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Updated on July 21, 2017, 9:40 am

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21 Jul: @ 09:37:33  Hart Mtn. NWR - Sage Thrasher singing, C Nighthawks roosting [L Markoff]
21 Jul: @ 08:43:49  Youth Scholarship - OBA Annual Meeting [Ken Chamberlain]
21 Jul: @ 00:16:43  coastal gulls in summer in Yamhill area--something going on to drive them inland? [Harry Fuller]
20 Jul: @ 20:17:52  Sparrow ID "quiz" redux [Joel Geier]
20 Jul: @ 19:04:46  moving sale [harrietand1]
20 Jul: @ 18:58:15  Which refuge? [Bill Tice]
20 Jul: @ 17:14:13  Re: ID help? [Larry McQueen]
20 Jul: @ 17:04:13  Re: teaching with bad photos [Larry McQueen]
20 Jul: @ 16:26:37  Todays Pics [Bill Tice]
20 Jul: @ 12:20:04  Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 7/19/17 [Wink Gross]
20 Jul: @ 11:51:50  Re: teaching with bad photos [Tom Crabtree]
20 Jul: @ 11:27:55  Re: teaching with bad photos [Alan Contreras]
20 Jul: @ 11:22:47  Re: teaching with bad photos [Wayne Hoffman]
20 Jul: @ 11:08:38  Albino goldfinch near Airlie (southern Polk county) [Joel Geier]
20 Jul: @ 11:07:11  Re: ID help? [Alan Contreras]
20 Jul: @ 11:04:28  ID help? [Pat Truhn]
20 Jul: @ 11:01:31  Re: teaching with bad photos [Paul Sullivan]
20 Jul: @ 10:58:33  ID help please [Pat Truhn]
20 Jul: @ 10:39:04  Re: digest non-attachments [Dennis Vroman]
20 Jul: @ 09:52:53  video - Virginia Rail, GT Grackle - Summer Lake WMA [L Markoff]
20 Jul: @ 09:28:30  The turnstones of the world [Robert O'Brien]
20 Jul: @ 08:53:35  teaching with bad photos [Robert O'Brien]
20 Jul: @ 01:50:58  Fwd: bad photo id quiz [Robert O'Brien]
20 Jul: @ 01:20:33  Re: Non-sparrow juvenile mystery bird [Robert O'Brien]
20 Jul: @ 00:34:14  Re: teaching with bad photos [Tom Crabtree]
20 Jul: @ 00:30:22  Re: teaching with bad photos [Joel Geier]
20 Jul: @ 00:25:40  bad photo id quiz [Linda Fink]
20 Jul: @ 00:11:53  Re: The turnstones of the world [Robert O'Brien]
20 Jul: @ 00:07:09  teaching with bad photos [Paul Sullivan]
19 Jul: @ 23:12:29  Re: digest non-attachments [Karl Schneck]
19 Jul: @ 22:32:14  Re: digest non-attachments [Larry McQueen]
19 Jul: @ 21:21:52  The turnstones of the world [Owen Schmidt]
19 Jul: @ 21:06:39  Re: Wed Morning Birding Crew at Royal Ave Fern Ridge [Alan Contreras]
19 Jul: @ 20:38:36  Wed Morning Birding Crew at Royal Ave Fern Ridge [Ellen Cantor]
19 Jul: @ 19:10:23  Common Poorwill calls, Lake County [L Markoff]
19 Jul: @ 17:36:47  Re: Another sparrow quiz [Paul Sullivan]
19 Jul: @ 16:39:00  Re: Joel's invisible sparrow [Linda Fink]
19 Jul: @ 15:43:54  Re: Fernhill Red-breasted Merganser.... [Lars Per Norgren]
19 Jul: @ 15:18:22  Peregrine vs. Pileated (not in Oregon) [Robert O'Brien]
19 Jul: @ 14:52:14  Re: Fernhill Red-breasted Merganser.... [Russ Namitz]
19 Jul: @ 14:07:22  Re: New Coos Location Added to Birding Oregon Guide [Russ Namitz]
19 Jul: @ 11:38:27  Re: digest non-attachments [Joel Geier]
19 Jul: @ 11:30:45  New Coos Location Added to Birding Oregon Guide [Charles Gates]
19 Jul: @ 11:18:02  digest non-attachments [Linda Fink]
19 Jul: @ 10:29:00  Re: Another sparrow quiz [Joel Geier]
19 Jul: @ 10:23:58  Re: Another sparrow quiz [Joel Geier]
19 Jul: @ 01:40:04  Fern Ridge Res (Lane Co), 7/18 evening [Barry McKenzie]
19 Jul: @ 00:03:57  Non-sparrow juvenile mystery bird [Robert O'Brien]
18 Jul: @ 23:41:56  Re: Another sparrow quiz [Joel Geier]
18 Jul: @ 23:08:23  Re: Another sparrow quiz [Mark Nikas]





Subject: Hart Mtn. NWR - Sage Thrasher singing, C Nighthawks roosting
Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 9:37 am
From: canyoneagle AT comcast.net
 
This was the first time that I visited Hart Mountain NWR. I got lucky in my timing, there was water galore! I ran out of time and only saw a fraction of the place. It was great, I want to go back to explore more of it!
There were many Sage Thrashers singing. One perched up high and I was able to record its cheerful voice.
On the way out of Hart Mountain I noticed a few Common Nighthawks. One was flying and two were roosting in a tree. (They were at about 12:30 and 4:00 in the tree).
https://www.flickr.com/gp/cany...
Lori Markoff
Eugene (South Hills)



Subject: Youth Scholarship - OBA Annual Meeting
Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 8:43 am
From: kjchamberlain AT comcast.net
 
August 1 deadline for applications is approaching.Oregon Birding Association is pleased to offer three Youth Scholarships for this year™s Annual Meeting in Malheur. The scholarship will cover two nights lodging at the Field Station, six meals, and registration fees. The meeting is September 16 and 17.To qualify, you must:be a student in 6th grade through senior in college (undergraduate), andbe an OBA or WOS member or child of an OBA/WOS member.To enter, send an email to the OBA Board atboard@orbirds.orgwith your name and address, age, year in school, and a brief statement about why you™d like to participate.Deadline to apply isAugust 1, 2017.The OBA Annual Meeting Committee will make the selections and contact the winners. Awards may be announced on the OBA website and Facebook pages
OBA Board
(Please excuse crossposting)



Subject: coastal gulls in summer in Yamhill area--something going on to drive them inland?
Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 0:16 am
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
Glaucous-winged today...first record I have this time of yearhttps://atowhee.wordpress.com/...
--
Harry Fullerauthor of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA, see: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding, see: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: Sparrow ID "quiz" redux
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 20:17 pm
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Sorry for a somewhat disappointing end to this "quiz." I hoped that I'd
be able to supply a more definitive answer based on a follow-up visit,
but, well, ... nest predation sometimes happens.

This particular site had two Vesper Sparrow nests fail due to predation,
within 50 m or so of where we found this nest which I *think* belonged
to a Song Sparrow. Location, location, location, as realtors famously
like to say.

But just to give more of a sense of the nest situation, here's an
uncropped version of the same photo that I posted earlier (downscaled in
terms of resolution).

This was as good as I could get with the zoom lens and misbehaving
auto-focus on my Nikon Coolpix L840. I sure do miss my old Canon AE-1
and the Tamron zoom lens that I jammed in a minor fall back in 1987
while doing a bit of no-gear rock-climbing to get what I still regard as
one of my best photos, of a tenacious young Douglas-fir growing out of a
70+ degree rock slope with Liberty Bell (in the North Cascades) in the
background. That was the last time I did any serious photography.

I really miss having a camera with full manual focus. I have no doubt I
could have gotten much better photos of this bird on the nest, with my
old AE-1 and lens. But I sure don't miss the film-developing costs!

Anyway, this photo shows more of the nest situation, in a clump of
non-native grass.The bird is just below dead-center. You can see her eye
if you look closely.

Happy birding,
Joel
--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



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Subject: moving sale
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 19:04 pm
From: harrietand1 AT comcast.net
 
I'm looking for some Garage Sale fellow birders. I'm moving to Senior Living and want some birder/animal lovers to help me shrink my "footprint". I havedecorated withlots of small carvings from around the world. I count 68 elephants. The first who asks can have my Smithsonian, Sept 2010 issue with photos of the last known fledglingIvory Billed woodpecker. Audubon got my books. 
I live close inNE Port. Buy my house while you are here.



Subject: Which refuge?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 18:58 pm
From: ticebill7 AT gmail.com
 
I neglected to mention the name of the refuge where I took pics today, which is Baskett Slough NWR.

Bill TicePOST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
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Subject: Re: ID help?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 17:14 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
 
I agree with Alan.  WW Pewee.

Larry

> On Jul 20, 2017, at 9:04 AM, Pat Truhn wrote:
>
>

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Subject: Re: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 17:04 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
 
Hey, you guys ” QUIT IT!
It was only an idea and not even a new idea! Why the inappropriate reactions?

Larry

On Jul 20, 2017, at 9:27 AM, Alan Contreras > wrote:

I™ll contribute a headless kingbird with a barely visible tail. No known photos of the beer-bottle grebe are available, which is a good thing.

Now let™s all remind ourselves that this is July, not February. Put. The keyboards. Down.


Alan Contreras
acontrer56@gmail.com

Eugene, Oregon

www.alanlcontreras.com





On Jul 20, 2017, at 9:22 AM, Wayne Hoffman > wrote:

Good idea, Robert.

I can contribute a photo i took years ago at Ramsey Canyon of a White-eared Hummingbird that was departing the feeder as I pressed the shutter. The image is pretty well smooshed across the frame, but the prominent white streak on the head and the red smear of the bill make it still (just barely) identifiable. At the time I considered starting a contest for the worst still-identifiable bird photo.

Wayne

On 7/20/2017 6:53:50 AM, Robert O'Brien > wrote:

What about a bad bird guide? It could have a combination of fuzzy photos and illustrations with questionable proportions and colors that are a little too garish. These could include little arrows pointing to random spots on the bird. The descriptions could have occasipnal misspellings (sic) and lots of apostrophies. I'd be happy to write the first draft if there is sufficient interest. I already have lots of appropriate photos and I'm a terrible artist so I'll use stick figures whenever possible. I'd be doing the photo IDs for the first draft myself so naturally there would be lots of latitude there. It could be priced low and sold at Walmart.
Bob obrien (Just an idea, and now it's time to get some coffee.)

On Wednesday, July 19, 2017, Tom Crabtree > wrote:
> And, of course, Paul, you never have bad looks at birds when you are out in
> the field. And never have fleeting glances. And the birds always look
> perfect like the best images in the best books. (And things were always
> better in the good ol' days, but that's another story).
>
> Unfortunately, that isn't reality for most of us. We learn more pushing the
> envelope, challenging us to go beyond our comfort level and having things so
> they aren't wrapped up in a box with a little bow on top. That's why some
> people study empids and come up with ways of separating them. Or sub-adult
> gulls. It's why we don't have only "confusing fall warblers" anymore. A
> recent Birding photo quiz showed the underwing patterns of some birds with
> their heads chopped off. They point was these are similar looking birds,
> can you ID them without the obvious advantage of seeing the whole bird.
>
> Bad photos are good challenges and separate those willing to stretch their
> ID skills rather than have the answers handed to them on a plate.
>
> My 2 cents worth, with all due respect.
>
> Tom Crabtree
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Paul Sullivan
> Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:07 PM
> To: obol@freelists.org
> Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
> Subject: [obol] teaching with bad photos
>
> Larry, with all due respect,
>
> I am strongly against teaching with bad photos. If you want to educate
> people on what birds look like, I think it best to marshal the best images
> you can. Isn™t that why we make field guides? Don™t artists aim to capture
> the true color, shape, jizz, etc of each species “ at various seasons and
> ages? If you want to teach mathematics you don™t begin with insoluble
> puzzles.
>
> I™ve been to presentations where marginal photos are offered as examples of
> what a rare species looks like. I™ve been to birders™ nights where quiz
> birds are offered up. People talk about challenge and some folks enjoy
> the back-and-forth. It is a place for the people who already know a lot to
> show off, to get (or guess) the right answer. It is a place for the
> presenter to say, I know the answer, bet you can™t guess what this is. I
> think these kind of experiences intimidate or confuse people more than
> teach.
>
> I don™t think such sessions really educate people. I think if you are going
> to take someone and lead them along, you need to move in an organized
> progression, showing field marks, explaining habitat and behavior,
> illustrating your lesson with the best images you can muster. Echoing your
> comment, I believe the living bird on a field trip can teach in a few
> minutes more than can be captured in any series of photos.
>
> That™s my two cents.
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> ----------------------
> Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
> Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
> From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
>
> Joel and all,
>
> This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this
> was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the
> field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal.
> The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the
> challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list,
> as a teaching exercise?
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
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> http://www.freelists.org/list/...
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> obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
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>
>



Subject: Todays Pics
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 16:26 pm
From: ticebill7 AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,I had a good day taking pics, so thought I'd share them with the group.
http://variousoregonbirdingpik...

--
Bill Tice
Birding: The best excuse for getting outdoors, and, for avoiding chores



Subject: Pittock, NW Portland, week ending 7/19/17
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 12:20 pm
From: winkg AT hevanet.com
 
Here is the summary of my morning walks from NW Seblar Terracetothe Pittock Mansion for the week 7/13 to 7/19/17. Species neitherseen nor heard the previous week are inALLCAPS.
Additional information about my walk, including an archiveofweekly summaries and a checklist, may befound athttp://www.hevanet.com/winkg/d...
The sightings are also in eBird.
I did the walk 4 days this week.
Species # days found (peak #, date)
Band-tailed Pigeon 2 (1)Mourning Dove 3 (1)Vaux™s Swift 1 (2, 7/14)Anna™s Hummingbird 4 (5, 7/19)Rufous Hummingbird 2 (3)Red-breasted Sapsucker 2 (2, 7/19)Downy Woodpecker 1 (1, 7/19)HAIRY WOODPECKER 1 (1, 7/14)Northern Flicker 4 (4)OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER 1 (1, 7/19)PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER 1 (1, 7/19)HUTTON™S VIREO 2 (2, 7/19)Steller's Jay 3 (4)American Crow 4 (8)Violet-green Swallow 2 (6, 7/13)Black-capped Chickadee 4 (14, 7/19)Chestnut-backed Chickadee 2 (9)Bushtit 1 (18, 7/19)Red-breasted Nuthatch 4 (6)BROWN CREEPER 1 (1, 7/18)Pacific Wren 1 (1, 7/18)Bewick™s Wren 4 (3, 7/19)American Robin 4 (12)CEDAR WAXWING 1 (2, 7/19)Orange-crowned Warbler 1 (1, 7/19)Black-throated Gray Warbler 1 (2, 7/19)Wilson™s Warbler 1 (4, 7/13)Dark-eyed Junco 4 (12)Song Sparrow 4 (15, 7/19)Spotted Towhee 3 (4)WESTERN TANAGER 1 (1, 7/19)Black-headed Grosbeak 3 (4, 7/19)House Finch 2 (2)LESSER GOLDFINCH 1 (1, 7/19)EVENING GROSBEAK 1 (1, 7/18)
Misses (birds found at least 3 days in previous 2 weeks butnot found this week): Pileated Woodpecker, Swainson™sThrush, European Starling, Purple Finch
Wink GrossPortland



Subject: Re: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 11:51 am
From: tc AT empnet.com
 
Paul,

On this, I agree with you completely. There is no "one right way" approach
to this. It's why there are picture field guides and artist drawing field
guides. I think throwing a bunch of bad photos at beginning birders would
just discourage them and possibly drive them away from the hobby. But for
others, more advanced on the learning curve, "stump the chumps" photo
quizzes are a welcome challenge. On some photos (or videos or recordings)
we may never arrive at a consensus (just look at the whole Ivory-billed
Woodpecker debate among the country's best birders) but I think the process
is valuable even if we don't arrive at one correct answer. If bad photo
quizzes aren't your thing, don't participate. But if you are one who likes
a challenge, dive in, it might be fun.

Tom


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Sullivan [mailto:paultsullivan@onlinenw.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 9:01 AM
To: 'Tom Crabtree'; obol@freelists.org
Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
Subject: RE: [obol] teaching with bad photos

Yeah, Tom, you're right :-)

My field experiences are always picture perfect. Great light, no leaves in
the way, etc. Yeah, right. :-)

In the field I/we do struggle with elusive, puzzling views of birds. We ask
our friends, "Get on that bird up there. I can't see its head. Can you
tell what it is? I think it's may be a vireo, but I can't see enough."
What we end up with over time is a mosaic of glimpses. From them we build a
composite of the whole bird and come to an identification -- or maybe the
bird flies off and we don't know what it was. Marginal photos capture only
a few frames out of that whole field experience. Sometimes they can provide
an answer, but not always.

It can be fun to work on a puzzle together, trying to sort out what we're
seeing. I acknowledge that we've learned more about Empidonax flycatchers
and fall warblers over time by studying photos and specimens.

I guess there's two groups of "students" here. Those who are quite a ways
along the learning curve may jump in and wrestle with the marginal photo,
pointing out the white square patch on the wing (I think I see it. Do you?)
Those who are at the beginning of the learning curve are left saying
"Whaaat? You lost me." Not everyone wants to be able to identify birds by
their underwings alone.

So researchers are working on the puzzle of cancer, or the birth of stars.
Lots of contradictory clues. Experts disagreeing. The public confused.
Only when we have come to some synthesis of the clues and put them in an
order that takes in all the disparate pieces of the puzzle can we tell a
coherent story to the public.

Through research the investigators learn. Through good teaching the layman
learns.

Good puzzling to you,

Paul

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Subject: Re: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 11:27 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
I™ll contribute a headless kingbird with a barely visible tail. No known photos of the beer-bottle grebe are available, which is a good thing.
Now let™s all remind ourselves that this is July, not February. Put. The keyboards. Down.


Alan Contrerasacontrer56@gmail.com
Eugene, Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Jul 20, 2017, at 9:22 AM, Wayne Hoffman <whoffman@peak.org> wrote:





Good idea, Robert.


I can contribute a photo i took years ago at Ramsey Canyon of a White-eared Hummingbird that was departing the feeder as I pressed the shutter. The image is pretty well smooshed across the frame, but the prominent white streak on the head and the red smear of the bill make it still (just barely) identifiable. At the time I considered starting a contest for the worst still-identifiable bird photo.
WayneOn 7/20/2017 6:53:50 AM, Robert O'Brien <baro@pdx.edu> wrote:What about a bad bird guide? It could have a combination of fuzzy photos and illustrations with questionable proportions and colors that are a little too garish. These could include little arrows pointing to random spots on the bird. The descriptions could have occasipnal misspellings (sic) and lots of apostrophies. I'd be happy to write the first draft if there is sufficient interest. I already have lots of appropriate photos and I'm a terrible artist so I'll use stick figures whenever possible. I'd be doing the photo IDs for the first draft myself so naturally there would be lots of latitude there. It could be priced low and sold at Walmart.
Bob obrien (Just an idea, and now it's time to get some coffee.)

On Wednesday, July 19, 2017, Tom Crabtree <tc@empnet.com> wrote:
> And, of course, Paul, you never have bad looks at birds when you are out in
> the field. And never have fleeting glances. And the birds always look
> perfect like the best images in the best books. (And things were always
> better in the good ol' days, but that's another story).
>
> Unfortunately, that isn't reality for most of us. We learn more pushing the
> envelope, challenging us to go beyond our comfort level and having things so
> they aren't wrapped up in a box with a little bow on top. That's why some
> people study empids and come up with ways of separating them. Or sub-adult
> gulls. It's why we don't have only "confusing fall warblers" anymore. A
> recent Birding photo quiz showed the underwing patterns of some birds with
> their heads chopped off. They point was these are similar looking birds,
> can you ID them without the obvious advantage of seeing the whole bird.
>
> Bad photos are good challenges and separate those willing to stretch their
> ID skills rather than have the answers handed to them on a plate.
>
> My 2 cents worth, with all due respect.
>
> Tom Crabtree
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Paul Sullivan
> Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:07 PM
> To: obol@freelists.org
> Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
> Subject: [obol] teaching with bad photos
>
> Larry, with all due respect,
>
> I am strongly against teaching with bad photos. If you want to educate
> people on what birds look like, I think it best to marshal the best images
> you can. Isn™t that why we make field guides? Don™t artists aim to capture
> the true color, shape, jizz, etc of each species “ at various seasons and
> ages? If you want to teach mathematics you don™t begin with insoluble
> puzzles.
>
> I™ve been to presentations where marginal photos are offered as examples of
> what a rare species looks like. I™ve been to birders™ nights where quiz
> birds are offered up. People talk about challenge and some folks enjoy
> the back-and-forth. It is a place for the people who already know a lot to
> show off, to get (or guess) the right answer. It is a place for the
> presenter to say, I know the answer, bet you can™t guess what this is. I
> think these kind of experiences intimidate or confuse people more than
> teach.
>
> I don™t think such sessions really educate people. I think if you are going
> to take someone and lead them along, you need to move in an organized
> progression, showing field marks, explaining habitat and behavior,
> illustrating your lesson with the best images you can muster. Echoing your
> comment, I believe the living bird on a field trip can teach in a few
> minutes more than can be captured in any series of photos.
>
> That™s my two cents.
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> ----------------------
> Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
> Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
> From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
>
> Joel and all,
>
> This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this
> was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the
> field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal.
> The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the
> challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list,
> as a teaching exercise?
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
> POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org JOIN OR QUIT:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Contact moderator:
> obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
> POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
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> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
>



Subject: Re: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 11:22 am
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Good idea, Robert.


I can contribute a photo i took years ago at Ramsey Canyon of a White-eared Hummingbird that was departing the feeder as I pressed the shutter. The image is pretty well smooshed across the frame, but the prominent white streak on the head and the red smear of the bill make it still (just barely) identifiable. At the time I considered starting a contest for the worst still-identifiable bird photo.
Wayne
On 7/20/2017 6:53:50 AM, Robert O'Brien <baro@pdx.edu> wrote:What about a bad bird guide? It could have a combination of fuzzy photos and illustrations with questionable proportions and colors that are a little too garish. These could include little arrows pointing to random spots on the bird. The descriptions could have occasipnal misspellings (sic) and lots of apostrophies. I'd be happy to write the first draft if there is sufficient interest. I already have lots of appropriate photos and I'm a terrible artist so I'll use stick figures whenever possible. I'd be doing the photo IDs for the first draft myself so naturally there would be lots of latitude there. It could be priced low and sold at Walmart.
Bob obrien (Just an idea, and now it's time to get some coffee.)

On Wednesday, July 19, 2017, Tom Crabtree <tc@empnet.com> wrote:
> And, of course, Paul, you never have bad looks at birds when you are out in
> the field. And never have fleeting glances. And the birds always look
> perfect like the best images in the best books. (And things were always
> better in the good ol' days, but that's another story).
>
> Unfortunately, that isn't reality for most of us. We learn more pushing the
> envelope, challenging us to go beyond our comfort level and having things so
> they aren't wrapped up in a box with a little bow on top. That's why some
> people study empids and come up with ways of separating them. Or sub-adult
> gulls. It's why we don't have only "confusing fall warblers" anymore. A
> recent Birding photo quiz showed the underwing patterns of some birds with
> their heads chopped off. They point was these are similar looking birds,
> can you ID them without the obvious advantage of seeing the whole bird.
>
> Bad photos are good challenges and separate those willing to stretch their
> ID skills rather than have the answers handed to them on a plate.
>
> My 2 cents worth, with all due respect.
>
> Tom Crabtree
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Paul Sullivan
> Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:07 PM
> To: obol@freelists.org
> Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
> Subject: [obol] teaching with bad photos
>
> Larry, with all due respect,
>
> I am strongly against teaching with bad photos. If you want to educate
> people on what birds look like, I think it best to marshal the best images
> you can. Isn™t that why we make field guides? Don™t artists aim to capture
> the true color, shape, jizz, etc of each species “ at various seasons and
> ages? If you want to teach mathematics you don™t begin with insoluble
> puzzles.
>
> I™ve been to presentations where marginal photos are offered as examples of
> what a rare species looks like. I™ve been to birders™ nights where quiz
> birds are offered up. People talk about challenge and some folks enjoy
> the back-and-forth. It is a place for the people who already know a lot to
> show off, to get (or guess) the right answer. It is a place for the
> presenter to say, I know the answer, bet you can™t guess what this is. I
> think these kind of experiences intimidate or confuse people more than
> teach.
>
> I don™t think such sessions really educate people. I think if you are going
> to take someone and lead them along, you need to move in an organized
> progression, showing field marks, explaining habitat and behavior,
> illustrating your lesson with the best images you can muster. Echoing your
> comment, I believe the living bird on a field trip can teach in a few
> minutes more than can be captured in any series of photos.
>
> That™s my two cents.
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> ----------------------
> Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
> Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
> From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
>
> Joel and all,
>
> This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this
> was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the
> field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal.
> The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the
> challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list,
> as a teaching exercise?
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
> POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org JOIN OR QUIT:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Contact moderator:
> obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
> POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
>



Subject: Albino goldfinch near Airlie (southern Polk county)
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 11:08 am
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Hi all,

This morning a finch with entirely white plumage was flying around in a
Christmas tree farm along Airlie Rd., about 3 miles west of Hwy 99W.

When I first saw it It was feeding in a weedy area in close proximity to
three different kinds of finches (American Goldfinch, Lesser Goldfinch,
and House Finch) plus White-crowned Sparrows and Chipping Sparrows. It
was handy to have all of these birds there to compare shapes; with an
all-white bird, there's not much else to go on!

In terms of general proportions, size, and bill shape it looked most
like the American Goldfinches. When it finally flew, it went with a
flock of about 8 American Goldfinches and had the same undulating style
of flight.

I saw the white goldfinch and its flock a couple more times while I was
out there, roaming over a wide area (a quarter mile or more). So if you
happen to be driving along Airlie Rd. and keep your eyes open, you might
get to see this very striking bird.

Speaking of Hwy 99W, it's still snarled up just north of Adair Village
by the aftermath of the fuel tanker spill that happened 11 days ago. A
nice scenic, paved detour route if you're headed north from Corvallis is
to go west on Tampico Rd. (at Adair Village) and follow this all the way
to where turns into Berry Creek Rd. and then runs into Airlie Rd.

Happy birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis


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Subject: Re: ID help?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 11:07 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
If we assume that the whitish outer tail feather is an artifact of light, it looks like a Western Wood-Pewee.


Alan Contrerasacontrer56@gmail.com
Eugene, Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Jul 20, 2017, at 9:04 AM, Pat Truhn <pat.truhn@gmail.com> wrote:Hope it is still OK to send 2 pics in an email. Any idea what this
is? No color on belly/chest other than lighter gray. Saw it in my
Wilsonville yard.


IMG_4314.JPG
IMG_4316.JPG

These pictures were sent with Picasa, from Google.
Try it out here: http://picasa.google.com/
<IMG_4314.JPG><IMG_4316.JPG>



Subject: ID help?
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 11:04 am
From: pat.truhn AT gmail.com
 
Hope it is still OK to send 2 pics in  an email.  Any idea what this
is? No color on belly/chest other than lighter gray. Saw it in my
Wilsonville yard.


IMG_4314.JPG
IMG_4316.JPG

These pictures were sent with Picasa, from Google.
Try it out here: http://picasa.google.com/



Subject: Re: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 11:01 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Yeah, Tom, you're right :-)

My field experiences are always picture perfect. Great light, no leaves in
the way, etc. Yeah, right. :-)

In the field I/we do struggle with elusive, puzzling views of birds. We ask
our friends, "Get on that bird up there. I can't see its head. Can you
tell what it is? I think it's may be a vireo, but I can't see enough."
What we end up with over time is a mosaic of glimpses. From them we build a
composite of the whole bird and come to an identification -- or maybe the
bird flies off and we don't know what it was. Marginal photos capture only
a few frames out of that whole field experience. Sometimes they can provide
an answer, but not always.

It can be fun to work on a puzzle together, trying to sort out what we're
seeing. I acknowledge that we've learned more about Empidonax flycatchers
and fall warblers over time by studying photos and specimens.

I guess there's two groups of "students" here. Those who are quite a ways
along the learning curve may jump in and wrestle with the marginal photo,
pointing out the white square patch on the wing (I think I see it. Do you?)
Those who are at the beginning of the learning curve are left saying
"Whaaat? You lost me." Not everyone wants to be able to identify birds by
their underwings alone.

So researchers are working on the puzzle of cancer, or the birth of stars.
Lots of contradictory clues. Experts disagreeing. The public confused.
Only when we have come to some synthesis of the clues and put them in an
order that takes in all the disparate pieces of the puzzle can we tell a
coherent story to the public.

Through research the investigators learn. Through good teaching the layman
learns.

Good puzzling to you,

Paul
-----Original Message-----
From: tom crabtree [mailto:tomcr1968@gmail.com] On Behalf Of Tom Crabtree
Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:34 PM
To: paultsullivan@onlinenw.com; obol@freelists.org
Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
Subject: RE: [obol] teaching with bad photos

And, of course, Paul, you never have bad looks at birds when you are out in
the field. And never have fleeting glances. And the birds always look
perfect like the best images in the best books. (And things were always
better in the good ol' days, but that's another story).

Unfortunately, that isn't reality for most of us. We learn more pushing the
envelope, challenging us to go beyond our comfort level and having things so
they aren't wrapped up in a box with a little bow on top. That's why some
people study empids and come up with ways of separating them. Or sub-adult
gulls. It's why we don't have only "confusing fall warblers" anymore. A
recent Birding photo quiz showed the underwing patterns of some birds with
their heads chopped off. They point was these are similar looking birds,
can you ID them without the obvious advantage of seeing the whole bird.

Bad photos are good challenges and separate those willing to stretch their
ID skills rather than have the answers handed to them on a plate.

My 2 cents worth, with all due respect.

Tom Crabtree

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] On Behalf
Of Paul Sullivan
Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:07 PM
To: obol@freelists.org
Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
Subject: [obol] teaching with bad photos

Larry, with all due respect,

I am strongly against teaching with bad photos. If you want to educate
people on what birds look like, I think it best to marshal the best images
you can. Isn’t that why we make field guides? Don’t artists aim to capture
the true color, shape, jizz, etc of each species – at various seasons and
ages? If you want to teach mathematics you don’t begin with insoluble
puzzles.

I’ve been to presentations where marginal photos are offered as examples of
what a rare species looks like. I’ve been to birders’ nights where quiz
birds are offered up. People talk about “challenge” and some folks enjoy
the back-and-forth. It is a place for the people who already know a lot to
show off, to get (or guess) the right answer. It is a place for the
presenter to say, “I know the answer, bet you can’t guess what this is.” I
think these kind of experiences intimidate or confuse people more than
teach.

I don’t think such sessions really educate people. I think if you are going
to take someone and lead them along, you need to move in an organized
progression, showing field marks, explaining habitat and behavior,
illustrating your lesson with the best images you can muster. Echoing your
comment, I believe the living bird on a field trip can teach in a few
minutes more than can be captured in any series of photos.

That’s my two cents.

Paul Sullivan

----------------------
Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com

Joel and all,

This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this
was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the
field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal.
The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the
challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list,
as a teaching exercise?

Larry




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Subject: ID help please
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 10:58 am
From: pat.truhn AT gmail.com
 
Any idea what this is??? I feel like I should know this, but I don't. Belly is light colored, no peach color, no yellow. Seen in my yard in Wilsonville. Thanks.



IMG_4315.JPG

IMG_4316.JPG
IMG_4313.JPG


These pictures were sent with Picasa, from Google.

Try it out here: http://picasa.google.com/ 2 Attachments



Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 10:39 am
From: dpvroman AT budget.net
 
Appears to be the rear portion of a California Towhee

Dennis
----- Original Message -----
From: Karl Schneck
To: larmcqueen@msn.com
Cc: obol
Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 9:11 PM
Subject: [obol] Re: digest non-attachments


I'll bite... this isn't an especially bad photo, but limited... this could be fun :-)






Karl Schneck



"As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but nature's sources never fail." John Muir



On Wed, Jul 19, 2017 at 8:31 PM, Larry McQueen wrote:

Joel and all,


This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal. The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list, as a teaching exercise?


Larry




On Jul 19, 2017, at 5:45 PM, Joel Geier wrote:


Hi Larry & All,

Sorry that I have to give a more inconclusive answer on this "quiz" than I was hoping for.

Today when I checked back on that nest, the mom was nowhere in sight and the nest was empty, with no sign of the two very young nestlings or the one egg that were in the nest cup yesterday. So it might not be possible to establish the identity of this bird with certainty, except so far as we can get from my photos and incidental observations.

I think she was a Song Sparrow -- not a species that I would normally expect to find nesting in this kind of situation. This was in a grazed upland pasture where the general habitat structure is oak savanna. There are a couple of very small shrubs nearby (one heavily browsed rose bush maybe 2 ft high, about 3 yards from the nest, and a couple of smaller ones within 5 yards or so), and a young oak (maybe 6" dbh) about 5 yards away. Otherwise the vegetation is mainly grasses and forbs, mostly 6-12 inches high except for scattered clumps of slightly higher vegetation 18-24" high like the one where this nest is located.

The "impossibly long tail" of course fits with Song Sparrow. The first photo also shows a touch of rust on the crown, which I was also able to see in my frontal view of the bird when I noted the dark upper mandible (and not much of anything else). She did have an "ornery" look!

I wasn't thinking about Grasshopper Sparrow at all (the nest cup was too big, for starters) but I can see why the one photo could lead folks in that direction. A Song Sparrow should have a post-ocular stripe, but this bird's head is turned slightly so that's not visible (I didn't see it in the field either, but what you can see in this photo is better than my field view). So I think the plain-faced look is just an artifact of how the bird's head is turned.

Besides the tail and the bill coloration and size, the other main thing that leads me to the conclusion of Song Sparrow is the generally grungy look of the back. "Grungy" of course is a highly technical term! ;-) The bright bits of sunlight filtering through the vegetation certainly add to the difficulty, but this is the same situation that I faced in the field. Song Sparrows do have eye rings, though that characteristic seldom gets mentioned for this under-appreciated species.

The other main candidates in that location would be White-crowned Sparrow, Chipping Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, and Savannah Sparrow. This particular field/pasture has a high density of Chipping and Vesper Sparrow, but very few if any White-crowns or Savannahs (based on multiple field visits over the past few months). I was mainly trying to rule out Savannah Sparrow as an alternative to Vesper Sparrow, when I followed up on this nest. The idea of Song Sparrow didn't actually occur to me until after I got back home, still feeling puzzled, and looked at the same photos that I shared.

Happy birding,
Joel



On Wed, 2017-07-19 at 23:41 +0000, Larry McQueen wrote:

What I can make out of one of the pictures looks like Grasshopper Sparrow. I see a large eye, pale eye-ring, buffy and gray colors, and flat crown with a median line. But the nest should have a hood over it, or maybe that is only when the bird is absent (?). The GRSP™s eye is the most conspicuous feature of the face. To me, it has a stare unmatched by other sparrows. But of course, there is not much to see in this photo.



I can™t make anything of the other photo except what looks like an impossibly long tail.
NOT a feature of GRSP



Larry






On Jul 19, 2017, at 9:37 AM, Joel Geier wrote:


Hi Linda & All,

The attachments can be found in the regular OBOL archives at this link:

https://www.freelists.org/post...

Looks like I did attach them correctly on the first go after all -- sorry I didn't think to check this before I sent them a second time this morning.

The ABA message list doesn't always pick up attachments, so it's good to keep the OBOL archives in mind for this kind of thing.

Joel

On Wed, 2017-07-19 at 09:17 -0700, Linda Fink wrote:
Those of us on digest do not get photos attached to messages and did not
get any "clip" to click on for Joel's sparrow attachment. I went to the
aba obol message list and it's not there either. I am accustomed to
going there for the scrambled letter messages when people send from
their cell phones, but however Joel sent his photos, not even aba could
grab them.

Linda, curious in Yamhill County



Subject: video - Virginia Rail, GT Grackle - Summer Lake WMA
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 9:52 am
From: canyoneagle AT comcast.net
 
A juvie Virginia Rail was giving its parent a fit because the youngster was exploring the big wide world!
The male Great-tailed Grackle was beating the heat in the shower. Sometimes he got too close to the nest box for the Tree Swallows™ comfort, and they would dive bomb him.
Sandhill Cranes were bugling, stirring and delightful!
https://www.flickr.com/gp/cany...
Lori Markoff
Eugene (South Hills)



Subject: The turnstones of the world
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 9:28 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
I assume we can look for this pair online again on Aug. 16?
Bob obrien

On Wednesday, July 19, 2017, Robert O'Brien <baro@pdx.edu> wrote:
> Well, pending splits; but enjoy them while you can.
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 19, 2017 at 7:21 PM, Owen Schmidt <oschmidt@att.net> wrote:
>>
>> all in one photograph! Today at The Cove, Seaside, Clatsop County.
>> oschmidt@att.net
>> Wednesday, July 19, 2017
>> </mail/u/0/s/?view=at&thd5e6865843e330&attid=01&disp=eb&realattid^ee8fd3da5234fa_0.1.1&zw&atsh=1gt;
>>
>>
>
>



Subject: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 8:53 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
What about a bad bird guide? It could have a combination of fuzzy photos and illustrations with questionable proportions and colors that are a little too garish. These could include little arrows pointing to random spots on the bird. The descriptions could have occasipnal misspellings (sic) and lots of apostrophies. I'd be happy to write the first draft if there is sufficient interest. I already have lots of appropriate photos and I'm a terrible artist so I'll use stick figures whenever possible. I'd be doing the photo IDs for the first draft myself so naturally there would be lots of latitude there. It could be priced low and sold at Walmart.
Bob obrien (Just an idea, and now it's time to get some coffee.)

On Wednesday, July 19, 2017, Tom Crabtree <tc@empnet.com> wrote:
> And, of course, Paul, you never have bad looks at birds when you are out in
> the field. And never have fleeting glances. And the birds always look
> perfect like the best images in the best books. (And things were always
> better in the good ol' days, but that's another story).
>
> Unfortunately, that isn't reality for most of us. We learn more pushing the
> envelope, challenging us to go beyond our comfort level and having things so
> they aren't wrapped up in a box with a little bow on top. That's why some
> people study empids and come up with ways of separating them. Or sub-adult
> gulls. It's why we don't have only "confusing fall warblers" anymore. A
> recent Birding photo quiz showed the underwing patterns of some birds with
> their heads chopped off. They point was these are similar looking birds,
> can you ID them without the obvious advantage of seeing the whole bird.
>
> Bad photos are good challenges and separate those willing to stretch their
> ID skills rather than have the answers handed to them on a plate.
>
> My 2 cents worth, with all due respect.
>
> Tom Crabtree
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] On Behalf
> Of Paul Sullivan
> Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:07 PM
> To: obol@freelists.org
> Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
> Subject: [obol] teaching with bad photos
>
> Larry, with all due respect,
>
> I am strongly against teaching with bad photos. If you want to educate
> people on what birds look like, I think it best to marshal the best images
> you can. Isn™t that why we make field guides? Don™t artists aim to capture
> the true color, shape, jizz, etc of each species “ at various seasons and
> ages? If you want to teach mathematics you don™t begin with insoluble
> puzzles.
>
> I™ve been to presentations where marginal photos are offered as examples of
> what a rare species looks like. I™ve been to birders™ nights where quiz
> birds are offered up. People talk about challenge and some folks enjoy
> the back-and-forth. It is a place for the people who already know a lot to
> show off, to get (or guess) the right answer. It is a place for the
> presenter to say, I know the answer, bet you can™t guess what this is. I
> think these kind of experiences intimidate or confuse people more than
> teach.
>
> I don™t think such sessions really educate people. I think if you are going
> to take someone and lead them along, you need to move in an organized
> progression, showing field marks, explaining habitat and behavior,
> illustrating your lesson with the best images you can muster. Echoing your
> comment, I believe the living bird on a field trip can teach in a few
> minutes more than can be captured in any series of photos.
>
> That™s my two cents.
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> ----------------------
> Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
> Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
> From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
>
> Joel and all,
>
> This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this
> was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the
> field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal.
> The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the
> challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list,
> as a teaching exercise?
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
> POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org JOIN OR QUIT:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Contact moderator:
> obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
> POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
>



Subject: Fwd: bad photo id quiz
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 1:50 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Well, the photographer lives in Florida and I did too, for 5 years, long ago.
I gotta go with Gray Kingbird
Bob OBrien
But it's the duckling that killin' me.

On Wed, Jul 19, 2017 at 10:25 PM, Linda Fink <linda@fink.com> wrote:
>
> Thanks for reminding me about the ABA monthly photo quiz. I had not done it for many months but learned a great deal from it when I did. (Granted, I forgot what I had learned soon after but...) For those interested, the link to the current quiz is here: http://aba.org/photoquiz/
>
> All past quizzes, with answers, are linked on that page.
>
> Linda in Yamhill County
> --
>
> POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
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> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>



Subject: Re: Non-sparrow juvenile mystery bird
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 1:20 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Well the responses were evenly divided between Hooded Merganser (a local breeder) and Pied-bill Grebe which
could well breed but I've never seen around here in breeding season. Several people commented on the bill as favoring one or the other. I'm almost certain it's not a PB Grebe, based upon my distant obervation. To me it seemed to have a shorter
bill than a Merganser. But, Hooded starts out with a duck-like bill which lengthens as it reaches adulthood, based upon internet photos. When young Hooded babies do have a bi-colored head, but that seems to go away as the bird ages.

See http://countrycaptures.blogspo...

search for
Disappearing Act: Hooded Merganseron that page.

And also http://countrycaptures.blogspo...

search for "Hooded Merganser apparently from an early hatch" for a couple more photos. These birds have a more elongated merganser shape than the one I photographed, are getting an elongated bill and are not nearly so bicolored on the head as mine.

Golden-eye ducklings (assuming species are similar) are very strongly bi-colored on the head when very young and I guess this would gradually fade as they get older. But Goldeneye at this low elevation seems a stretch.

Here are some photos of younger goldeneye ducklings


On Tue, Jul 18, 2017 at 10:02 PM, Robert O'Brien <> wrote:
Enough of this sparrow nonsense.

Here is another Clackamas R. area mystery bird, photo taken about a month ago.
This one is a duck(ling, I guess).
I've found 5 breeding species in the area over many years but there may be more.
Wood Duck, Hooded Merganser, Mallard, Cinnamon Teal, Common Merganser.

Don't think this is one of them.

There is one full frame of the nearby wetland and the others are blown up to 100%.
This bird was pushing around something white which I thought might be a fish but doesn't appear to be
upon enlargement. The only other ducks present were some unattached adult Mallards far distant.

I photographed a Goldeneye mother and brood in the Cascades south of Bend a few years ago and It looks like one of them
and if so would have to be Barrow's. But that's not possible..............is it? Elevation here is 130 ft. This wetland is about
1/2 mile from the river. Puny Richardson Creek is nearby but it 'can't' have enough water flow for a lost Goldeneye to nest (can it?)

Seems like I remember seeing a book at Powells years ago on duckling ID. I guess I should have bought it.

Any ideas?

Bob OBrien Carver OR



Subject: Re: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 0:34 am
From: tc AT empnet.com
 
And, of course, Paul, you never have bad looks at birds when you are out in
the field. And never have fleeting glances. And the birds always look
perfect like the best images in the best books. (And things were always
better in the good ol' days, but that's another story).

Unfortunately, that isn't reality for most of us. We learn more pushing the
envelope, challenging us to go beyond our comfort level and having things so
they aren't wrapped up in a box with a little bow on top. That's why some
people study empids and come up with ways of separating them. Or sub-adult
gulls. It's why we don't have only "confusing fall warblers" anymore. A
recent Birding photo quiz showed the underwing patterns of some birds with
their heads chopped off. They point was these are similar looking birds,
can you ID them without the obvious advantage of seeing the whole bird.

Bad photos are good challenges and separate those willing to stretch their
ID skills rather than have the answers handed to them on a plate.

My 2 cents worth, with all due respect.

Tom Crabtree

-----Original Message-----
From: obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] On Behalf
Of Paul Sullivan
Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:07 PM
To: obol@freelists.org
Cc: larmcqueen@msn.com
Subject: [obol] teaching with bad photos

Larry, with all due respect,

I am strongly against teaching with bad photos. If you want to educate
people on what birds look like, I think it best to marshal the best images
you can. Isn’t that why we make field guides? Don’t artists aim to capture
the true color, shape, jizz, etc of each species – at various seasons and
ages? If you want to teach mathematics you don’t begin with insoluble
puzzles.

I’ve been to presentations where marginal photos are offered as examples of
what a rare species looks like. I’ve been to birders’ nights where quiz
birds are offered up. People talk about “challenge” and some folks enjoy
the back-and-forth. It is a place for the people who already know a lot to
show off, to get (or guess) the right answer. It is a place for the
presenter to say, “I know the answer, bet you can’t guess what this is.” I
think these kind of experiences intimidate or confuse people more than
teach.

I don’t think such sessions really educate people. I think if you are going
to take someone and lead them along, you need to move in an organized
progression, showing field marks, explaining habitat and behavior,
illustrating your lesson with the best images you can muster. Echoing your
comment, I believe the living bird on a field trip can teach in a few
minutes more than can be captured in any series of photos.

That’s my two cents.

Paul Sullivan

----------------------
Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com

Joel and all,

This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this
was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the
field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal.
The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the
challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list,
as a teaching exercise?

Larry




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Subject: Re: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 0:30 am
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Paul and all,

I somewhat resent the implication that I deliberately posted "bad
photos" just to create a difficult puzzle.

This was a genuine puzzle in the sense that I was still trying to figure
it out myself. I thought it would be interesting and helpful to see if
others had different ideas from the conclusion that I was leaning
toward.

Birds on nests are often difficult to identify. Tens of thousands of
years of evolution have taught them to stay concealed and immobile so
far as possible. So you might just have one or two "limited" views to
work with. This is a real field situation, not a contrived situation.

I could have walked in and flushed this bird, to get a better view. I
could have justified that in the name of "science," since this was part
of a research project. But I didn't want to do that, because I knew this
bird had already been off her nest for extended periods, a couple of
times that day.

I thought it was worth trying to puzzle out her identity base on these
"limited" views, rather than cause further disturbance. I do think the
photos that I posted give enough information to figure it out, even if
it's not easy or necessarily "instructive" for folks who are just trying
to learn how to learn how to identify common sparrows based on a few
field marks.

On the other hand, these photos also give a look at a nesting sparrow
that few birders ever manage to see. I was trying to share that way of
looking at sparrows. This is an important part of their life cycle, that
few are privileged or lucky enough to see. The fact that they're so good
at hiding their nests almost in plain sight is one of the more
remarkable characteristics of these plain, drab brown birds.

Good birding,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



Subject: bad photo id quiz
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 0:25 am
From: linda AT fink.com
 
Thanks for reminding me about the ABA monthly photo quiz. I had not done
it for many months but learned a great deal from it when I did.
(Granted, I forgot what I had learned soon after but...) For those
interested, the link to the current quiz is here: http://aba.org/photoquiz/

All past quizzes, with answers, are linked on that page.

Linda in Yamhill County
--

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Subject: Re: The turnstones of the world
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 0:11 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Well, pending splits; but enjoy them while you can.


On Wed, Jul 19, 2017 at 7:21 PM, Owen Schmidt wrote:

>
> all in one photograph! Today at The Cove, Seaside, Clatsop County.
>
> oschmidt@att.net
> Wednesday, July 19, 2017
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: teaching with bad photos
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 0:07 am
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Larry, with all due respect,

I am strongly against teaching with bad photos. If you want to educate
people on what birds look like, I think it best to marshal the best images
you can. Isn’t that why we make field guides? Don’t artists aim to capture
the true color, shape, jizz, etc of each species – at various seasons and
ages? If you want to teach mathematics you don’t begin with insoluble
puzzles.

I’ve been to presentations where marginal photos are offered as examples of
what a rare species looks like. I’ve been to birders’ nights where quiz
birds are offered up. People talk about “challenge” and some folks enjoy
the back-and-forth. It is a place for the people who already know a lot to
show off, to get (or guess) the right answer. It is a place for the
presenter to say, “I know the answer, bet you can’t guess what this is.” I
think these kind of experiences intimidate or confuse people more than
teach.

I don’t think such sessions really educate people. I think if you are going
to take someone and lead them along, you need to move in an organized
progression, showing field marks, explaining habitat and behavior,
illustrating your lesson with the best images you can muster. Echoing your
comment, I believe the living bird on a field trip can teach in a few
minutes more than can be captured in any series of photos.

That’s my two cents.

Paul Sullivan

----------------------
Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com

Joel and all,

This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this
was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the
field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal.
The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the
challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list,
as a teaching exercise?

Larry




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Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 23:12 pm
From: keschneckdds AT gmail.com
 
I'll bite... this isn't an especially bad photo, but limited... this could
be fun :-)




Karl Schneck

"As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but
nature's sources never fail." John Muir

On Wed, Jul 19, 2017 at 8:31 PM, Larry McQueen wrote:

> Joel and all,
>
> This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and
> this was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of
> the field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly
> minimal. The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with
> the challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this
> list, as a teaching exercise?
>
> Larry
>
>
> On Jul 19, 2017, at 5:45 PM, Joel Geier wrote:
>
> Hi Larry & All,
>
> Sorry that I have to give a more inconclusive answer on this "quiz" than I
> was hoping for.
>
> Today when I checked back on that nest, the mom was nowhere in sight and
> the nest was empty, with no sign of the two very young nestlings or the one
> egg that were in the nest cup yesterday. So it might not be possible to
> establish the identity of this bird with certainty, except so far as we can
> get from my photos and incidental observations.
>
> I think she was a Song Sparrow -- not a species that I would normally
> expect to find nesting in this kind of situation. This was in a grazed
> upland pasture where the general habitat structure is oak savanna. There
> are a couple of very small shrubs nearby (one heavily browsed rose bush
> maybe 2 ft high, about 3 yards from the nest, and a couple of smaller ones
> within 5 yards or so), and a young oak (maybe 6" dbh) about 5 yards away.
> Otherwise the vegetation is mainly grasses and forbs, mostly 6-12 inches
> high except for scattered clumps of slightly higher vegetation 18-24" high
> like the one where this nest is located.
>
> The "impossibly long tail" of course fits with Song Sparrow. The first
> photo also shows a touch of rust on the crown, which I was also able to see
> in my frontal view of the bird when I noted the dark upper mandible (and
> not much of anything else). She did have an "ornery" look!
>
> I wasn't thinking about Grasshopper Sparrow at all (the nest cup was too
> big, for starters) but I can see why the one photo could lead folks in that
> direction. A Song Sparrow should have a post-ocular stripe, but this bird's
> head is turned slightly so that's not visible (I didn't see it in the field
> either, but what you can see in this photo is better than my field view).
> So I think the plain-faced look is just an artifact of how the bird's head
> is turned.
>
> Besides the tail and the bill coloration and size, the other main thing
> that leads me to the conclusion of Song Sparrow is the generally grungy
> look of the back. "Grungy" of course is a highly technical term! ;-) The
> bright bits of sunlight filtering through the vegetation certainly add to
> the difficulty, but this is the same situation that I faced in the field.
> Song Sparrows do have eye rings, though that characteristic seldom gets
> mentioned for this under-appreciated species.
>
> The other main candidates in that location would be White-crowned Sparrow,
> Chipping Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, and Savannah Sparrow. This particular
> field/pasture has a high density of Chipping and Vesper Sparrow, but very
> few if any White-crowns or Savannahs (based on multiple field visits over
> the past few months). I was mainly trying to rule out Savannah Sparrow as
> an alternative to Vesper Sparrow, when I followed up on this nest. The idea
> of Song Sparrow didn't actually occur to me until after I got back home,
> still feeling puzzled, and looked at the same photos that I shared.
>
> Happy birding,
> Joel
>
>
>
> On Wed, 2017-07-19 at 23:41 +0000, Larry McQueen wrote:
>
> What I can make out of one of the pictures looks like Grasshopper
> Sparrow. I see a large eye, pale eye-ring, buffy and gray colors, and flat
> crown with a median line. But the nest should have a hood over it, or
> maybe that is only when the bird is absent (?). The GRSP™s eye is the most
> conspicuous feature of the face. To me, it has a stare unmatched by other
> sparrows. But of course, there is not much to see in this photo.
>
>
>
> I can™t make anything of the other photo except what looks like an
> impossibly long tail.
>
> NOT a feature of GRSP
>
>
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jul 19, 2017, at 9:37 AM, Joel Geier wrote:
>
>
> Hi Linda & All,
>
> The attachments can be found in the regular OBOL archives at this link:
>
> https://www.freelists.org/post...
>
> Looks like I did attach them correctly on the first go after all -- sorry
> I didn't think to check this before I sent them a second time this morning.
>
> The ABA message list doesn't always pick up attachments, so it's good to
> keep the OBOL archives in mind for this kind of thing.
>
> Joel
>
> On Wed, 2017-07-19 at 09:17 -0700, Linda Fink wrote:
>
> Those of us on digest do not get photos attached to messages and did not
> get any "clip" to click on for Joel's sparrow attachment. I went to the
> aba obol message list and it's not there either. I am accustomed to
> going there for the scrambled letter messages when people send from
> their cell phones, but however Joel sent his photos, not even aba could
> grab them.
>
> Linda, curious in Yamhill County
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 22:32 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
 
Joel and all,

This is of course, another lesson on the difficulties of photo IDs, and this was an especially challenge one, due to limitations. Most aspects of the field are not present in photos, and these were reduced to nearly minimal. The fun of it is the challenge, and we could be playing more with the challenge. How about others deliberately posting bad photos on this list, as a teaching exercise?

Larry


On Jul 19, 2017, at 5:45 PM, Joel Geier > wrote:

Hi Larry & All,

Sorry that I have to give a more inconclusive answer on this "quiz" than I was hoping for.

Today when I checked back on that nest, the mom was nowhere in sight and the nest was empty, with no sign of the two very young nestlings or the one egg that were in the nest cup yesterday. So it might not be possible to establish the identity of this bird with certainty, except so far as we can get from my photos and incidental observations.

I think she was a Song Sparrow -- not a species that I would normally expect to find nesting in this kind of situation. This was in a grazed upland pasture where the general habitat structure is oak savanna. There are a couple of very small shrubs nearby (one heavily browsed rose bush maybe 2 ft high, about 3 yards from the nest, and a couple of smaller ones within 5 yards or so), and a young oak (maybe 6" dbh) about 5 yards away. Otherwise the vegetation is mainly grasses and forbs, mostly 6-12 inches high except for scattered clumps of slightly higher vegetation 18-24" high like the one where this nest is located.

The "impossibly long tail" of course fits with Song Sparrow. The first photo also shows a touch of rust on the crown, which I was also able to see in my frontal view of the bird when I noted the dark upper mandible (and not much of anything else). She did have an "ornery" look!

I wasn't thinking about Grasshopper Sparrow at all (the nest cup was too big, for starters) but I can see why the one photo could lead folks in that direction. A Song Sparrow should have a post-ocular stripe, but this bird's head is turned slightly so that's not visible (I didn't see it in the field either, but what you can see in this photo is better than my field view). So I think the plain-faced look is just an artifact of how the bird's head is turned.

Besides the tail and the bill coloration and size, the other main thing that leads me to the conclusion of Song Sparrow is the generally grungy look of the back. "Grungy" of course is a highly technical term! ;-) The bright bits of sunlight filtering through the vegetation certainly add to the difficulty, but this is the same situation that I faced in the field. Song Sparrows do have eye rings, though that characteristic seldom gets mentioned for this under-appreciated species.

The other main candidates in that location would be White-crowned Sparrow, Chipping Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, and Savannah Sparrow. This particular field/pasture has a high density of Chipping and Vesper Sparrow, but very few if any White-crowns or Savannahs (based on multiple field visits over the past few months). I was mainly trying to rule out Savannah Sparrow as an alternative to Vesper Sparrow, when I followed up on this nest. The idea of Song Sparrow didn't actually occur to me until after I got back home, still feeling puzzled, and looked at the same photos that I shared.

Happy birding,
Joel



On Wed, 2017-07-19 at 23:41 +0000, Larry McQueen wrote:
What I can make out of one of the pictures looks like Grasshopper Sparrow. I see a large eye, pale eye-ring, buffy and gray colors, and flat crown with a median line. But the nest should have a hood over it, or maybe that is only when the bird is absent (?). The GRSP™s eye is the most conspicuous feature of the face. To me, it has a stare unmatched by other sparrows. But of course, there is not much to see in this photo.


I can™t make anything of the other photo except what looks like an impossibly long tail.
NOT a feature of GRSP


Larry




On Jul 19, 2017, at 9:37 AM, Joel Geier > wrote:

Hi Linda & All,

The attachments can be found in the regular OBOL archives at this link:

https://www.freelists.org/post...

Looks like I did attach them correctly on the first go after all -- sorry I didn't think to check this before I sent them a second time this morning.

The ABA message list doesn't always pick up attachments, so it's good to keep the OBOL archives in mind for this kind of thing.

Joel

On Wed, 2017-07-19 at 09:17 -0700, Linda Fink wrote:

Those of us on digest do not get photos attached to messages and did not
get any "clip" to click on for Joel's sparrow attachment. I went to the
aba obol message list and it's not there either. I am accustomed to
going there for the scrambled letter messages when people send from
their cell phones, but however Joel sent his photos, not even aba could
grab them.

Linda, curious in Yamhill County



Subject: The turnstones of the world
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 21:21 pm
From: oschmidt AT att.net
 
all in one photograph!  Today at The Cove, Seaside, Clatsop County.

oschmidt@att.net
Wednesday, July 19, 2017



Subject: Re: Wed Morning Birding Crew at Royal Ave Fern Ridge
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 21:06 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
That owl was out there Sunday, too, and has apparently been hunting there in daylight for a couple of weeks, according to Roger Robb.

Alan ContrerasEugene, Oregon
acontrer56@gmail.com
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Jul 19, 2017, at 6:38 PM, Ellen Cantor <ellencantor@gmail.com> wrote:

Eight of us birded Fern Ridge from the Royal Ave parking lot, to the Royal Observation Platform, then south from there, eventually leaving the dike to hike east, then north across the now dried mudflats, making a loop back to the parking lot.

Best birds were 2 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, 10 SEMI-PALMATED PLOVERS, 2 ADULT SPOTTED SANDPIPERS with 2 fuzzy chicks, several WILSON'S PHALOROPES, 3 PURPLE MARTIN, 1 BLACK TERN, and 1 GREAT HORNED OWL perched on a snag out in the open overlooking the mudflats.

Shorebird numbers keep increasing. Good numbers of Greater Yellowlegs, Long-billed Dowitchers, and Western and Least Sandpipers.

Birders present: Sylvia Maulding, Judy Franzen, Sarah Vasconcellos, Scott McNeeley, Steve Dignam, Tom Cable, and Ellen Cantor

My complete list can be seen on ebird:
https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...

Good Birding!
Ellen Cantor



Subject: Wed Morning Birding Crew at Royal Ave Fern Ridge
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 20:38 pm
From: ellencantor AT gmail.com
 
Eight of us birded Fern Ridge from the Royal Ave parking lot, to the Royal Observation Platform, then south from there, eventually leaving the dike to hike east, then north across the now dried mudflats, making a loop back to the parking lot.

Best birds were 2 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, 10 SEMI-PALMATED PLOVERS, 2 ADULT SPOTTED SANDPIPERS with 2 fuzzy chicks, several WILSON'S PHALOROPES, 3 PURPLE MARTIN, 1 BLACK TERN, and 1 GREAT HORNED OWL perched on a snag out in the open overlooking the mudflats.

Shorebird numbers keep increasing. Good numbers of Greater Yellowlegs, Long-billed Dowitchers, and Western and Least Sandpipers.

Birders present: Sylvia Maulding, Judy Franzen, Sarah Vasconcellos, Scott McNeeley, Steve Dignam, Tom Cable, and Ellen Cantor

My complete list can be seen on ebird:
https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...

Good Birding!
Ellen Cantor



Subject: Common Poorwill calls, Lake County
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 19:10 pm
From: canyoneagle AT comcast.net
 
I recorded these Common Poorwills on Bullard Canyon Rd., Lake County. There were several birds calling. The interesting thing to me was that one of the birds called at a particularly faster rate than the others did. 
Several Common Nighthawks were calling too, and you might hear one of them towards the end of the second video.
And a bonus, at the start of the second video you can see planet Venus on the left, and then the Moon as I pan right.
https://www.flickr.com/gp/cany...
Lori Markoff
Eugene (South Hills)



Subject: Re: Another sparrow quiz
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 17:36 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
From the FreeList archive I was able to view these marginal photos.

I don't think bird ID from marginal photos is a fun game, however, I see a
large eye In a pale face with a strong dark edge to the bird's crown and a
median crown stripe. I also see a pointed tail.

I'm guessing Grasshopper Sparrow. I know that doesn't fit with the clue
that it's a usual species in an unususal place.

Paul Sullivan

------------------------------
[obol] Another sparrow quiz
From: Joel Geier
To: Oregon Birders OnLine
Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2017 21:00:10 -0700
Hiall,

ThissparrowwasonanestingrasslandhabitatinruralBentonCounty
today.Canyouidentifyher?

Happysparrow-watching,
Joel
--
JoelGeier
CampAdairareanorthofCorvallis

Attachment: DSCN0556_cropped.JPG
Description: JPEG image
Attachment: DSCN0558_cropped.JPG
Description: JPEG image


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Subject: Re: Joel's invisible sparrow
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 16:39 pm
From: linda AT fink.com
 
Now that I've seen the photos, I'm more clueless than before. I can't
even tell for sure what's bird, what's grass, what's sunspots, and what
is my imagination. Seems like a long tail but maybe that's because all I
can see is the tail (I think that's a tail). The other photo might be a
big eye, or an eye with an eye ring. So I really don't have a clue
because what it looks most like to me nests in sagebrush not grasslands
(Brewer's Sparrow). I must be mistaking the tail for something else or
thinking it's longer than it is. I will be back on the computer tonight
hoping you have set us all straight, Joel.

Linda in Yamhill County
--

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Subject: Re: Fernhill Red-breasted Merganser....
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 15:43 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
*Hooded Mergs are small-probably no bigger than a Cinnamon Teal, which in turn are bigger thanGren-winged Teal. Red-breasted Mergs are also a lot smaller than Commons. Standing bodies ofwater in western Washington County can have a lot of Hooded Mergs in July, about as ubiquitous asMallards. I think it quite plausible Russ saw the Red-breast again. Lars
On Jul 19, 2017, at 12:51 PM, Russ Namitz wrote:Hello all~
Following up on Dave Irons's inquiry about the July Red-breasted Merganser at Fernhill Wetlands in Forest Grove that I originally reported (again) on July 4th. My sighting was brief of an actively diving female merganser on the far side of the pond through my scope. It was associating with female Cinnamon Teal and was slightly larger than these ducks. I continued on to the Purple Martin boxes to try for a photo, but was unable to refind the merganser for the duration of my visit.
Subsequent visits by other birders with photos have produced a female/immature Hooded Merganser. Could I have misidentified the merganser? It is certainly possible. My gut impression was a Red-breasted Merganser, especially since there was one here in May, but I may have gotten it wrong. I don't feel that I did, but evidence points to the contrary. My apologies if it was a wild merganser chase.
Russ NamitzOregon



Subject: Peregrine vs. Pileated (not in Oregon)
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 15:18 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Who would win this contest?

Ran across this on the internet.

http://www.sarahphotography.ca...

Bob OBrien

PS The good guy doesn't always (ever?) win.



Subject: Re: Fernhill Red-breasted Merganser....
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 14:52 pm
From: namitzr AT hotmail.com
 
Hello all~


Following up on Dave Irons's inquiry about the July Red-breasted Merganser at Fernhill Wetlands in Forest Grove that I originally reported (again) on July 4th. My sighting was brief of an actively diving female merganser on the far side of the pond through
my scope. It was associating with female Cinnamon Teal and was slightly larger than these ducks. I continued on to the Purple Martin boxes to try for a photo, but was unable to refind the merganser for the duration of my visit.


Subsequent visits by other birders with photos have produced a female/immature Hooded Merganser. Could I have misidentified the merganser? It is certainly possible. My gut impression was a Red-breasted Merganser, especially since there was one here in
May, but I may have gotten it wrong. I don't feel that I did, but evidence points to the contrary. My apologies if it was a wild merganser chase.


Russ Namitz
Oregon



Subject: Re: New Coos Location Added to Birding Oregon Guide
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 14:07 pm
From: namitzr AT hotmail.com
 
Thanks for all your hard work and diligence for maintaining this site and keeping it relevant and fresh. The link didn't work for me, but folks can access sites for Coos County here.
http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/...



Cheers,
Russ Namitz
Oregon



Subject: Re: digest non-attachments
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 11:38 am
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Hi Linda & All,

The attachments can be found in the regular OBOL archives at this link:

https://www.freelists.org/post...

Looks like I did attach them correctly on the first go after all --
sorry I didn't think to check this before I sent them a second time this
morning.

The ABA message list doesn't always pick up attachments, so it's good to
keep the OBOL archives in mind for this kind of thing.

Joel

On Wed, 2017-07-19 at 09:17 -0700, Linda Fink wrote:

> Those of us on digest do not get photos attached to messages and did not
> get any "clip" to click on for Joel's sparrow attachment. I went to the
> aba obol message list and it's not there either. I am accustomed to
> going there for the scrambled letter messages when people send from
> their cell phones, but however Joel sent his photos, not even aba could
> grab them.
>
> Linda, curious in Yamhill County



Subject: New Coos Location Added to Birding Oregon Guide
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 11:30 am
From: cgates326 AT gmail.com
 
Periodically, I add locations to the Oregon Birding Site Guide at
http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi... Russ Namitz suggested I add
Bolivar Mt./Eden Valley to the Coos County site guide. I finally got
around to adding it. Click on the aforementioned link and then click on
Coos County. You will see Bolivar Mt on the bottom of the chart. Click
on the name and you will get info on this site.

If you are working on your Coos list or just looking for a Coast Range
drive in Coos County, check out this spot. Thanks Russ.

--
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.
Mark Twain

Chuck Gates
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Central Oregon
Oregon Birding Site Guide
http://www.ecaudubon.org/#!bir...
Oregon County Checklists
http://www.ecaudubon.org/#!cou...

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Subject: digest non-attachments
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 11:18 am
From: linda AT fink.com
 
Those of us on digest do not get photos attached to messages and did not
get any "clip" to click on for Joel's sparrow attachment. I went to the
aba obol message list and it's not there either. I am accustomed to
going there for the scrambled letter messages when people send from
their cell phones, but however Joel sent his photos, not even aba could
grab them.

Linda, curious in Yamhill County
--

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Subject: Re: Another sparrow quiz
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 10:29 am
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
P.S. Here's a second try at sending those photos. They were supposed to
be regular attachments but somehow they seem to have wound up as
embedded images in my posting. I must have messed up somehow when I
attached them -- sorry about that.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



Subject: Re: Another sparrow quiz
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 10:23 am
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Hi all,

Thanks for the various guesses as to this bird's ID. I think I know what
it is, based mainly on these photos, but I'm not 100% sure.

I'll be following up on this nest again, and will let you know once I
manage to confirm the ID. My own suspicion is that it's a fairly common
species, but nesting in a somewhat unexpected situation.

Happy birding,
Joel

On Tue, 2017-07-18 at 21:41 -0700, Joel Geier wrote:

> Sorry to see that there were problems for some folks, opening the two
> photos that I sent. Hopefully you've all managed to find them now.
>
> A further clue (not visible in the photos) is that the upper mandible
> on this bird was entirely dark.
>
> On Tue, 2017-07-18 at 21:00 -0700, Joel Geier wrote:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> > This sparrow was on a nest in grassland habitat in rural Benton
> > County today. Can you identify her?
> >
> > Happy sparrow-watching,
> > Joel
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: Fern Ridge Res (Lane Co), 7/18 evening
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 1:40 am
From: barrymckenzie AT comcast.net
 
OBOL-
Allen Brooks and I birded the dikes at FRR (south of the Royal Ave platform) this evening 5:00 - 7:45pm.
Warm and breezy conditions with beautiful light for observation and photography.

Shorebird habitat is prime east of the dike running south from the Royal Ave platform. As the water has receded, there is enough dry mud that one can now walk south on the dike, then east across dry mud and swing back north on the east side of the water (staying on dry mud the entire time) and finally back to Royal Ave itself (as it extends west past the gate).

Highlights:
Whimbrel 1
Black-bellied Plover 1 (eclipse plumage)
Western Sandpiper 150
Least Sandpiper 200
Semi-palm Sandpiper 0
Semi-palm Plover 8
LB Dowitcher 200
Wilson™s Phalarope 6 juv
Gr Yellowlegs 50
L Yellowlegs 0
Spotted Sandpiper 5
Killdeer lots
Bank Swallow 1

Barry McKenzie
Eugene


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Subject: Non-sparrow juvenile mystery bird
Date: Wed Jul 19 2017 0:03 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Enough of this sparrow nonsense.

Here is another Clackamas R. area mystery bird, photo taken about a month
ago.
This one is a duck(ling, I guess).
I've found 5 breeding species in the area over many years but there may be
more.
Wood Duck, Hooded Merganser, Mallard, Cinnamon Teal, Common Merganser.

Don't think this is one of them.

There is one full frame of the nearby wetland and the others are blown up
to 100%.
This bird was pushing around something white which I thought might be a
fish but doesn't appear to be
upon enlargement. The only other ducks present were some unattached adult
Mallards far distant.

I photographed a Goldeneye mother and brood in the Cascades south of Bend a
few years ago and It looks like one of them
and if so would have to be Barrow's. But that's not
possible..............is it? Elevation here is 130 ft. This wetland is
about
1/2 mile from the river. Puny Richardson Creek is nearby but it 'can't'
have enough water flow for a lost Goldeneye to nest (can it?)

Seems like I remember seeing a book at Powells years ago on duckling ID. I
guess I should have bought it.

Any ideas?

Bob OBrien Carver OR



Subject: Re: Another sparrow quiz
Date: Tue Jul 18 2017 23:41 pm
From: joel.geier AT peak.org
 
Sorry to see that there were problems for some folks, opening the two
photos that I sent. Hopefully you've all managed to find them now.

A further clue (not visible in the photos) is that the upper mandible on
this bird was entirely dark.

On Tue, 2017-07-18 at 21:00 -0700, Joel Geier wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> This sparrow was on a nest in grassland habitat in rural Benton County
> today. Can you identify her?
>
> Happy sparrow-watching,
> Joel
>
>
>


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



Subject: Re: Another sparrow quiz
Date: Tue Jul 18 2017 23:08 pm
From: elepaio AT gmail.com
 
Oops.  I guess I better learn how to open attachments and not be a smart
ass.

On Tue, Jul 18, 2017 at 9:00 PM, Joel Geier wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> This sparrow was on a nest in grassland habitat in rural Benton County
> today. Can you identify her?
>
> Happy sparrow-watching,
> Joel
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>


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