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Updated on April 23, 2019, 2:40 pm

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23 Apr: @ 14:36:16  Fern Ridge Cattle Egret 4/23 [Noah Strycker]
23 Apr: @ 13:31:06  Re: White-Fronted Geese [Paul Sullivan]
23 Apr: @ 12:37:29  White-Fronted Geese [Bruce Newhouse]
23 Apr: @ 12:28:03  Another yard first! [Lona Pierce]
23 Apr: @ 12:20:43  White-Fronted Geese [Bruce Newhouse]
23 Apr: @ 11:58:09  Re: Coos Migrants 4/22/2019 [philliplc]
23 Apr: @ 11:51:43  Tabor extravaganza [Abby Haight]
23 Apr: @ 09:22:40  Fernhill Wetlands citizen-science training this SATURDAY, 27 April [Jay Withgott]
23 Apr: @ 08:18:12  Re: upcoming migration forecast [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
23 Apr: @ 07:11:16  Coos Migrants 4/22/2019 [Tim Rodenkirk]
23 Apr: @ 04:49:05  Enjoying Ferruginous Hawks [Paul Sullivan]
23 Apr: @ 00:30:56  Illinois Valley Josephine County yard birds [Romain Cooper]
22 Apr: @ 22:41:03  Re: upcoming migration forecast [Rebecca Hartman]
22 Apr: @ 22:17:18  Re: Bird watchers and photographers (no apostrophe and no unnecessary capitals) [Josh Spice]
22 Apr: @ 22:08:57  upcoming migration forecast [Phil Pickering]
22 Apr: @ 21:35:53  Re: Bird watchers and photographers (no apostrophe and no unnecessary capitals) [clearwater]
22 Apr: @ 18:14:51  Malheur update [Alan Contreras]
22 Apr: @ 17:17:13  Linn Vesper Sparrows, Western Kingbird, Marion Chipping Sparrow 4/22/19 [Roy Gerig]
22 Apr: @ 16:56:44  White-fronts again [Phil Pickering]
22 Apr: @ 15:38:30  Western Kingbird at Baskett Slough [Brandon Wagner]
22 Apr: @ 09:28:18  Re: Mt. Tabor Park, Portland [Gerard Lillie]
22 Apr: @ 08:15:09  Re: Mt. Tabor Park, Portland [Lars Norgren]
21 Apr: @ 23:43:15  Vaux Swift chimney roost-Weigand Hall [Mary Garrard]
21 Apr: @ 23:42:06  Hybrid Yellow-shafted Flicker still here. [Tim]
21 Apr: @ 23:16:14  Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 4/17/2019--LATE REPORT [Wink Gross]
21 Apr: @ 22:43:18  Re: Lincoln County Swainson's Hawk [David Irons]
21 Apr: @ 21:20:51  Lincoln County Swainson's Hawk [Nicholas Martens]
21 Apr: @ 21:14:47  Re: Too close? [Wayne Hoffman]
21 Apr: @ 20:39:00 Re: SAS Ankeny NWR Field Trip Report [Barbara Dolan]
21 Apr: @ 20:26:09  Too close? [Jason A. Crotty]
21 Apr: @ 20:15:43  Roadside Nests & Etiquette [clay crofton]
21 Apr: @ 19:19:53  American White Pelicans [Cindy Tofflemoyer]
21 Apr: @ 19:11:51  SAS Ankeny NWR Field Trip Report [Mike Unger]
21 Apr: @ 18:41:30  Malheur update [Alan Contreras]
21 Apr: @ 18:18:04  "PDX fire station" [Lyn Topinka]
21 Apr: @ 18:13:18  Vanport YELLOWS !!! ... FOS - Yellow-headed BB and Gr Yellowlegs [Lyn Topinka]
21 Apr: @ 18:07:44  Re: Happy Easter and help request [Larry McQueen]
21 Apr: @ 17:42:23  Re: Bird Watchers and Photographer's [David Irons]
21 Apr: @ 17:09:05  Re: Anybody want to take a stab? [Susan Kirkbride]
21 Apr: @ 16:53:44  Coos Calliopes/Vesper Sp et al. [Tim Rodenkirk]
21 Apr: @ 16:17:11  Re: Bird Watchers and Photographer's [Wayne Hoffman]
21 Apr: @ 15:08:40  Re: Anybody want to take a stab? [Lars Norgren]
21 Apr: @ 14:58:02  Re: Bird Watchers and Photographer's [Tom Crabtree]
21 Apr: @ 14:48:27  Re: Bean goose yes [Tom Crabtree]
21 Apr: @ 14:39:30  Happy Easter and help request [Linda Fink]
21 Apr: @ 14:18:46  Fwd: [LCBNO] Horned Puffin (dead) and big Whimbrel flock [150] near Ona Beach [Lincoln Co.] [Range Bayer]
21 Apr: @ 13:52:05  Swamp Sparrow in Gresham yard [peter barnes]
21 Apr: @ 13:08:49  Re: Anybody want to take a stab? [Cindy Zalunardo]
21 Apr: @ 12:28:32  foy bandtailed pigeon coos [Karen Saxton]
21 Apr: @ 12:26:26  Warblers in Silverton [Grant Canterbury]





Subject: Fern Ridge Cattle Egret 4/23
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 14:36 pm
From: noah.strycker AT gmail.com
 
Hi birders,

There is an apparent CATTLE EGRET this morning near the Hwy 126 viewing platform in the Fisher Unit of Fern Ridge Wildlife Area (west of Eugene), hanging out with several Great Egrets in the wetlands north and west of the platform. It seems to have a slight buffy wash on the head and back, and is otherwise obviously much smaller and stockier than the Great Egrets, though I mainly saw the birds in flight as they foraged behind tall grasses.

Our group from the Cascades Raptor Center also enjoyed views of two SORAS, BLACK-NECKED STILTS, a BITTERN, and, at Royal Avenue, a beautiful male YELLOW WARBLER.

Good birding,
Noah

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Subject: Re: White-Fronted Geese
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 13:31 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Fifteen minutes ago I heard Gtr White-fronted Geese over my backyard in
McMinnville. Saw a couple Tukey Vultures too.

The ground is covered with 25 Golden-crowned Sparrows and the feeders with
12 Evening Grosbeaks. I'm looking for the first Black-headed Grosbeak, due
any day now.

Paul Sullivan
Rummel St
McMinnville

----------------------

Subject: White-Fronted Geese
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 12:37 pm
From: newhouse AT efn.org

No sooner than hitting "send" on the last report than several Vs of

high-flying WHITE-FRONTED GEESE came flying over SE Eugene heading NNW.



Probably in the range of 1500, in Vs that slowly "morphed" into and away

from each other. About 10 minutes later, another 500 or so.



Bruce Newhouse in Eugene




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Subject: White-Fronted Geese
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 12:37 pm
From: newhouse AT efn.org
 
No sooner than hitting "send" on the last report than several Vs of
high-flying WHITE-FRONTED GEESE came flying over SE Eugene heading NNW.

Probably in the range of 1500, in Vs that slowly "morphed" into and away
from each other. About 10 minutes later, another 500 or so.

Bruce Newhouse in Eugene



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Subject: Another yard first!
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 12:28 pm
From: alkpierce AT gmail.com
 
Never would have expected this bird in my yard, although I've gotten brief glimpses of them in the Columbia County foothills once or twice. In my backyard a MOUNTAIN QUAIL is puttering around with the squirrels, sparrows, jays and mourning doves. The usual California quail I get daily aren't here at the moment. I posted a photo on Facebook on a couple of Oregon birder sites -- not a great photo but clearly a mountain quail. It has been feeding on the chicken scratch/millet mix I put out for the birds, and even took a dustbath in the long-abandoned sandbox area nearby. It is still here. My son is taking a video of the quail now. May post on if the video comes out OK. This is four miles north of Scappoose.Lona Pierce



Subject: White-Fronted Geese
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 12:20 pm
From: newhouse AT efn.org
 
Whitey L. in SE Eugene reports this morning (Tuesday) that about 11,000
WHITE-FRONTED GEESE have flown over in a northerly direction between
about 9 a.m. and 10 when he called.

Bruce Newhouse in Eugene


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Subject: Re: Coos Migrants 4/22/2019
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 11:58 am
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
Also had first of year Evening Grosbeaks yesterdaywith small flocks headed north over the Lincoln Countycoast range at about 1500 ft. And this morning for thefirst time a few flocks audible going over the immediatecoast in Lincoln City. Seems to be at least a minornorthbound wave moving through right now.
I had that experience with N Pygmy Owl quite a fewtimes this weekend while trying to do a broad samplingof the lower coast range here. They seem pretty adaptable,as expected with one on territory somewhere around mostclear cut edges. But also a few heard in forest borderinglowland pastures, and they are denser than I would haveguessed moving up into more enclosed forest higher inthe coast range.
Phil




Was working east of Myrtle Point, Coos in the forested Coast Range on Monday. I was in a Doug-fir stand about 50 years old adjacent to old growth. As soon as I got out of my truck I heard a N Pygmy Owl calling from the older stand, they are pretty easy to hear this time of year.





The stand I was doing plant surveys in was packed with singing birds- many HERMIT, BLACK-THROATED GRAY and WILSON™S WARBLERS and lots of PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS. Early in the day I could stand at any one spot and hear two or three of each singing. I had four Pac Slopes calling/singing close to me at one point- very cool day!


Also heard my first EVENING GROSBEAKS.





Happy birding,


Tim R


Coos Bay

@gmail.com>



Subject: Tabor extravaganza
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 11:51 am
From: abhaight AT gmail.com
 
Was up at our favorite volcano at around 7:30 this morning to do stairs -- but took my binocs, of course. The big maples at the northeast side of the top loop were alive with birds! In just a few minutes of watching: Wilson's, Black-throated gray, Townsend's, Yellow-rumped, Nashville and Orange-crowned warblers. Warbling and Cassin's vireos. A Hammonds flycatcher.
Also, after seeing just two Great Horned owlets in previous visits -- but having glimpses of a possible third -- finally saw all three, looking big, fuzzy and fierce.
I love this time of year!



Subject: Fernhill Wetlands citizen-science training this SATURDAY, 27 April
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 9:22 am
From: withgott AT comcast.net
 
Hello OBOL ”
For all of you who love birding at Fernhill Wetlands, this is to let you know that the joint Portland Audubon / Clean Water Services citizen-science effort to assess the influence on birdlife of the habitat construction project there in 2014-2015 is still ongoing, and that we are inviting new volunteer birders to participate.
This SATURDAY morning, April 27th, we are hosting a training session at Fernhill. New and existing volunteers are both welcome. Anyone with solid birding skills who would enjoy following a very simple eBird-based protocol to help monitor birds (flexibly, on your own time) is welcome to join the project. Details and links are here: https://audubonportland.org/ab...

***Please RSVP*** if you plan to come, to Joe Liebezeit, as mentioned in the link, so we know how many are coming!
(And if you™re interested in contributing but can™t make the Sat. event, then by all means be in touch with Joe or me as well.)
Cheers and good birding, everyone,
Jay WithgottPortland



Subject: Re: upcoming migration forecast
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 8:18 am
From: deweysage AT frontier.com
 
If it happens, a really good spot on the south coast is the China Creek
Bandon State Natural Area parking lot in Bandon. If it happens, the
birds will move north along the beach and the New River corridor.
Since the mouth of New River is a little less than a mile south of the
parking lot, the birds will end up concentrated near China Creek, and
you can get a good view from the parking lot as the birds move north.

If it happens, it is amazing. The problem is figuring out if and what
day it will happen.

Cheers
Dave Lauten


On 4/22/2019 8:40 PM, Rebecca Hartman wrote:
> I'm all for occasionally spectacular! This is my first migration when
> I'm near a coast. So , obolers, where would you recommend? I can leave
> Eugene Wednesday at 11 and am free for a week. Where would you go?
>
> On Mon, Apr 22, 2019, 8:08 PM Phil Pickering > wrote:
>
> Thought it was worth mentioning that this is the first
> spring since 2013 that the short window for peak
> shorebird/seabird flights starting in a couple days is
> forecast to coincide with a sustained period of daily
> north winds extending far down into southern Cal.
>
> In the past these conditions have typically compressed
> migrating flocks near shore, as well as (I think)
> north/south causing larger than normal, occasionally
> spectacular aggregations to form. The last few spring
> coastal migrations have been comparatively lackluster,
> so hoping the current long-range forecast holds and
> I didn't just jinx it.
>
> Phil
>



Subject: Coos Migrants 4/22/2019
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 7:11 am
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
Was working east of Myrtle Point, Coos in the forested Coast Range on Monday. I was in a Doug-fir stand about 50 years old adjacent to old growth. As soon as I got out of my truck I heard a N Pygmy Owl calling from the older stand, they are pretty easy to hear this time of year.
The stand I was doing plant surveys in was packed with singing birds- many HERMIT, BLACK-THROATED GRAY and WILSON™S WARBLERS and lots of PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS. Early in the day I could stand at any one spot and hear two or three of each singing. I had four Pac Slopes calling/singing close to me at one point- very cool day!Also heard my first EVENING GROSBEAKS.
Happy birding,Tim RCoos Bay



Subject: Enjoying Ferruginous Hawks
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 4:49 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Jim Leonard et al,
Jim, I™m glad you got to see, photograph, and enjoy the Ferruginous Hawks at the nest off Hwy 205, north of the Narrows, on your first visit. They are beautiful birds. It always puts a smile on my face when I see one of them and realize that it is not just another Red-tail.
I™ve probably spent a cumulative hour watching that nest, but in multiple 5-minute visits over the last 15 years. I was on one of the tours at the recent Migratory Bird Festival. We had about 16 people in a van and small bus. We stopped on the far shoulder of the road for less than 10 minutes and didn™t get out of the vehicles. Those who wanted took photos through the windows and we moved on.
I also enjoyed 7 Ferruginous Hawks on utility poles along Hwy 20 as I crossed Deschutes County on my way home April 14. Our group enjoyed seeing Ferruginous Hawks NE of Enterprise in January. Just west of McMinnville Carol and I enjoyed seeing a Ferruginous Hawk that spent the winter of 2012-13 at a field on her raptor route. It was fun to see it each month. My records show that I™ve seen this species in 3 western and 14 eastern Oregon counties, so your chances are better on the east side.
I don™t have the budget or the equipment or the skill or the patience or the desire to sit and capture the superlative photographs that you do. We come to birds with different purposes, but we both enjoy the birds we spend time watching.
Let me recommend another window to enjoying these beautiful birds. The book A Hawk in the Sun by Leon Powers (2003) is a popular telling of the Ph.D. research that Dr. Powers conducted in SE Idaho. He went on to be a Professor at Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa, ID. It is enjoyable, well-written, and offers rich insight into the biology of this species.
Enjoy your passion,
Paul Sullivan
McMinnville



Subject: Illinois Valley Josephine County yard birds
Date: Tue Apr 23 2019 0:30 am
From: romain AT frontiernet.net
 
Two good (for our location) yard birds today - 4/22/19.  At about
4:20 pm, Christie noticed a CA Towhee at our feeder. This is a
first, though we have detected CATO near this location a few times in
the past (usually during the post-breeding period). They are regular
in Takilma on the valley floor just a mile away.

At 8:50 pm, a Common Poorwill called repeatedly from near the
house. One was heard at the same location on 4/14/19. Location:
Takilma area, about 200' off the valley floor, Illinois Valley, OR.

Romain Cooper
10398 Takilma Road
Cave Junction, OR 97523
541-592-2311


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Subject: Re: upcoming migration forecast
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 22:41 pm
From: rhartman AT eou.edu
 
I'm all for occasionally spectacular! This is my first migration when I'm near a coast. So , obolers, where would you recommend? I can leave Eugene Wednesday at 11 and am free for a week. Where would you go?

On Mon, Apr 22, 2019, 8:08 PM Phil Pickering <[email protected]> wrote:
Thought it was worth mentioning that this is the firstspring since 2013 that the short window for peakshorebird/seabird flights starting in a couple days isforecast to coincide with a sustained period of dailynorth winds extending far down into southern Cal.
In the past these conditions have typically compressedmigrating flocks near shore, as well as (I think)
north/south causing larger than normal, occasionallyspectacular aggregations to form. The last few springcoastal migrations have been comparatively lackluster,so hoping the current long-range forecast holds andI didn't just jinx it.
Phil



Subject: Re: Bird watchers and photographers (no apostrophe and no unnecessary capitals)
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 22:17 pm
From: joshspice AT gmail.com
 
‘‘˜˜
Joel, thanks for the kind words.
Josh


On Mon, Apr 22, 2019, 19:35 <[email protected]> wrote:
I appreciated very much what Josh Spice had to say.

However my main reason for posting here is to get rid of the annoying and inappropriate apostrophe in the original subject heading that Dave, Josh and others have responded to.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



Subject: upcoming migration forecast
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 22:08 pm
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
Thought it was worth mentioning that this is the firstspring since 2013 that the short window for peakshorebird/seabird flights starting in a couple days isforecast to coincide with a sustained period of dailynorth winds extending far down into southern Cal.
In the past these conditions have typically compressedmigrating flocks near shore, as well as (I think)
north/south causing larger than normal, occasionallyspectacular aggregations to form. The last few springcoastal migrations have been comparatively lackluster,so hoping the current long-range forecast holds andI didn't just jinx it.
Phil



Subject: Re: Bird watchers and photographers (no apostrophe and no unnecessary capitals)
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 21:35 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
I appreciated very much what Josh Spice had to say.

However my main reason for posting here is to get rid of the annoying and inappropriate apostrophe in the original subject heading that Dave, Josh and others have responded to.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



Subject: Malheur update
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 18:14 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
The Ground Squirrel
GazetteApril 22, 2019
A lovely day here. I spent the day away from HQ until now so
will check it a little this evening.
Highlights: WT Swifts are around at the Roaring Springs
Cliff as usual. A couple of Brewer™s
Sparrows, so they are trickling in. BW
Teal, which has been hard to come by, at the funky pond north of Frenchglen “ I
always forget the name of it. At least one imm Rough-leg is still around, this
one at a random location a couple of miles north of Round Barn. There are NO
Bank Swallows at the road cut near Diamond School. Two Bald Eagles at Roaring
Springs “ the rumor mill says they may be nesting there (again?).
MI: minimal. I was
out in several locations that could have had mozzies and none did.
Tomorrow I™ll be at HQ in the morning. With good weather all week there should be a
steady ramp-up of migrants.




Alan [email protected], Oregon
TEMPORARY ADDRESS:Malheur NWR36391 Sodhouse Ln
Princeton OR 97721
www.alanlcontreras.com
http://osupress.oregonstate.ed...



Subject: Linn Vesper Sparrows, Western Kingbird, Marion Chipping Sparrow 4/22/19
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 17:17 pm
From: roygerig AT gmail.com
 
I drove to Belts Road x Gap Road in Linn County just in time this morning for a road crew and grader, so it seemed to be almost free of birds but I did hear 2 VESPER SPARROWS, and several Savannahs were around, no Grasshopper Sparrows that I detected. Toward home, I went to Ward Butte and saw a frustrated WESTERN KINGBIRD trying to catch a very zigzaggy \ dual winged large insect that looked delicious
At home just now, I saw a dazed looking CHIPPING SPARROW sitting down when I came across it not 3 feet away, maybe it was tired and hungry so I went back then carefully scattered seed nearby which it started to eat right away, then went around eating more while looking more normal or, er, chipper. This is the second CHSP in my yard this spring, I usually only get one, or so it seems
Roy Gerig Salem OR



Subject: White-fronts again
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 16:56 pm
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
Have seen flocks moving over multiple locations inLincoln County again
today. Includes the spectacularsight of a single extended broken group
of 1200+ flyingin overlapping strings at different altitudes NW
overthe Salishan spit, and continuing straight NW out of viewover the
ocean into the face of an incoming squall.Attached shot of part of the
group.
Phil



Subject: Western Kingbird at Baskett Slough
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 15:38 pm
From: bmwboarder AT gmail.com
 
There was a Western Kingbird flycatching from some brambles along the north
side of Coville Rd this afternoon. Just a little east of the S-curves. Not
too far from the road. Such a lovely bird to get to watch!

Aside from Long-billed Dowitchers, not much else for shorebirds yet.

Cheers,
Brandon Wagner
Independence


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Subject: Re: Mt. Tabor Park, Portland
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 9:28 am
From: gerardlillie AT outlook.com
 
That is correct, Lars. Only one Eurasian Collard Dove has been recorded on the walks.






Gerard

Subject: Re: [obol] Mt. Tabor Park, Portland






FOS MacG Warbler here at 900ft, 50km nw of Mt Tabor on Sunday. New Yard Bird:Eurasian Collared Dove. 100s of m off property, but l hear it easily from the patio right now. At least 100 acres of the neighborhood has been clearcut since Labor
Day. In the five years l was a pretty faithful participant in the Mt Tabor birdsong walks l recall a single Eurasian Collared Dove, and it was at the starting point, which fronts a residential landscape. I encountered the name of a cake in a trivia quiz this
week,"Columba di Pasquale". A single EUDO would make a meager pigeon pie. I hope the species waits until next Easter for another visit. McGillivray's Warbler have not been a breeding species here for 10 or 15 years since the canopy closed in after logging
the last time. I hope the edges of our property ,with copious sunlight restored, will attract family oriented Macs once again.lpn





On Sun, Apr 21, 2019, 10:22 AM Gerard Lillie <[email protected]> wrote:




Hello All,




After having been gone for a while I birded Mt. Tabor Park (and my nearby yard) for the first time this spring. I noted 25+ YELLOW-RUMPED, 4 NASHVILLE, 3 BLACK-THROATED GRAY, 2 TOWNSEND'S and 1 MacGillivray's WARBLERS. Also, 2 HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHERS, 1 CASSIN'S
VIREOand 1 PURPLE FINCH. These were short visits due to time constraints and I assume more migrants were present. There were very few RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS, which I found interesting.




Good birding,






Gerard Lillie

Portland, OR



Subject: Re: Mt. Tabor Park, Portland
Date: Mon Apr 22 2019 8:15 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
FOS MacG Warbler here at 900ft, 50km nw of Mt Tabor on Sunday. New Yard Bird:Eurasian Collared Dove. 100s of m off property, but l hear it easily from the patio right now. At least 100 acres of the neighborhood has been clearcut since Labor Day. In the five years l was a pretty faithful participant in the Mt Tabor birdsong walks l recall a single Eurasian Collared Dove, and it was at the starting point, which fronts a residential landscape. I encountered the name of a cake in a trivia quiz this week,"Columba di Pasquale". A single EUDO would make a meager pigeon pie. I hope the species waits until next Easter for another visit. McGillivray's Warbler have not been a breeding species here for 10 or 15 years since the canopy closed in after logging the last time. I hope the edges of our property ,with copious sunlight restored, will attract family oriented Macs once again.lpn

On Sun, Apr 21, 2019, 10:22 AM Gerard Lillie <[email protected]> wrote:







Hello All,




After having been gone for a while I birded Mt. Tabor Park (and my nearby yard) for the first time this spring. I noted 25+ YELLOW-RUMPED, 4 NASHVILLE, 3 BLACK-THROATED GRAY, 2 TOWNSEND'S and 1 MacGillivray's WARBLERS. Also, 2 HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHERS, 1 CASSIN'S
VIREOand 1 PURPLE FINCH. These were short visits due to time constraints and I assume more migrants were present. There were very few RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS, which I found interesting.




Good birding,






Gerard Lillie

Portland, OR



Subject: Vaux Swift chimney roost-Weigand Hall
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 23:43 pm
From: springazure1 AT gmail.com
 
Hello, tonight I made the rounds of many of the known (to me) chimney roosts for migrating Vaux Swifts. I ended up at sunset at Weigand Hall, where I met Jill and Cub, who were enjoying the lovely evening and where there were FINALLY some swifts to count! None of the other locations were active tonight.

I counted 190 using the Weigand Hall chimney.

For those who are not familiar with the Vaux Happening chimney counts, see the website for much useful and interesting information. I checked previous years' reports to see the range of dates for our Corvallis locations. I have not been consistent for the past couple of migration seasons.

I was interested to discover from previous years™ counts that there are a couple of locations I didn™t know about. One location is especially intriguing to me: 525 NW Monroe, where counts were recorded in September 2018 (I was out of town all of September 2018 so didn™t get to do any swift counting). I had not known of this site previously. It™s intriguing because a chimney is not visible on Google Earth, but there has to be something they are using so I™ll check it out visually. It™s also intriguing because I often hear swifts around the library, but assumed that they went to the Whiteside site or even up to Weigand or another one of the known roosts.

It was great to have my first count of the season!

If you observe swifts using any roost in Corvallis, could you please post it to the midvalley birders group? I™ve been keeping a list of known sites.

The frustration of swift-counting in Corvallis is that there are so many potential roosts, and they are not consistent from season to season or even night to night. But I always enjoy the challenge!

Happy spring migration!

Mary

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Subject: Hybrid Yellow-shafted Flicker still here.
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 23:42 pm
From: timberwolf69 AT hotmail.com
 
I guess the theme in my backyard this week was Yellow. I've seen the Hybrid Yellow-shaft 3 times now. I put thistle socks up after not doing it for 4 or 5 years and the Goldfinches found them in 4 hours and they have come in force. And today a 6-pack of Golden-crowned
Sparrows showed up cleaning up under the feeders. I don't ever remember seeing Golden-crowns before in my backyard, just White's. I was wondering if they are migrating through. The map shows this as winter range.




Tim Gannon

Reedsport



Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 4/17/2019--LATE REPORT
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 23:16 pm
From: winkg AT hevanet.com
 
Here is the summary of my morning walks from NW Seblar Terrace
to the Pittock Mansion for the week 4/11/19 to 4/17/19.Speciesneither seen nor heard in the previous weekarein ALL CAPS.
Additional information about my walkmay be found at
http://www.hevanet.com/winkg/d...

The sightings are also in eBird.

I did the walk only 3 days this week.
Thursday, Apr 25, I will be leading another of this season™s MorningBird Song Walks at the Pittock Mansion for Portland Audubon. Formore information, see
https://audubonportland.org/tr...

Species # days found (peak #, date)
CACKLING GOOSE 1 (?[heard only], 4/11)
BAND-TAILED PIGEON 1 (1, 4/12)
Anna™s Hummingbird 2 (2, 4/12)
COOPER™S HAWK 1 (1, 4/12)
Red-breasted Sapsucker 3 (2)Downy Woodpecker 2 (1, 4/11 & 12)
Hairy Woodpecker 1 (2, 4/12)
Pileated Woodpecker 2 (2, 4/13)
Northern Flicker 3 (5)
Hutton™s Vireo 1 (1, 4/12)
Steller's Jay 2 (3, 4/12)
American Crow 3 (12)
Violet-green Swallow 1 (4, 4/12)
CLIFF SWALLOW 1 (1, 4/12)
Black-capped Chickadee 3 (9, 4/12)

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 2 (3, 4/11)
Bushtit 1 (1, 4/13)
Red-breasted Nuthatch 3 (5, 4/12)
Pacific Wren 3 (6, 4/11)
Golden-crowned Kinglet 2 (7, 4/12)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3 (8)
Varied Thrush 1 (1, 4/12)
American Robin 3 (11)
EUROPEAN STARLING 1 (2, 4/13)
EVENING GROSBEAK 1 (4, 4/12)
House Finch 3 (2)
Lesser Goldfinch 3 (4)
Dark-eyed Junco 3 (15, 4/12)
Song Sparrow 3 (9)

Spotted Towhee 2 (5, 4/13)
Orange-crowned Warbler 2 (1, 4/12 & 13)
Misses (birds found at least 3 days in previous 2 weeks but notfound this week): Bewick™s Wren

Wink Gross
Portland



Subject: Re: Lincoln County Swainson's Hawk
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 22:43 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Great find and nice documentary photos Nicholas. Your images leave no doubt that your bird was a Swainson's Hawk. The head pattern with a strong pale supercilium is indicative of non-adult bird. The rather solid dark across the breast suggests that the bird
is transitioning to adult plumage. Swainson's have proportionally longer wings than Red-tailed Hawks, as they are much longer-distance migrants. Their outer wing tapers on both the leading and trailing edge creating a pointed wingtip that is different in shape
than the outer wings on other Oregon Buteos.




This is definitely a very good bird for Lincoln County and anywhere on the outer coast. Unlike other outer coastal counties, Lincoln is sort of devoid of the extensive open pastures where birds like Swainson's and Rough-legged Hawks like to hunt, so finding
one there is probably dependent on getting flyover. Over the last decade or so we've become a lot more enlightened about migrant Swainson's west of the Cascades, in part because there is a somewhat regular spring "flight" of sorts that is witnessed up at Neah
Bay, Washington most years. It used to be that Swainson's was considered extremely rare west of the Cascades in spring and rarer still along the coast. About five or six years ago, Shawneen Finnegan, David Mandell and I had two Swainson's in a single day in
Tillamook County, with one at Nehalem Meadows and another in the large pasture opposite Fenk Road just west of Tillamook. About that same time I found a Swainson's Hawk in a large recently-mowed dairy pasture just east of Lafayette in Yamhill County in early
May. I was working and didn't have binoculars with me, so I alerted Paul Sullivan, who lives in nearby McMinnville and Shawneen Finnegan, who both followed up. Paul found at least three and perhaps four birds and by the time Shawneen arrived from Portland
about an hour later there were no fewer than five Swainson's scavenging the pasture for shredded rodents.Between now and about mid-May
is the prime window for northbound Swainson's Hawks.




Dave Irons

Beaverton, OR



Subject: Lincoln County Swainson's Hawk
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 21:20 pm
From: nicholas.j.martens AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,
Maureen and I visited Beaver Creek Natural Area this morning, down by the short boardwalk, and had an interesting buteo fly overhead. The long tapered wings, dark breast band, finely barred tail and a bunch of other characteristics all point to SWAINSON'S HAWK. Our eBird checklist contains several photos and further description. I don't see any previous eBird records for Lincoln County, so it was a lucky sighting indeed!
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Happy birding,Nick Martens



Subject: Re: Too close?
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 21:14 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Thanks for the videos, Jason.


In a quick scan I saw nothing in the Turnstone/Sanderling video or the Fulmar video that indicated they were materially affected by you. That said, it is very possible that some of the Turnstones were "maintaining a minimum distance" i.e. not coming to the closest rocks to you because you were there. If this was the case I do not consider it consequential. They had quite a bit of habitat and you were not blocking access to the one critical feeding spot. Consider a different example: you are walking on a sidewalk beside a large area of lawn and a robin feeding on the lawn moves 20' or so away from the sidewalk as you pass. Yes you affected its choice of feeding location, but it is highly unlikely that this had any significance whatsoever for its survival or capacity to reproduce.
The Tattler was showing some indications of nervousness (although they may "teeter" for reasons other than nervousness),and I got the impression that it might have been a bit concerned about your presence. However when it did move it appeared that it actually moved toward you, which might suggest that any nervousness was caused by something else.
I have often had the experience of standing on a beach photographing a flock of shorebirds, sometimes slowly moving closer to them, and suddenly have them all flush together. My first thought is "where's the falcon" and often I can spot a raptor that caused the flush. My second thought is "I must have gotten too close" but often after circling around a few times the birds have come back and landed closer to me than they were before, demonstrating that something else flushed them, and that they were not particularly concerned by my presence.
Wayne.




On 4/21/2019 9:26:25 PM, Jason A. Crotty <[email protected]> wrote:Like many, I have wondered whether I have gotten too close. Obviously, if a bird flies away or is nervously surveying me, I think I have gotten too close. But if they seem undisturbed or ignore me, it seems OK, even if I'm pretty close. Note that I'm excluding nesting birds and birds of concern. That said, the discussion has alerted me to the fact that there may be non-obvious signs of distress that I may not be trained to look for. These signs may subtle and not captured by photos. But there have been rare instances where I've taken some videos, which may capture the nuances better than a photograph. That might make a nice teaching moment.

For context, these are from near Half Moon Bay CA, at one of my favorite spots when I lived in SF, Pillar Point Harbor. I typically went alone, moved slowly, and let the birds come to me. The tide often brought them close, just like Dave Irons mentioned.

I should say that I think all of these were fine, but I am happy to be told I am wrong and which behaviors suggest I was too close.

https://youtu.be/KZyRsKMLN_I
https://youtu.be/M2P9tTOo5fA
This one is from down the coast a bit, when a dead blue whale washed up on shore, bringing Northern Fulmar with it. They didn't seem the slightest bit concerned by me, but maybe they were.

https://youtu.be/KKbH59iJVdA
Jason CrottyPortland



Subject: SAS Ankeny NWR Field Trip Report
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 20:39 pm
From: barbarabird.dolan AT gmail.com
 
Nice Mike, not real warm here at 4800 yesterday when some trips complained
that even though they had a hundred and six Birds by their leaders there
were Winds of 50 to80 t Trinidad and had to stay on board in the bus or
cars.
Barbara
b

On Sun, Apr 21, 2019, 5:11 PM Mike Unger wrote:

> *SAS ANKENY NWR FIELD TRIP SUMMARY*
>
> *April 21, 2019*
>
>
>
> I led today's Salem Audubon birding field trip at Ankeny NWR. I was joined
> by seven (7) other birders for the trip. The weather on this Easter
> morning was mostly cloudy with little wind and no rain. It was 48 degrees
> at the start and 52 degrees at the end of the field trip. We made four
> stops around the refuge including Pintail Marsh, the Acorn Woodpecker
> corner, the second pullout on Buena Vista Road just before Eagle Marsh and
> Eagle Marsh. We walked around part of the perimeter of Eagle Marsh out to
> Teal and Willow Marshes. We identified (saw or heard) 45 species. The one
> noticeable observation was how vocal most of the birds were during our trip
> with the Common Yellowthroats and Marsh Wrens being very vocal.
>
>
>
> *Most notable sightings:*
>
> The sighting of the day was a *Black-necked Stilt* flying over Pintail
> Marsh at close range. It was neat seeing its reddish-pink legs trailing
> behind it. This is an unusual find as we usually see these stilts at
> Baskett Slough NWR;
>
> There were 11 duck species seen during the day including two *Cinnamon
> Teal*, two *Ruddy Ducks* and one *Northern Pintail*;
>
> There were not a lot of raptors around the refuge. We saw one
> sub-adult *Bald Eagle *along the western edge of Eagle Marsh as well as two
> adult Bald Eagles that flew over and scared up lots of geese. The only
> other raptors were one *Red-tailed Hawk, *a *Northern Harrier* and
> seven *Turkey
> Vultures*;
>
> We saw a *Black Phoebe* along the front edge of Eagle Marsh and saw
> a *Rufous
> Hummingbird* down the Eagle Marsh trail just where it splits off to Teal
> and Willow Marshes. We also heard an *American Bittern* along the west
> side of Eagle Marsh;
>
> The woodpeckers were few and far between as we saw three *Downy
> Woodpeckers *and heard a *Northern Flicker. *Some of the Downy Woodpeckers
> were drumming on trees;
>
> The only warblers were the vocal Common Yellowthroats (12) that
> stayed hidden, two *Yellow Warblers* that were singing and two
> *Orange-crowned
> Warblers*. We got good looks at one of the Orange-crowned Warblers.
>
> A complete list of today's birds follows. Our next SAS bird walk will be a
> SAS-Shorts bird walk is at Fairview Wetlands on *Wednesday, April 24th at
> 5:30 PM.* Meet in the ODFW parking lot located at 4034 Fairview Industrial
> Dr SE in Salem. The Minto-Brown Island Park bird walk is on *Wednesday,
> May 1st* *at 7:00 AM. *Meet at Parking Lot #3 at the end of Minto Island
> Road. Please join us if you can.
>
>
>
> Mike Unger
>
> Keizer, OR
>
>
>
> *Ankeny NWR Checklist Summary for April 21, 2019*
>
> *Number of Species: 45*
>
>
>
> Checklists included in this summary: 4
> (1): Ankeny NWR--Pintail [email protected] 6:57 AM
> (2): Corner of Ankeny Hill and Buena Vista Roads (Acorn Woodpecker corner)
> @ 7:39 AM
> (3): Second pullout on right side of Buena Vista Road @ 7:46 AM
> (4): Ankeny NWR--Eagle Marsh @ 8:03 AM
>
> 500 Cackling Goose -- (1),(2)
> 4 Canada Goose -- (4)
> 2 Cinnamon Teal -- (4)
> 9 Northern Shoveler -- (3)
> 18 Gadwall -- (3)
> 25 American Wigeon -- (4)
> 9 Mallard -- (4)
> 1 Northern Pintail -- (3)
> 50 Green-winged Teal -- (3)
> 28 Ring-necked Duck -- (1),(4)
> 9 Lesser Scaup -- (4)
> 39 Bufflehead -- (1),(4)
> 2 Ruddy Duck -- (1)
> 4 Pied-billed Grebe -- (1),(4)
> 1 Eurasian Collared-Dove -- (1)
> 3 Mourning Dove -- (1),(2),(3)
> 1 Rufous Hummingbird -- (4)
> 30 American Coot -- (4)
> 1 Black-necked Stilt -- (1)
> 1 American Bittern -- (4)
> 1 Great Blue Heron -- (4)
> 7 Turkey Vulture -- (4)
> 1 Northern Harrier -- (2)
> 3 Bald Eagle -- (1),(3),(4)
> 1 Red-tailed Hawk -- (4)
> 3 Downy Woodpecker -- (4)
> 1 Northern Flicker -- (4)
> 1 woodpecker sp. -- (4)
> 1 Black Phoebe -- (4)
> 2 American Crow -- (4)
> 20 Tree Swallow -- (1)
> 7 Black-capped Chickadee -- (4)
> 9 Marsh Wren -- (1),(4)
> 2 Bewick's Wren -- (4)
> 2 American Robin -- (4)
> 14 European Starling -- (1),(2)
> 2 White-crowned Sparrow -- (4)
> 10 Golden-crowned Sparrow -- (4)
> 2 Savannah Sparrow -- (4)
> 3 Song Sparrow -- (4)
> 8 Spotted Towhee -- (3),(4)
> 38 Red-winged Blackbird -- (1),(2),(3),(4)
> 2 Orange-crowned Warbler -- (4)
> 12 Common Yellowthroat -- (3),(4)
> 2 Yellow Warbler -- (4)
> 17 Yellow-rumped Warbler -- (3),(4)
> 1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (4)
> 1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) -- (4)
> _______________________________________________
> birding mailing list
> [email protected]lleybirding.org
> http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...
>
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
[email protected]
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: Too close?
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 20:26 pm
From: jasonacrotty AT gmail.com
 
Like many, I have wondered whether I have gotten too close. Obviously, if a bird flies away or is nervously surveying me, I think I have gotten too close. But if they seem undisturbed or ignore me, it seems OK, even if I'm pretty close. Note that I'm excluding nesting birds and birds of concern. That said, the discussion has alerted me to the fact that there may be non-obvious signs of distress that I may not be trained to look for. These signs may subtle and not captured by photos. But there have been rare instances where I've taken some videos, which may capture the nuances better than a photograph. That might make a nice teaching moment. 

For context, these are from near Half Moon Bay CA, at one of my favorite spots when I lived in SF, Pillar Point Harbor. I typically went alone, moved slowly, and let the birds come to me. The tide often brought them close, just like Dave Irons mentioned.

I should say that I think all of these were fine, but I am happy to be told I am wrong and which behaviors suggest I was too close.

https://youtu.be/KZyRsKMLN_I
https://youtu.be/M2P9tTOo5fA
This one is from down the coast a bit, when a dead blue whale washed up on shore, bringing Northern Fulmar with it. They didn't seem the slightest bit concerned by me, but maybe they were.

https://youtu.be/KKbH59iJVdA
Jason CrottyPortland



Subject: Roadside Nests & Etiquette
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 20:15 pm
From: claycbirds AT gmail.com
 
I feel zero need to rehash the alleged impact upon the residents of long established and successful nests along 205. I would like to add asecond side to this debate by discussing polite road side etiquette.There are also well known nests on nearby gravel roads which offer a much safer and quieter viewing opportunity.
First. Above all. Please be careful out there. It is a long straight stretch and traffic moves quite fast. Your first concern is pulling all the way off the road. Think how you would feel if your trip to the store, or school, or work, was impacted by a partially blocked road.
Secondly, You may not understand what my Dad, an Illinois farm boy, called country friendly. The social network in many rural areas includes slowing down to check on stranded motorists. You may feel interrupted or threatened by the potential good Samaritans. Yet they deserve a thumbs up and a smile. I do not use a wave off, it might be mistaken for a stop and help me wave. They may stop anyway. A smile and explanation of why you have stopped may be appropriate. Please be mindful that this can be an opportunity to be a goodwill ambassador for the birding community to the ranching community.
Happy Birding
Clay Crofton
The Boy Who Cried Wrentit



Subject: American White Pelicans
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 19:19 pm
From: 75catlover06 AT gmail.com
 
Wow, just saw 16 Pelicans circle over our property by the east Springfield
section of the Willamette River; then they were off to the West.



Subject: SAS Ankeny NWR Field Trip Report
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 19:11 pm
From: unger730 AT gmail.com
 
*SAS ANKENY NWR FIELD TRIP SUMMARY*

*April 21, 2019*



I led today's Salem Audubon birding field trip at Ankeny NWR. I was joined
by seven (7) other birders for the trip. The weather on this Easter
morning was mostly cloudy with little wind and no rain. It was 48 degrees
at the start and 52 degrees at the end of the field trip. We made four
stops around the refuge including Pintail Marsh, the Acorn Woodpecker
corner, the second pullout on Buena Vista Road just before Eagle Marsh and
Eagle Marsh. We walked around part of the perimeter of Eagle Marsh out to
Teal and Willow Marshes. We identified (saw or heard) 45 species. The one
noticeable observation was how vocal most of the birds were during our trip
with the Common Yellowthroats and Marsh Wrens being very vocal.



*Most notable sightings:*

The sighting of the day was a *Black-necked Stilt* flying over Pintail
Marsh at close range. It was neat seeing its reddish-pink legs trailing
behind it. This is an unusual find as we usually see these stilts at
Baskett Slough NWR;

There were 11 duck species seen during the day including two *Cinnamon
Teal*, two *Ruddy Ducks* and one *Northern Pintail*;

There were not a lot of raptors around the refuge. We saw one
sub-adult *Bald Eagle *along the western edge of Eagle Marsh as well as two
adult Bald Eagles that flew over and scared up lots of geese. The only
other raptors were one *Red-tailed Hawk, *a *Northern Harrier* and
seven *Turkey
Vultures*;

We saw a *Black Phoebe* along the front edge of Eagle Marsh and saw
a *Rufous
Hummingbird* down the Eagle Marsh trail just where it splits off to Teal
and Willow Marshes. We also heard an *American Bittern* along the west
side of Eagle Marsh;

The woodpeckers were few and far between as we saw three *Downy
Woodpeckers *and heard a *Northern Flicker. *Some of the Downy Woodpeckers
were drumming on trees;

The only warblers were the vocal Common Yellowthroats (12) that
stayed hidden, two *Yellow Warblers* that were singing and two *Orange-crowned
Warblers*. We got good looks at one of the Orange-crowned Warblers.

A complete list of today's birds follows. Our next SAS bird walk will be a
SAS-Shorts bird walk is at Fairview Wetlands on *Wednesday, April 24th at
5:30 PM.* Meet in the ODFW parking lot located at 4034 Fairview Industrial
Dr SE in Salem. The Minto-Brown Island Park bird walk is on *Wednesday,
May 1st* *at 7:00 AM. *Meet at Parking Lot #3 at the end of Minto Island
Road. Please join us if you can.



Mike Unger

Keizer, OR



*Ankeny NWR Checklist Summary for April 21, 2019*

*Number of Species: 45*



Checklists included in this summary: 4
(1): Ankeny NWR--Pintail [email protected] 6:57 AM
(2): Corner of Ankeny Hill and Buena Vista Roads (Acorn Woodpecker corner)
@ 7:39 AM
(3): Second pullout on right side of Buena Vista Road @ 7:46 AM
(4): Ankeny NWR--Eagle Marsh @ 8:03 AM

500 Cackling Goose -- (1),(2)
4 Canada Goose -- (4)
2 Cinnamon Teal -- (4)
9 Northern Shoveler -- (3)
18 Gadwall -- (3)
25 American Wigeon -- (4)
9 Mallard -- (4)
1 Northern Pintail -- (3)
50 Green-winged Teal -- (3)
28 Ring-necked Duck -- (1),(4)
9 Lesser Scaup -- (4)
39 Bufflehead -- (1),(4)
2 Ruddy Duck -- (1)
4 Pied-billed Grebe -- (1),(4)
1 Eurasian Collared-Dove -- (1)
3 Mourning Dove -- (1),(2),(3)
1 Rufous Hummingbird -- (4)
30 American Coot -- (4)
1 Black-necked Stilt -- (1)
1 American Bittern -- (4)
1 Great Blue Heron -- (4)
7 Turkey Vulture -- (4)
1 Northern Harrier -- (2)
3 Bald Eagle -- (1),(3),(4)
1 Red-tailed Hawk -- (4)
3 Downy Woodpecker -- (4)
1 Northern Flicker -- (4)
1 woodpecker sp. -- (4)
1 Black Phoebe -- (4)
2 American Crow -- (4)
20 Tree Swallow -- (1)
7 Black-capped Chickadee -- (4)
9 Marsh Wren -- (1),(4)
2 Bewick's Wren -- (4)
2 American Robin -- (4)
14 European Starling -- (1),(2)
2 White-crowned Sparrow -- (4)
10 Golden-crowned Sparrow -- (4)
2 Savannah Sparrow -- (4)
3 Song Sparrow -- (4)
8 Spotted Towhee -- (3),(4)
38 Red-winged Blackbird -- (1),(2),(3),(4)
2 Orange-crowned Warbler -- (4)
12 Common Yellowthroat -- (3),(4)
2 Yellow Warbler -- (4)
17 Yellow-rumped Warbler -- (3),(4)
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- (4)
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) -- (4)
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
[email protected]
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: Malheur update
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 18:41 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
The Ground Squirrel
GazetteApril 21, 2019
Mosquito Index: 1 (scale of 10). One bit me INSIDE the HQ today, which seemed
unreasonable for the date.
Highlights: New arrivals were House Wren found by Don Powers™
George Fox U bird class (a pretty sharp bunch) and a Chipping Sparrow that
Diana Byrne and I came across by the HQ. Three Horned Grebes on Marshall Pond
all day were nice; that is a missable bird here. Nashville found by the GFU
class. WT Sparrow continues. Short-ears have been present late afternoons north
and nw of HQ.
Major influx of Yellow-rumps was obvious after the
temperature got above 55 and the bugs came out.
My morning estimate was maybe 20 or so “ this afternoon there were
probably more than 50.
Weather should be nice for the coming week. I have the next
three days off from docent duty and will get out into the refuge and as far
south as Roaring Springs.
Alan [email protected], Oregon
TEMPORARY ADDRESS:Malheur NWR36391 Sodhouse Ln
Princeton OR 97721
www.alanlcontreras.com
http://osupress.oregonstate.ed...



Subject: "PDX fire station"
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 18:18 pm
From: pointers AT pacifier.com
 
hi all ... today at the "PDX fire station" we ran into a large mixed flock of mostly Savannah Sparrows, with House Sparrows and American Pipits, and one CHIPPING SPARROW !!! ... the Chipping Sparrow was a Multnomah County first for us !!!


Lyn TopinkaVancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.comColumbiaRiverImages.comNorthwestBirding.com
Sent from my Galaxy Tab A



Subject: Vanport YELLOWS !!! ... FOS - Yellow-headed BB and Gr Yellowlegs
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 18:13 pm
From: pointers AT pacifier.com
 
hi all ... we had two FOS birds at Vanport today - a single male Yellow-headed Blackbird and a single Greater Yellowlegs ...
we also were hoping to see Purple Martins as someone has put up Gourds, but there probably is no room left --- Tree Swallows have moved in ...




Lyn TopinkaVancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.comColumbiaRiverImages.comNorthwestBirding.com
Sent from my Galaxy Tab A



Subject: Re: Happy Easter and help request
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 18:07 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
 
Orange-crowned Warblers love to feed on fresh blossoms, probably for nectar, but maybe also for insects.

That™s what this one is doing.

Larry

> On Apr 21, 2019, at 12:38 PM, Linda Fink wrote:
>
> from those who like a challenge and won't tell me I should figure it out myself... What is this warbler? https://lindafink-birdnotes.bl...
>
> Thanks!
>
> Linda Fink near Grand Ronde Agency, Yamhill County
> --
>
> POST: Send your post to [email protected]
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: [email protected]
>

9$wrX4P0~+-XS8rzX{PjzYu+-



Subject: Re: Bird Watchers and Photographer's
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 17:42 pm
From: llsdirons AT msn.com
 
Wayne et al.,




OBOL is a large forum with well over 1000 subscribers at this point. Many of us are known, having a left a considerable footprint with our activities and postings. Others are far less known and by and large anonymous. When these folks see posts about experiences
being had by those who are more conspicuous and known in this forum they often seek to duplicate our experiences. On many occasions I have posted mini-travelogues of a sort with a roster of locations that I visited, what I found there, and tips for where to
look for certain birds, then subsequently had folks from OBOL sending me a note saying they followed my tracks and had a great birding experience. Similarly, I have noticed that folks on the Facebook "Birding Oregon" forum (which Jim also uses) go out to sites
where prominent posters like Jim have gone in hopes of getting the same kind of stunning photos that Jim routinely takes.




Herein lies the issue. Jim is an experienced bird photographer who often uses his vehicle as a blind as he sits and patiently waits to get great photos, particularly at Baskett Slough NWR, where he has been a fixture for many years. With practice and patience
it's possible to get relatively close to most birds without having much impact on them, but it is a learned skill not an innate one. I trust that Jim is conscientious about disturbing birds and I haven't seen any of his photos that suggest his subjects were
overly stressed. In this case he stayed on the road, came prepared with chairs so that he could sit and remain still as he waited for photo opportunities.




But what happens when less experienced birders and bird photographers go out to Malheur in hopes of getting the same sort of close-up photos of the Hwy 205 Ferruginous Hawks. It is unlikely that most will have the sort of camera equipment that Jim uses, or
an understanding of the patience and distance that must be maintained to keep the birds relatively calm. In order to get similar results with inferior equipment they are going to have to get much closer to the birds and lacking Jim's experience they may not
be as patient about waiting for the birds to be in position for a desired photo. If they see that Jim spent and hour and a half on site they may be inclined do similarly, but perhaps in a much more impactful way.On
more than one occasion I've seen birders/bird photographers jump the fence along Hwy 205 and go way out on the flat area north of the Narrows to get close to Burrowing Owl nests. It's not a reach to expect that others might do the same in an effort to get
closer and get better photos of the Ferruginous Hawk on and around the nest.




None of us has the ability to control the actions of others and I'm certainly in no position to tell Jim or anyone else how to go about
their hobby. What we can do as a community is try to help people new to birding and bird photography understand how their actions may be impacting the birds that they are trying to enjoy. Like Jim, I've stationed myself at water features and shorebird flats
and other places where with patience one can get great bird photos with little if any perceptible impact on the birds. When it's just me I can sit still and be quiet for long periods, but when others join me they often struggle to stop fidgeting and moving
about in an effort to get a better photo angle. They end up stalking birdsinstead of waiting for the birds to come to them.




I once sat at the edge of Yaquina Bay for over an hour waiting for the incoming tide to push two juvenile Hudsonian Godwits onto the last
piece of exposed mudflat right in front of me. I was like driftwood, not moving and just waiting. In the end the entire mudflat was covered and the two godwits were on a small grassy raised area within 20 feet of me. One of the birds tucked its head under
its wing and went to sleep about 12 feet from where I sat. These are magical experiences that I would hope all of us have the opportunity to enjoy, but they rarely happen by accident or without some degree of forethought and planning.




Dave Irons

Beaverton, OR











From: [email protected] <[email protected]> on behalf of Wayne Hoffman <[email protected]>
Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2019 9:13 PM
To: Tom Crabtree; Jim Leonard; [email protected]
Subject: [obol] Re: Bird Watchers and Photographer's




Hi, again -



Tom, your and Dave's comments are appropriate in the abstract, but my reading of Jim's description of his actions, and more importantly my reading of his photographs, do not support your conclusions that he was inappropriately stressing the birds.


Some birds species tend to be very shy relative to human contact and some tend to be quite tolerant. Some individuals within species are a lot more tolerant than others.


The responsible thing for photographers and birders to do is learn to interpret the behavior of the birds in your presence, and respond responsibly to that, rather than set arbitrary rules for how long is too long, or how close is too close. If he birds
are showing signs of being bothered by your presence, back off, leave, or change your behavior. If they are not showing signs of disturbance, trust their judgment.


Jim uses a far larger lens than I will ever be able to afford, which allows him to get large images from quite a ways away. If, as he described, he sat in a lawn chair to observe, his lack of movement and presumably noise would have rendered him less
threatening as well.


I was not their either, so I cannot know for sure whether he was "bothering" the hawks, but I see little in his description, and nothing in the three photos, that seems automatically out of line. Again, my experiences with the Yaquina Head Peregrines
give me a different perspective than I used to have on birds' capacity to adapt to nonthreatening human presence.


Wayne

On 4/21/2019 3:58:20 PM, Tom Crabtree <[email protected]> wrote:


Jim,

That isnt what Dave is saying at all. I am a birder and a photographer. I like getting close to birds, too, But as a birder and being concerned about sensitive species, I recognize that
it is important to keep my distance and keep any disturbances to a minimum. There is a line where we cross into being an inappropriate distance or staying too long so that we are affecting the birds behavior. We had a discussion about this with regard to
the Eastern Bluebirds last fall and a lengthy discussion about approaching the Linn County Snowy Owl a few years ago. Like Dave I think an hour and a half in close proximity to a Ferruginous Hawk nest is way too long. Unfortunately some people dont recognize
when their own behavior crosses the line.

Tom Crabtree, Bend

From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]]
On Behalf Of Jim Leonard
Sent: Saturday, April 20, 2019 10:51 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Bird Watchers and Photographer's


After reading Dave Irons comments maybe bird watchers and photographers should stay in their homes and not go near trees because you might disturb a bird, Be sure you don't drive or walk through any wildlife refuges because you might
disturb some birds Don't go walking through the woods because there might be a nest that you don't see and you might disturb a bird. I have seen car loads of bird watchers from Audubon field trips unload out of their cars near water and scare every duck
and bird away within 100 yards while I sit quietly in my truck taking photos out my window not disturbing anything. If Dave is so nervous about disturbing birds maybe he should stay home and give up bird watching and quit criticizing other birders. Jim Leonard.



Subject: Re: Anybody want to take a stab?
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 17:09 pm
From: susan.kirkbride99 AT gmail.com
 
Thanks to everyone for identifying the weird duck I found yesterday at Cannon Beach Settling Ponds. It was sure a surprise find!

Susan Kirkbride
Hillsboro, OR

> On Apr 21, 2019, at 7:47 AM, David Irons wrote:
>
> The head pattern and body coloration all appear to be a match for “Brewers Duck which is a Msllard X Gadwall hybrid. I was lucky enough to stumble across one of these at Tule Lake NWR years ago. Unfortunately, it was before I was taking bird photos. Duck hybrids are always a very cool find.
>
> Dave Irons
> Besverton, OR
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 21, 2019, at 6:40 AM, Mike Patterson wrote:
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>>
>> Reported to eBird yesterday from the Cannon Beach Ponds.
>>
>> A clue for the non-duck people "Bemaculated".
>>
>> --
>> Mike Patterson
>> Astoria, OR
>> Bald Eagles - a gateway bird
>> http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
>> POST: Send your post to [email protected]
>> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Contact moderator: [email protected]
>>
> I4hh%~“+-$
> 9!8ml?“+-N-+0~“+-+*'-^h“jzl
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Subject: Coos Calliopes/Vesper Sp et al.
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 16:53 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
4/21/2019Took the 21/4 hour drive to the SE corner of Coos County this AM. Birded Eden Valley (2,200™) on the Siskiyou NF. I usually like to hike up nearby Mt Bolivar (4,300™) but it was in the clouds. Temps were cool (40-42F) with some drizzle so bird activity was slow. In Eden Valley I was able to locate three male CALLIOPE HUMMERS, two which did displays for me. This general location has proven to be reliable for them in late April/early May and birds have been observed there 13 of the last 20 yrs- can™t believe it has been that long since I saw my first one there! Other first of the years for Coos for me included:RUFFED GROUSE (two drumming)MACGILLIVRAY™S WARBLER (not singing- to cold)MOUNTAIN QUAIL (several calling)SOOTY GROUSE (several calling)PACIFIC-SLOPE FLY (many in now-especially down in Powers)TOWNSEND™S SOLITAIRE (one down low along road at base of Mt Bolivar)Also 4 RB Sapsuckers
Powers area:One VESPER SPARROW in field south of town- 6th year straight, I assume they are breeding as they seem to stick around into June (I don™t check them often)One singing WILSON™S WARBLERalong the Powers Hwy near Broadbent.A few BAND-TAILED PIGEONS up high and down around Powers.
Still missing this spring are Lesser Goldfinches, normally abundant in Powers (winter too).
Saw Lincoln™s Sparrows up high and down low- they are obviously moving too.
Had one big warbler flock near Powers with 50+ birds- mostly Townsends with many singing, several BTG Warblers also singing, Yellow-rumps and OC Warblers mixed in too- just the rumps singing plus a singing Cassin™s Vireo- what a fun flock!
Happy Easter,Tim RCoos Bay



Subject: Re: Bird Watchers and Photographer's
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 16:17 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Hi, again -


Tom, your and Dave's comments are appropriate in the abstract, but my reading of Jim's description of his actions, and more importantly my reading of his photographs, do not support your conclusions that he was inappropriately stressing the birds.
Some birds species tend to be very shy relative to human contact and some tend to be quite tolerant. Some individuals within species are a lot more tolerant than others.
The responsible thing for photographers and birders to do is learn to interpret the behavior of the birds in your presence, and respond responsibly to that, rather than set arbitrary rules for how long is too long, or how close is too close. If he birds are showing signs of being bothered by your presence, back off, leave, or change your behavior. If they are not showing signs of disturbance, trust their judgment.
Jim uses a far larger lens than I will ever be able to afford, which allows him to get large images from quite a ways away. If, as he described, he sat in a lawn chair to observe, his lack of movement and presumably noise would have rendered him less threatening as well.
I was not their either, so I cannot know for sure whether he was "bothering" the hawks, but I see little in his description, and nothing in the three photos, that seems automatically out of line. Again, my experiences with the Yaquina Head Peregrines give me a different perspective than I used to have on birds' capacity to adapt to nonthreatening human presence.
Wayne
On 4/21/2019 3:58:20 PM, Tom Crabtree <[email protected]> wrote:Jim,
That isn™t what Dave is saying at all. I am a birder and a photographer. I like getting close to birds, too, But as a birder and being concerned about sensitive species, I recognize that it is important to keep my distance and keep any disturbances to a minimum. There is a line where we cross into being an inappropriate distance or staying too long so that we are affecting the bird™s behavior. We had a discussion about this with regard to the Eastern Bluebirds last fall and a lengthy discussion about approaching the Linn County Snowy Owl a few years ago. Like Dave I think an hour and a half in close proximity to a Ferruginous Hawk nest is way too long. Unfortunately some people don™t recognize when their own behavior crosses the line.
Tom Crabtree, Bend
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Jim Leonard
Sent: Saturday, April 20, 2019 10:51 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Bird Watchers and Photographer's
After reading Dave Irons comments maybe bird watchers and photographers should stay in their homes and not go near trees because you might disturb a bird, Be sure you don't drive or walk through any wildlife refuges because you might disturb some birds Don't go walking through the woods because there might be a nest that you don't see and you might disturb a bird. I have seen car loads of bird watchers from Audubon field trips unload out of their cars near water and scare every duck and bird away within 100 yards while I sit quietly in my truck taking photos out my window not disturbing anything. If Dave is so nervous about disturbing birds maybe he should stay home and give up bird watching and quit criticizing other birders. Jim Leonard.



Subject: Re: Anybody want to take a stab?
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 15:08 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
I too was going to guess Gadwall X Wigeon. These puddle duck hybrids routinely reveal ancestral traits-- colors and patterns that neither of today's parents exhibit.
On Sun, Apr 21, 2019, 11:07 AM Cindy Zalunardo <[email protected]> wrote:
Mike, Your posts always pique my curiosity. I would have guessed an unlikely Eurasian widgeon X gadwall hybrid. However due to your clue I learned about a Brewer™s duck: mallard X gadwall hybrid that folks mostly in Minnesota see occasionally.


Cindy Zalunardo

(541) 280-6179


> On Apr 21, 2019, at 6:40 AM, Mike Patterson <[email protected]> wrote:

>

> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

>

> Reported to eBird yesterday from the Cannon Beach Ponds.

>

> A clue for the non-duck people "Bemaculated".

>

> --

> Mike Patterson

> Astoria, OR

> Bald Eagles - a gateway bird

> http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...

> POST: Send your post to [email protected]

> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...

> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol

> Contact moderator: [email protected]

>

POST: Send your post to [email protected]

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Subject: Re: Bird Watchers and Photographer's
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 14:58 pm
From: tc AT empnet.com
 
Jim,
That isn™t what Dave is saying at all. I am a birder and a photographer. I like getting close to birds, too, But as a birder and being concerned about sensitive species, I recognize that it is important to keep my distance and keep any disturbances to a minimum. There is a line where we cross into being an inappropriate distance or staying too long so that we are affecting the bird™s behavior. We had a discussion about this with regard to the Eastern Bluebirds last fall and a lengthy discussion about approaching the Linn County Snowy Owl a few years ago. Like Dave I think an hour and a half in close proximity to a Ferruginous Hawk nest is way too long. Unfortunately some people don™t recognize when their own behavior crosses the line.
Tom Crabtree, Bend
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Jim Leonard
Sent: Saturday, April 20, 2019 10:51 PM
To: obol
Subject: [obol] Bird Watchers and Photographer's
After reading Dave Irons comments maybe bird watchers and photographers should stay in their homes and not go near trees because you might disturb a bird, Be sure you don't drive or walk through any wildlife refuges because you might disturb some birds Don't go walking through the woods because there might be a nest that you don't see and you might disturb a bird. I have seen car loads of bird watchers from Audubon field trips unload out of their cars near water and scare every duck and bird away within 100 yards while I sit quietly in my truck taking photos out my window not disturbing anything. If Dave is so nervous about disturbing birds maybe he should stay home and give up bird watching and quit criticizing other birders. Jim Leonard.



Subject: Re: Bean goose yes
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 14:48 pm
From: tc AT empnet.com
 
This morning from 10:30 to 11 Craig & Marilyn Miller, Jerry Lear and I
observed it along the O'Neill Highway, about a half mile past the entrance
to the Wetlands complex. It was about 75-100 yards from the road just at
the edge of the sage in the field with Canada Geese.

Tom Crabtree, Bend

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf
Of Chuck Gates
Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2019 8:06 AM
To: obol
Cc: COBOL
Subject: [obol] Bean goose yes


Still present near Crooked River Wetlands. Best viewed by walking the
Wetlands on the west side of ponds 11 and 12.
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Subject: Happy Easter and help request
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 14:39 pm
From: linda AT fink.com
 
from those who like a challenge and won't tell me I should figure it out
myself... What is this warbler?
https://lindafink-birdnotes.bl...

Thanks!

Linda Fink near Grand Ronde Agency, Yamhill County
--

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Subject:
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 14:18 pm
From: range.bayer AT gmail.com
 
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Walt and Rebecca [email protected] [LCBNO]

Date: Sun, Apr 21, 2019 at 10:51 AM
Subject: [LCBNO] Horned Puffin (dead) and big Whimbrel flock near Ona Beach
To: Lincoln Co. Birding & Nature Observing

This morning we found a dead Horned Puffin located about halfway
between the 148th St crossover and the creek mouth at Ona Beach
(roughly 6 miles south of Newport). It was up at the high tide line
near the base of the dunes; appears to be an adult in non-breeding
plumage. We got photos but don™t have an online place to post. Left it
in place but with the high tide cycle and the scavengers it may not
stay there long.

Also saw a big aggregation of at least 150 Whimbrels resting and
feeding down near the water™s edge a little ways north of the 148th St
crossover. A few flocks of (unidentified) small shorebirds also flew
past.

Rebecca Cheek
Walt Nelson
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Subject: Swamp Sparrow in Gresham yard
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 13:52 pm
From: pbarnes123 AT gmail.com
 
Passerine migrants have been passing through my Gresham yard the past couple of days, with 20-30 Yellow-rumped and single Orange-crowned Warblers each day. This morning, a Swamp Sparrow visited for about 10 minutes and gave good looks.
Peter Barnes



Subject: Re: Anybody want to take a stab?
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 13:08 pm
From: cindybirdzalunardo AT gmail.com
 
Mike, Your posts always pique my curiosity. I would have guessed an unlikely Eurasian widgeon X gadwall hybrid. However due to your clue I learned about a Brewer™s duck: mallard  X gadwall hybrid that folks mostly in Minnesota see occasionally.

Cindy Zalunardo
(541) 280-6179

> On Apr 21, 2019, at 6:40 AM, Mike Patterson wrote:
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> Reported to eBird yesterday from the Cannon Beach Ponds.
>
> A clue for the non-duck people "Bemaculated".
>
> --
> Mike Patterson
> Astoria, OR
> Bald Eagles - a gateway bird
> http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
> POST: Send your post to [email protected]s.org
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: [email protected]
>
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Subject: foy bandtailed pigeon coos
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 12:28 pm
From: kcsaxton AT gmail.com
 
j}z.y*)e



Subject: Warblers in Silverton
Date: Sun Apr 21 2019 12:26 pm
From: grantandstacy17 AT gmail.com
 
Orange-crowned Warblers the most abundant bird this morning, outnumbering Yellow-rumped. Several Common Yellowthroats singing in wetlands. First of year Nashville Warbler, Black-throated Gray Warbler, and Hammond's Flycatcher.
--
Grant Canterbury<[email protected]>


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