordilleran conundrum that we deal with here.
> [As an aside, if you want to see a really funny interpretation, look at the
> eBird maps for Cordilleran and Pacific-slope Flycatchers along the
> Washington/Idaho border. Its amazing how those birds can read maps!] The
> authors acknowledge that a different definition of what is a species could
> lead to four different species, but dont resolve that question and say a
> detailed analysis of these data will be presented elsewhere.
>
> Here is a map showing the information their data shows the following.
> [Gray dots are Pacific-slope, yellow are Cordilleran and the orange and
> green are the Mexican forms. Where a dot has two colors it shows the
> intermixing of the forms. Unfortunately they didnt examine any Central
> Oregon birds.
>
> It appears we havent heard the last word on Empidonax difficilis
> (difficilis indeed!).
>
>
>
> [image: cid:172764e62734ce8e91]
>
>
>
>
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] *On
> Behalf Of *Jack Maynard
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 05, 2020 12:35 PM
> *To:* Oregon Birders On Line
> *Subject:* [obol] Lake County PAC-slope?
>
>
>
> Hello obol,
>
> With some trepidation I am going to check in a Pacific-slope Flycatcher
> from a location SE of Lakeview in The Warner Mountains. It trips Rare. I
> have a few pics and a sound recording but very limited connectivity here.
>
>
>
> Kelli and I were birding a spot called Willow Creek campground this
> morning and heard what we thought were the distinct vocalizations of the
> Pac-slope, but thought they shouldnt be present this far East. We heard
> at least two birds making the Ju-weeeep call and eventually saw two and
> photographed one of the birds. Ill include a pic or two with this email. I
> wont be able to get the sound recording uploaded until I get home to
> Portland tomorrow or Tuesday.
>
>
>
> Ill be interested to hear from folks as to whether this was a good ID.
> Both pac-slope and Cordilleran tick rare. West of the cascades Id call
> these pacific-slope and move on.
>
>
>
> Sorry about the blurry photos, they are the only ones I could get to
> transfer from my camera.
>
>
>



Subject: Fwd: Re: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 11:37 am
From: scott AT speywater.com
 
Cheers!

Scott O'Donnell

Troy, Wallowa County

Message sent from "The Bird Aquarium".

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Mystery Song
Date: 2020-07-06 09:36
From: Scott O'Donnell
To: matthewghunter@gmail.com

I'm not an expert, and I'm half deaf, but I agree with Matt that there's
at least some degree of probability that it's the robin. The first time
I heard the recording I immediately thought it had to be a thrush, then
I noticed the consistent timing of the robin's "giggle", as Matt did.

Scott O'Donnell
Wallowa County


On 2020-07-06 09:16, Matthew G Hunter wrote:
> Regarding Kay Carter's mystery song. That IS a tough one!!! I don't
> think it is a Hutton's Vireo or a Sora. It has a thrush quality, and
> my first guess is an American Robin for whatever reason doing a single
> note, but in between several of these notes I can barely hear a little
> robin "laughter" or chuckles, consistently right after the down-up
> call. The quality matches robin well. If it was in trees, robin would
> make sense. A tough one, but that's my guess.
>
> Matt Hunter
> Umpqua Basin
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Subject: Re: 100+ murrelets
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 11:37 am
From: kim.nelson AT oregonstate.edu
 
Alan,

Thanks for this report. Fun sighting! In the 1980s and 1990s one used to be able to see this many murrelets from locations along the central coast between Florence and Lincoln City. With fewer murrelets today it is much harder to find large groups, although it is still possible depending on ocean conditions. There must have been good upwelling and large number of forage fish off Bray Point on Friday.

Happy birding, Kim

S. Kim Nelson
Oregon State University
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
104 Nash Hall
Corvallis, OR 97331
541.737.1962
kim.nelson@oregonstate.edu
https://www.oregonmurrelet.org...

From: obol-bounce@freelists.org On Behalf Of Alan Contreras
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 8:20 PM
To: OBOL
Subject: [obol] 100+ murrelets

I think this only went to the Lanebirds list earlier. Today Vjera Thompson and I saw well over 100 Marbled Murrelets on the water in a two and a half mile stretch of coast in northern Lane County (Klootchman to Bob Creek). There were over 80 visible at once from Bray Point. I have never seen this many from one point of land before.

Also in coastal Lane today were a Marbled Godwit, a few peeps, two SB Dows and three Greater Yellowlegs. Several Pacific Loons and a few rhinos were mixed into large flocks of both Surf and WW Scoters. One Clarks Grebe was in with the summering Westerns.

The first surge of beat-up looking adult California Gulls has arrived, with over 300 at the Florence jetties.


Alan Contreras
acontrer56@gmail.com
Eugene, Oregon

www.alanlcontreras.com



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 11:17 am
From: matthewghunter AT gmail.com
 
Regarding Kay Carter's mystery song.
That IS a tough one!!! I don't think it is a Hutton's Vireo or a Sora. It has a thrush quality, and my first guess is an American Robin for whatever reason doing a single note, but in between several of these notes I can barely hear a little robin "laughter" or chuckles, consistently right after the down-up call. The quality matches robin well. If it was in trees, robin would make sense. A tough one, but that's my guess.

Matt HunterUmpqua Basin



Subject: Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile?
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 9:57 am
From: colleen.mcdaniel79 AT gmail.com
 
Looks like they just need to preen to me. I think its their underlay feathers that are disturbed and sticking out. I always see white downy feathers from TUVU when at a scavenged site.
ColleenHillsboro
On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 7:32 AM Bob Archer <rabican1@gmail.com> wrote:
Very true, my screen had head missing, had to scroll over a bit.
Bob
On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 7:20 AM Angela Calabrese <cbreseangela@gmail.com> wrote:
It's not a juvenile as they have black/grey heads for the first year of their life.I have seen TUVU covered in feces as theh like to roost above one another. I wonder if that is what this is.
Angela


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S8 Active, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Bob Archer <rabican1@gmail.com> Date: 7/6/20 7:13 AM (GMT-08:00) To: OBOL <obol@freelists.org> Subject: [obol] Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile?
The white down on hatch-year birds can remainon thebird for a few months. Good question, had to look it up. The bend in the wings seems to be most common area.
Bob Archer
On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 12:57 AM joy shreyer <dmarc-noreply@freelists.org> wrote:
Picture taken at Baskett Slough



Subject: Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile?
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 9:32 am
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
Very true, my screen had head missing, had to scroll over a bit.
Bob
On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 7:20 AM Angela Calabrese <cbreseangela@gmail.com> wrote:
It's not a juvenile as they have black/grey heads for the first year of their life.I have seen TUVU covered in feces as theh like to roost above one another. I wonder if that is what this is.
Angela


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S8 Active, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Bob Archer <rabican1@gmail.com> Date: 7/6/20 7:13 AM (GMT-08:00) To: OBOL <obol@freelists.org> Subject: [obol] Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile?
The white down on hatch-year birds can remainon thebird for a few months. Good question, had to look it up. The bend in the wings seems to be most common area.
Bob Archer
On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 12:57 AM joy shreyer <dmarc-noreply@freelists.org> wrote:
Picture taken at Baskett Slough



Subject: Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile?
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 9:21 am
From: cbreseangela AT gmail.com
 
It's not a juvenile as they have black/grey heads for the first year of their life.I have seen TUVU covered in feces as theh like to roost above one another. I wonder if that is what this is.AngelaSent via the Samsung Galaxy S8 Active, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Bob Archer Date: 7/6/20 7:13 AM (GMT-08:00) To: OBOL Subject: [obol] Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile? The white down on hatch-year birds can remainon thebird for a few months. Good question, had to look it up. The bend in the wings seems to be most common area.Bob ArcherOn Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 12:57 AM joy shreyer wrote:Picture taken at Baskett Slough



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 9:19 am
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
And amazing as it soundsI have seen Sora sitting in trees. Though maybe 15 feet or so high. And be assured I was not, firmly standing on ground was I.
Bob Archer
On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 6:08 AM <t4c1x@peak.org> wrote:
Kay,Well, you will have to make up your own mind, but just because a Sora was never there before, doesn't mean it couldn't be, especially in the post breeding season, when birds begin to wander around. On my farm in the middle of a pasture there is a small pond about 150 x 100 feet, which dries up each summer. I have only recorded Virginia Rail here three times in 70 years, but about five years ago one nested (successfully) in the grassy part of the pond where the water was only about six inches deep. These things do happen. And the fact a Red-winged Blackbird was calling in the area indicates a wetland significant enough for a wandering Sora to show up.Darrel
From: "KayCarter001" <KayCarter001@outlook.com>
To: "obol" <obol@freelists.org>
Sent: Sunday, July 5, 2020 10:08:31 PM
Subject: [ADV] [obol] Re: Mystery Song

Hmmm. I'm not convinced. Yes, there's a first time for everything, but I've been birding this small area for many years and Sora is not something I've ever encountered there.

Further, while the "words" of the sounds I recorded are correct for Sora call, the timbre seems wrong to me. Sora is more sharp-edged, verging on strident even at it's most plaintive, while this bird's voice was somewhat blurry or "round."

Then there's the question of habitat. While the area is a wetland, there is only one tiny patch of cattails (not near where the bird was), no sedges, no rushed. It's really mostly just a creek bottom, with grasses, willow and other shrubs, and plenty of the expected valley invasives like blackberry. Given that this is not migration season, it seems an unlikely spot for a Sora to drop into.

Finally, while I admit that I could be fooled by this, I had the strong impression that the sound was coming from at least 20-25' up in a stand of trees, not from ground level.

The more I think about it, the more I'm leaning towards Sally Nelson's suggestion of Purple Finch - especially since I had a Purple Finch an hour later (and a mile away) doing such a good Cassin's Vireo imitation.

Kay

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan@onlinenw.com>
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 8:34 PM
To: obol@freelists.org
Cc: KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: Mystery Song

Kay,

Thank you for sending me the audio file, and the added information that there is a wetland with Red-winged Blackbirds.

I will say with firm conviction that this is a SORA, and not a Hutton's Vireo. It is two-noted and up-slurred. The initial note is longer. "pooo-WEEEP"

A Hutton's Vireo does a higher pitched, also up-slurred call, but shorter: "s'WEEEP , s'WEEEP. s'WEEEP"

I can imitate both species (I speak the language), and I've had conversations with both of them. I don't know what I'm saying, but I know what they sound like.

Paul Sullivan


------------------------

Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.



Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.

--------------------------
Subject: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:25 am
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but I'm not having any success. Any suggestions? (I'm after the repeated 2-syllable "do-whit" call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



P 0yb( %8j!l?j!%
ifj+%^hyb(



Subject: Re: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile?
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 9:13 am
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
The white down on hatch-year birds can remain on the bird for a few
months. Good question, had to look it up. The bend in the wings seems to
be most common area.

Bob Archer

On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 12:57 AM joy shreyer
wrote:

> Picture taken at Baskett Slough
>
>
>



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 8:08 am
From: t4c1x AT peak.org
 
Kay,Well, you will have to make up your own mind, but just because a Sora was never there before, doesn't mean it couldn't be, especially in the post breeding season, when birds begin to wander around. On my farm in the middle of a pasture there is a small pond about 150 x 100 feet, which dries up each summer. I have only recorded Virginia Rail here three times in 70 years, but about five years ago one nested (successfully) in the grassy part of the pond where the water was only about six inches deep. These things do happen. And the fact a Red-winged Blackbird was calling in the area indicates a wetland significant enough for a wandering Sora to show up.Darrel
From: "KayCarter001" <KayCarter001@outlook.com>
To: "obol" <obol@freelists.org>
Sent: Sunday, July 5, 2020 10:08:31 PM
Subject: [ADV] [obol] Re: Mystery Song

Hmmm. I'm not convinced. Yes, there's a first time for everything, but I've been birding this small area for many years and Sora is not something I've ever encountered there.

Further, while the "words" of the sounds I recorded are correct for Sora call, the timbre seems wrong to me. Sora is more sharp-edged, verging on strident even at it's most plaintive, while this bird's voice was somewhat blurry or "round."

Then there's the question of habitat. While the area is a wetland, there is only one tiny patch of cattails (not near where the bird was), no sedges, no rushed. It's really mostly just a creek bottom, with grasses, willow and other shrubs, and plenty of the expected valley invasives like blackberry. Given that this is not migration season, it seems an unlikely spot for a Sora to drop into.

Finally, while I admit that I could be fooled by this, I had the strong impression that the sound was coming from at least 20-25' up in a stand of trees, not from ground level.

The more I think about it, the more I'm leaning towards Sally Nelson's suggestion of Purple Finch - especially since I had a Purple Finch an hour later (and a mile away) doing such a good Cassin's Vireo imitation.

Kay

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan@onlinenw.com>
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 8:34 PM
To: obol@freelists.org
Cc: KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: Mystery Song

Kay,

Thank you for sending me the audio file, and the added information that there is a wetland with Red-winged Blackbirds.

I will say with firm conviction that this is a SORA, and not a Hutton's Vireo. It is two-noted and up-slurred. The initial note is longer. "pooo-WEEEP"

A Hutton's Vireo does a higher pitched, also up-slurred call, but shorter: "s'WEEEP , s'WEEEP. s'WEEEP"

I can imitate both species (I speak the language), and I've had conversations with both of them. I don't know what I'm saying, but I know what they sound like.

Paul Sullivan


------------------------

Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.



Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.

--------------------------
Subject: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:25 am
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but I'm not having any success. Any suggestions? (I'm after the repeated 2-syllable "do-whit" call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



P 0yb(%8j!l?j!%
ifj+%^hyb(



Subject: Turkey vulture-Is the one with white on wing a juvenile?
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 2:57 am
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
>'-jGjZG)h



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 0:09 am
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com
 
Hmmm.  I'm not convinced.  Yes, there's a first time for everything, but I've been birding this small area for many years and Sora is not something I've ever encountered there.

Further, while the "words" of the sounds I recorded are correct for Sora call, the timbre seems wrong to me. Sora is more sharp-edged, verging on strident even at it's most plaintive, while this bird's voice was somewhat blurry or "round."

Then there's the question of habitat. While the area is a wetland, there is only one tiny patch of cattails (not near where the bird was), no sedges, no rushed. It's really mostly just a creek bottom, with grasses, willow and other shrubs, and plenty of the expected valley invasives like blackberry. Given that this is not migration season, it seems an unlikely spot for a Sora to drop into.

Finally, while I admit that I could be fooled by this, I had the strong impression that the sound was coming from at least 20-25' up in a stand of trees, not from ground level.

The more I think about it, the more I'm leaning towards Sally Nelson's suggestion of Purple Finch - especially since I had a Purple Finch an hour later (and a mile away) doing such a good Cassin's Vireo imitation.

Kay

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Sullivan
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 8:34 PM
To: obol@freelists.org
Cc: KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: Mystery Song

Kay,

Thank you for sending me the audio file, and the added information that there is a wetland with Red-winged Blackbirds.

I will say with firm conviction that this is a SORA, and not a Hutton's Vireo. It is two-noted and up-slurred. The initial note is longer. "pooo-WEEEP"

A Hutton's Vireo does a higher pitched, also up-slurred call, but shorter: "s'WEEEP , s'WEEEP. s'WEEEP"

I can imitate both species (I speak the language), and I've had conversations with both of them. I don't know what I'm saying, but I know what they sound like.

Paul Sullivan


------------------------

Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.



Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.

--------------------------
Subject: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:25 am
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but I'm not having any success. Any suggestions? (I'm after the repeated 2-syllable "do-whit" call.)



Kay Carter

Canby




I@R 0~+-XS8rzX{PjzYu+-



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 22:34 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Kay,

Thank you for sending me the audio file, and the added information that there is a wetland with Red-winged Blackbirds.

I will say with firm conviction that this is a SORA, and not a Hutton's Vireo. It is two-noted and up-slurred. The initial note is longer. "pooo-WEEEP"

A Hutton's Vireo does a higher pitched, also up-slurred call, but shorter: "s'WEEEP , s'WEEEP. s'WEEEP"

I can imitate both species (I speak the language), and I've had conversations with both of them. I don't know what I'm saying, but I know what they sound like.

Paul Sullivan


------------------------

Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.



Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.

--------------------------
Subject: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:25 am
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com

I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but I'm not having any success. Any suggestions? (I'm after the repeated 2-syllable "do-whit" call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



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Subject: Tern ID help
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 21:56 pm
From: vanderwall3720 AT gmail.com
 
My wife and I spotted what we believe to be a Caspian tern over the
Willamette river flying back and forth between Minto Brown Island Park and
the Salem Riverfront park.

Are they found this far inland or could it be something else? We were
kayaking and had no binoculars but I managed to snap a few pictures with my
phone. It is definitely some variety of tern but I am not familiar with
what would be most likely..

Thanks!

Andrew and Jodi Vanderwall



Subject: Newport Nearshore Pelagics
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 20:23 pm
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
My brother and I pursued elusive hatchery coho salmon off of Newport today and they remained that way all day.  The adventure did provide for some seabird viewing opportunities.  We traveled west from Newport out to 5.5 miles then south to Ona Beach then along the shore back to Newport.  From 4.5 to 5.5 miles offshore we saw numerous foraging common murres and about 300 sooty shearwaters.  Best birds in this area were 2 red-necked phalaropes and 3 fork-tailed storm-petrels along with 2 rhino auklets.  Close to shore we saw 5 marbled murrelets along with other nearshore expected species.  We observed 1 ocean sunfish 4 miles offshore and 2 others only about 1.5 miles offshore.  These were not big as sunfish go.



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 18:29 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
*Can't Link to individual photos or song files in Macaulay Library.*
This drove me crazy also for quite awhile.
The solution is to click on the link to the original eBird report that
included the song/photo in the Library and then email the url of this eBird
List
Bob OBrien Carver OR

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 3:38 PM Andy Thomas
wrote:

> There are a few Hutton's Vireo songs in the Macaulay Library collection,
> https://tinyurl.com/y7rkho8p, that match yours pretty closely, except
> they are all higher pitched; this one in particular (Way down the 2nd page
> on the left. Sorry, the site will not let me link to individual files.):
>
> [image: Inline image]
>
> If you have a way to view the spectrogram, you will see that the shape of
> the sound is very close to yours, but 1000 Hz or so higher. I didn't look
> through them all -- maybe you can find a closer match.
>
> Andrew Thomas
>
> On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 2:43:22 PM PDT, Kay Carter <
> kaycarter001@outlook.com> wrote:
>
>
> I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The
> recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them
> year-round.
>
>
>
> Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my
> list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I
> had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds
> by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that
> shortly.
>
>
>
> Kay
>
>
>
> *From:* Andy Thomas
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 05, 2020 10:35 AM
> *To:* OBOL ; KayCarter001@outlook.com
> *Subject:* Re: [obol] Mystery Song
>
>
>
> I used https://birdnet.cornell.edu/ap...
>
> to analyze your sound file. I filtered to play the 2-syllable "do-whit"
> call only. A screen shot of the result is attached. The most likely is
> Clay-colored Thrush, among several other Eurasian species, but all are low
> probability. In other words, Birdnet is stumped. The other prominent call
> -- the higher pitched down-slurred call -- seems to be Red-wing Blackbird
> (also according to Birdnet).
>
>
>
> Andrew Thomas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 7:25:12 AM PDT, Kay Carter <
> kaycarter001@outlook.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I
> was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly
> willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought
> to be able to put a name to it, but Im not having any success. Any
> suggestions? (Im after the repeated 2-syllable do-whit call.)
>
>
>
> Kay Carter
>
> Canby
>



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 17:38 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
There are a few Hutton's Vireo songs in the Macaulay Library collection, https://tinyurl.com/y7rkho8p,  that match yours pretty closely, except they are all higher pitched; this one in particular (Way down the 2nd page on the left. Sorry, the site will not let me link to individual files.):


If you have a way to view the spectrogram, you will see that the shape of the sound is very close to yours, but 1000 Hz or so higher. I didn't look through them all -- maybe you can find a closer match.
Andrew Thomas

On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 2:43:22 PM PDT, Kay Carter wrote:


I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.



Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.



Kay



From: Andy Thomas
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 10:35 AM
To: OBOL ; KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: [obol] Mystery Song



I usedhttps://birdnet.cornell.edu/ap... to analyze your sound file. I filtered to play the 2-syllable "do-whit" call only. A screen shot of the result is attached. The most likely is Clay-colored Thrush, among several other Eurasian species, but all are low probability. In other words, Birdnet is stumped. The other prominent call -- the higher pitched down-slurred call -- seems to be Red-wing Blackbird (also according to Birdnet).



Andrew Thomas













On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 7:25:12 AM PDT, Kay Carter wrote:





I recorded the attached at about 8:00AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but Im not having any success. Any suggestions? (Im after the repeated 2-syllable do-whit call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



Subject: Mystery two tone bird call
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 17:08 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
Quinton's suggestion of Sora is a good one. Before l listened to the recording l was thinking--"It's July. There's a lot of juveniles coming on stage." The serious repetition bolstered my HUVI guess. This also a common trait of recently fledged birds.Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 17:05 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com
 
I would be extremely surprised at Sora.  I have never detected one there in the 16 years Ive lived here and birded the edge of the wetland at least weekly.  Virginia Rail, yes.  Red-winged Blackbirds a-plenty.

Kay Carter

From: Quinton Nice
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 2:56 PM
To: KayCarter001@outlook.com
Cc: OBOL
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Mystery Song

I think it's a Sora.

Quinton Nice

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020, 2:43 PM Kay Carter > wrote:
I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.

Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.

Kay

From: Andy Thomas >
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 10:35 AM
To: OBOL >; KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: [obol] Mystery Song

I used https://birdnet.cornell.edu/ap... wrote:



I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but Im not having any success. Any suggestions? (Im after the repeated 2-syllable do-whit call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



Subject: Purple Finch? Really???
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 17:00 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com
 
On Thursday morning I was on my regular local bird walk when I heard what I immediately believed to be a Cassin's Vireo.  It was near the top of a row of Photinia.  I thought that was pretty cool, because although there had been one nearby in breeding season for 3 years or so, that was a number of years ago and I've not detected one in the area before or since.

This bird was moving through the branches, and though I could easily follow its movements both by following the moving branches and by ear, I was struggling to get it in sight. But finally, I got a glimpse - and it turned out to be a "female-plumaged" (probably first-year male) Purple Finch. I hoped I'd just spotted the wrong bird, but the finch flew away almost immediately, and the call - which had been constant for at least 3 minutes - disappeared with it.

Yes, Purple Finches have a variety of songs, and yes wishful thinking can play a big part in bird ID, but I can't help but think that finch was really enjoying tricking me.

Kay Carter
Canby



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:56 pm
From: quintonnice77 AT gmail.com
 
I think it's a Sora.

Quinton Nice

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020, 2:43 PM Kay Carter wrote:

> I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird. The
> recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them
> year-round.
>
>
>
> Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my
> list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I
> had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds
> by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that
> shortly.
>
>
>
> Kay
>
>
>
> *From:* Andy Thomas
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 05, 2020 10:35 AM
> *To:* OBOL ; KayCarter001@outlook.com
> *Subject:* Re: [obol] Mystery Song
>
>
>
> I used https://birdnet.cornell.edu/ap...
>
> to analyze your sound file. I filtered to play the 2-syllable "do-whit"
> call only. A screen shot of the result is attached. The most likely is
> Clay-colored Thrush, among several other Eurasian species, but all are low
> probability. In other words, Birdnet is stumped. The other prominent call
> -- the higher pitched down-slurred call -- seems to be Red-wing Blackbird
> (also according to Birdnet).
>
>
>
> Andrew Thomas
>
>
>
> [image: Inline image]
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 7:25:12 AM PDT, Kay Carter <
> kaycarter001@outlook.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I
> was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly
> willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought
> to be able to put a name to it, but Im not having any success. Any
> suggestions? (Im after the repeated 2-syllable do-whit call.)
>
>
>
> Kay Carter
>
> Canby
>



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:43 pm
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com
 
I can confirm that the other call is, indeed Red-winged Blackbird.  The recording was made on the edge of a small wetland that hosts them year-round.

Most responses have leaned towards Huttons Vireo, which is also on my list of possibilities. Ive never heard one quite like this, but then I had an experience later the same day that emphasizes that identifying birds by ear alone is not always as reliable as wed like. Ill post about that shortly.

Kay

From: Andy Thomas
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 10:35 AM
To: OBOL ; KayCarter001@outlook.com
Subject: Re: [obol] Mystery Song

I used https://birdnet.cornell.edu/ap... wrote:



I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but Im not having any success. Any suggestions? (Im after the repeated 2-syllable do-whit call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



Subject: Re: Lake County PAC-slope?
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 16:10 pm
From: tc AT empnet.com
 
Jack,



It trips rare because the default is Pacific-slope x Cordilleran (Western) Flycatcher for Lake County. Photos wont do you any good for the species. Someone who has studied them for years indicates that he doubts any birds North of Arizona/New Mexico are pure birds, there is a lot of admixing going on. I have heard birds in Bend alternate Pac-slope and Cordilleran calls. I had one this summer that started with a Cordilleran note and then go into full Pac-slope mode.



An article published last year [Linck, E., K. Epperly, P. van Else, G. M.. Spellman, R. W. Bryson, Jr., J. E. McCormacks, R. Canales-Del Castillo, and J. Klicka. 2019. Dense geographic and genomic sampling reveals paraphyly and a cryptic lineage in a classic sibling species complex. Syst. Biol. 0(0):111, 2019, DOI:10.1093/sysbio/syz027.] posits that there anywhere between one and four species involved in this complex. They favor either one species for all of Western North America (including hybrids) or two species split with one for the US and one for Mexico. Either would eliminate the Pacific-slope/Cordilleran conundrum that we deal with here. [As an aside, if you want to see a really funny interpretation, look at the eBird maps for Cordilleran and Pacific-slope Flycatchers along the Washington/Idaho border. Its amazing how those birds can read maps!] The authors acknowledge that a different definition of what is a species could lead to four different species, but dont resolve that question and say a detailed analysis of these data will be presented elsewhere.

Here is a map showing the information their data shows the following. [Gray dots are Pacific-slope, yellow are Cordilleran and the orange and green are the Mexican forms. Where a dot has two colors it shows the intermixing of the forms. Unfortunately they didnt examine any Central Oregon birds.

It appears we havent heard the last word on Empidonax difficilis (difficilis indeed!).



cid:172764e62734ce8e91





Tom Crabtree, Bend









From: obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] On Behalf Of Jack Maynard
Sent: Sunday, July 05, 2020 12:35 PM
To: Oregon Birders On Line
Subject: [obol] Lake County PAC-slope?



Hello obol,

With some trepidation I am going to check in a Pacific-slope Flycatcher from a location SE of Lakeview in The Warner Mountains. It trips Rare. I have a few pics and a sound recording but very limited connectivity here.



Kelli and I were birding a spot called Willow Creek campground this morning and heard what we thought were the distinct vocalizations of the Pac-slope, but thought they shouldnt be present this far East. We heard at least two birds making the Ju-weeeep call and eventually saw two and photographed one of the birds. Ill include a pic or two with this email. I wont be able to get the sound recording uploaded until I get home to Portland tomorrow or Tuesday.



Ill be interested to hear from folks as to whether this was a good ID. Both pac-slope and Cordilleran tick rare. West of the cascades Id call these pacific-slope and move on.



Sorry about the blurry photos, they are the only ones I could get to transfer from my camera.



Subject: Lake County COFL
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 15:06 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
Hey Jack. I put Cordilleran Flycatcher on my life list w/in walking distance of Willow Creek campground. I'd love to get there every year . I don't believe it is possible to distinguish the species visually, in the field or in the hand. Vocalizations l heard in the Warner Mtns and a few weeks later around the town of La Grande were nothing like a PacSlope(a breeding species in my yard in Washington County). Recordings l made on my cell phone were much less distinctive sounding than what l actually heard.   I fail to see the logic in birders' ambivalence about the taxonomy. Sure, intergrades exist. But that is also the case with Sapsuckers in the same parts of Oregon. And anyone with a few hours in Tillamook County or downtown Portland on a winter day can't help but see hundreds of Olympic Gulls. Yet l've never encountered a serious suggestion to lump the Western and G-wing Gulls. Doing point counts in Union County l encountered four unequivocal COFL and two PSFL in about three hours. I'm sure there are plenty of ambivalent birds and had l encountered three or four of those in a row l might be cultivating different prejudices .Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Re: Campground recommendations in Lake County for July
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 15:05 pm
From: lora.minty AT gmail.com
 
We've made several tent camping trips to Lake County in late July or August, mostly aiming for migrating shorebirds at Summer Lake and the thousands of birds on Lake Abert.
My two cents:

Marster Spring CG is in the most convenient location and we usually stay there. Sometimes it's been crowded, but there are a couple of other campgrounds up the road. The mosquitos can be bad, especially at dusk. In the past we've headed to the saloon in Paisley for dinner; this year we might have to come up with another plan. The birding and hiking along the Chewaucan River is pretty good -- one year we saw a fledgling Northern Pygmy Owl struggling to stay upright on a branch as it was bombarded by Red-Breasted Sapsuckers. It looked like the sapsuckers and owls had nested in adjacent trees.

East Bay CG is probably the best all-around campground, a great place to hang out, especially if you can score a good site. We've never had problems with bugs or wind there, so far. We also spent a night at Thompson CG on the other side of the reservoir and was nice and quiet, though not as birdy. Unfortunately Thompson Reservoir is somewhat inconvenient for our usual plans, as it's a bumpy (though paved) half-hour trip back and forth from Hwy 31. But we're tempted to stay there and explore the area more fully, a la Bill Shelmerdine.

Every time we stop to bird at Silver Creek Marsh CG we've been eaten alive, so we've never had the courage to camp there.

There are also four very primitive camping areas at the Summer Lake Wildlife Refuge. We've stayed at the Ana River and the Bullsgate Dike sites. They're not great for tent camping (possibility of bugs, wind, scary toilets) but it's a fantastic experience to be in the middle of all those birds. The night sounds can't be beat, and the dawn chorus is wonderful.

One of these years we're going to try a night at Duncan Reservoir, a primitive BLM campground in the middle of the sage and junipers southeast of Silver Lake.

Lora MintyBill Bradford

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 12:10 PM Erik Bergman <bergie444@live.com> wrote:








Hi, OBOLers. Im seeking a campsite for use as a base to explore the Summer Lake area. I see campgrounds at East Bay, Silver Creek Marsh and Marster Springs. Which of these (or any other) might be best in mid-July birding? Your recommendations
are appreciated. Erik Bergman



Subject: Re: Lake County PAC-slope?
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 14:43 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Jack. The only Western-type I have heard on territory in the Warners was making Pac-slope sounds.
I have heard second-hand that on the California side of the Warners, observers default to Cordilleran. Im not sure why.
Lump em.

Alan Contrerasacontrer56@gmail.comEugene, Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



On Jul 5, 2020, at 12:34 PM, Jack Maynard <jmaynard@peak.org> wrote:Hello obol,With some trepidation I am going to check in a Pacific-slope Flycatcher from a location SE of Lakeview in The Warner Mountains. It trips Rare. I have a few pics and a sound recording but very limited connectivity here.
Kelli and I were birding a spot called Willow Creek campground this morning and heard what we thought were the distinct vocalizations of the Pac-slope, but thought they shouldnt be present this far East. We heard at least two birds making the Ju-weeeep call and eventually saw two and photographed one of the birds. Ill include a pic or two with this email. I wont be able to get the sound recording uploaded until I get home to Portland tomorrow or Tuesday.
Ill be interested to hear from folks as to whether this was a good ID. Both pac-slope and Cordilleran tick rare. West of the cascades Id call these pacific-slope and move on.
Sorry about the blurry photos, they are the only ones I could get to transfer from my camera.
<image2.jpeg><image1.jpeg>
<image0.jpeg>

I have better photos but they are of a silent Empid we saw very soon after and are not sure it is the same bird we heard. The bird in the pics is the bird we heard.Im attempting to add a sound recording.<New Recording 68.m4a>
Apologies in advance if this is too much data but I dont have a way to link to a page or eBird with this damn iPhone.
Jack MaynardPortland Oregon
Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Lake County PAC-slope?
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 14:35 pm
From: jmaynard AT peak.org
 
Hello obol,
With some trepidation I am going to check in a Pacific-slope Flycatcher from a location SE of Lakeview in The Warner Mountains. It trips Rare. I have a few pics and a sound recording but very limited connectivity here.

Kelli and I were birding a spot called Willow Creek campground this morning and heard what we thought were the distinct vocalizations of the Pac-slope, but thought they shouldnt be present this far East. We heard at least two birds making the Ju-weeeep call and eventually saw two and photographed one of the birds. Ill include a pic or two with this email. I wont be able to get the sound recording uploaded until I get home to Portland tomorrow or Tuesday.

Ill be interested to hear from folks as to whether this was a good ID. Both pac-slope and Cordilleran tick rare. West of the cascades Id call these pacific-slope and move on.

Sorry about the blurry photos, they are the only ones I could get to transfer from my camera.





I have better photos but they are of a silent Empid we saw very soon after and are not sure it is the same bird we heard. The bird in the pics is the bird we heard.
Im attempting to add a sound recording.


Apologies in advance if this is too much data but I dont have a way to link to a page or eBird with this damn iPhone.

Jack Maynard
Portland Oregon

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Re: New WT Sparrow Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 13:46 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
K







On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 10:54:26 AM PDT, Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan@onlinenw.com> wrote:





There goes the nemonic for the White-throated Sparrow: "Oh, sweet, Can-a-da,
Can-a-da, Can-a-da."

These youngsters always want to telescope(shorten) our language. Just
listen to Milennials.

Thnk boutit

Paul Sullivan

------------------------
Subject: New WT Sparrow Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:34 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com

My wife sent this to me- thought some obolers might be interested.

Tim RodenkirkCoos Bay

---------- Forwarded message ---------

From: holly rodenkirk <hrodenkirk@gmail.com>

Date: Sat, Jul 4, 2020 at 6:00 PM

Subject: bird call

To: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk@gmail.com>





https://gizmodo.com/a-viral-ne... 20-07-03


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Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:58 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Kay,

Your recording doesn't come through on the ABA's Birding News.
It doesn't appear in the FreeList archive of OBOL posts.
It doesn't come through on Silia.com either.
I can't see/hear it.

Could you send me a copy of your recording?

Thanks,

Paul

Paul T. Sullivan
paultsullivan@onlinenw.com
503-472-5306 h
971-237-4864 c



------------------
[obol] Mystery Song
From: Kay Carter
To: OBOL
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2020 14:24:26 +0000
Irecordedtheattachedatabout8:00AMonThursday,7/2,inCanby.Iwas
neverabletoseethebird,whichseemedtobedeepinagroupofcurly
willows.Itcalledcontinuouslyforseveralminutes.IfeellikeIoughtt
o
beabletoputanametoit,butI'mnothavinganysuccess.Anysuggestion
s?
(I'maftertherepeated2-syllable"do-whit"call.)

KayCarter
Canby


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Subject: Re: New WT Sparrow Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:54 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
There goes the nemonic for the White-throated Sparrow: "Oh, sweet, Can-a-da,
Can-a-da, Can-a-da."

These youngsters always want to telescope(shorten) our language. Just
listen to Milennials.

Thnk boutit

Paul Sullivan

------------------------
Subject: New WT Sparrow Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:34 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com

My wife sent this to me- thought some obolers might be interested.

Tim RodenkirkCoos Bay

---------- Forwarded message ---------

From: holly rodenkirk

Date: Sat, Jul 4, 2020 at 6:00 PM

Subject: bird call

To: Tim Rodenkirk





https://gizmodo.com/a-viral-ne... 20-07-03


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Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:35 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
I used https://birdnet.cornell.edu/ap... to analyze your sound file. I filtered to play the 2-syllable "do-whit" call only. A screen shot of the result is attached. The most likely is Clay-colored Thrush, among several other Eurasian species, but all are low probability. In other words, Birdnet is stumped. The other prominent call -- the higher pitched down-slurred call -- seems to be Red-wing Blackbird (also according to Birdnet).

Andrew Thomas






On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 7:25:12 AM PDT, Kay Carter wrote:


I recorded the attached at about 8:00AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but Im not having any success. Any suggestions? (Im after the repeated 2-syllable do-whit call.)



Kay Carter

Canby



Subject: New WT Sparrow Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 12:34 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
My wife sent this to me- thought some obolers might be interested.
Tim RodenkirkCoos Bay
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: holly rodenkirk <hrodenkirk@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, Jul 4, 2020 at 6:00 PM
Subject: bird call
To: Tim Rodenkirk <timrodenkirk@gmail.com>


https://gizmodo.com/a-viral-ne... 20-07-03



Subject: Re: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:30 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
My first guess would be Hutton's Vireo. The sound is not exactly right, but that's almost certainly a technical artifact. A regular nester at our house, the kid's dubbed it "the world's most boring bird song".Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Kay Carter Date: 7/5/20 7:24 AM (GMT-08:00) To: OBOL Subject: [obol] Mystery Song

I recorded the attached at about 8:00
AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby. I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows. It called continuously for several minutes. I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but Im
not having any success. Any suggestions? (Im after the repeated 2-syllable do-whit call.)

Kay Carter
Canby



Subject: Re: White goose in Tillamook
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:27 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
White Graylags (Anser anser) are the equivalent of the Peking Duck ( a white domestic Mallard) and are fully capable of flight. For several years a family sized group, 5-6 , lived in nw Tangent. I saw them flying back and forth across the highway when commuting . The south side of the highway often a had a large flock of Cacklers in winter. To see the white geese mixed in, wings folded and at a distance, inevitably gave the uninitiated potent false hopes.Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: David Bailey Date: 7/4/20 6:52 PM (GMT-08:00) To: obol@freelists.org Subject: [obol] White goose in Tillamook Cliff and Denise,Snow geese have pink Bill's and extensive black in the outer wings...I suspect this is an escaped domestic goose.---------- Forwarded message ---------From: Date: Sat, Jul 4, 2020, 18:29Subject: [eBird Alert] Tillamook County Rare Bird Alert To: *** Species Summary:

- Snow Goose (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the Tillamook County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Tillamook County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
- Reported Jul 03, 2020 19:02 by Denise Harrington
- Goose Point, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "White goose, orange bill. Mingling with group of Canada Goose which were about the same size."

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
- Reported Jul 03, 2020 19:02 by Cliff Cordy
- Goose Point, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "White goose, orange bill. Mingling with group of Canada Goose which were about the same size."

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Tillamook County Rare Bird Alert

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https://ebird.org/alerts

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/...



Subject: Mystery Song
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 9:25 am
From: KayCarter001 AT outlook.com
 
I recorded the attached at about 8:00 AM on Thursday, 7/2, in Canby.  I was never able to see the bird, which seemed to be deep in a group of curly willows.  It called continuously for several minutes.  I feel like I ought to be able to put a name to it, but I'm not having any success.  Any suggestions?  (I'm after the repeated 2-syllable "do-whit" call.)

Kay Carter
Canby



Subject: southern Cascades
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 0:18 am
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
at 4600' elevation:
https://atowhee.blog/2020/07/0...
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: White goose in Tillamook
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 20:53 pm
From: davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com
 
Cliff and Denise,
Snow geese have pink Bill's and extensive black in the outer wings...I suspect this is an escaped domestic goose.

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: <ebird-alert@cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, Jul 4, 2020, 18:29
Subject: [eBird Alert] Tillamook County Rare Bird Alert <daily>
To:


*** Species Summary:


- Snow Goose (2 reports)


---------------------------------------------

Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Tillamook County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Tillamook County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.


eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...


Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 19:02 by Denise Harrington

- Goose Point, Tillamook, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "White goose, orange bill. Mingling with group of Canada Goose which were about the same size."


Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 19:02 by Cliff Cordy

- Goose Point, Tillamook, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "White goose, orange bill. Mingling with group of Canada Goose which were about the same size."


***********


You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Tillamook County Rare Bird Alert


Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts


eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/...



Subject: Oregon Rare Bird Alert
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 20:15 pm
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
*** Species Summary:


Snow Goose (2 Tillamook)

Canvasback (4 Lane)

Herring Gull (1 Wasco)

Common Tern (1 Clatsop)

White-faced Ibis (4 Lane)

Red-naped Sapsucker (2 Deschutes)

Horned Lark (2 Lane)

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1 Yamhill)

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1 Deschutes)

Purple Finch (1 Wallowa)

Cassin's Finch (1 Washington)

Brewer's Sparrow (5 Jackson)

Fox Sparrow (Thick-billed) (3 Lane)

Lincoln's Sparrow (3 Lane)

Yellow-breasted Chat (1 Jefferson)

Great-tailed Grackle (2 Lane)

Northern Waterthrush (2 Lane)

Indigo Bunting (4 Union)


---------------------------------------------



Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 19:02 by Cliff Cordy

- Goose Point, Tillamook, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "White goose, orange bill. Mingling with group of Canada Goose which were about the same size."


Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 19:02 by Denise Harrington

- Goose Point, Tillamook, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "White goose, orange bill. Mingling with group of Canada Goose which were about the same size."


Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 10:54 by John Sullivan

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Continuing. Worn adult male. White back and sides, black breast, red head and neck, long sloping forehead."


Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 08:48 by Sylvia Maulding

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "male. whitish back, reddish brown head, black chest, sloping black bill. iPhone photo."


Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Nancy Clogston

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "Continuing in Pond 5, about 1/3 down from the north, seen from the east dike. Ayatha with long sloped forehead."


Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Vjera Thompson

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "Continuing in Pond 5, about 1/3 down from the north, seen from the east dike. Ayatha with long sloped forehead."


Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) (3)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 11:36 by Jean Marie Linhart

- Celilo Park, Wasco, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Took photos and Merlin id'd one as herring gull and a second as California gull."


Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 17:40 by Kalli Fergus

- Fort Stevens SP--Parking Area D, Clatsop, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Immature/non breeding. Black cap behind head, small patch of white in front. Hanging out with caspian group at jetty Bay Area, parking lot D. Spotted and reported previously."


White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 14:32 by Forest Tomlinson

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Continuing bird."


White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 10:54 by John Sullivan

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Continuing. Maroon wader with long, decurved bill."


White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Nancy Clogston

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "Continuing. South end of pond 5. Reddish medium wader with long curved bill."


White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Vjera Thompson

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "Continuing. South end of pond 5. Reddish medium wader with long curved bill."


Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 07:37 by Maureen Leong-Kee

- Calliope Crossing, Deschutes, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Visiting nest cavity. Red cap, red throat, red nape. No red in supercillium, white line connecting bill with breast. Photos."


Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 07:37 by Nicholas Martens

- Calliope Crossing, Deschutes, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Visiting nest cavity. Red cap, red throat, red nape. No red in supercillium, white line connecting bill with breast. Photos."


Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Nancy Clogston

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Audio

- Comments: "Singing on the east edge of pond 6 (dry with small plants). Not seen."


Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Vjera Thompson

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Audio

- Comments: "Singing on the east edge of pond 6 (dry with small plants). Not seen."


Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) (1)

- Reported Jul 02, 2020 12:05 by Pamela Lindholm-Levy

- 30770 SW Buckhaven Rd. Hillsboro, OR 97123, Yamhill, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "In a Douglas fir tree near an open field and other conifers nearby"


Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (1)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 11:00 by Jacqueline Wong

- Smith Rock SP, Deschutes, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Male singing loudly on top of small tree next to trail."


Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus) (2)

- Reported Jul 02, 2020 12:00 by Scott O'Donnell

- Speywater Lodge, Wallowa, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Pair. Male red all over, very red, including the very top of head. Overall appearance (shape and posture) seems more similar to House Finch than the Cassin's Finches that are always here this time of year. Female noticeably darker and less defined than female Cassin's. Viewed at water feature five feet away from window for several minutes. They disappeared when I went for the camera."


Cassin's Finch (Haemorhous cassinii) (2)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 17:17 by Anonymous eBirder

- 13056 SW Mayview Way, Portland US-OR 45.42528, -122.83271, Washington, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Females, no male with them today."


Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 09:11 by Janet Kelly

- Mt Ashland Day Use Area--Rabbit Ears, Jackson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "In the same area Frank found one yesterday, below Rabbit Ears. Pale underparts, no breast spot or streaks."


Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri) (2)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 07:46 by Alex Lamoreaux

- Mt. Ashland, Jackson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "Pair together in short manzanita and sage. Known, low-density breeding location. Photos."


Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri) (2)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 07:46 by Lauren diBiccari

- Mt. Ashland, Jackson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 1 Photo

- Comments: "Pair together in short manzanita and sage. Known, low-density breeding location. Photos."


Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 09:57 by Alex Lamoreaux

- Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest, Talent US-OR (42.0747,-122.7519), Jackson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Singing downslope - known, low-density breeding area."


Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 09:57 by Lauren diBiccari

- Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest, Talent US-OR (42.0747,-122.7519), Jackson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Singing downslope - known, low-density breeding area."


Fox Sparrow (Thick-billed) (Passerella iliaca [megarhyncha Group]) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:08 by Joshua Little

- Willamette National Forest, Blue River US-OR 43.55203, -122.35191, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "On territory"


Fox Sparrow (Thick-billed) (Passerella iliaca [megarhyncha Group]) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 18:15 by Joshua Little

- Willamette National Forest, Blue River US-OR 43.55203, -122.35191, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Breeder"


Fox Sparrow (Thick-billed) (Passerella iliaca [megarhyncha Group]) (1) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 19:14 by Joshua Little

- Willamette National Forest, Oakridge US-OR (43.5674,-122.3416), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "On territory"


Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (2) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 09:43 by Magnus Persmark

- Blair Lake Trail (No. 3553), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "One seen and one or two more heard. Sparrow with buffy breast finely streaked in black. White belly. Crested crown over thick gray supercilium."


Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 04:46 by Joshua Little

- Willamette National Forest, Oakridge US-OR (43.5674,-122.3416), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "On territory"


Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (3) CONFIRMED

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 17:54 by Joshua Little

- Willamette National Forest, Oakridge US-OR 43.57558, -122.33563, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Singing on breeding grounds, pics"


Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) (1)

- Reported Jul 03, 2020 06:20 by Jacob Durrent

- Pelton Regulating Dam Wildlife Overlook, Jefferson, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Singing its very distinctive songs from down below the overlook. No visual but hard to mistake those wild sounds for anything else."


Great-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Nancy Clogston

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 5 Photos

- Comments: "Heard making weird grackle noises, then seen. Larger than blackbirds with large tail. Perched on the osprey platform in pond 5. Flew south, landed on logs on southern end, then we lost track of it."


Great-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 06:34 by Vjera Thompson

- Fern Ridge WMA--Royal Ave. area (general), Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 5 Photos

- Comments: "Heard making weird grackle noises, then seen. Larger than blackbirds with large tail. Perched on the osprey platform in pond 5. Flew south, landed on logs on southern end, then we lost track of it."


Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 08:34 by Joshua Little

- Mule Prairie, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "County lifer! Still singing away in the place Tom Mickel found it a couple days ago. Vocal recordings and poor pics."


Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 12:59 by Tye Jeske

- Salt Creek Falls, Lane, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Comments: "Lifet and new state bird. Heard singing at Mule Prairie found by Tom M., possibly heard two which would make sense since they used to breed here in the 80s and 90s. Heard singing typical song of "sweet sweet swee wee wee chew chew", the prairie is pretty hard to get at. Heard bird singing pretty distantly, and I tried to spot it singing on top of a willow but was unable to, was also too far for any decent audio."


Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 04:27 by Nolan Clements

- Ladd Marsh WMA -- Elk Trap MAPS Banding Station, Union, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "1 newly banded. Second year male. 1st record for the station, and 3rd county record. Captured at 0710. After it was released it was not heard, seen, nor captured again. It was not detected prior to capture. Please note that this bird is not chaseable as it is on a section of the management area that is closed to the public. Pics. A real shocker!"


Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 04:27 by Arlene Blumton

- Ladd Marsh WMA -- Elk Trap MAPS Banding Station, Union, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "1 newly banded. Second year male. 1st record for the station, and 3rd county record. Captured at 0710. After it was released it was not heard, seen, and captured again. It was not detected prior to capture. Please note that this bird is not caseable as it is on a section of the management area that is closed to the public. Pics. A real shocker!"


Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 04:27 by Laura Mahrt

- Ladd Marsh WMA -- Elk Trap MAPS Banding Station, Union, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "1 newly banded. Second year male. 1st record for the station, and 3rd county record. Captured at 0710. After it was released it was not heard, seen, nor captured again. It was not detected prior to capture. Please note that this bird is not caseable as it is on a section of the management area that is closed to the public. Pics. A real shocker!"


Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) (1)

- Reported Jul 04, 2020 04:27 by Cathy Nowak

- Ladd Marsh WMA -- Elk Trap MAPS Banding Station, Union, Oregon

- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...

- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

- Media: 4 Photos

- Comments: "1 newly banded. Second year male. 1st record for the station, and 3rd county record. Captured at 0710. After it was released it was not heard, seen, nor captured again. It was not detected prior to capture. Please note that this bird is not chaseable as it is on a section of the management area that is closed to the public. Pics. A real shocker!"


***********


You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Oregon Rare Bird Alert


Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts


eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/...


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