ABA's Birding News >> Oregon

Oregon bird news by date

Updated on August 21, 2018, 9:25 am

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


21 Aug: @ 09:23:42  Another Collection of Tufted Puffin Photos [Jim Leonard]
21 Aug: @ 08:21:28  Sounds of Fall 8/21/18 [Tim Rodenkirk]
20 Aug: @ 22:33:34  Re: neck-ringed local geese [Steve Nord]
20 Aug: @ 21:53:20  Re: neck-ringed local geese [Wayne Hoffman]
20 Aug: @ 20:42:09  Re: neck-ringed local geese [Cody W. Smith]
20 Aug: @ 20:07:35  neck-ringed local geese [Harry Fuller]
20 Aug: @ 19:32:50  South Saddle Mountain (Washington Co) [Stefan Schlick]
20 Aug: @ 19:32:17  Re: for anyone interested in helping identify a shorebird [Alan Contreras]
20 Aug: @ 19:31:49  Re: for anyone interested in helping identify a shorebird [Jeff Gilligan]
20 Aug: @ 19:29:23  for anyone interested in helping identify a shorebird [Linda Fink]
20 Aug: @ 18:36:28  Fern Ridge Map posted [Alan Contreras]
20 Aug: @ 16:27:26  Re: Warbler flock and Western Tanager [Janet and Phil Lamberson]
20 Aug: @ 15:17:16  Re: Warbler flock and Western Tanager [Steve Jaggers]
20 Aug: @ 14:56:20  Re: Vaux’s Swifts in Eugene (and Portland) [Jeff Gilligan]
20 Aug: @ 14:44:50  Warbler flock and Western Tanager [Janet and Phil Lamberson]
20 Aug: @ 11:59:43  Fern Ridge shortspur [Lars Norgren]
20 Aug: @ 11:54:17  Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur [Alan Contreras]
20 Aug: @ 11:51:44  Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur [Alan Contreras]
20 Aug: @ 11:51:03  Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur [Nagi Aboulenein]
20 Aug: @ 11:36:52  Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur [Alan Contreras]
20 Aug: @ 11:32:05  Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur [Nagi Aboulenein]
20 Aug: @ 10:36:40  Townsend's Solitaire near Newport OR [Eric Horvath]
20 Aug: @ 00:20:47  Fwd: Aplodontia [George Neavoll]
20 Aug: @ 00:10:48  Malheur Plumbeous Vireos etc. 8/16-8/19 [Noah Strycker]
20 Aug: @ 00:06:02  Aplodontia [Pamela Johnston]
20 Aug: @ 00:05:14  Vaux’s Swifts in Eugene [Barbara Combs]
19 Aug: @ 23:03:11  Blair Lake, Lane Co. [John Sullivan]
19 Aug: @ 17:54:18  Re: Pelagic Cormorant Feeding Chick Photo Sequence [Bob Archer]
19 Aug: @ 17:17:29  Pelagic Cormorant Feeding Chick Photo Sequence [Roger Freeman]
19 Aug: @ 16:42:58  Are you going to the OBA conference? [Kai Frueh]
19 Aug: @ 15:18:59  Shorebird Festival Lodging Going Quickly [HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE]
19 Aug: @ 15:00:31  Re: Vaux’s Swifts - Eugene Area - Where are they? [Alan Contreras]
19 Aug: @ 14:58:05  Vaux’s Swifts - Eugene Area - Where are they? [Barbara Combs]
19 Aug: @ 13:38:46  Washington Co. bluebirds [Lona Pierce]
19 Aug: @ 10:54:45  Re: Lake Abert Shorebird Count [Craig Miller]
19 Aug: @ 10:01:35  Lake Abert Franklin's Gulls [Lars Norgren]
19 Aug: @ 09:45:40  Re: juncos [Lars Norgren]
19 Aug: @ 09:39:10  Pelagic Cormorant Feeding Chick Photo Sequence [Jim Leonard]
19 Aug: @ 09:17:03  Re: BIRD BANDS [shovelor]
19 Aug: @ 00:05:15  Re: BIRD BANDS [cbreseangela]
18 Aug: @ 22:48:54  Goodies from a Fern Ridge Portland Audubon trip (Lane Co) [Stefan Schlick]
18 Aug: @ 21:52:48  Re: Lake Abert Shorebird Count [Wayne Hoffman]
18 Aug: @ 21:51:25  New Yard Bird - Song Sparrow [Jack Williamson]
18 Aug: @ 21:35:46  Re: juncos [Tim Rodenkirk]
18 Aug: @ 20:49:11  Re: BIRD BANDS [Karl Schneck]
18 Aug: @ 20:40:17  BIRD BANDS [carol speegle]
18 Aug: @ 20:27:02  Re: BIRD BANDS [Bill Shanahan]
18 Aug: @ 19:44:52  Re: BIRD BANDS [Nels Nelson]
18 Aug: @ 19:31:55  Re: BIRD BANDS [dpvroman]
18 Aug: @ 19:09:14  BIRD BANDS [DOUGLAS BEALL]





Subject: Another Collection of Tufted Puffin Photos
Date: Tue Aug 21 2018 9:23 am
From: photojleonard AT gmail.com
 
A few more Tufted Puffin photos taken at Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach on August 14th. by Jim Leonard. I smile every time I see or photograph a Tufted Puffin. (Clown Faced)


Click on link below.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/mPDL...



Subject: Sounds of Fall 8/21/18
Date: Tue Aug 21 2018 8:21 am
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
On my morning walk in Coos Bay there was the first real definite movement of calling SWAINSONS THRUSHES I have heard this fall- between about 0515-0545. There was a few breaks but most of the time there was a steady number of drip calls all around me as I walked.
Pretty foggy here with smoke mixed in. Yesterday was the first really smoky day here in Coos Bay. With 80F predicted here and east winds we should have another pretty smoky one. Anyhow, escaping to the coast to get out of the smoke may have to wait another day or so.
Saw 6 Lesser Yellowlegs, a few SB Dows and a Western Sand or two out on N Spit Coos Bay late yesterday PM in the foggy smoke.
Merry migration!Tim RCoos Bay



Subject: Re: neck-ringed local geese
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 22:33 pm
From: stevernord AT gmail.com
 
OBOL;
I have sightings of white neck collared Canada Geese here in Washington County. Amazingly both times were also in August.
August 30, 2016 there were 6 collared Geese at Jackson Bottom Wetlands in Hillsboro.August 21, 2017 there were 5 collared Canada Geese at Fernhill Wetlands in Forest Grove.
I reported the band numbers to the Banding Lab and learned that all the birds had been banded near Nanaimo, BC and were hatched 2015 or earlier. One of the birds seen at Jackson Bottom in 2016, was also one of the birds at Fernhill Wetlands in 2017.
Good BirdingSteve NordBeaverton, OR



Subject: Re: neck-ringed local geese
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 21:53 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Hi -
Here on the coast we have seen some Nanaimo collars among our Westerns. We also see a very prominent late migration northward of westerns (late May and June), which we think is a molt migration of subadults (1-2 year-olds). Roy Lowe has collected a lot of information on this over the years. It would be really interesting to know how old the birds collared at Nanaimo and encountered in Oregon were when collared.
Wayne
On 8/20/2018 6:42:29 PM, Cody W. Smith <[email protected]> wrote:Harry,
These very well could be from the big collaring project in Nanaimo, BC. Several were harvested on Fern Ridge Lake (and a couple other Willamette Valley locations) during the second week of September 2017, banded the same year. I know personally of 6 harvested last September and 1 other seen. These westerns are migrating south early on and are not all residents. The alternative is the annual banding project on the islands of the Lower Columbia River - I know they banded there this year, but Im not sure if they put on collars.
Cody SmithMolalla, OR
On Aug 20, 2018, at 6:07 PM, Harry Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:

Who's neck-banding our local Canada Geese? Saw group of five likely parents with three young, flying over Carlton, photo but no chance of reading the bands.atowhee.blog/2018/08/20/chipping-in-smoke-all-around/
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: Re: neck-ringed local geese
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 20:42 pm
From: kingsalmon92 AT gmail.com
 
Harry,
These very well could be from the big collaring project in Nanaimo, BC. Several were harvested on Fern Ridge Lake (and a couple other Willamette Valley locations) during the second week of September 2017, banded the same year. I know personally of 6 harvested last September and 1 other seen. These westerns are migrating south early on and are not all residents. The alternative is the annual banding project on the islands of the Lower Columbia River - I know they banded there this year, but Im not sure if they put on collars.
Cody SmithMolalla, OR
On Aug 20, 2018, at 6:07 PM, Harry Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:

Who's neck-banding our local Canada Geese? Saw group of five likely parents with three young, flying over Carlton, photo but no chance of reading the bands.atowhee.blog/2018/08/20/chipping-in-smoke-all-around/
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: neck-ringed local geese
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 20:07 pm
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
Who's neck-banding our local Canada Geese? Saw group of five likely parents with three young, flying over Carlton, photo but no chance of reading the bands.atowhee.blog/2018/08/20/chipping-in-smoke-all-around/
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: South Saddle Mountain (Washington Co)
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 19:32 pm
From: greenfant AT hotmail.com
 
I tried to escape the smoky conditions in the Tualitin Valley today by driving up South Saddle Mountain, the tallest mountain in Washington Co. I encountered even thicker smoke and a lot of work trucks. There essentially were no birds,
except for a Western Bluebird and 4-5 Mountain Quail (at about MP6.5 of Beaver Dam Rd).


Stefan Schlick

Hillsboro, OR



Subject: Re: for anyone interested in helping identify a shorebird
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 19:32 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Bingo. And some very nice pics of it.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com




On Aug 20, 2018, at 5:28 PM, Linda Fink <[email protected]> wrote:http://lindafink-birdnotes.blo...

today, Aug. 20, beach north of Cape Kiwanda, low tide, all by its lonesome

My tentative id is on the basis of wings longer than tail and scaly back pattern, dark legs, and because it looks like the illustration in Sibley's of a juvenile Baird's. Obviously, I'm just guessing.

Linda Fink
--

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: for anyone interested in helping identify a shorebird
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 19:31 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
Yes - it is definitely a Bairds Sandpiper.  The reasons you used in your analysis were sound.


Jeff Gilligan


> On Aug 20, 2018, at 5:28 PM, Linda Fink wrote:
>
> http://lindafink-birdnotes.blo...
>
> today, Aug. 20, beach north of Cape Kiwanda, low tide, all by its lonesome
>
> My tentative id is on the basis of wings longer than tail and scaly back pattern, dark legs, and because it looks like the illustration in Sibley's of a juvenile Baird's. Obviously, I'm just guessing.
>
> Linda Fink
> --
>
> POST: Send your post to [email protected]
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: [email protected]
>

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: for anyone interested in helping identify a shorebird
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 19:29 pm
From: linda AT fink.com
 
http://lindafink-birdnotes.blo...

today, Aug. 20, beach north of Cape Kiwanda, low tide, all by its lonesome

My tentative id is on the basis of wings longer than tail and scaly back
pattern, dark legs, and because it looks like the illustration in
Sibley's of a juvenile Baird's. Obviously, I'm just guessing.

Linda Fink
--

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Fern Ridge Map posted
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 18:36 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Note that the Fern Ridge dike map is available on the OBA web site at:
http://www.orbirds.org/fernrid...
I dont mind sending to people who cant get it off the web.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



Subject: Re: Warbler flock and Western Tanager
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 16:27 pm
From: pjlamberson AT gmail.com
 
Sorry - I live in Lincoln County between Toledo and Siletz
On Mon, Aug 20, 2018, 1:14 PM Steve Jaggers <[email protected]> wrote:



This is a great post regarding fall ish activity...and an example of the value of including location please as some of us might wonder where in Oregon this is happening.

Steve Jaggers
On August 20, 2018 at 12:44 PM Janet and Phil Lamberson <[email protected]> wrote:

I went on a short walk this morning around the neighborhood and enjoyed a mixed flock of warblers (Wilson's, Orange-crowned, Black-throated Gray) moving through, and a Western Tanager enjoying the ripe Cascara berries.



Subject: Re: Warbler flock and Western Tanager
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 15:17 pm
From: sjjag AT comcast.net
 
This is a great post regarding fall ish activity...and an example of the value of including location please as some of us might wonder where in Oregon this is happening.


Steve Jaggers

> On August 20, 2018 at 12:44 PM Janet and Phil Lamberson wrote:
>
> I went on a short walk this morning around the neighborhood and enjoyed a mixed flock of warblers (Wilson's, Orange-crowned, Black-throated Gray) moving through, and a Western Tanager enjoying the ripe Cascara berries.
>



Subject: Re: Vaux’s Swifts in Eugene (and Portland)
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 14:56 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
They are gathering in roosts in Portland now as well.  Late yesterday I saw about 150 circling around in my NE Portland neighborhood.  I dont see which chimney they entered.   There are only a few pairs that nest in the neighborhood.

Jeff Gilligan



POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Warbler flock and Western Tanager
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 14:44 pm
From: pjlamberson AT gmail.com
 
I went on a short walk this morning around the neighborhood and enjoyed a
mixed flock of warblers (Wilson's, Orange-crowned, Black-throated Gray)
moving through, and a Western Tanager enjoying the ripe Cascara berries.



Subject: Fern Ridge shortspur
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 11:59 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
I have been known to turn the car around on a busy state hwy (101 for instance) when I heard a young Cowbird calling in the month of August. Deceit may not be the raison d'etre of Molothrus after, but certainly its modus operandus.lpn



Subject: Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 11:54 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
You absolutely made the right choice in posting it. Way better than doing what one observer did - saved her neighbors photo from the front yard in April until the post-CBC meeting nine months later. Shook it out onto the table for i.d. help. It was a White Wagtail.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



On Aug 20, 2018, at 9:50 AM, Nagi Aboulenein <[email protected]> wrote:OK - overenthusiasm had the day, it appears. Looks like a juvenile Brownheaded Cowbirds tricked both of us (it also managed to trick the Merlin Bird ID app, which didn't even list Cowbird as an option).
Cheers,
Nagi & Taghrid

On Mon, Aug 20, 2018 at 9:31 AM Nagi Aboulenein <[email protected]> wrote:
Hi All -


Second attempt to send this - first attempt last night apparently went into the OBOL bit-bucket due to attachment size. Anyways.

On our way back from another visit to the Sisters area (more on
that later, with photos - we had an amazing half-hour session with a
Black-backed Woodpecker mom + juvenile), we decided to take the long way
home and make a detour through Fern Ridge in Eugene, based on recent
reports of interesting sightings.


While there, we saw what we think may have been a first-winter
Chestnut-collared Longspur - the bird didnt quite fit for Lapland
Longspur based on:

Streaking on the chestAbsence of chest band
Bicolored billLack of Lapland Longspur facial features/markingsThe bird was seen at around 3:30pm today (Aug 19), and it was on
Pond 6 (Pelican Pond), based on Alan Contreras excellent map of the
Fern Ridge ponds, near a log with some grass growing out of it. The bird
stayed around for a few minutes, then flew off. By the time other
birders (Barbara Nolan and Wes?) arrived, it had departed.


Ive attached the best photo I got below (extreme distance, thermal haze made for a low quality photo).


Well happily stand corrected and guilty of overenthusiasm, but we
figured wed put out the photo and let the fun discussions begin :)



Good birding,


Nagi & Taghrid
<Chestnut-collared Longspur - Maybe.jpg>



Subject: Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 11:51 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
I should note that the first time I saw one of these imm. cowbirds I was at the tip of Cape Arago the first week of September. The one I saw was yellower than some. When I saw it my mind had moved on from streaky juvie season to fall vagrant season. I instantly said "WOW it must be a _______ . Im wasn't sure what went in the blank but it must be something from the Big Book of Siberian Pleasure-Finches, right? I crawled through the grass and got some photos. And better looks. Took me a day to figure out what it was.
Be on the outer south coast (or montane lakebeds of the s half of Oregon) in early October and there may well be a Chestnut-collared.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Aug 20, 2018, at 9:31 AM, Nagi Aboulenein <[email protected]> wrote:Hi All -


Second attempt to send this - first attempt last night apparently went into the OBOL bit-bucket due to attachment size. Anyways.

On our way back from another visit to the Sisters area (more on
that later, with photos - we had an amazing half-hour session with a
Black-backed Woodpecker mom + juvenile), we decided to take the long way
home and make a detour through Fern Ridge in Eugene, based on recent
reports of interesting sightings.


While there, we saw what we think may have been a first-winter
Chestnut-collared Longspur - the bird didnt quite fit for Lapland
Longspur based on:

Streaking on the chestAbsence of chest band
Bicolored billLack of Lapland Longspur facial features/markingsThe bird was seen at around 3:30pm today (Aug 19), and it was on
Pond 6 (Pelican Pond), based on Alan Contreras excellent map of the
Fern Ridge ponds, near a log with some grass growing out of it. The bird
stayed around for a few minutes, then flew off. By the time other
birders (Barbara Nolan and Wes?) arrived, it had departed.


Ive attached the best photo I got below (extreme distance, thermal haze made for a low quality photo).


Well happily stand corrected and guilty of overenthusiasm, but we
figured wed put out the photo and let the fun discussions begin :)



Good birding,


Nagi & Taghrid
<Chestnut-collared Longspur - Maybe.jpg>



Subject: Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 11:51 am
From: nagi.aboulenein AT gmail.com
 
OK - overenthusiasm had the day, it appears. Looks like a juvenile
Brownheaded Cowbirds tricked both of us (it also managed to trick the
Merlin Bird ID app, which didn't even list Cowbird as an option).

Cheers,

Nagi & Taghrid

On Mon, Aug 20, 2018 at 9:31 AM Nagi Aboulenein
wrote:

> Hi All -
>
> Second attempt to send this - first attempt last night apparently went
> into the OBOL bit-bucket due to attachment size. Anyways.
>
> On our way back from another visit to the Sisters area (more on that
> later, with photos - we had an amazing half-hour session with a
> Black-backed Woodpecker mom + juvenile), we decided to take the long way
> home and make a detour through Fern Ridge in Eugene, based on recent
> reports of interesting sightings.
>
> While there, we saw what we think may have been a first-winter
> Chestnut-collared Longspur - the bird didnt quite fit for Lapland Longspur
> based on:
>
> - Streaking on the chest
> - Absence of chest band
> - Bicolored bill
> - Lack of Lapland Longspur facial features/markings
>
> The bird was seen at around 3:30pm today (Aug 19), and it was on Pond 6
> (Pelican Pond), based on Alan Contreras excellent map of the Fern Ridge
> ponds, near a log with some grass growing out of it. The bird stayed around
> for a few minutes, then flew off. By the time other birders (Barbara Nolan
> and Wes?) arrived, it had departed.
>
> Ive attached the best photo I got below (extreme distance, thermal haze
> made for a low quality photo).
>
> Well happily stand corrected and guilty of overenthusiasm, but we figured
> wed put out the photo and let the fun discussions begin :)
>
> Good birding,
>
> Nagi & Taghrid
>
> [image: Chestnut-collared Longspur - Maybe.jpg]
>



Subject: Re: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 11:36 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
I think this is a nasty juvie cowbird. They get identified as all kinds of things. Imm longspur would have a very small bill and a heavy face pattern.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Aug 20, 2018, at 9:31 AM, Nagi Aboulenein <[email protected]> wrote:Hi All -


Second attempt to send this - first attempt last night apparently went into the OBOL bit-bucket due to attachment size. Anyways.

On our way back from another visit to the Sisters area (more on
that later, with photos - we had an amazing half-hour session with a
Black-backed Woodpecker mom + juvenile), we decided to take the long way
home and make a detour through Fern Ridge in Eugene, based on recent
reports of interesting sightings.


While there, we saw what we think may have been a first-winter
Chestnut-collared Longspur - the bird didnt quite fit for Lapland
Longspur based on:

Streaking on the chestAbsence of chest band
Bicolored billLack of Lapland Longspur facial features/markingsThe bird was seen at around 3:30pm today (Aug 19), and it was on
Pond 6 (Pelican Pond), based on Alan Contreras excellent map of the
Fern Ridge ponds, near a log with some grass growing out of it. The bird
stayed around for a few minutes, then flew off. By the time other
birders (Barbara Nolan and Wes?) arrived, it had departed.


Ive attached the best photo I got below (extreme distance, thermal haze made for a low quality photo).


Well happily stand corrected and guilty of overenthusiasm, but we
figured wed put out the photo and let the fun discussions begin :)



Good birding,


Nagi & Taghrid
<Chestnut-collared Longspur - Maybe.jpg>



Subject: Potential RBA - Fern Ridge - Chestnut-collared Longspur
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 11:32 am
From: nagi.aboulenein AT gmail.com
 
Hi All -

Second attempt to send this - first attempt last night apparently went into
the OBOL bit-bucket due to attachment size. Anyways.

On our way back from another visit to the Sisters area (more on that later,
with photos - we had an amazing half-hour session with a Black-backed
Woodpecker mom + juvenile), we decided to take the long way home and make a
detour through Fern Ridge in Eugene, based on recent reports of interesting
sightings.

While there, we saw what we think may have been a first-winter
Chestnut-collared Longspur - the bird didnt quite fit for Lapland Longspur
based on:

- Streaking on the chest
- Absence of chest band
- Bicolored bill
- Lack of Lapland Longspur facial features/markings

The bird was seen at around 3:30pm today (Aug 19), and it was on Pond 6
(Pelican Pond), based on Alan Contreras excellent map of the Fern Ridge
ponds, near a log with some grass growing out of it. The bird stayed around
for a few minutes, then flew off. By the time other birders (Barbara Nolan
and Wes?) arrived, it had departed.

Ive attached the best photo I got below (extreme distance, thermal haze
made for a low quality photo).

Well happily stand corrected and guilty of overenthusiasm, but we figured
wed put out the photo and let the fun discussions begin :)

Good birding,

Nagi & Taghrid

[image: Chestnut-collared Longspur - Maybe.jpg]



Subject: Townsend's Solitaire near Newport OR
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 10:36 am
From: horvath AT pioneer.net
 
Hi OBOL, yesterday 19 August I found a Townsends Solitaire in Lincoln County, inland from Ona Beach.     Solitaires do not occur every year in Lincoln County.
Directions, from Newport, OR travel south on highway 101 to Brian Booth State Park (aka Ona Beach). Turn left on Beaver Creek Road. Go 1 mile E and turn left onto North Beaver Creek road. Go another 2 or 3 miles to Elkhorn Road, and turn Right. Stay on Elkhorn road for 6 miles to where the road makes a T junction and there is a brown sign indicating directions to Horse Creek Trail of the Drift Creek Wilderness. Park at the T junction and the solitaire was calling repeatedly in the heavily thinned (very open) forest here. Eek.Eek.Eek.
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Fwd: Aplodontia
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 0:20 am
From: gneavoll AT comcast.net
 
Yes, congrats! Ive only seen two Mountain Beavers (Aplodontia), one hanging limp in the jaws of a Mink at Fernhill Wetlands, the other dead on a forest trail in the Coast Range (Washington County). Im always looking for one - alive.
George NeavollS.W. Portland
Begin forwarded message:From: Pamela Johnston <[email protected]>
Subject: [obol] Aplodontia
Date: August 19, 2018 at 10:05:17 PM PDT
To: OBOL <[email protected]>
Reply-To: [email protected]

Congratulations, John! That is one elusive critter. I saw one in 1986 or so on the Larch Mtn trail above Multnomah Falls. My friend and I stood in amazement as the homely little thing shuffled off. An animal, like a gopher, built for a life spent underground.
There's a reason why we watch birds - you stand a good chance of seeing them.
Pamela Johnston



Subject: Malheur Plumbeous Vireos etc. 8/16-8/19
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 0:10 am
From: noah.strycker AT gmail.com
 
Hi birders,
I spent a long weekend hiking and camping with my dad around Malheur and Steens. There was so much smoke and haze, especially in the Fields/Alvord areas, you could stare straight at the sun two hours before sunset. Conditions were very dry - not a drop of water at the Narrows or many other places.
We still encountered about 140 species of birds around Harney County and had a great hike up Big Indian Gorge on Friday, and up Pike Creek Canyon on Saturday.

Most unexpected was a territorial pair of PLUMBEOUS VIREOS occupying Page Springs Campground on Friday (17 Aug), mostly in the junipers between sites #20-25 in the campground loop. One individual spent at least a couple of weeks singing in this exact spot last August - so it looks like that male has returned and found a mate in 2018! This year's singing bird even has tail molt in the same pattern as it did last year. "Birds of Oregon: A General Reference" lists only one previous record of a territorial pair of Plumbeous Vireos in Oregon, which were observed near Lakeview in July 1996. I followed these ones around for a while and saw no sign of nesting, but they seemed to be settled in. There are reports of single Plumbeous Vireos almost every year in southeast Oregon, but they are rarely documented - in fact the Oregon Bird Records Committee has only accepted eight state records.
Some photos of both birds from Friday are here:
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

And here are pictures of the solo male from August 16, 2017, one year and a day before:
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


Otherwise, we found no rarities but plenty of fun birds. Malheur doesn't get birded much in August but is quite active this time of year. Here are some other highlights:
SNOW GOOSE - 1 at Hwy 205 substation pond on 8/16 (photo)WOOD DUCK - 3 along the north Center Patrol Road on 8/16HOODED MERGANSER - 1 at Chickahominy Reservoir on 8/19CHUKAR - 7 at Steens East Rim on 8/17 and 50+ in Pike Creek Canyon on 8/18GREATER SAGE-GROUSE - 5 on Steens road above Fish Lake on 8/17 (photo)SNOWY PLOVER - 17 at Alvord Hot Springs on 8/18MARBLED GODWIT - 2 at Chickahominy Reservoir on 8/19BAIRD'S SANDPIPER - Seen in several places, ones and twosRED-NECKED PHALAROPE - 510 was a high count at the Burns S.P. on 8/19SNOWY EGRET - 1 at Buena Vista on 8/16RED-SHOULDERED HAWK - 1 at HQ on 8/16, 1 at Roaring Springs on 8/17PEREGRINE FALCON - Strafing shorebirds at Alvord Hot Springs on 8/18OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER - 1 at Page Springs on 8/17DUSKY FLYCATCHER - A migrant at HQ on 8/16 and 8/18 (photo)ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER - 1 at Sage Hen Hill Rest Area on 8/19EASTERN KINGBIRD - Several still hanging around HQ and Page SpringsBANK SWALLOW - Huge numbers, second most common swallow after BarnBLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER - 1.5 miles up Big Indian Gorge on 8/17 (photo)BLACK ROSY-FINCH - Distant views at Steens East Rim on 8/17SAGEBRUSH SPARROW - 1 with a sparrow flock at Chickahominy on 8/19LINCOLN'S SPARROW - An early migrant at Fields on 8/18NASHVILLE WARBLER - 2 in Big Indian Gorge on 8/17TOWNSEND'S WARBLER - 1 at HQ on 8/18
Good birding,
Noah Strycker and Bob Keefer



Subject: Aplodontia
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 0:06 am
From: shovzan AT gmail.com
 
Congratulations, John! That is one elusive critter. I saw one in 1986 or so on the Larch Mtn trail above Multnomah Falls. My friend and I stood in amazement as the homely little thing shuffled off. An animal, like a gopher, built for a life spent underground.
There's a reason why we watch birds - you stand a good chance of seeing them.
Pamela Johnston



Subject: Vaux’s Swifts in Eugene
Date: Mon Aug 20 2018 0:05 am
From: bcombs232 AT gmail.com
 
I visited an alternate Vauxs Swift roost site tonight - the Smith Family Bookstore.I counted 345 swifts entering that chimney. Last year on August 19, I counted 1163 entering the chimney at Agate Hall.Fluctuations are expected, so I dont think any conclusions can be drawn from the comparison.There may well be other alternate roost sites. In this weather, many might even be roostingin trees. I have seen some do that on a balmy evening in the Pioneer Cemetery near Agate Hall.I will continue checking the bookstore roost this season.
Thank you to everyone who privided comments on where the swifts might be. I would still like to know whether there are more roost sites in the Eugene area, and where they are.

--
Barbara Combs obie '70
Lane County, OR



Subject: Blair Lake, Lane Co.
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 23:03 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
Hello All,
Laura and I set out to hike the Blair Lake to Mule Mt Trail today, but found the trail closed due to an active fire in the area. We hiked / bushwhacked our way around the lake instead. A pair of LINCOLNS SPARROWS acting nesty this late in the season was interesting. Apair ofDUSKY FLYCATCHERS were also nearby. ANASHVILLE WARBLER along withmanyORANGE-CROWNS,YELLOW-RUMPS andTOWNSENDS WARBLERS werearound the lake.No Green-tailed Towhee sightingsto report.
The highlight of the day came on our drive down from the lake when an APLODONTIAaka Sewellel,Mountain Beaver or Boomer skuttled across the road in front of us dragging a largebundle of ferns and grasses to its burrow.We were close and got a brief but spectacularlook at thisLifer Mammalfor both of us! We never expected to see this strange creature during the day, but thePetersonmammal guide says they are sometimes active during the day, especiallyin late summer.There were many drag-marks across the dusty road from recent activityandwell-worn paths to several entrances to amaze of burrowsjust off the side of the road. Very cool.
Good Birding and Mammaling!
John Sullivan & Laura JohnsonSpringfield, OR


Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com



Subject: Re: Pelagic Cormorant Feeding Chick Photo Sequence
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 17:54 pm
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
I'll go with Kelp Greenling
Bob Archer
On Sun, Aug 19, 2018 at 3:16 PM, Roger Freeman <[email protected]> wrote:
Cool photo sequence! Someone care to venture a guess on the fish ID in shots 3-4?Roger Freeman
On Sun, Aug 19, 2018 at 7:39 AM Jim Leonard <[email protected]> wrote:


I was recently at Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach and photographed a Pelagic Cormorant on its nest feeding one of its three chicks. Photo sequence shows the chick putting its whole head down the parents mouth and throat and pulling out a fish to eat. Photos by Jim Leonard.Click on link below.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Hyyr...



Subject: Pelagic Cormorant Feeding Chick Photo Sequence
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 17:17 pm
From: freemanbecard AT gmail.com
 
Cool photo sequence! Someone care to venture a guess on the fish ID in shots 3-4?Roger Freeman
On Sun, Aug 19, 2018 at 7:39 AM Jim Leonard <[email protected]> wrote:


I was recently at Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach and photographed a Pelagic Cormorant on its nest feeding one of its three chicks. Photo sequence shows the chick putting its whole head down the parents mouth and throat and pulling out a fish to eat. Photos by Jim Leonard.Click on link below.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Hyyr...



Subject: Are you going to the OBA conference?
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 16:42 pm
From: kaifrueh2 AT gmail.com
 
Hi everyone,
My brother Ben and I both received scholarships to OBA's annual meeting in Garibaldi from September 28-30, and they have asked for someone who is attending the meeting to be a point person for us. As minors (we are 13 and 15 years old and very responsible), OBA requires an adult at the meeting to be responsible for them. Our mom will take us and will be staying at the RV park where the conference is held, but she isn't a birder so doesn't want to attend. I would really appreciate you considering being our point person, and get back with me.
If you would like to contact my mom (Kerstin) you can reach her at [email protected] or call or text her at 541-730-3817.
Thanks a lot, I really appreciate it.
Kai FruehCorvallis, OR



Subject: Shorebird Festival Lodging Going Quickly
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 15:18 pm
From: ninerharv2 AT msn.com
 
Good Afternoon


Just an alert to all who were contemplating dorm lodging for this year's Oregon Shorebird Festival, be aware that our supply is dwindling rapidly. We have no more rooms with two beds and about a half-dozen rooms
with a single bed. We will put you on a waiting list at your request as cancelations may occur.



Join both advanced and beginning birders alike on the Southern Oregon coast on September 21-23rd for the 32ndt Oregon Shorebird Festival.
The festival, housed at the Oregon Institute for Marine Biology in Charleston, is a celebration of Oregon shorebirds and an educational experience, with field trips, talks, bird watching, and shared meals. On-line registration for the event is now open at
www.oregonshorebirdfestival.org.








Home

www.oregonshorebirdfestival.org

32nd Annual Oregon Shorebird Festival Learn More





Harv Schubothe



Subject: Re: Vaux’s Swifts - Eugene Area - Where are they?
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 15:00 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
No idea of roost site but at least 20 are loosely hanging over the Churchill shopping center on Bailey Hill right up til dusk. Maybe there is a chimnet there, at the LDS site or the nearby grade school?


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Aug 19, 2018, at 12:57 PM, Barbara Combs <[email protected]> wrote:Last night I counted only one Vauxs Swift entering the chimney at Agate Hall. It left the chimney almost immediately. Last week there were about a dozen in the area, though none entered the chimney. A nice-sized flock was recently reported in the area near the pioneer cemetery, about one long block away. By now I expected that at least some swifts would be using the Agate Hall chimney. Other prime swift locations in Western Oregon are tallying numbers in the hundreds.
Where are the Eugene area swifts roosting? Smith Family Bookstore? The old Sacred Heart hospital building? Another location that needs to be discoverd? The search is on. Any clues as to their whereabouts would be greatly appreciated.--
Barbara Combs obie '70
Lane County, OR



Subject: Vaux’s Swifts - Eugene Area - Where are they?
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 14:58 pm
From: bcombs232 AT gmail.com
 
Last night I counted only one Vauxs Swift entering the chimney at Agate Hall. It left the chimney almost immediately. Last week there were about a dozen in the area, though none entered the chimney. A nice-sized flock was recently reported in the area near the pioneer cemetery, about one long block away. By now I expected that at least some swifts would be using the Agate Hall chimney. Other prime swift locations in Western Oregon are tallying numbers in the hundreds.
Where are the Eugene area swifts roosting? Smith Family Bookstore? The old Sacred Heart hospital building? Another location that needs to be discoverd? The search is on. Any clues as to their whereabouts would be greatly appreciated.--
Barbara Combs obie '70
Lane County, OR



Subject: Washington Co. bluebirds
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 13:38 pm
From: lona.pierce AT centurylink.net
 
A flock of approx. 50 W. BLUEBIRDS was foraging and flying across Highway 6 between Timber and Glenwood on August 15 near Gales Creek. This is secondhand info from Randy Bergman who was driving through and stopped when he saw them. He also saw a large flock of about 100 WHITE PELICANS in early August west of Clatskanie, feeding in a mitigation wetland built by the Port of Portland.
My yard in Warren just north of Scappoose: Anna's and rufous hummers not keen on sharing the feeder or flowers with each other. Two families of Calif quail are regulars, and a young W. tanager has been in the yard the last couple of days. Cooper's have been visiting a lot lately too. Pollinators: lots of bumblebees and various small native bees in my yard, with a handful of skippers and tiger swallowtails, but very few honeybees.
Lona Pierce



Subject: Re: Lake Abert Shorebird Count
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 10:54 am
From: gismiller AT gmail.com
 
Thanks Wayne for putting this into historical context.
I have seen evidence of Franklin's Gulls breeding in the Warner Valley for several years. The birds at Lake Abert suggests a new, very successful breeding season in the Chewaucan marsh southwest of Lake Abert.
Craig MillerBend
On Sat, Aug 18, 2018, 7:52 PM Wayne Hoffman <[email protected]> wrote:

Hi, Craig -
Franklin's Gulls were unknown in Oregon when Gabrielson and Jewett published their Birds of Oregon (published 1940 but data collection pretty much ended in 1035). Oregon's first record was of birds found nesting in about 1940 at Malheur NWR. Since then they nested there annually, and individuals have been found here and there around the state, but the Malheur colony was the only known nesting site west of the Rockies until after 2000. What I have just described was the status as of the publication of BOGR in 2003. Since then they colonized the Klamath Basin, and there seems to be a colony there most years, sometimes in California, sometimes in Oregon. I think it takes quite a few together (maybe 100+) for the social stimulation to actually nest.
Anyway, since that expansion happerend they have been much more frequent as visitors west of the Cascades, and some years I see them in numbers at Summer Lake and in the marshes along Chewaucan River.
So, I suspect your numbers at Abert Lake reflect larger SE Oregon populations than were the case before the expansion into the Klamath country.
Wayne


On 8/17/2018 9:45:52 PM, Craig Miller <[email protected]> wrote:I conducted a shorebird count at Lake Abert a week ago (August 11). There were still good numbers of birds, although not nearly as many Wilson's Phalaropes as a month ago. Perhaps most impressive were the 442 Franklin's Gulls scattered along the entire east shore. This species was relatively rare a decade ago. Other highlights include:
Eared Grebe - 2,730Sandhill Crane - 5Black-necked Stilt - 400American Avocet - 2,120Killdeer - 11Baird's Sandpiper - 4Least Sandpiper - 26Western Sandpiper - 235Long-billed Dowitcher - 29Wilson's Phalarope - 2,778Red-necked Phalarope - 645Greater Yellowlegs - 1Willet - 5Ring-billed Gull - 208California Gull - 1,042White-faced Ibis - 5Peregrine Falcon - 2
Cheers,
Craig MillerBend



Subject: Lake Abert Franklin's Gulls
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 10:01 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
There were dozens, perhaps scores, of Franklin's Gulls at the mouth of the
Chewaucan the first weekend of June this year.



Subject: Re: juncos
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 9:45 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
This is the kind of observation that makes me love Obol. For years the Dog Days were something of a burden to me. The dawn chorus of spring falls away rapidly across July. Early morning in August can feel so ominous. I suspect the songbirds see it quite differently--abundant food, Clement weather, the days are still long, but no longer the hideous press of squalling nestlings. All over Europe children are back in the classroom. Across mid-latitude America I imagine millions of birds shifting gears.lpn
On Sat, Aug 18, 2018, 1:26 PM Alan Contreras <[email protected]> wrote:
A fledged young junco was in my birdbath in west Eugene today, the first junco since spring. They do nest just upslope here (and once in the yard) so this is probably local talent, but I thought Id mention it anyway.
An interesting phenomenon is that a number of birds started checking the sites of my feeders this week. I dont feed in summer but these birds clearly think its time I started for the season. Of note is that the species that showed up are quite varied: Downy, Rb Nuthatch, American Goldfinch, BC Chick and Bushtit. None of these so much as noticed the feeder spots (or empty suet feeders) since May, then all of them did in about five days.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



Subject: Pelagic Cormorant Feeding Chick Photo Sequence
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 9:39 am
From: photojleonard AT gmail.com
 
I was recently at Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach and photographed a Pelagic Cormorant on its nest feeding one of its three chicks. Photo sequence shows the chick putting its whole head down the parents mouth and throat and pulling out a fish to eat. Photos by Jim Leonard.Click on link below.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Hyyr...



Subject: Re: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 9:17 am
From: shovelor AT gmail.com
 
My thoughts exactly. 2018 Pigeon bands are green.

Sent from my iPhone
On Aug 18, 2018, at 9:39 PM, carol speegle <[email protected]> wrote:

Sounds like it may have been a racing pigeon. Here is a contact.WILLAMETTE RPCClub Code:WPCSecretary:PETE JORGENSONCity:JUNCTION CITYState:ORPhone #:541-912-6183Email:[email protected]



Subject: Re: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sun Aug 19 2018 0:05 am
From: cbreseangela AT gmail.com
 
I am curious if this goshawk is the same bird reported as being a lost falconry bird with jesses on that was reported earlier today on a falconry forum? Any chance there is a photo of the gos?
Thanks
Angela

Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S8 Active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "DOUGLAS BEALL(Redacted sender "wizbang_98_99" for DMARC)" Date: 8/18/18 6:23 PM (GMT-08:00) To: [email protected], Karl Schneck Cc: Dennis Vroman , OBOL Subject: [obol] Re: BIRD BANDS

Some confusion, it was the dove that was banded






On Saturday, August 18, 2018, 6:01:33 PM PDT, Karl Schneck wrote:





How do you band agoshawk? Sounds dangerous... a Golden Eagle would be easier, I would think.Karl Schneck

"As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but nature's sources never fail." John Muir


On Sat, Aug 18, 2018 at 5:44 PM Nels Nelson wrote:
https://ibo.boisestate.edu/con...
https://ibo.boisestate.edu/blo...
In addition to what Dennis recommends (which I totally agree with and is where I always start when finding a banded bird), you may want to contact the Intermountain Bird Observatory at Boise State (see above links). They have a LOT of good information on goshawks and other raptors.
If you don't find the info. you are looking for regarding this particular leg band, contact me off line (via my personal email) and I can put you in contact with a biologist who is (and has been for the past 5 years) monitoring and studying No. Goshawks in a national forest in eastern Oregon.
Nels Nelson

On Sat, Aug 18, 2018 at 5:31 PM, wrote:

Go to the BBL report band sight and follow the directions:https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/...
Dennis



On 2018-08-18 17:08, DOUGLAS BEALL wrote:


Juvenile Goshawk dined on a Eurasian collared Dove this morning and it had a plastic lime green leg band which read WPC 3647. Does anyone know who the band belongs to so I can report it -thanks




Virus-free. www.avg.com



Subject: Goodies from a Fern Ridge Portland Audubon trip (Lane Co)
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 22:48 pm
From: greenfant AT hotmail.com
 
Our 9 Portland Audubon Birding Day folks got to Fern Ridge at about 8:20am this morning when we met up with Rebecca and Johns Lane County Audubon group. We stayed in sync the whole morning and both got to see a very similar set of birds.
Thanks to the sharp eyes from both groups! It was fun!


Highlights were:


Stilt Sandpiper - 1 (continuing adult)

Solitary Sandpiper 1

Semipalmated Sandpiper 2

Bairds Sandpiper 1 (only)

Bank Swallow 1

Yellow-headed Blackbird 1

Black-crowned Night-heron 1

Black Tern 2

Caspian Tern - 2


Both Clarks and Western Grebes were at Perkins Peninsula Park. We also found the Trumpeter Swans at Forcia and Larsen Reservoir.


Stefan Schlick

Hillsboro, OR



Subject: Re: Lake Abert Shorebird Count
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 21:52 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Hi, Craig -
Franklin's Gulls were unknown in Oregon when Gabrielson and Jewett published their Birds of Oregon (published 1940 but data collection pretty much ended in 1035). Oregon's first record was of birds found nesting in about 1940 at Malheur NWR. Since then they nested there annually, and individuals have been found here and there around the state, but the Malheur colony was the only known nesting site west of the Rockies until after 2000. What I have just described was the status as of the publication of BOGR in 2003. Since then they colonized the Klamath Basin, and there seems to be a colony there most years, sometimes in California, sometimes in Oregon. I think it takes quite a few together (maybe 100+) for the social stimulation to actually nest.
Anyway, since that expansion happerend they have been much more frequent as visitors west of the Cascades, and some years I see them in numbers at Summer Lake and in the marshes along Chewaucan River.
So, I suspect your numbers at Abert Lake reflect larger SE Oregon populations than were the case before the expansion into the Klamath country.
Wayne


On 8/17/2018 9:45:52 PM, Craig Miller <[email protected]> wrote:I conducted a shorebird count at Lake Abert a week ago (August 11). There were still good numbers of birds, although not nearly as many Wilson's Phalaropes as a month ago. Perhaps most impressive were the 442 Franklin's Gulls scattered along the entire east shore. This species was relatively rare a decade ago. Other highlights include:
Eared Grebe - 2,730Sandhill Crane - 5Black-necked Stilt - 400American Avocet - 2,120Killdeer - 11Baird's Sandpiper - 4Least Sandpiper - 26Western Sandpiper - 235Long-billed Dowitcher - 29Wilson's Phalarope - 2,778Red-necked Phalarope - 645Greater Yellowlegs - 1Willet - 5Ring-billed Gull - 208California Gull - 1,042White-faced Ibis - 5Peregrine Falcon - 2
Cheers,
Craig MillerBend



Subject: New Yard Bird - Song Sparrow
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 21:51 pm
From: jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com
 
We just had avery unusual Song Sparrow briefly visit ourbirdbath - gray upperparts with jet-black bilateral throat stripes.
Jack WilliamsonWest Linn, Oregon



Subject: Re: juncos
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 21:35 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
We had a male Wilsons Warbler wander into our yard and briefly check out our hummer feeder yesterday, a first for this species at our feeders?! We live in town in Coos Bay in habitat this species does not frequent. Anyhow out in the Coast Range where I have been working the past couple of weeks every Chickadee flock I have encountered has also had multiple BTG and Wilsons Warblers. Everybody is moving! Yesterday on my way home in Coast Range east of Myrtle Point, Coos I had to open a gate after passing through private clearcuts around 1 PM. Had a nighthawk calling overhead. I often hear nighthawks around noon time in August in the Coast Range in Coos (have for 20+ yrs). Nothing in the early AM or late PM, it is the lunch bell for me! Within two weeks I will not hear nighthawks in the Coast Range until next June (the same pattern I have noticed over the yrs- I am out most days this time of year).
No GC Sparrows here but juncoes and WC Sparrows are common summer breeders in and around Coos Bay so no surprise seeing lots of them now.
Merry migration!Tim RCoos Bay
On Sat, Aug 18, 2018 at 1:26 PM Alan Contreras <[email protected]> wrote:
A fledged young junco was in my birdbath in west Eugene today, the first junco since spring. They do nest just upslope here (and once in the yard) so this is probably local talent, but I thought Id mention it anyway.
An interesting phenomenon is that a number of birds started checking the sites of my feeders this week. I dont feed in summer but these birds clearly think its time I started for the season. Of note is that the species that showed up are quite varied: Downy, Rb Nuthatch, American Goldfinch, BC Chick and Bushtit. None of these so much as noticed the feeder spots (or empty suet feeders) since May, then all of them did in about five days.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



Subject: Re: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 20:49 pm
From: keschneckdds AT gmail.com
 
I was wondering which bird you were referring to as banded, but it seemed obvious that it would not be the dove... another lesson for me to not make assumptions.Karl Schneck

"As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but nature's sources never fail." John Muir


On Sat, Aug 18, 2018 at 6:27 PM Bill Shanahan <[email protected]> wrote:
I didn't know anybody was banding Eurasian collared doves...



Subject: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 20:40 pm
From: teacher4now AT gmail.com
 
Sounds like it may have been a racing pigeon. Here is a contact.WILLAMETTE RPCClub Code:WPCSecretary:PETE JORGENSONCity:JUNCTION CITYState:ORPhone #:541-912-6183Email:[email protected]



Subject: Re: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 20:27 pm
From: iamshanahan AT gmail.com
 
I didn't know anybody was banding Eurasian collared doves...



Subject: Re: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 19:44 pm
From: nelsnelson7 AT gmail.com
 
https://ibo.boisestate.edu/con...
https://ibo.boisestate.edu/blo...
In addition to what Dennis recommends (which I totally agree with and is where I always start when finding a banded bird), you may want to contact the Intermountain Bird Observatory at Boise State (see above links). They have a LOT of good information on goshawks and other raptors.
If you don't find the info. you are looking for regarding this particular leg band, contact me off line (via my personal email) and I can put you in contact with a biologist who is (and has been for the past 5 years) monitoring and studying No. Goshawks in a national forest in eastern Oregon.
Nels Nelson

On Sat, Aug 18, 2018 at 5:31 PM, <[email protected]> wrote:

Go to the BBL report band sight and follow the directions:https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/...
Dennis



On 2018-08-18 17:08, DOUGLAS BEALL wrote:


Juvenile Goshawk dined on a Eurasian collared Dove this morning and it had a plastic lime green leg band which read WPC 3647. Does anyone know who the band belongs to so I can report it -thanks




Virus-free. www.avg.com



Subject: Re: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 19:31 pm
From: dpvroman AT budget.net
 
Go to the BBL report band sight and follow the directions:https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/...
Dennis



On 2018-08-18 17:08, DOUGLAS BEALL wrote:


Juvenile Goshawk dined on a Eurasian collared Dove this morning and it had a plastic lime green leg band which read WPC 3647. Does anyone know who the band belongs to so I can report it -thanks




Virus-free. www.avg.com



Subject: BIRD BANDS
Date: Sat Aug 18 2018 19:09 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
Juvenile Goshawk dined on a Eurasian collared Dove this morning and it had a plastic lime green leg band which read WPC 3647. Does anyone know who the band belongs to so I can report it -thanks

| | Virus-free. www.avg.com |


American Birding Podcast







ABA's FREE Birder's Guide. Get the most recent issue now >>




Contact us.