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Updated on June 21, 2018, 5:30 am

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21 Jun: @ 05:27:38  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [Paul Sullivan]
21 Jun: @ 05:03:55  Jeff county, ECAS Wednesday birders visited Green Ridge springs [jmeredit]
21 Jun: @ 04:00:58  Common Nighthawk Silverton OR, Marion county [Roger Freeman]
21 Jun: @ 03:06:40  OBA Field Trip - Haystack Rock/Cannon Beach [Ken Chamberlain]
21 Jun: @ 01:34:06  more on skua [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
20 Jun: @ 22:48:07  family album of Great Gray Owls in Jackson County [Harry Fuller]
20 Jun: @ 21:42:37  Re: Coastal Nighthawks [dawn v]
20 Jun: @ 20:52:41  Santiam Pass road-shoulder hazard warning [Joel Geier]
20 Jun: @ 20:44:13  Another common nighthawk report [Jeff Dillon]
20 Jun: @ 17:20:42  Re: Common Nighthawk Washington County Jackson Bottom [Steve Engel]
20 Jun: @ 15:46:24  nighthawks [Linda Fink]
20 Jun: @ 05:59:08  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [Caleb Centanni]
20 Jun: @ 05:08:40  Re: Coastal Nighthawks [Ken Chamberlain]
20 Jun: @ 05:03:42  Re: Coastal Nighthawks [James Billstine]
20 Jun: @ 04:45:10  Re: Skua video [David Bailey]
20 Jun: @ 01:43:42  Ash-throated fly [Joshua Galpern]
20 Jun: @ 01:06:06  Birding doldrums? What? This is the best time of year for birding! [Joel Geier]
19 Jun: @ 23:56:51  Re: Skua video [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
19 Jun: @ 23:55:10  Skua video [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
19 Jun: @ 23:27:08  Mountain Bluebird nesting in Santiam Pass area, Linn Co. [Joel Geier]
19 Jun: @ 20:48:27  How should Oregon birders organize? [Zack Schlanger]
19 Jun: @ 18:42:13  surprising monster on the beach at New River Coos Cty [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
19 Jun: @ 14:32:06  Kvetching like it's February... [Mike Patterson]
19 Jun: @ 13:34:15  Photo Collection American Bittern Baskett Slough NWR [Jim Leonard]
19 Jun: @ 06:07:55  Bird Spoken Here [Linda Fink]
19 Jun: @ 04:22:41  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [Paul Sullivan]
19 Jun: @ 03:29:50  Re: Books [Alan Contreras]
19 Jun: @ 03:28:01  Books [dawn v]
19 Jun: @ 00:53:41  Re: Lincoln Calif. Quail, close to Hwy 20, Jun 16, 2018 [Lars Norgren]
19 Jun: @ 00:31:20  Lincoln Calif. Quail, close to Hwy 20, Jun 16, 2018 [Jamie Simmons]
19 Jun: @ 00:20:03  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
18 Jun: @ 21:40:28  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [Diane Cavaness]
18 Jun: @ 21:28:10  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [Alan Contreras]
18 Jun: @ 15:08:07  A quick note about OBA membership counts [dawn v]
18 Jun: @ 04:15:27  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [David Irons]
18 Jun: @ 03:22:08  California grouse, not too far from Oregon border in Siskiyou County [Harry Fuller]
17 Jun: @ 23:38:31  No Vesper Sparrows detected at Mima Mounds (Thurston Co., Washington) this morning [Joel Geier]
17 Jun: @ 23:18:45  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [Treesa Hertzel]
17 Jun: @ 22:06:10  Scio Breeding Bird Survey on 6/16 (Linn & Marion Co.) [Joel Geier]
17 Jun: @ 20:09:56  Re: Fwd: Smith Rock raptors and a big surprise [Michelle & Kim Kathol]
17 Jun: @ 20:09:10  Re: How should Oregon birders organize? [David Irons]
17 Jun: @ 19:45:24  Nightjar Surveys [Jordan Epstein]
17 Jun: @ 19:27:44  Malheur Hdqtrs BLUE JAY [Shawneen Finnegan]
17 Jun: @ 17:46:14  Lane C. swans [Alan Contreras]
17 Jun: @ 05:38:07  Re: Green tailed towhee [David Vick]
17 Jun: @ 00:51:32  Fwd: Smith Rock raptors and a big surprise [David Vick]
16 Jun: @ 23:42:01  Coos Redheads 6/16/18 [Tim Rodenkirk]
16 Jun: @ 23:33:19  Fwd: Re: Warbler Song Help [Tim Rodenkirk]
16 Jun: @ 21:23:17  Re: Warbler Song Help [Joshua Galpern]
16 Jun: @ 21:04:54  Re: Warbler Song Help [Roger Freeman]





Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Thu Jun 21 2018 5:27 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Folks,

I am pleased by the response that this topic has generated and the
participation of voices from multiple viewpoints.

I am also saddened. Saddened that the prime thing that I have wanted for
the last 16 years, namely to get the publication Oregon Birds back to what
it was, has been so quickly dismissed as impossible, wishful thinking, a
bygone thing. It was something I loved, something I worked hard on,
something I hoped to see continue into the future in a form that would reach
a wider audience. Then it kinda fell apart and I couldn't stop it.

I'd like to make one small plea to those who say that that day has passed,
that you can't get authors to write. I subscribe to the journals of the
Minnesota Ornithologists Union and the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology.
They both still produce a quarterly publication with statewide seasonal
field notes. It can be done if people have the will. Can't get writers?
Look at all the folks who blog. Writing for publication simply requires
that one takes a little more time to revise, rewrite, and polish that blog
you dashed off in a short time. At a minimum, seasonal field notes take 4
writers, one for each season, or it can be done by a committee, dividing up
the species. The way Oregon Birds has been produced has asked the editors
to wrangle multiple authors, each issue. Herding cats. I do commend those
who have done the work, but the system has been quite complicated.

In our discussion of Field Notes we have focused on the narrative style of
telling the story of what we saw. That's like writing a letter about your
year. "We went here and saw this, etc..." We celebrate the good finds and
give credit to the birders who found them.
But I believe that published Field Notes are also an archived record of what
species (and how many, how distributed) were seen in the state during this
time. It's there for future researchers. That's why I advocate a format
that includes all the species, common and rare. If we only talk about the
good rare birds we found, we won't track the decline or increase of abundant
species.

Another strand in the thread of this discussion has been "how do we attract
younger birders?" Plenty of good ideas there.

But I want to also include this strand: "how do we not leave senior birders
behind?" I see folks who aren't digitally savvy dropping out. Left in the
dust. All the discussion about the new hardware and software goes over our
gray heads.

I disagree with the idea that eBird is simple and libraries are complicated.
Not for me and my generation.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to this discussion. I hope this
will help the OBA board make decisions going forward.

Paul Sullivan

--------------------
[obol] Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Readingthediscussiononthisthreadsinceyesterdaysuggestsamore
quantifiedversionofwhatIandothershavesuggestedaboutoutreach,
publications,andthefutureoforganizationintheOregonbirding
community.

ThankssomuchtoPaulforstartingthisdiscussion,whichhasbroughtup
somanygoodideas.Andalsothankstoeveryonewho'dparticipatedinthe
discussionforsharingideas,it'sbeenveryinterestingtoread.I'mglad
wehaveourcommunityasitisnow,whateveritwasinthepastand
whateveritbecomesinthefuture.

Bestwishesandgoodbirding!

CalebCentanni


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Subject: Jeff county, ECAS Wednesday birders visited Green Ridge springs
Date: Thu Jun 21 2018 5:03 am
From: jmeredit AT bendnet.com
 
Always difficult to leave Whiskey Springs but we eventually got to Bear
and Thorn Springs today. Our group was a perfect size and a nice mix of
birders to enjoy being tucked away together with the birds.
We didn't have "all" of our warblers but we had excellent and repeated
views of Black-throated Gray. Hermit and Townsend's - like warblers did
not stay in view long enough for checking field marks carefully. Both
Cassin's and Warbling Vireos were present and Warbling did some fun
fluttering over the water basin a number of times, showing us how it is
done. Both hummingbirds also hovered around the spill-over area of the
tub. Multiple Purple and Cassin's Finches kept us on our toes trying to
ID them and some probably were best left as un-identified. Some
impressive photographers were in the group so perhaps some mysteries
will be solved later.

Thanks to Evan for ebirding today. Thanks to Bob W at Timber Services
for allowing birding at Whiskey. If you don't know how to find these
springs, the ECAS website has all the answers. ecaudubon.org In the
non-bird department, several bull Elk left Whiskey area as we
approached, Sherrie found a blue staining mushroom, a bitter bolete, at
Bear Springs, and we had a blue Bi-colored Cluster Lily or a Brodiaea at
Thorn Springs. Well, also a bunch of knapweed there which needs work of
many hands at some point. Next week, Gray Butte, Rimrock Springs,
Crooked River Grasslands.

This report was mailed for Judy Meredith by http://birdnotes.net
Turkey Vulture
Unidentified Accipiter
Red-tailed Hawk
Eurasian Collared-Dove - Village Greens in Sisters
Mourning Dove
Calliope Hummingbird
Rufous Hummingbird
Williamson's Sapsucker - Bear Springs
Western Wood-Pewee
Cassin's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Common Raven
Mountain Chickadee - some with barely a white supercillium so recently
fledged perhaps
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Nashville Warbler - only briefly seen by 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Gray Warbler
+Townsend's Warbler - briefly seen by a few
+Hermit Warbler - briefly seen by most
+++ The above two should probably be recorded as HETOs
MacGillivray's Warbler
Western Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Purple Finch
Cassin's Finch
Pine Siskin
Total number of species seen: 30
Birders today: Paul Sullivan, Denise Fainberg, Mary Shivell, Dave Rein,
Mark Neudorfer, Evan Thomas, Sherrie Pierce, Jan Landau, Peter and Toni
Morozumi, Judy Meredith. Good birding, Judy, [email protected]
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Subject: Common Nighthawk Silverton OR, Marion county
Date: Thu Jun 21 2018 4:00 am
From: freemanbecard AT gmail.com
 
At the risk of overdoing the CONI reports .... I spend a lot of evenings in
my yard east of Silverton from 830-900pm listening and watching for Common
Nighthawks against the western horizon. Monday evening about 850pm I
spotted a distant and silent flying individual flying south to north. It
seems for about every 5-6 evenings I am intently watching, I may see or
hear one.

Roger Freeman
East of Silverton OR
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Subject: OBA Field Trip - Haystack Rock/Cannon Beach
Date: Thu Jun 21 2018 3:06 am
From: kjchamberlain AT comcast.net
 
Oregon Birding Association- Cannon Beach / Haystack Rock Field Trip, Clatsop County.
Trip Leaders: Diana Byrne & Ken Chamberlain
When:7 am - 12 noon, Saturday July 14, 2018
Where: This trip will be based in Cannon Beach, Oregon. We will meet at the mid-town public parking lot located S. Hemlock and Gower Ave at 7 am. We will first bird Haystack Rock (part of the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge), followed by birding several sites in Cannon Beach and nearby.
Birds andsite conditions: The primary target species of this trip is the Tufted Puffin. We will be visiting during a 2 ft. minus tide allowing relatively close viewing. There will be emphasis on slow birding and bird photography during this portion of the trip. We should have good photographic opportunities for the puffins and other seabirds, both perched and especially in flight.
Other species found at Haystack Rock include Harlequin Duck, Common Murre, Pigeon Guillemot, Black Oystercatchers, our three species of Cormorants, and nesting Western Gulls.
We will follow up with birding for passerine species at upland sites around town and nearby. We will wrap up at noon.
Public restrooms are located near the SW corner of the parking lot, on the west side of Hemlock St. We will walk about 1/2 mile from the parking lot and along the beach to reach Haystack Rock.Walking at other birding locations will include gravel roads and paths that are level or slightly sloped, with distances up to 2 miles. Coffee will not be available at 7am will in Cannon Beach at 7am, please bring your own.
How to register: This trip is limited to 16 Oregon Birding Association members. If you are not a current member, you can join online at http://www.orbirds.org/join.ht... There is no fee for this field trip, however preregistration is required. You can register for the trip at https://goo.gl/J8uaJd.
Please contact Ken Chamberlain with all questions or comments regarding this [email protected], 503-819-3335.
Please excuse my cross-posting



Subject: more on skua
Date: Thu Jun 21 2018 1:34 am
From: deweysage AT frontier.com
 
As some noted, the SKUA didn't look so good. It's carcass was found
today by Joe Metzler in Curry Cty along New River. Vultures had
already gotten into it, but the wings were still present.

Cheers
Dave Lauten




On 6/20/2018 4:53 PM, Treesa Hertzel wrote:
> Thanks for the idea, David C. Bailey.
>
> Dave Lauten?s skua video is now posted on the OBA home page here:
> www.orbirds.org
>
>
>
>
> On Jun 19, 2018, at 9:44 PM, David Bailey
> >
> wrote:
>
> Maybe you could send it to the OBA photos page? I am sure that I am
> not the only reader that would be interested in studying the Skua you
> observed.
>
> David C. Bailey
> Seaside, Oregon
>
> On Tue, Jun 19, 2018, 4:56 PM DJ Lauten and KACastelein
> > wrote:
>
> It's a fascinating set of frames of primary molt in a skua in
> June.......
>
> On 6/19/2018 4:54 PM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:
> > We do have a short video of the skua taking off if anyone wants
> to see
> > it, but it's probably a pretty big file......
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> > Dave Lauten
> >
> > POST: Send your post to [email protected]
>
> > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>
> > Contact moderator: [email protected]
>
> >
> >
>
> POST: Send your post to [email protected]
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> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>
> Contact moderator: [email protected]
>
>
>



Subject: family album of Great Gray Owls in Jackson County
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 22:48 pm
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
no details of locations included, nesting site was on private land
atowhee.blog/2018/06/20/great-gray-owls-a-family-album/
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com






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Subject: Re: Coastal Nighthawks
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 21:42 pm
From: d_villa AT mail.com
 
eBird report with photos is here:https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



dawn v

Lincoln City/Nelscott




Sent:Wednesday, June 20, 2018 at 10:58 AM

From:"dawn v" <[email protected]>

To:"Tim Rodenkirk" <[email protected]>

Cc:OBOL <[email protected]>

Subject:[obol] Re: Coastal Nighthawks


Am looking at a Common Nighthawk now. I'm about 2(?) miles inland on NF1726 East of Lincoln City. I think might have disturbed it frm a nest? It flew up from The ground then circled over me several times before

Landing on a small log in a scrub pile. Will post photos with my eBird report when i get home.



dawn v



Subject: Santiam Pass road-shoulder hazard warning
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 20:52 pm
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Hi again all,

Since birders are prone to pulling over to the side of the road quickly
when we see something interesting, thought I should put out a warning on
the current conditions along U.S. Hwy 20 in the Santiam Pass area
(particularly right in the pass and on the east side of the pass).

Monday evening when my daughter Martha and I were on our way over the
pass, we noticed a guy standing by a pickup that was pulled over on the
eastbound shoulder. As we passed, we could see that his front right
wheel was down in a 3-ft deep gully. So we looped back to help. As I
started to pull over, I had to pick the spot carefully since there were
several more gullies in the shoulder.

The poor guy (named Matt) said that he'd just bought the truck for about
$500 (a 1990 compact Chevy pickup) over in Eugene and was driving back
to Redmond when it overheated. He pulled over quickly and next thing he
knew, he hit the gully. Luckily he wasn't hurt and his truck seemed to
be OK, except it was high-centered on the edge of the gully. He was kind
of down on his luck in a number of ways, having just moved up to Redmond
from Arlington, Texas, and definitely couldn't afford to call a tow
truck.

I found a scissors jack in the rental vehicle that we were driving, and
luckily we were able to get it under the frame and start jacking up the
corner of the truck that was hanging over the gully, back-filling under
the tire with pumice gravel as we raised it up, plus backfilled the
gully behind where he'd gone over it with the other front wheel.

Neither of us had a shovel but Martha reminded me that we had a
hand-trowel along in case we needed to dig a cat-hole while camping ...
plus I had a plastic bag along for trash. It took a while with those
pathetic tools, but finally we got Matt out of there and on his way.
Matt was extremely appreciative and gave me a bottle of Walmart bottled
water which came in handy later during our trip.

I noticed there are quite a few similar gullies along the highway this
year. It would be easy to break an axle or worse if you hit one while
pulling off the road at any kind of speed. So definitely watch out if
you're birding up there and watching for woodpeckers in the burn as you
drive by.

I'll be contacting ODOT about this situation too but it could take them
a while to fix the problem.

Safe birding,
Joel


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



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Subject: Another common nighthawk report
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 20:44 pm
From: hirundorustica AT comcast.net
 
Reporting for someone else . . .

Michele Zwartjes had a COMMON NIGHTHAWK last night around 8:30 pm (June 19) in SW Portland (Multnomah Village).

Jeff Dillon
Gladstone, Oregon



Subject: Re: Common Nighthawk Washington County Jackson Bottom
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 17:20 pm
From: Steve.Engel AT hillsboro-oregon.gov
 
About an hour after sunset on June 19, 2018, heard a nighthawk calling above the Tualatin River / Highway 219 "junction".  The "peent" call was heard five times in two minutes. I did not hang around much longer.

steve engel

Hillsboro, Oregon

Steve Engel, Nature Program Supervisor
City of Hillsboro Parks & Recreation
Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve
2600 SW Hillsboro Highway
Hillsboro, OR 97123

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Subject: nighthawks
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 15:46 pm
From: linda AT fink.com
 
heard at dusk here for the last week, maybe, over Agency Creek on our
farm, far SW Yamhill County, east side of Coast Range foothills.

Linda Fink, near Grand Ronde Agency
--

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Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 5:59 am
From: caleb AT centanni.com
 
Reading the discussion on this thread since yesterday suggests a more quantified version of what I and others have suggested about outreach, publications, and the future of organization in the Oregon birding community. This is not to say that OBA itself necessarily has the resources, human or monetary, to easily expand it's outreach in any major capacity. Considering that, these are three ideas of future goals OBA and the community may want to consider.
1. Expand the current objective of bringing people together further into the realm of education and outreach.I like Paul's image of circles of birding interest with arrows in and out. Oregon birders can broaden the circles of interest both by individual contributions, like reaching reaching out to help interested people in our lives learn about birds (the part we are already pretty good at) and by organizing as a community (using structures that already exist, like OBA) to coordinate, support, and expand community outreach programs. These could be more birding walks in local communities, more connections with high schools, or any number of other ideas. The important part is that we connect to more people.
2. Attempt to fill some of the gaps left in the birding world if we only use eBird.There are some people on this list who could elaborate on what they think are big problems with eBird, but essentially, eBird has trouble representing some of the more human aspects of birding, the personal knowledge and in-the-field experience that can tell us things about where birds occur and why they occur there, among other things. While eBird may eventually come to dominate the world of listing, we should work on continuing the narrative, experiential, and human advantages that field notes and birding articles provide. This may eventually mean moving some of OBA's subscription material (and perhaps adding more materials and resources) online, but we need to make sure the benefits of these written resources stay available.
3. Find ways to continue publishing material, online or in print.This is closely related to the other two points, but we should make sure to keep publishing material connected to birding in Oregon. Paul mentioned 'Birds of Oregon' as a symbol of our outreach in bookstores around the state. The new age of eBird and other new technology certainly seems to call for new publications to revise our understanding of distribution and habitat in our state, among other subjects. If Oregon birders and OBA members can produce this type of material in book form or by expanding online presence, it might increase the relevance of the organization and the community to young birders.

So these are all of course just ideas, which are much easier to state as ideas than to turn into realities, and which have lots of problems and pitfalls and don't represent every perspective or solve every problem. But hopefully they provide a few more consolidated ideas to consider as a group.
Thanks so much to Paul for starting this discussion, which has brought up so many good ideas. And also thanks to everyone who'd participated in the discussion for sharing ideas, it's been very interesting to read. I'm glad we have our community as it is now, whatever it was in the past and whatever it becomes in the future.
Best wishes and good birding!
Caleb Centanni
On Mon, Jun 18, 2018, 9:22 PM Paul Sullivan <[email protected]> wrote:
Caleb,



Thank you for your articulate and compelling contribution to our discussion.

I am pleased to see the many contributions to this topic.



One of the things we had, years ago, was the distribution of Oregon Birds to

bookstores around the state. I appeared in the magazine rack. It said.

"There is this organization out there. Check us out." It was outreach. I

don't know how many copies were sold, but the effort was made. It made me

proud every time I saw it in a store. But that got dropped.



You can draw a diagram of circles on the Oregon State map, circles

representing various groups of people with an interest in birds. Then you

can ask, "How do we make these circles grow? How do we bring more people

into this thing we care so much about?"



One answer is to draw arrows pointing INTO the circles. That represents

efforts to get people to come help us do what WE are interested in. Join

us.

Another answer is to draw arrows pointing OUT OF the circles. That

represents efforts to meet people where THEY are and to serve them with what

they want to know about birds. Any time I'm at a place where I can show

someone a bird in the scope, I get an appreciative response.



Paul Sullivan



--------------------------------

[obol] Re: How should Oregon birders organize?

Hiall,



Ican'tspeaktowhatthingsusedtobe.Istartedbirdingin2014andit's

beenanintegralpartofmylifeeversince.Ijustturned18,andduring

mytimeasabirderI'veseenMalheurinbrightspringandSauvieIslandin

grassysummerandNewportinmistywinter.Istillhavealotmoretosee,

butI'vealreadyfalleninlovewithbirdinginOregon,tellingthestories

andknowingthecountryasmuchascollectingthedata.AndIdon'tthink

thatmygenerationisreallythatdifferentinwhatwewantfrombirding.

We'remoredifferentinhowweenteredthecommunityandwhatitshowedto

us.



Ebirdisverycool,efficient,anduseful.ButI'mnotabirderbecause

birdingiscool,efficient,anduseful,andtobehonestthosearen'teven

thereasonsIuseeBird.Idobothbecauseofthepeople,ouramazing

community,andthelandscape,ourremarkablestate.IalsowriteField

NotesforOBA,andorganizealocalCBC,andtheseareasormore

meaningfultomethaneBird.EbirdissimplyatoolIuseinthehopethat

itmightsomedayhelpusunderstandourcommunityandlandscapebetter.



WhatI'mtryingtogetathereisthatyoungpeoplelikemearen'treally

tellinganybodythatfieldnotesorarticlesortheold-stylebirding

communityisoldnews.It'smorethatthecommunityingeneralisalmost

completelyunknowntomostofthem.WhenIfirststartedbirding,my

brotherandIbarelywereawareoftheOregonbirdingcommunity.Ebirdwas

theonlyresourcewehadtobepartofanysortofbirdingcommunity.We

gotlucky,andeBirdconnecteduswithsomeonewhowaspartofOBOLand

OBA.Fromtherethecommunityhasmostlywelcomeduswithopenarms,but

withoutthatluckIdon'tknowifI'dhaveacluewhataListservorField

NotesorChristmasBirdCountsare.Ifwetellourselvesthatyoungpeople

aretooimpatientandpluggedinanddisinterestedtoenjoyourcommunity,

thecommunitywillslowlybecomelesspersonalandlessfamiliar.Butifwe

giveyoungpeopleachance,andwereallytrytoconnectwiththem(not

justwiththeonesweknowasbirders,butwiththetheoneswhohaven't

discoveredusyet),wemightfindthere'smoreofthemwhowillfallin

lovewithbirding,asacommunityandasastoryandasalife,thanwe

think.



SoIthinktheOBAandourcommunitycanmoveforwardbyaskingaquestion:

howwecanmakebirdinginOregonasacommunity,notjustasahobby,

somethingthatpeopleknowabout?Oregoniansyoungandoldknow(andlove)

hiking,biking,fishing,hunting,adventuring,andsightseeing.Init'sown

way,birdingiseachofthesethings.ButwhenImentionbirdingtosomeone

myagetheresponseisusually"Ohwow!Haveyouseen'TheBigYear'?"

Moreimportantly,though,it'susuallyfollowedbygenuine,oratleast

polite,interestinwhatIactuallydooutthereinthewildernessallday.

Imagineifbirdingwassomethingmorelikehikingorbikingorfishing?

Eachoftheseisoutdoorsandrequirespatience,butlotsofyoungpeople

loveit.It'snotthatweneedtogethalfthestateofOregonbirding,but

Ithinkifwecouldworkongettingbirdingtobesomethingthat's

accessibleasanidea,inourpublicspaces,ourlibrariesandschools,and

inourpsycheasastate,wecouldgosomewherebeautiful.Ourcommunityis

uniqueinthatit'sacloseonewhichproducesmeaningfulconnectionsand

friendships.Ifmoreinterestedpeopleknewaboutitandfelttheywerea

partofit,narrativearticlesandOBAmeetingsmightbemorepopularI

don'thavetheanswerstothemanyquestionsthatideabringsup,butwe

havesomethinginthiscommunitythatisremarkable,andIthinkwecanget

newpeopletofallinlovewithitalljustlikewedidifwereallyshow

themwhatwehaveandcanhavehere.



Quarterlyfieldnotesandprintedmagazinesmaybeathingofthepast,but

thestoriestheytoldandthemeaningtheyheldinourcommunityarenot.

Birdingisanadventure,ascience,anart,afunhobby,adeeplove,a

collectionofdata,acollectionofmemories,acornerofyourcountrydown

agravelroad,acrispMaymorninginMalheur.It'salandscape,awayof

thinking,andit'safamily.IfallthosemysteriouseBirderswedon'tknow

andalltheyoungpeoplewholovetheoutdoorscouldseethat,they'dwant

towriteaboutitandreadaboutitandbepartofourcommunityasmuchas

wedo.



Iwroteanovelhereanditdoesn'treallyproposeasolution,soI

apologizeforthat,butmyhopeistoaskaquestionwhichwecananswer

together.



Bestwishesandgoodbirding,



CalebCentanni





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Subject: Re: Coastal Nighthawks
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 5:08 am
From: kjchamberlain AT comcast.net
 
Jeanne and I just got back from our own COMMON NIGHTHAWK encounter. We went out to to look for them in a large clear cut on private lands about 6 miles east of Neskowin in Tillamook Co. this evening. We found three birds in flight, preenting & booming, during display flights; a very fun encounter.
They seem to be uncommon and local summer birds where there are open areas in this part of the coast range foothills. My experience is that evenings are the best time to find them. I have not seen them in Neskowin or on the outer coast.
eBird checklist with sound recording:https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
All the best
Ken Chamberlain
Neskowin



Subject: Re: Coastal Nighthawks
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 5:03 am
From: billstinj AT gmail.com
 
For the three summers I have lived in Garibaldi I have had calling nighthawks over my house. However, this is in the back of Tillamook Bay and the coast range is 6 blocks behind my house.
I have also had a nighthawk calling at least once in the late afternoon at the high school which is basically right on the beach.
A couple weeks ago I had one calling in Tillamook around 3:00 p.m. They are a great bird!
--
James Billstine
http://wingsaroundtheumpqua.bl...



Subject: Re: Skua video
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 4:45 am
From: davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com
 
Maybe you could send it to the OBA photos page? I am sure that I am not the only reader that would be interested in studying the Skua you observed.
David C. BaileySeaside, Oregon
On Tue, Jun 19, 2018, 4:56 PM DJ Lauten and KACastelein <[email protected]> wrote:
It's a fascinating set of frames of primary molt in a skua in June.......



On 6/19/2018 4:54 PM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:

> We do have a short video of the skua taking off if anyone wants to see

> it, but it's probably a pretty big file......

>

> Cheers

>

> Dave Lauten

>

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>

>



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Subject: Ash-throated fly
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 1:43 am
From: jgalpern17 AT gmail.com
 
There was an Ash-Throated Flycatcher this afternoon behind the osprey tower at Lane Community Collage. This seems like fair habitat.
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



Subject: Birding doldrums? What? This is the best time of year for birding!
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 1:06 am
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Several writers in the current dominant thread have referred to this
part of the year as the "doldrums."

This is the most amazing time of the year if you're interested in:

(1) breeding bird behavior

(2) breeding bird distribution

(3) fledgling identification challenges

(4) fledgling cuteness

Yeah, maybe we're past the peak season for jaw-dropping rarities. But
right now, with the latest batch of fledglings, there are probably more
birds out there flying around than at any other time of year.

Absolutely the best time of year for birding, in my view. And if anyone
is getting bored ... I hear there are some Breeding Bird Survey routes
in need of volunteers!

Happy birding in the peak of breeding season!
Joel


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



Subject: Re: Skua video
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 23:56 pm
From: deweysage AT frontier.com
 
It's a fascinating set of frames of primary molt in a skua in June.......

On 6/19/2018 4:54 PM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein wrote:
> We do have a short video of the skua taking off if anyone wants to see
> it, but it's probably a pretty big file......
>
> Cheers
>
> Dave Lauten
>
> POST: Send your post to [email protected]
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>
>

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Subject: Skua video
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 23:55 pm
From: deweysage AT frontier.com
 
We do have a short video of the skua taking off if anyone wants to see
it, but it's probably a pretty big file......

Cheers

Dave Lauten

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Subject: Mountain Bluebird nesting in Santiam Pass area, Linn Co.
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 23:27 pm
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Hi all,

This morning on our way back from an owl survey in Central Oregon, my
daughter Martha and I stopped by the Pacific Crest trailhead in Santiam
Pass. There we spotted a female MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD that carried food
repeatedly to nestlings in a natural cavity in a snag left by the 2003
B&B fire.

Looking on ebird there have been nearly a dozen Mountain Bluebird
reports from the Santiam Pass area this season, some even with nice
photos. However none of the reports mention breeding behavior.

Other cavity-nesters making use of the abundant snags in the old burn
area included:

HOUSE WREN (pair actively feeding young in another snag, female also
soliciting while the male sang, which suggests that they may be gearing
up for a second brood as soon as the current batch leaves the nest);

RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER (foraging)

HAIRY WOODPECKER (foraging and calling)

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH (heard calling)

WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS were feeding fledglings in the brushy regrowth, a
few AUDUBON'S YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS were singing. COMMON NIGHTHAWKS,
JUNCOS, CHIPPING SPARROWS and MOUNTAIN CHICKADEES were also sounding
off.

All in all, a pretty lively place, especially considering what it looked
like 13 years ago.

Good birding,
Joel


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
[email protected]
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 20:48 pm
From: schlanger99 AT gmail.com
 
Some thoughts from a young birder regarding the future of Oregon birding / demise of print media and listservs.
As has already been mentioned, listservs are undoubtedly on their way out. Scroll through the ABA Birding News site and you'll find a lot of listservs that are either dead or just barely limping along. Change is the only constant.I'm the only birder under thirty I know who doesn't have a facebook account for tapping in to RBAs and birding news. I will have to make the transition and get anaccount soon though.yJust because I spend an inordinate amount of time on eBird doesn't mean I'm not into books and magazines. If I had the funds I would have a subscription to all the birding material I could get and buy another shelf of field-guides. That said, more birds and birdwatching on the internet just means more potential exposure for the public. Quantity has a quality all its own and eBird will likely be more useful for future researchers than the past records of a smaller population of observers.If the OBA needs a way to spend money, I would suggest more educational scholarships, even earmarking some money to get folks involved in bird banding. We should all be reaching out to the people who live in rural parts of the state where so many of us travel to see birds.
Birdwatching is clearly growing as a pastime, yet I find that I'm frequently the youngest birder around when I've been at popular birding spots in Oregon and farther afield. I'm not the first person in this thread to suggest that more outreach is key. My birdwatching mentor Paul Dickinson, likely a familiar name to a few subscribers on this listserv, has been leading school-trips to Malheur nearly every year since 1969. Instead of building a big life-list, he has exposed hundreds of students to Oregon's birds, including quite a few who've become "serious" birders or gone on to work in biology or education. I've been fortunate enough to co-lead seven trips to Harney county and get high-school kids excited about birds. We are the future of birding.
I frequently hear about the good ol' days, whether it be stories from the golden-age of West Coast (mostly California) birding, or how there just used to be more birds around to see. The youngsters don't really know anything about that old-timey stuff. With the exponential growth of online (and print!) resources, more birdwatchers internationally, better optics and digital photography, the future is bright.
And lastly, Mike is right to point out the way these conversations always pop up in the "doldrums". I personally like getting out to see baby crows and double-digits of song sparrows. The shorbs will be back soon. Happy birding.
- Zack



Subject: surprising monster on the beach at New River Coos Cty
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 18:42 pm
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To: OBOL
From: DJ Lauten and KACastelein
Subject: [obol] surprising monster on the beach at New River Coos Cty
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Subject: Kvetching like it's February...
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 14:32 pm
From: celata AT pacifier.com
 
Mark Twain is often credited with saying "Everybody complains
about the weather, but nobody ever does anything about it"

Me? I think globally and bird locally...

https://nclctrust.org/on-the-l...

I do what I can, not what others think I should...

--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
That question...
http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
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Subject: Photo Collection American Bittern Baskett Slough NWR
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 13:34 pm
From: photojleonard AT gmail.com
 
American Bittern photo collection recently photographed at Baskett Slough NWR by Jim Leonard. This American Bittern was very close so all photos are not cropped. Tech information: Canon 7D body, Cannon 500mm F/4 lens, shutter speed between 1/1600-1/2000 second, F/4 aperature and ISO 800. Click on link below for photos.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Yy9F...



Subject: Bird Spoken Here
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 6:07 am
From: linda AT fink.com
 
just an idea... Whale Spoken Here is popular on the coast with trained
volunteers telling visitors about whales and helping point them out.
Caleb wrote a beautiful piece on how he got involved and what birding
means to him... Perhaps if OBA had trained volunteers with scopes at
bird-friendly sites on certain days with plenty of advance
advertising... young (and older) people would come, look, ask questions,
meet birders, take home a birding site guide... and become part of the
birding community. And maybe soon be writing articles for the Oregon
Birds journal...

In other words, put a little effort into making people feel welcome.

Linda Fink, (both old and crusty), who would probably never meet other
birders if it weren't for the popularity of our resident Barn Owls...
and for Paul Sullivan bringing visiting birders to our farm now and
then. And for our local CBC's countdown.
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Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 4:22 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Caleb,

Thank you for your articulate and compelling contribution to our discussion.
I am pleased to see the many contributions to this topic.

One of the things we had, years ago, was the distribution of Oregon Birds to
bookstores around the state. I appeared in the magazine rack. It said.
"There is this organization out there. Check us out." It was outreach. I
don't know how many copies were sold, but the effort was made. It made me
proud every time I saw it in a store. But that got dropped.

You can draw a diagram of circles on the Oregon State map, circles
representing various groups of people with an interest in birds. Then you
can ask, "How do we make these circles grow? How do we bring more people
into this thing we care so much about?"

One answer is to draw arrows pointing INTO the circles. That represents
efforts to get people to come help us do what WE are interested in. Join
us.
Another answer is to draw arrows pointing OUT OF the circles. That
represents efforts to meet people where THEY are and to serve them with what
they want to know about birds. Any time I'm at a place where I can show
someone a bird in the scope, I get an appreciative response.

Paul Sullivan

--------------------------------
[obol] Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Hiall,

Ican'tspeaktowhatthingsusedtobe.Istartedbirdingin2014andit's
beenanintegralpartofmylifeeversince.Ijustturned18,andduring
mytimeasabirderI'veseenMalheurinbrightspringandSauvieIslandin
grassysummerandNewportinmistywinter.Istillhavealotmoretosee,
butI'vealreadyfalleninlovewithbirdinginOregon,tellingthestories
andknowingthecountryasmuchascollectingthedata.AndIdon'tthink
thatmygenerationisreallythatdifferentinwhatwewantfrombirding.
We'remoredifferentinhowweenteredthecommunityandwhatitshowedto
us.

Ebirdisverycool,efficient,anduseful.ButI'mnotabirderbecause
birdingiscool,efficient,anduseful,andtobehonestthosearen'teven
thereasonsIuseeBird.Idobothbecauseofthepeople,ouramazing
community,andthelandscape,ourremarkablestate.IalsowriteField
NotesforOBA,andorganizealocalCBC,andtheseareasormore
meaningfultomethaneBird.EbirdissimplyatoolIuseinthehopethat
itmightsomedayhelpusunderstandourcommunityandlandscapebetter.

WhatI'mtryingtogetathereisthatyoungpeoplelikemearen'treally
tellinganybodythatfieldnotesorarticlesortheold-stylebirding
communityisoldnews.It'smorethatthecommunityingeneralisalmost
completelyunknowntomostofthem.WhenIfirststartedbirding,my
brotherandIbarelywereawareoftheOregonbirdingcommunity.Ebirdwas
theonlyresourcewehadtobepartofanysortofbirdingcommunity.We
gotlucky,andeBirdconnecteduswithsomeonewhowaspartofOBOLand
OBA.Fromtherethecommunityhasmostlywelcomeduswithopenarms,but
withoutthatluckIdon'tknowifI'dhaveacluewhataListservorField
NotesorChristmasBirdCountsare.Ifwetellourselvesthatyoungpeople
aretooimpatientandpluggedinanddisinterestedtoenjoyourcommunity,
thecommunitywillslowlybecomelesspersonalandlessfamiliar.Butifwe
giveyoungpeopleachance,andwereallytrytoconnectwiththem(not
justwiththeonesweknowasbirders,butwiththetheoneswhohaven't
discoveredusyet),wemightfindthere'smoreofthemwhowillfallin
lovewithbirding,asacommunityandasastoryandasalife,thanwe
think.

SoIthinktheOBAandourcommunitycanmoveforwardbyaskingaquestion:
howwecanmakebirdinginOregonasacommunity,notjustasahobby,
somethingthatpeopleknowabout?Oregoniansyoungandoldknow(andlove)
hiking,biking,fishing,hunting,adventuring,andsightseeing.Init'sown
way,birdingiseachofthesethings.ButwhenImentionbirdingtosomeone
myagetheresponseisusually"Ohwow!Haveyouseen'TheBigYear'?"
Moreimportantly,though,it'susuallyfollowedbygenuine,oratleast
polite,interestinwhatIactuallydooutthereinthewildernessallday.
Imagineifbirdingwassomethingmorelikehikingorbikingorfishing?
Eachoftheseisoutdoorsandrequirespatience,butlotsofyoungpeople
loveit.It'snotthatweneedtogethalfthestateofOregonbirding,but
Ithinkifwecouldworkongettingbirdingtobesomethingthat's
accessibleasanidea,inourpublicspaces,ourlibrariesandschools,and
inourpsycheasastate,wecouldgosomewherebeautiful.Ourcommunityis
uniqueinthatit'sacloseonewhichproducesmeaningfulconnectionsand
friendships.Ifmoreinterestedpeopleknewaboutitandfelttheywerea
partofit,narrativearticlesandOBAmeetingsmightbemorepopularI
don'thavetheanswerstothemanyquestionsthatideabringsup,butwe
havesomethinginthiscommunitythatisremarkable,andIthinkwecanget
newpeopletofallinlovewithitalljustlikewedidifwereallyshow
themwhatwehaveandcanhavehere.

Quarterlyfieldnotesandprintedmagazinesmaybeathingofthepast,but
thestoriestheytoldandthemeaningtheyheldinourcommunityarenot.
Birdingisanadventure,ascience,anart,afunhobby,adeeplove,a
collectionofdata,acollectionofmemories,acornerofyourcountrydown
agravelroad,acrispMaymorninginMalheur.It'salandscape,awayof
thinking,andit'safamily.IfallthosemysteriouseBirderswedon'tknow
andalltheyoungpeoplewholovetheoutdoorscouldseethat,they'dwant
towriteaboutitandreadaboutitandbepartofourcommunityasmuchas
wedo.

Iwroteanovelhereanditdoesn'treallyproposeasolution,soI
apologizeforthat,butmyhopeistoaskaquestionwhichwecananswer
together.

Bestwishesandgoodbirding,

CalebCentanni


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Subject: Re: Books
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 3:29 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
That is a good price, especially for Washington.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com




On Jun 18, 2018, at 8:29 PM, dawn v <[email protected]> wrote:I was perusing our local used bookstore today. He has a copy of Gabrielson and Jewett's Birds of Oregon and a copy of Jewett's Birds of Washington State each for $30 if anyone is interested.


dawn v


Sent from BlueMail



Subject: Books
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 3:28 am
From: d_villa AT mail.com
 
I was perusing our local used bookstore today. He has a copy of Gabrielson and Jewett's Birds of Oregon and a copy of Jewett's Birds of Washington State each for $30 if anyone is interested.


dawn v


Sent from BlueMail



Subject: Re: Lincoln Calif. Quail, close to Hwy 20, Jun 16, 2018
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 0:53 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
There were wild Cal.Quail in Nashville and some miles further down whatever back hwy leads to Eddyville, when I lived in Summit,1984-85. I have observed the species on my property repeatedly, where I would have presumed it to be the exclusive domain of Mtn Quail. I saw a full family(ad.male&female,6-8 juv.)at our mailbox in mid summer once. This is fairly deep woods. I heard one crowing at the bottom of a big clearcut,miles from acultivated field or house, and where I knew there were 3 crowing mtn q. I was sceptical about that one, but Nels Nelson got definitive photos at the same spot one or more years later. Based on my purely anecdotal notes spanning 100miles latitude and 4 decades, I think your Valley Quail could be countable, Jamie. Lpn
On Mon, Jun 18, 2018, 5:31 PM Jamie Simmons <[email protected]> wrote:

Obolonians,



On Saturday, while running the Salado Breeding Bird Survey, Jim Anderson and I distinctly heard a calling CALIFORNIA QUAIL at a location that is just over 1.1 miles from Hwy 20 along Elk City Rd.See notes below from the eBird checklist for more details. The map point for the location is about where we were standing. I have no reason to think it was a wild bird, but was not able to confirm that nor its exact location. (I.e it could even have been restrained.)
To "sweeten the pot" for anyone considering looking, 3 Willow Flycatchers were singing in the large clearcut above the road just over a half mile in from Hwy 20.Jamie SimmonsCorvallis



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "[email protected]" <[email protected]>To: "[email protected]" <[email protected]>Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018, 5:14:46 PM PDTSubject: eBird Report - Salado BBS--Stop 31, Jun 16, 2018
Salado BBS--Stop 31, Lincoln, Oregon, USJun 16, 2018 7:45 AM - 7:48 AMProtocol: StationaryComments: Jim Anderson assisted12 speciesCalifornia Quail 1 Not seen, but it was loudly calling "Chicago" and heard well more than once by both of us. It seemed to be coming from near (below) the house or the barn that are nearby to the west, which may be a clue as to the bird's origin. (From our location, a view of where it was emanating from was blocked by trees.) Given the BBS protocol, we didn't take the time to backtrack and look for it.Band-tailed Pigeon 3Red-breasted Sapsucker 2Olive-sided Flycatcher 1Western Wood-Pewee 1Warbling Vireo 1American Crow 1Swainson's Thrush 2White-crowned Sparrow 2Black-headed Grosbeak 1Brown-headed Cowbird 1Evening Grosbeak 2View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli... report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Lincoln Calif. Quail, close to Hwy 20, Jun 16, 2018
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 0:31 am
From: sapsuckers AT gmail.com
 
Obolonians,



On Saturday, while running the Salado Breeding Bird Survey, Jim Anderson and I distinctly heard a calling CALIFORNIA QUAIL at a location that is just over 1.1 miles from Hwy 20 along Elk City Rd.See notes below from the eBird checklist for more details. The map point for the location is about where we were standing. I have no reason to think it was a wild bird, but was not able to confirm that nor its exact location. (I.e it could even have been restrained.)
To "sweeten the pot" for anyone considering looking, 3 Willow Flycatchers were singing in the large clearcut above the road just over a half mile in from Hwy 20.Jamie SimmonsCorvallis



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "[email protected]" <[email protected]>To: "[email protected]" <[email protected]>Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018, 5:14:46 PM PDTSubject: eBird Report - Salado BBS--Stop 31, Jun 16, 2018
Salado BBS--Stop 31, Lincoln, Oregon, USJun 16, 2018 7:45 AM - 7:48 AMProtocol: StationaryComments: Jim Anderson assisted12 speciesCalifornia Quail 1 Not seen, but it was loudly calling "Chicago" and heard well more than once by both of us. It seemed to be coming from near (below) the house or the barn that are nearby to the west, which may be a clue as to the bird's origin. (From our location, a view of where it was emanating from was blocked by trees.) Given the BBS protocol, we didn't take the time to backtrack and look for it.Band-tailed Pigeon 3Red-breasted Sapsucker 2Olive-sided Flycatcher 1Western Wood-Pewee 1Warbling Vireo 1American Crow 1Swainson's Thrush 2White-crowned Sparrow 2Black-headed Grosbeak 1Brown-headed Cowbird 1Evening Grosbeak 2View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli... report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Tue Jun 19 2018 0:20 am
From: deweysage AT frontier.com
 
Hi Folks,

Some people might call me an old time birder now, and some people would
say no way, you're still not old enough to be an old timer. But I've
been birding for nearly 32 years, so I think that I at least qualify for
'been around the block a few times' category. Some people might even
say I am not a birder, as I rarely get out of Coos Cty, or actually do
any real birding. Maybe I'll do more someday when I get old....lol.
And normally I'd rather not jump into a discussion like this, because
honestly, we've been down this road before, and no matter how much some
old timers are wishing for the 'good old days', time moves on and well,
the 'good old days' are currently only 'now'. While there is a 'past',
we cannot go back to it, no matter what it looked like. Some of Paul's
musing were simply answered by Oscar and Hendrik - it has little to do
with laziness, and has a lot more to do with people being busy, and
interested in other stuff, and not having the time or the
desire......you can't force a magazine to happen if there aren't enough
things to put in the magazine. Don't blame the editors, and frankly in
this world of go, go, go, don't blame anyone, it's just the reality of
modern life.

With all that said, Caleb's description of what happened to him when he
started birding is.....well rather normal. When I started birding in
New Jersey 32 years ago, there was no computer, no listserves, no eBird,
no digital nothing. There was a phone number with the rare or good
birds of the week. That's it - no email, no texting, no chains,
nothing - this is in the Great Birding State of New Jersey. The way
you got into birding, and found out about stuff, was simply by word of
mouth. By meeting people. Nothing fancy. The number of people
on OBOL blows away the number of people who were real active birders in
NJ 32 years ago (I could not imagine running into 1500 birders at any
site in NJ even for the rarest of birds! Nowadays, I would not be
surprised.). So I have to chuckle a little, because honestly Caleb,
you actually have so much more at your fingertips than I did when I
started birding! In fact, I bet all one has to do is plug in a Google
search on 'birding' and you would quickly find innumerable
resources....none of which was available 32 years ago. I do applaud
your thoughts about the need to get the word out better.....if only we
taught such things in grade school, but I'm sure we'd offend someone
these days for pointing out the environment around them.....sigh......

Anyhow, I don't mean to answer any questions, nor criticize anyone's
experience, or rain on anyone's parade. Just wanted to share my 'semi
old timer' perspective a little for you young guns. Yeah, we used to
have phones on the wall that rang. Some of you might not have any
idea what that was like! LOL. Be glad you have all these resources.

How I wish I had digital Sibley and birdsongs at my fingertips when I
was a young gun. We had cassette tapes - you know those things with
magnetic tape in them.....oh nevermind.

Keep birding folks, you're wonderful.

Cheers
Dave 'formerly GOD, now semi retired, and soon to be Older Timer' Lauten





On 6/18/2018 2:19 PM, Caleb Centanni wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I can't speak to what things used to be. I started birding in 2014 and
> it's been an integral part of my life ever since. I just turned 18,
> and during my time as a birder I've seen Malheur in bright spring and
> Sauvie Island in grassy summer and Newport in misty winter. I still
> have a lot more to see, but I've already fallen in love with birding
> in Oregon, telling the stories and knowing the country as much as
> collecting the data. And I don't think that my generation is really
> that different in what we want from birding. We're more different in
> how we entered the community and what it showed to us.
>
> Ebird is very cool, efficient, and useful. But I'm not a birder
> because birding is cool, efficient, and useful, and to be honest those
> aren't even the reasons I use eBird. I do both because of the people,
> our amazing community, and the landscape, our remarkable state. I also
> write Field Notes for OBA, and organize a local CBC, and these are as
> or more meaningful to me than eBird. Ebird is simply a tool I use in
> the hope that it might someday help us understand our community and
> landscape better.
>
> What I'm trying to get at here is that young people like me aren't
> really telling anybody that field notes or articles or the old-style
> birding community is old news. It's more that the community in general
> is almost completely unknown to most of them. When I first started
> birding, my brother and I barely were aware of the Oregon birding
> community. Ebird was the only resource we had to be part of any sort
> of birding community. We got lucky, and eBird connected us with
> someone who was part of OBOL and OBA. From there the community has
> mostly welcomed us with open arms, but without that luck I don't know
> if I'd have a clue what a Listserv or Field Notes or Christmas Bird
> Counts are. If we tell ourselves that young people are too impatient
> and plugged in and disinterested to enjoy our community, the community
> will slowly become less personal and less familiar. But if we give
> young people a chance, and we really try to connect with them (not
> just with the ones we know as birders, but with the the ones who
> haven't discovered us yet), we might find there's more of them who
> will fall in love with birding, as a community and as a story and as a
> life, than we think.
>
> So I think the OBA and our community can move forward by asking a
> question: how we can make birding in Oregon as a community, not just
> as a hobby, something that people know about? Oregonians young and old
> know (and love) hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, adventuring, and
> sightseeing. In it's own way, birding is each of these things. But
> when I mention birding to someone my age the response is usually "Oh
> wow! Have you seen 'The Big Year'?" More importantly, though, it's
> usually followed by genuine, or at least polite, interest in what I
> actually do out there in the wilderness all day. Imagine if birding
> was something more like hiking or biking or fishing? Each of these is
> outdoors and requires patience, but lots of young people love it. It's
> not that we need to get half the state of Oregon birding, but I think
> if we could work on getting birding to be something that's accessible
> as an idea, in our public spaces, our libraries and schools, and in
> our psyche as a state, we could go somewhere beautiful. Our community
> is unique in that it's a close one which produces meaningful
> connections and friendships. If more interested people knew about it
> and felt they were a part of it, narrative articles and OBA meetings
> might be more popular I don't have the answers to the many questions
> that idea brings up, but we have something in this community that is
> remarkable, and I think we can get new people to fall in love with it
> all just like we did if we really show them what we have and can have
> here.
>
> Quarterly field notes and printed magazines may be a thing of the
> past, but the stories they told and the meaning they held in our
> community are not. Birding is an adventure, a science, an art, a fun
> hobby, a deep love, a collection of data, a collection of memories, a
> corner of your country down a gravel road, a crisp May morning in
> Malheur. It's a landscape, a way of thinking, and it's a family. If
> all those mysterious eBirders we don't know and all the young people
> who love the outdoors could see that, they'd want to write about it
> and read about it and be part of our community as much as we do.
>
> I wrote a novel here and it doesn't really propose a solution, so I
> apologize for that, but my hope is to ask a question which we can
> answer together.
>
> Best wishes and good birding,
>
> Caleb Centanni
>
> On Jun 18, 2018 10:29 AM, "Paul Sullivan" > wrote:
>
> One take on what we are collectively about is that we?re engaged
> in data collection. That perspective requires accuracy and the
> reviewers to catch mistakes.
>
> Another take is that we are sharing good birds so others can go
> see them.
>
> Another take is that we are doing photography or listing, for our
> own personal collections.
>
> Another take is that we should engage in conservation activism or
> rescuing injured birds or helping nesting bluebirds, osprey, etc.
>
> Another take is that we are heading off on pilgrimages to holy
> birding sites, with birding gurus.
>
> Another take is that we should stay home and tend our own patch.
>
> Another take is that we are discussing ornithological puzzles.
>
> Another take is all about organization, management, fundraising,
> and membership development.
>
> Another is about educating the young and the old to better know
> and enjoy birds.
>
> Another take is that organization itself is a bother. Turn off
> the computer and take a walk in the woods. Log only joy ? or solice.
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
>



Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 21:40 pm
From: scrapbird AT gmail.com
 
Caleb, as a 62-year-old birder, OBA board member, and longtime leader of birding activities for kids, I must tell you that your beautiful writing brought me to tears. You have captured the essence of what birding is for me as well.
Thank you for composing this and sharing it with the community. I completely agree that asking how we store data, what we should print, and how we should organize are not as important as your big question - How do we extend community to birders.
I appreciate your clarification about what is important to you as a young birder. Too often, we guess at that and get it wrong.
With appreciation, and hope that I will get to bird with you someday,Diane




On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 2:19 PM, Caleb Centanni <[email protected]> wrote:
Hi all,
I can't speak to what things used to be. I started birding in 2014 and it's been an integral part of my life ever since. I just turned 18, and during my time as a birder I've seen Malheur in bright spring and Sauvie Island in grassy summer and Newport in misty winter. I still have a lot more to see, but I've already fallen in love with birding in Oregon, telling the stories and knowing the country as much as collecting the data. And I don't think that my generation is really that different in what we want from birding. We're more different in how we entered the community and what it showed to us.
Ebird is very cool, efficient, and useful. But I'm not a birder because birding is cool, efficient, and useful, and to be honest those aren't even the reasons I use eBird. I do both because of the people, our amazing community, and the landscape, our remarkable state. I also write Field Notes for OBA, and organize a local CBC, and these are as or more meaningful to me than eBird. Ebird is simply a tool I use in the hope that it might someday help us understand our community and landscape better.
What I'm trying to get at here is that young people like me aren't really telling anybody that field notes or articles or the old-style birding community is old news. It's more that the community in general is almost completely unknown to most of them. When I first started birding, my brother and I barely were aware of the Oregon birding community. Ebird was the only resource we had to be part of any sort of birding community. We got lucky, and eBird connected us with someone who was part of OBOL and OBA. From there the community has mostly welcomed us with open arms, but without that luck I don't know if I'd have a clue what a Listserv or Field Notes or Christmas Bird Counts are. If we tell ourselves that young people are too impatient and plugged in and disinterested to enjoy our community, the community will slowly become less personal and less familiar. But if we give young people a chance, and we really try to connect with them (not just with the ones we know as birders, but with the the ones who haven't discovered us yet), we might find there's more of them who will fall in love with birding, as a community and as a story and as a life, than we think.
So I think the OBA and our community can move forward by asking a question: how we can make birding in Oregon as a community, not just as a hobby, something that people know about? Oregonians young and old know (and love) hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, adventuring, and sightseeing. In it's own way, birding is each of these things. But when I mention birding to someone my age the response is usually "Oh wow! Have you seen 'The Big Year'?" More importantly, though, it's usually followed by genuine, or at least polite, interest in what I actually do out there in the wilderness all day. Imagine if birding was something more like hiking or biking or fishing? Each of these is outdoors and requires patience, but lots of young people love it. It's not that we need to get half the state of Oregon birding, but I think if we could work on getting birding to be something that's accessible as an idea, in our public spaces, our libraries and schools, and in our psyche as a state, we could go somewhere beautiful. Our community is unique in that it's a close one which produces meaningful connections and friendships. If more interested people knew about it and felt they were a part of it, narrative articles and OBA meetings might be more popular I don't have the answers to the many questions that idea brings up, but we have something in this community that is remarkable, and I think we can get new people to fall in love with it all just like we did if we really show them what we have and can have here.
Quarterly field notes and printed magazines may be a thing of the past, but the stories they told and the meaning they held in our community are not. Birding is an adventure, a science, an art, a fun hobby, a deep love, a collection of data, a collection of memories, a corner of your country down a gravel road, a crisp May morning in Malheur. It's a landscape, a way of thinking, and it's a family. If all those mysterious eBirders we don't know and all the young people who love the outdoors could see that, they'd want to write about it and read about it and be part of our community as much as we do.
I wrote a novel here and it doesn't really propose a solution, so I apologize for that, but my hope is to ask a question which we can answer together.

Best wishes and good birding,
Caleb Centanni



Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 21:28 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
A magnificent philosophy of birding life from a leading voice in the next generation. Bravo, Caleb (and happy birthday).


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



On Jun 18, 2018, at 2:19 PM, Caleb Centanni <[email protected]> wrote:Hi all,
I can't speak to what things used to be. I started birding in 2014 and it's been an integral part of my life ever since. I just turned 18, and during my time as a birder I've seen Malheur in bright spring and Sauvie Island in grassy summer and Newport in misty winter. I still have a lot more to see, but I've already fallen in love with birding in Oregon, telling the stories and knowing the country as much as collecting the data. And I don't think that my generation is really that different in what we want from birding. We're more different in how we entered the community and what it showed to us.
Ebird is very cool, efficient, and useful. But I'm not a birder because birding is cool, efficient, and useful, and to be honest those aren't even the reasons I use eBird. I do both because of the people, our amazing community, and the landscape, our remarkable state. I also write Field Notes for OBA, and organize a local CBC, and these are as or more meaningful to me than eBird. Ebird is simply a tool I use in the hope that it might someday help us understand our community and landscape better.
What I'm trying to get at here is that young people like me aren't really telling anybody that field notes or articles or the old-style birding community is old news. It's more that the community in general is almost completely unknown to most of them. When I first started birding, my brother and I barely were aware of the Oregon birding community. Ebird was the only resource we had to be part of any sort of birding community. We got lucky, and eBird connected us with someone who was part of OBOL and OBA. From there the community has mostly welcomed us with open arms, but without that luck I don't know if I'd have a clue what a Listserv or Field Notes or Christmas Bird Counts are. If we tell ourselves that young people are too impatient and plugged in and disinterested to enjoy our community, the community will slowly become less personal and less familiar. But if we give young people a chance, and we really try to connect with them (not just with the ones we know as birders, but with the the ones who haven't discovered us yet), we might find there's more of them who will fall in love with birding, as a community and as a story and as a life, than we think.
So I think the OBA and our community can move forward by asking a question: how we can make birding in Oregon as a community, not just as a hobby, something that people know about? Oregonians young and old know (and love) hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, adventuring, and sightseeing. In it's own way, birding is each of these things. But when I mention birding to someone my age the response is usually "Oh wow! Have you seen 'The Big Year'?" More importantly, though, it's usually followed by genuine, or at least polite, interest in what I actually do out there in the wilderness all day. Imagine if birding was something more like hiking or biking or fishing? Each of these is outdoors and requires patience, but lots of young people love it. It's not that we need to get half the state of Oregon birding, but I think if we could work on getting birding to be something that's accessible as an idea, in our public spaces, our libraries and schools, and in our psyche as a state, we could go somewhere beautiful. Our community is unique in that it's a close one which produces meaningful connections and friendships. If more interested people knew about it and felt they were a part of it, narrative articles and OBA meetings might be more popular I don't have the answers to the many questions that idea brings up, but we have something in this community that is remarkable, and I think we can get new people to fall in love with it all just like we did if we really show them what we have and can have here.
Quarterly field notes and printed magazines may be a thing of the past, but the stories they told and the meaning they held in our community are not. Birding is an adventure, a science, an art, a fun hobby, a deep love, a collection of data, a collection of memories, a corner of your country down a gravel road, a crisp May morning in Malheur. It's a landscape, a way of thinking, and it's a family. If all those mysterious eBirders we don't know and all the young people who love the outdoors could see that, they'd want to write about it and read about it and be part of our community as much as we do.
I wrote a novel here and it doesn't really propose a solution, so I apologize for that, but my hope is to ask a question which we can answer together.

Best wishes and good birding,
Caleb Centanni



Subject: A quick note about OBA membership counts
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 15:08 pm
From: d_villa AT mail.com
 
Oregon Birding Association was founded in 1980 as Oregon Field Ornithologists with about 70 members. Membership grewasOFO flourished, climbingto about 475 individual members. In the early 2000's, membership started to decline, reaching a low of 205 in 2009. In 2013, OFO became Oregon Birding Association in hopes of drawing a broader audience. That, and the efforts of recent OBA boards have revilatized OBA, which has regrown to a current total of 447individual members.



dawn v, OBA Membership coordinator

Lincoln City/Nelscott



Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 4:15 am
From: llsdirons AT msn.com
 
Alan et al.,





First, thanksAlanfor agreeing with 84% of what I said. I think that is an OBOL record for me! Finding someone to compile and write field notes has always been a challenge and isn't likely to get easier. Over my 12+ years of service as an
NAB regional editor it became more and more difficult to compile a "complete" list of sightings. There was a 4-5 year period fromabout 2005-2010when it seemed a new local listserv was popping up about once a week. It went from OBOL being a rather singular
depository for bird posts to every sub-region of the state having its own forum. Unless you subscribed to all of them and mined them constantly, something would be missed. Then eBird usage ramped up about 8-9 years ago. There is still no easy way to mine and
revieweBird for sightings unless you have the sort of access that I enjoy as the statewide review coordinator. As time went on I found myself missing more and more important sightings and questioning the amount of time I was investing in trying to track them
all down. All the while the readership of the NAB was waning.





The end result of all this is that you find yourself asking, "why am I doing this and how many birders are reading what I write?" My passion for being an NAB editorand contributor was extremely high up until the last couple years. Then I found myself less
engaged in the compilation process and procrastinating more when it came to writing the seasonal columns. That, combined with an uncertain and increasingly delayed publication schedule and finally Ned Brinkley's retirement as the journal's editor, led to my
decision to give it up. It was a tough and painful decision to stop doing something that for many years brought me great joy and personal satisfaction.





Writing field notes is something you have to love doing. Otherwise it is a drudgery. It's a great way to learn status and distribution that you don't already know.Many of Oregon's birders (even some with a ton of experience) probably question whetherthey
know enough to be qualified to write field notes. It's really not as much about how much you know, but whether you know where to get answers.It is a learnable skill and there are plenty of resources both human and published that can answer the questions that
one encounters. I often queried the veteran birders in far corners of the state when there was something I didn't know, or didn't know for sure.
Birds of Oregon: A General Referenceand C.D. Littlefield's Birds of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge
were always nearby when I was writing an NAB column.





We are clearly at agenerational crossroads of sorts with regard to how birders exchange information about bird sightings. Younger birders have been reared in the digital/social media age. Theyapproach digitalinformation (and its many sources)as though it
is a Chinese buffet. They make ala carte selectionsrather than ordering a combo meal off the menu. Why subscribe to a journal thatincludes features and items of little or no interest?They don't subscribe to newspapers either.





Those of us reared in the print information age find pleasure in receiving printed journals and picking up the local or national newspaper. That fact that our combo plate comes with a spring roll and hot and sour soup is okay even if those aren't favorites.
We peruse the entire journal or newspaper and invariably find articles and features of unexpected interest, sort of likefinding the occasional spring roll that is much better than the rest. As Paul suggests, some veteran birders are not provided the sort
of publications they came to depend on and they aren't much into eBirding or depending on here today and buried in astream of emails tomorrowonline sources of information. I get that. I still subscribe to receive
North American Birds, Birding, Western Birds and Oregon Birds in printed form and I have written articles forand contributed to all of these publications in the last five years. I still like findingthe occasional surprisingly good
"spring roll."





Unlike most younger birders and my wife Shawneen, I do not subscribe to eBird alerts. I get annoyed enough at all the text message alerts I get from our text group at work. OBOL is the only birding listserv that I am subscribed to and I sometimes go days without
opening any messages. When I do, it's usually related to a discussion thread or ID question rather than the report of individual birds. For a while I found thatmy "where do I go birding today?" decisions were being overlyguided by what others had reported,
so I try to pay less attention to that than I once did.Also,I don't have to monitor the sightings as closely as I did when I was compiling them for field notes columns. Retirement from that has been nice.





Dave Irons

Beaverton, OR

From: [email protected] <[email protected]> on behalf of Alan Contreras <[email protected]>

Sent: Sunday, June 17, 2018 11:53 PM

To: OBOL ([email protected])

Subject: [obol] How should Oregon birders organize?



I agree with at least 84% of what Dave said in this note. I should clarify what I meant when I said it is hard to get people to write things. The problem OB editors ran into in recent
years, getting back to Pauls ideas, was that people were less willing to write quarterly field notes. The field notes were the anchor of the quarterly issue system so it became impractical to maintain four issues a year.



I dont think there has been a reduction in quality of the substantive articles. I cant speak for how easy they are to get in the past few years; Hendrik and Oscar would need to do that.



One cautionary note about eBird, of which I am a regular user. Many newer birders treat the number of local e-bird reports of an unusual species as the definitive number, that is, the complete status. It rarely is. Its a useful starting point,
but many parts of Oregon have baseline publications of one kind or another that provide a part of the picture. eBird is at its best when showing seasonal patterns and general distribution, particularly for more common species that get lots of reports.
















Alan Contreras

[email protected]

Eugene, Oregon





www.alanlcontreras.com
















On Jun 17, 2018, at 1:08 PM, David Irons <[email protected]> wrote:



Greetings All,



WhileIthink there is always merit to a nostalgicglance to thepast,I do not expect the Oregon birding community to turn back the clock or to ever resemble what it looked like
back in the 1980s and 1990s. That was more than quarter of century ago and everything we once knew as birders has evolved and or gone by the wayside. How many current Oregon birders even recognize the world that Paul is talking about? Only a handful of us.



Subject: California grouse, not too far from Oregon border in Siskiyou County
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 3:22 am
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
nothing rare but my best sequence of Sooty Grouse pictures ever:atowhee.blog/2018/06/17/why-did-the-chickens-cross-the-road/
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com






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Subject: No Vesper Sparrows detected at Mima Mounds (Thurston Co., Washington) this morning
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 23:38 pm
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
This might be more appropriate for Tweeters (the Washington equivalent
of OBOL) so perhaps someone who's subscribed to both lists can share it
there ... though the topic may be of regional interest regarding the
distribution of "Oregon" Vesper Sparrows as a subspecies.

After attending a graduation celebration in the Seattle area yesterday
afternoon/evening, I drove partway home then camped out south of
Olympia, then got up to check for Vesper Sparrows at Mima Mounds Natural
Area, near Littlerock. This site is only 15-20 miles from Joint Base
Lewis-McChord where a small remnant population of "Oregon" Vesper
Sparrows is being monitored, in parallel with similar efforts in the
Willamette Valley and Rogue Valley.

Seeing as I was in the area, I figured I might as well attempt a quick
survey to see if any color-banded Vesper Sparrows from JBLM had made it
over to Mima Prairie.

Unfortunately the gate to the interpretive trail at the north end of the
natural area (which closes at dusk) was still locked when I got there at
about 6:30 am. So I was limited to surveying from the south and east
edges of the prairie, along Mima and Bourdeaux Rds.

I heard a couple of WESTERN MEADOWLARKS and a few SAVANNAH SPARROWS, but
I didn't hear any Vesper Sparrows, even in response to recordings.

A check of eBird shows only one report of a single Vesper Sparrow from
Mima Mounds Natural Area this year, back on May 15th (with no details).

From eBird it's hard to know how much observer effort has gone into
looking for grassland sparrows at this site, but Savannah Sparrow
detections are a reasonable proxy. There have been three visits during
the 2016 nesting season so far (May-June) in which Savannah Sparrows
were detected (24 detections total).

Hopefully there might still be one or two pairs nesting in the north
part of this site, which I couldn't get to this morning.

Good birding,
Joel


--
Joel Geier
Corvallis, Oregon



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Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 23:18 pm
From: Autumn207 AT comcast.net
 
OBOL Members,
Im pretty sure that when Dave wrote that OBOL is dying on the vine, he meant that our listserv's purpose and usefulness are changing with the times. OBOL membership has been steadily increasing for the last 5 years and is now at 1572. I will let you know when we reach 2,000!
Treesa Hertzel, ModeratorSW Washington


On Jun 17, 2018, at 1:08 PM, David Irons <[email protected]> wrote:Greetings All,
WhileIthink there is always merit to a nostalgicglance to thepast,I do not expect the Oregon birding community to turn back the clock or to ever resemble what it looked like back in the 1980s and 1990s. That was more than quarter of century ago and everything we once knew as birders has evolved and or gone by the wayside. How many current Oregon birders even recognize the world that Paul is talking about? Only a handful of us.
I too find myself feeling occasionallynostalgic for the days and the way things were when I came of age as an Oregon birder, but any hope of that reality existing again will only producedisappointment. If I hope to be relevant in the current Oregon birding community I hadbest look to the future and figure out how I can make contributions giventhe current landscape. I am no longer aNorth American BirdsRegional Editor and I'm not on the Oregon Bird Records Committee.Instead I am a local reviewerand statewide review coordinator for eBird.If I write an article forOregon Birds(OB)it can't be a simple status and distribution piece like we used to write. That information can be readily produced in an instant with an eBird query. I have to find a way to share information that isn't readily available elsewhere and I hope that Ihave with recent contributions toOB.
I recall looking forward to seeing an issue ofAmerican Birdsand ultimatelyNorth American Birdsshow up in the mailbox. There was similar anticipation about receiving an issue ofOregon Birds.Those days are gone.North American Birdsis no longer my sole informational pipeline forknowing what birds are being seen elsewhere in North America. By the time it gets published it's old news. It's easyto suggest thatOregon Birdshasgone backwards in quality, or that changes in the wayfield notes are delivered make it less appealing. I personally think the quality of articles inOBis as good as it ever was and that finding folks willing to write articles probably isn't any more difficult than it ever has been.North American Birdsnever really changed its style much and still the subscribership steadily atrophied.
We live in an age where information is delivered to us in real time. It is impossible to produce and deliver printed materials in real time. Regardless of the quality of articles, or the style in which field notes are presented, the sharing of information that is already available elsewhere isold news and hence not news. I can submit sightings to eBird, post them on Facebook and OBOL or write a quick blog and post that if I want to share my bird sightings in a timely fashion. Even OBOL is dying on the vine a bit. It is mostlya discussion forum these days, not a place where all or even mostOregon birders go to get or sharereal time updates about birds they may want to go see. Birding listservs in other states are dealing with the same issues. As chance would have it,Shawneen just walked in the room and asked if anyone had posted on OBOL that a Blue Jay has been at Malheur HQ for several days. Maybe I missed it, but I haven't seen it posted here.
If you pull upthe current Top 100 for Oregon on eBird this morning, you will find that Sarah Swanson at 208 species is #100. I remind you that we are not quite halfway through the calendar year. Five years ago 208 species would have tied her with Mark Nikas for the 81st spot for theentire year. As I peruse the roster of folks who have reported more species in Oregon than I have thus far this year (there are 45 of them) I see names of many people who I've either not met, or don't know personally. The final standings for 2013 include only 17 people that I have not met personally and only a couple names that are wholly unfamiliar. All the folks who are over 200 for the year in 2018 are getting timely information somewhere. It's not OBOL, COBOL,OBorNAB, it's eBird.
More people are birding inOregon than ever before. As a community grows in size, and the Oregon birding community has grown exponentially, intimate connections between all members of that community become impossible. When you don't know another birder personally and have not spent time with them in the field, it is natural to have questions about their skills and level of experience when they report something out of the ordinary. Becoming a trusted source of information requires either a track record or familiarity. If you question someone about their eBird sighting (something I do routinely as a reviewer) building a relationship and trust has to be part of the equation. Some see being skeptical as being mean-spirited, or telling others that they are wrong and getting a charge out of it. It's not that at all.
I find the current crop of Oregon birders to bejust as friendly and engaging as we were back in the day, if not more so. As a group they are more knowledgeable and informed than we were back then. Most of them are not taken aback when asked about their sightings. They expect their reports to be reviewed and to get queries from local reviewers.They are polite, willing to share information and interested in getting to know other birders and learn from them.
Lets say thatthere are 1000 active Oregon birders (however you chooseto define "active"), which I think is a gross underestimate.Are ABA or OBA serving the needs of these folks? If so, why are so few of them joining these organizations?They don't join the Oregon Birding Association, the American Birding Association, or subscribe toNorth American Birdsand we should wonder why.I think it's becauseOBA, ABA, andNABhave not evolved a whole lot from what they were back in the day.Would rolling back the clock and recreating the "OFO" that Paul describes make a difference. I don't think so. If we want catch more mice, we need to build a better mousetrap. Perhapswe should ask those who aren't joining themwhy these organizations and publications have no appeal. Maybe weshould explore ways toadaptandmeet their needs rather than trying torecreatea nostalgic past that some choose to remember as having amore congenial and engaged birding communitythan whatwe see today. This may be the discussion that Paul was trying to initiate.
Dave IronsBeaverton, OR
From:[email protected]<[email protected]> on behalf of Alan Contreras <[email protected]>
Sent:Saturday, June 16, 2018 4:00 PM
To:[email protected]
Cc:[email protected]
Subject:[obol] Re: How should Oregon birders organize?A couple of comments on Pauls ideas. As I have been part of OBA since Day 1 I qualify as a Crusty Old Birder. Paul is Old but not Crusty.
The main reason that we went from OB based on quarterly field notes to the current two-issue system is that the combination of volume of data and disappearing writers meant that nobody would do the work to produce a quarterly. It takes time and needs a team effort. Teams have not been available.
The tabular vs. narrative presentation of field notes is an area where people have different views. I think the value added by the narrative format CAN make a huge positive difference if the writers know their regions and can point out WHY a report is notable. The best writers do this.
One of the big changes in the birding community since OB started is that knowledgeable birders in the 1980s were almost always willing to write for OB if asked. Today many will not. I am not sure why this is but Pauls note about a general loss of community may be a factor along with the unfortunate and erroneous idea that everything is on the web.
Ill stop there for now.

Alan ContrerasEugene, Oregon
[email protected]
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Jun 16, 2018, at 2:20 AM, Paul Sullivan <[email protected]> wrote:

Im responding to questions that were NOT asked in the recent survey of members of the Oregon Birding Association. I hope to start a conversation.



Subject: Scio Breeding Bird Survey on 6/16 (Linn & Marion Co.)
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 22:06 pm
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Saturday morning (June 16th) I ran the Scio Breeding Bird Survey route.
This route starts along Hwy 226 a few miles east of Scio and continues
on to Lyons and Mehama, then crosses Hwy 22, climbs up Fernridge Rd.,
and zigzags generally northward from there until it ends at the Union
Hill Cemetery.

As with all BBS routes, this one has fifty stops, spaced roughly half a
mile apart. The idea is to look and (mostly) listen for 3 minutes at
each stop, recording all birds that are seen or heard.

Yesterday's morning's weather was overcast with remarkably steady
temperatures, ranging from 55-60 F. A light drizzle about an hour into
the count fortunately didn't last long. Traffic conditions were much
better than last year, when part of this route was being used as a truck
detour route for Hwy 22.

I encountered excessive noise at only two stops along Thomas Creek, plus
the last stop where a groundskeeper was using a weed-whacker to trim
around the graves in the cemetery. At Stop 2, a BULLOCK's ORIOLE singing
from inside a young ash tree just 10 yards away did make it hard to hear
much else!

In contrast to last year, I detected no HORNED LARKS and only one VESPER
SPARROW (which was along Union Hill Rd.).

The numbers (total individuals for each species and number of stops at
which each species was detected) are listed below.

Happy birding,
Joel

Scio Breeding Bird Survey summary 2018-06-16

Species Total (Number of stops)
California Quail 5 (4)
Band-tailed Pigeon 14 (3)
Eurasian Collared-Dove 10 (9)
Mourning Dove 2 (2)
Killdeer 1 (1)
Turkey Vulture 3 (2)
Red-breasted Sapsucker 3 (3)
Northern Flicker 3 (3)
Olive-sided Flycatcher 1 (1)
Western Wood-Pewee 30 (22)
Willow Flycatcher 16 (11)
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 2 (1)
Warbling Vireo 10 (9)
Steller's Jay 8 (5)
California Scrub-Jay 7 (6)
American Crow 19 (14)
Common Raven 9 (6)
Purple Martin 1 (1)
Tree Swallow 2 (2)
Violet-green Swallow 21 (10)
Barn Swallow 6 (4)
Black-capped Chickadee 5 (3)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1 (1)
Bushtit 3 (2)
Red-breasted Nuthatch 3 (2)
House Wren 3 (3)
Pacific Wren 3 (2)
Bewick's Wren 6 (6)
Swainson's Thrush 68 (31)
American Robin 69 (36)
European Starling 46 (9)
Cedar Waxwing 6 (4)
House Sparrow 2 (2)
House Finch 2 (2)
Purple Finch 5 (5)
Lesser Goldfinch 1 (1)
American Goldfinch 15 (8)
Spotted Towhee 28 (23)
Chipping Sparrow 1 (1)
Vesper Sparrow 1 (1)
Savannah Sparrow 16 (9)
Song Sparrow 19 (17)
White-crowned Sparrow 40 (22)
Dark-eyed Junco 8 (7)
Yellow-breasted Chat 1 (1)
Red-winged Blackbird 5 (3)
Brown-headed Cowbird 4 (4)
Brewer's Blackbird 5 (4)
Orange-crowned Warbler 10 (7)
Common Yellowthroat 13 (9)
Black-throated Gray Warbler 3 (3)
Wilson's Warbler 2 (2)
Western Tanager 8 (6)
Black-headed Grosbeak 11 (10)
Lazuli Bunting 2 (2)
Downy Woodpecker 1 (1)
Hairy Woodpecker 1 (1)
Brown Creeper 2 (2)
Golden-crowned Kinglet 3 (2)
Bullock's Oriole 1 (1)

Vehicles 55 (25)
Noise (3)


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



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Subject: Re: Fwd: Smith Rock raptors and a big surprise
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 20:09 pm
From: kakathol AT cbbmail.com
 
Last year I had two big horn sheep on the road about half way up to grizzly peak. Any idea what type they may be and are the common there? Not to far from smith rock either.Kim Kathol Redmond OR
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018, 5:51 PM David Vick <[email protected]> wrote:

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: David Vick <[email protected]>
Date: Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 5:47 PM
Subject: Smith Rock raptors and a big surprise
To: BARNUM Josie * OPRD <[email protected]>, BROWN Scott A * OPRD <[email protected]>, COBOL <[email protected]>, kja <[email protected]>


Hi All,
The two bald eaglets took their first flights on Thursday and continue to spend most of their time hanging out on the nest tree waiting for mom and dad to bring home groceries which included a flying fish and a flying squirrel this morning. I know that both of these species are rather rare in Central Oregon but perhaps they were just receiving their first and last flying lessons. The golden eaglet is spending a lot of time exercising it's wings in the nest so fledging will in the next week or two. Unlike the neighbors, once a golden leaves the nest they want nothing to do with their former prison. If you were wanting to observe or photograph the balds from the rim better make it soon but please remember to complete the recently implemented agreement form if you haven't already done so. This can be obtained from the office or you can give me a call at 541-923-6943 and I will set you up. Despite the valiant efforts of Gary Landers of Wild Wings Raptor Rehabilitation in Sisters the tiercel of the peregrine pair was lost last month right after confirmation of incubation which obviously resulted in failure. It was kind of sad to see her defending the scrape for the following two weeks but such is the natural world. The good news is that the she has recruited a replacement, a very brief period of morning indeed! It is highly unlikely that they will produce a clutch this late in the season but it was awesome for Ranger Kyle and I to watch them hunting Violet-green Swallows from the face of Picnic Lunch Wall yesterday. The First Kiss climbing area's Prairie Falcons continue their nesting efforts and those closures also continue despite some members of the climbing community getting antsy but oh well. When I was checking on their status recently I noticed something out of place up on the rim. When I got my binoculars on it I was amazed to see a female California Bighorn Sheep. My first thought was, "Ewe got to be kidding!" I feel sheepish about posting this on COBAL but couldn't resist four baaad puns in a row. By proximity it would be more likely to have been one of the feral Mouflon Sheep from Crooked River Ranch but that apparently is not the case. The nearest population of bighorns was reintroduced in the Mutton Mountains on the Rez several years ago. (One of my former students, tribal member Joel Santos, was the recipient of the very first tag and bagged a huge ram when the population grew large enough to be hunted.) Many of you no doubt remember when the Mountain Goat showed up and stayed for awhile in the Dry Canyon out in the Badlands a few years ago. Populations always have those that hear the beat of a different drummer and are just hard wired to disperse like OR-7 did. Wonders never cease!
David VickInterpretive NaturalistSmith Rock State Park



Subject: Re: How should Oregon birders organize?
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 20:09 pm
From: llsdirons AT msn.com
 
Greetings All,





WhileIthink there is always merit to a nostalgicglance to thepast,I do not expect the Oregon birding community to turn back the clock or to ever resemble what it looked like back in the 1980s and 1990s. That was more than quarter of century ago and everything
we once knew as birders has evolved and or gone by the wayside. How many current Oregon birders even recognize the world that Paul is talking about? Only a handful of us.





I too find myself feeling occasionallynostalgic for the days and the way things were when I came of age as an Oregon birder, but any hope of that reality existing again will only producedisappointment. If I hope to be relevant in the current Oregon birding
community I hadbest look to the future and figure out how I can make contributions giventhe current landscape. I am no longer aNorth American BirdsRegional Editor and I'm not on the Oregon Bird Records Committee.

Instead I am a local reviewerand statewide review coordinator for eBird.If I write an article for
Oregon Birds (OB)it can't be a simple status and distribution piece like we used to write. That information can be readily produced in an instant with an eBird query. I have to find a way to share information that isn't readily available elsewhere
and I hope that Ihave with recent contributions to OB.





I recall looking forward to seeing an issue of American Birds and ultimately
North American Birds show up in the mailbox. There was similar anticipation about receiving an issue of
Oregon Birds. Those days are gone. North American Birds is no longer my sole informational pipeline forknowing what birds are being seen elsewhere in North America. By the time it gets published it's old news. It's easyto suggest thatOregon
Birdshasgone backwards in quality, or that changes in the wayfield notes are delivered make it less appealing. I personally think
the quality of articles in OBis as good as it ever was and that finding folks willing to write articles probably isn't any more difficult than it ever has been.North American Birds
never really changed its style much and still the subscribership steadily atrophied.





We live in an age where information is delivered to us in real time. It is impossible to produce and deliver printed materials in real
time. Regardless of the quality of articles, or the style in which field notes are presented, the sharing of information that is already available elsewhere isold news and hence not news. I can submit sightings to eBird, post them on Facebook and OBOL or
write a quick blog and post that if I want to share my bird sightings in a timely fashion. Even OBOL is dying on the vine a bit. It is mostlya discussion forum these days, not a place where all or even mostOregon birders go to get or sharereal time updates
about birds they may want to go see. Birding listservs in other states are dealing with the same issues. As chance would have it,Shawneen just walked in the room and asked if anyone had posted on OBOL that a Blue Jay has been at Malheur HQ for several days.
Maybe I missed it, but I haven't seen it posted here.





If you pull upthe current Top 100 for Oregon on eBird this morning, you will find that Sarah Swanson at 208 species is #100. I remind
you that we are not quite halfway through the calendar year. Five years ago 208 species would have tied her with Mark Nikas for the 81st spot for the
entire year. As I peruse the roster of folks who have reported more species in Oregon than I have thus far this year (there are 45 of them) I see names of many people who I've either not met, or don't know personally. The final standings for 2013 include
only 17 people that I have not met personally and only a couple names that are wholly unfamiliar. All the folks who are over 200 for the year in 2018 are getting timely information somewhere. It's not OBOL, COBOL,
OB or NAB, it's eBird.





More people are birding inOregon
than ever before. As a community grows in size, and the Oregon birding community has grown exponentially, intimate connections between all members of that community become impossible. When you don't know another birder personally and have not spent time with
them in the field, it is natural to have questions about their skills and level of experience when they report something out of the ordinary. Becoming a trusted source of information requires either a track record or familiarity. If you question someone about
their eBird sighting (something I do routinely as a reviewer) building a relationship and trust has to be part of the equation. Some see being skeptical as being mean-spirited, or telling others that they are wrong and getting a charge out of it. It's not
that at all.





I find the current crop of Oregon birders to bejust as friendly and engaging as we were back in the day, if not more so. As a group they
are more knowledgeable and informed than we were back then. Most of them are not taken aback when asked about their sightings. They expect their reports to be reviewed and to get queries from local reviewers.They are polite, willing to share information and
interested in getting to know other birders and learn from them.





Lets say thatthere are 1000 active Oregon birders (however you chooseto define "active"), which I think is a gross underestimate.Are
ABA or OBA serving the needs of these folks? If so, why are so few of them joining these organizations?

They don't join the Oregon Birding Association, the American Birding Association, or subscribe toNorth American Birds
and we should wonder why.I think it's becauseOBA, ABA, andNABhave not evolved a whole lot from what they were back in the day.Would
rolling back the clock and recreating the "OFO" that Paul describes make a difference. I don't think so. If we want catch more mice, we need to build a better mousetrap. Perhapswe
should ask those who aren't joining themwhy these organizations and publications have no appeal. Maybe weshould
explore ways toadaptandmeet
their needs rather than trying torecreatea
nostalgic past that some choose to remember as having amore congenial and engaged birding communitythan
whatwe see today. This may be the discussion that Paul was trying to initiate.





Dave Irons

Beaverton, OR





From: [email protected] <[email protected]> on behalf of Alan Contreras <[email protected]>

Sent: Saturday, June 16, 2018 4:00 PM

To: [email protected]

Cc: [email protected]

Subject: [obol] Re: How should Oregon birders organize?



A couple of comments on Pauls ideas. As I have been part of OBA since Day 1 I qualify as a Crusty Old Birder. Paul is Old but not Crusty.



The main reason that we went from OB based on quarterly field notes to the current two-issue system is that the combination of volume of data and disappearing writers meant that nobody would do the work to produce a quarterly. It takes time and needs a
team effort. Teams have not been available.



The tabular vs. narrative presentation of field notes is an area where people have different views. I think the value added by the narrative format CAN make a huge positive difference if the writers know their regions and can point out WHY a report is
notable. The best writers do this.



One of the big changes in the birding community since OB started is that knowledgeable birders in the 1980s were almost always willing to write for OB if asked. Today many will not. I am not sure why this is but Pauls note about a general loss of community
may be a factor along with the unfortunate and erroneous idea that everything is on the web.



Ill stop there for now.



Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon


[email protected]



www.alanlcontreras.com










On Jun 16, 2018, at 2:20 AM, Paul Sullivan <[email protected]> wrote:








Im responding to questions that were NOT asked in the recent survey of members of the Oregon Birding Association. I hope to start a conversation.



Subject: Nightjar Surveys
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 19:45 pm
From: yaakovm AT comcast.net
 
Hi All,

Occasionally there are references to sightings of Common Nighthawk or Poorwill. I wonder if you're aware of the annual survey conducted by the Nightjar Survey Network, run by the Center for Conservation Biology. The survey is conducted on one evening/night during one of three survey windows and takes about 2-4 hours depending on how far it is to the survey route. I've been doing a survey like this in the Scapoose area for a number of years and noticed that there are many unadopted routes in Oregon just waiting for someone. If you're interested, all the information can be found at http://www.nightjars.org/. The last available window this year is June 20 - July 6.

Jordan Epstein

Portland



Subject: Malheur Hdqtrs BLUE JAY
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 19:27 pm
From: shawneenfinnegan AT gmail.com
 
I just received a text from Adrienne Wolf-Lockett that there has been a BLUE JAY at Headquarters for the past three days. They were surprised to see it given its presence over the past few days. Attached is a photo by Bob Lockett of the jay.

She also said that they heard about a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER at Page Springs.

Shawneen Finnegan
Beaverton, OR



Subject: Lane C. swans
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 17:46 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Josh Galpern just saw three large swans that he thought were Trumpeters on the old log pond along Hwy. 126 between Noti and Cougar Pass (Badger Mtn.). Because of the winding road this is a drive-by-quickly site.


Alan [email protected], Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



Subject: Re: Green tailed towhee
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 5:38 am
From: or.naturalist AT gmail.com
 
Hi Bob,
The Scrantons just hiked up Black Butte and saw five Green Tailed Towhees on the south flank. Really a gorgeous species! If you go make it early in the day as it is very exposed and the temps will be in the mid 80's next week. Good birding,
David
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 8:19 AM Tom Crabtree <[email protected]> wrote:
Bob, no Am. Three-toed Woodpeckers were found for the Woodpecker festival two weeks ago so no nests are known this year. Your best bet would probably be to drive up highway 242 to the gate and walk in to where the Millie burn starts and wander around the burnt lodgepole pines and hope you get lucky. Green-tailed Towhees can be found at Indian Ford Campground, Cold Springs Campground, FS road 12 towards Black Butte, Trout Creek Butte Road. They like the manzanita/ponderosa pine stands.Tom Crabtree, Bend



Subject: Fwd: Smith Rock raptors and a big surprise
Date: Sun Jun 17 2018 0:51 am
From: or.naturalist AT gmail.com
 
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: David Vick <[email protected]>
Date: Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 5:47 PM
Subject: Smith Rock raptors and a big surprise
To: BARNUM Josie * OPRD <[email protected]>, BROWN Scott A * OPRD <[email protected]>, COBOL <[email protected]>, kja <[email protected]>


Hi All,
The two bald eaglets took their first flights on Thursday and continue to spend most of their time hanging out on the nest tree waiting for mom and dad to bring home groceries which included a flying fish and a flying squirrel this morning. I know that both of these species are rather rare in Central Oregon but perhaps they were just receiving their first and last flying lessons. The golden eaglet is spending a lot of time exercising it's wings in the nest so fledging will in the next week or two. Unlike the neighbors, once a golden leaves the nest they want nothing to do with their former prison. If you were wanting to observe or photograph the balds from the rim better make it soon but please remember to complete the recently implemented agreement form if you haven't already done so. This can be obtained from the office or you can give me a call at 541-923-6943 and I will set you up. Despite the valiant efforts of Gary Landers of Wild Wings Raptor Rehabilitation in Sisters the tiercel of the peregrine pair was lost last month right after confirmation of incubation which obviously resulted in failure. It was kind of sad to see her defending the scrape for the following two weeks but such is the natural world. The good news is that the she has recruited a replacement, a very brief period of morning indeed! It is highly unlikely that they will produce a clutch this late in the season but it was awesome for Ranger Kyle and I to watch them hunting Violet-green Swallows from the face of Picnic Lunch Wall yesterday. The First Kiss climbing area's Prairie Falcons continue their nesting efforts and those closures also continue despite some members of the climbing community getting antsy but oh well. When I was checking on their status recently I noticed something out of place up on the rim. When I got my binoculars on it I was amazed to see a female California Bighorn Sheep. My first thought was, "Ewe got to be kidding!" I feel sheepish about posting this on COBAL but couldn't resist four baaad puns in a row. By proximity it would be more likely to have been one of the feral Mouflon Sheep from Crooked River Ranch but that apparently is not the case. The nearest population of bighorns was reintroduced in the Mutton Mountains on the Rez several years ago. (One of my former students, tribal member Joel Santos, was the recipient of the very first tag and bagged a huge ram when the population grew large enough to be hunted.) Many of you no doubt remember when the Mountain Goat showed up and stayed for awhile in the Dry Canyon out in the Badlands a few years ago. Populations always have those that hear the beat of a different drummer and are just hard wired to disperse like OR-7 did. Wonders never cease!
David VickInterpretive NaturalistSmith Rock State Park



Subject: Coos Redheads 6/16/18
Date: Sat Jun 16 2018 23:42 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
Three males and a female at the old Weyco pond site N Spit of Coos Bay. No Coos breeding records but birds have been seen in both July and early August at this location so maybe late migrants?
Very few Gadwall this year. We have had upwards of 50 breeding pairs at this site the last few years- only five or ten pairs that I could see.
One oversummering Bufflehead also.
Enjoy!Tim RCoos Bay



Subject: Fwd: Re: Warbler Song Help
Date: Sat Jun 16 2018 23:33 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Tim Rodenkirk <[email protected]>
Date: Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 4:31 PM
Subject: Re: [obol] Re: Warbler Song Help
To: <[email protected]>


Sounds like a standard Hermit to me. They normally end on a lower note like that song.
A couple days ago I thought I was hearing a parula out in the Coast Range. After a while the bird did the standard BT Gray song!
Tim RCoos Bay
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 2:23 PM Joshua Galpern <[email protected]> wrote:
Hermit warbler can sometimes sound like that.
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018, 2:04 PM Roger Freeman <[email protected]> wrote:
The warbler if very faint for sure. Could it be a Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warbler? Otherwise Alan's guess of a BTGWarbler could be.Roger FreemanSilverton
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 1:36 PM, Caleb Centanni <[email protected]> wrote:
Hi all,
Setophaga warbler songs are one of the areas I still struggle with. The attached is a medium-quaility recording of one from Fishback Hill west of Monmouth in Polk County yesterday. If anyone can ID it for my education, that would be awesome. You may have to turn your volume up to hear the bird well.
Thanks, and good birding,
Caleb Centanni



Subject: Re: Warbler Song Help
Date: Sat Jun 16 2018 21:23 pm
From: jgalpern17 AT gmail.com
 
Hermit warbler can sometimes sound like that.
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018, 2:04 PM Roger Freeman <[email protected]> wrote:
The warbler if very faint for sure. Could it be a Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warbler? Otherwise Alan's guess of a BTGWarbler could be.Roger FreemanSilverton
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 1:36 PM, Caleb Centanni <[email protected]> wrote:
Hi all,
Setophaga warbler songs are one of the areas I still struggle with. The attached is a medium-quaility recording of one from Fishback Hill west of Monmouth in Polk County yesterday. If anyone can ID it for my education, that would be awesome. You may have to turn your volume up to hear the bird well.
Thanks, and good birding,
Caleb Centanni



Subject: Re: Warbler Song Help
Date: Sat Jun 16 2018 21:04 pm
From: freemanbecard AT gmail.com
 
The warbler if very faint for sure. Could it be a Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warbler? Otherwise Alan's guess of a BTGWarbler could be.Roger FreemanSilverton
On Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 1:36 PM, Caleb Centanni <[email protected]> wrote:
Hi all,
Setophaga warbler songs are one of the areas I still struggle with. The attached is a medium-quaility recording of one from Fishback Hill west of Monmouth in Polk County yesterday. If anyone can ID it for my education, that would be awesome. You may have to turn your volume up to hear the bird well.
Thanks, and good birding,
Caleb Centanni


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