ABA's Birding News >> Oregon

Oregon bird news by date

Updated on April 22, 2018, 8:45 pm

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


22 Apr: @ 20:42:08  Wasco today [Bob Archer]
22 Apr: @ 20:32:27  Re: Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene [Larry McQueen]
22 Apr: @ 18:09:41  Re: Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene [David Irons]
22 Apr: @ 17:52:40  Re: Coos Calliope Hummer et al. 4/22/18 [Tim Rodenkirk]
22 Apr: @ 17:26:05  Coos Calliope Hummer et al. 4/22/18 [Tim Rodenkirk]
22 Apr: @ 17:18:47  Re: Malheur NWR birding guide? [Tom Crabtree]
22 Apr: @ 15:24:23  Herbert Farm wetlands? [Frank Kolwicz]
22 Apr: @ 15:09:44  Albino collared dove [Joshua Galpern]
22 Apr: @ 15:07:51  Re: Interesting Sapsucker at Pittock Mansion 4/22 [Philip Kline]
22 Apr: @ 14:59:10  Malheur NWR birding guide? [John Shewey]
22 Apr: @ 14:42:24  migration today [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
22 Apr: @ 14:38:50  Vesper & Grasshopper Sparrow, Linn County [Roger Robb]
22 Apr: @ 14:31:49  Yamhill: Baker Creek Dippers fledge for Earth Day [Harry Fuller]
22 Apr: @ 13:50:27  2 FOY and BTGW at Mt Tabor this morning [Jack Maynard]
22 Apr: @ 13:30:21  Warbling Vireo at Whitaker Ponds Portland this morning [Ev]
22 Apr: @ 13:23:26  N. Goshawk, Ridgefield, Clark Co, WA [Bob]
22 Apr: @ 12:33:44  Backyard Birds Near Silverton [John Thomas]
22 Apr: @ 12:25:08  Interesting Sapsucker at Pittock Mansion 4/22 [Angela Calabrese]
22 Apr: @ 10:52:32  Mary's Peak, April 21 [Lars Per Norgren]
22 Apr: @ 10:30:00  Re: disappearing hummingbirds [Karen Saxton]
22 Apr: @ 08:53:08  Photo Collection : William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge [Jim Leonard]
22 Apr: @ 01:07:38  disappearing hummingbirds [Andrew Marshall]
21 Apr: @ 22:31:55  Santiam run - Harlequin, Barrow's, Horned Grebes, Common Loons [tom]
21 Apr: @ 20:31:51  Columbia Estuary Report - 4/21/2018 [Mike Patterson]
21 Apr: @ 19:55:53  Spanish Head 4/21 [Phil Pickering]
21 Apr: @ 18:36:55  Common Loons courting - in Yamhill County! [Paul Sullivan]
21 Apr: @ 17:52:01  Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene [Tye Jeske]
21 Apr: @ 17:00:50  Mallard duck behavior [Paul Buescher]
21 Apr: @ 16:35:47  Re: OBA Trip Photos - Wallowa County [Nagi Aboulenein (Birds)]
21 Apr: @ 16:01:41  ?utf-8?Q?Re:_Anna’s_Hummingbirds_disappear?Message-Id: <6314288E-A758-41[email protected]> [Bill Tice]
21 Apr: @ 15:37:55  Re: Anna's Hunningbirds disappear [Barbara Combs]
21 Apr: @ 14:27:02  Re: Anna's Hunningbirds disappear [Karen Saxton]
21 Apr: @ 12:17:04  Anna's Hunningbirds disappear [DJ Lauten and KACastelein]
21 Apr: @ 10:52:08  Harris's Sparrow Troutdale [Justin Cook]
21 Apr: @ 09:27:56  FOY Vaux’s Swift [Roy Lowe]
21 Apr: @ 08:31:43  Re: A few Coos birds 4/17/18 [Lars Per Norgren]
21 Apr: @ 08:22:44  A few Coos birds 4/17/18 [Tim Rodenkirk]
21 Apr: @ 01:38:21  Cassin's Vireos, Scouters Mountain, Clackamas County [Tim Janzen]
21 Apr: @ 01:23:25  Re: Acorn Woodpecker, Canby [Jack Williamson]
20 Apr: @ 23:30:15  Bend Birding Help [[email protected]]
20 Apr: @ 22:14:33  Greater White-fronted Geese in migration, Yamhill Co [Pamela Johnston]
20 Apr: @ 22:11:17  Re: Tillamook County: Eastern Kingbird? [Jeff Gilligan]
20 Apr: @ 21:50:34  Re: Tillamook County: Eastern Kingbird? [Andrew Ferre]
20 Apr: @ 20:44:41  Mid-elevation Marion County Detroit Area 4/20/2018 [Roy Gerig]
20 Apr: @ 20:34:31  Tillamook County: Eastern Kingbird? [Andrew Ferre]
20 Apr: @ 18:50:48  Acorn Woodpecker, Canby [Kay Carter]
20 Apr: @ 17:50:57  Yamhill--Daily dipper update and questions about feeding technique [Harry Fuller]
20 Apr: @ 16:53:57  Re: Eugene Townsend's Solitaire and possible female Calliope [Brandon Green]
20 Apr: @ 16:45:27  Chinook Landing - no Eared Grebe [Lyn Topinka]
20 Apr: @ 16:37:57  BBS routes now available for Tualatin, Sisters, Elk Lake [Paul Adamus]





Subject: Wasco today
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 20:42 pm
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
I had a fun bird loop through White River WMA today, just east of FR 27. Went up there last night, no owls. Nashville Warblers are back as well as Gray Flycatchers. Thought I heard a Mac but could not locate, no wolves (2 are in area). My list:


White River WMA Loop, Wasco, Oregon, USApr 22, 2018 7:20 AM - 2:20 PMProtocol: Traveling11.0 mile(s)Comments: sunny no wind, temp went from 32 to 5636 species (+1 other taxa)Canada Goose 7Wood Duck 3Mallard 2Wild Turkey 1Turkey Vulture 3Red-tailed Hawk 3Mourning Dove 2Vaux's Swift 7Downy Woodpecker 3Northern Flicker 4Gray Flycatcher 9Cassin's Vireo 3Steller's Jay 6Tree Swallow 8Mountain Chickadee 15Chestnut-backed Chickadee 7Red-breasted Nuthatch 11White-breasted Nuthatch (Interior West) 7Brown Creeper 2House Wren 3Pacific Wren 1Golden-crowned Kinglet 3Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5Western Bluebird 4Hermit Thrush 2American Robin 6Nashville Warbler 5Yellow-rumped Warbler 100Black-throated Gray Warbler 4warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.) 1 possible Mac, one burst of songChipping Sparrow 55Dark-eyed Junco 40White-crowned Sparrow 2Spotted Towhee 4Brown-headed Cowbird 2Purple Finch 2Cassin's Finch 50



Bob ArcherPDX



Subject: Re: Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 20:32 pm
From: larmcqueen AT msn.com
 
I have to disagree with Irons on the Catharus ID, although I too was surprised at the size of those spots.  Ignoring that, the spots on Hermit are darker and really appear to be black.  The structure of this bird is more like a Swainsons.  By comparison, Hermit appears dainty and with a longer-looking tail, usually slightly cocked.  The bird in the photo is stocky like a Swainsons; shorter tail, not cocked.
But there is one feature of Swainsons that I dont see in this photo. The breast, where the spotting occurs, ought to show a subtle wash of tan color. Hermit has spots on white.
Photos are tricky. I was not present to see the bird, but I am inclined to favor the ID of those who did, and for the reasons above.
Larry



On Apr 22, 2018, at 7:09 PM, David Irons > wrote:


Tye et al.,


I have looked at the photos of the reported Swainson's Thrush from yesterday at Skinner's Butte and to my eye it does not look right for that species. I am looking primarily at the size, color and spacing of the spotting on the upper breast, all of which favor Hermit Thrush in my opinion.


First, the spots are rather large and somewhat irregular in size. This is typical of Hermit and not so of russet-backed Swainson's Thrushes, which have smaller spots that seem (at least to my eye) to be more consistent in size. Second, the spacing of the spots appears to be less dense overall than they normally appear on the upper breast of a Swainson's. On Hermits the spotting seems less organized (if that makes sense) with wide spacing between some spots and others that abut one another creating a larger splotch sort of the way the spots on the upper breast of a Sooty Fox Sparrow do. Finally, the spots are dark dusky chocolatey brown, looking almost black at a glance. The spots are clearly the darkest brown on the bird when compared to the brown on the shoulder and crown that can be seen in the photo. On a russet-backed Swainson's (the kind that prevail in western Oregon) the spots are decidedly reddish brown and typically about the same color as the upper parts of the bird. It's hard to tell, but this bird doesn't seem to have as much buffy wash across the breast as a russet-backed Swainson's should show.


Here is a link to the eBird checklist with the photo of this thrush for those who may want to have a look at it.

https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...

Dave Irons
Beaverton, OR

________________________________
From: [email protected]> on behalf of Tye Jeske >
Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2018 10:51 PM
To: Tye Jeske
Subject: [obol] Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene

This Mourning and early afternoon Alan Contreras, Joshua Galpern, Torrey Gage-Tomlinson and I birded Skinner's Butte, and then some of Cantrell Neilson and Meadowlark area this Mourning.

Skinner Butte was full of stuff this mourning, and we ended up with 48 species in total. We had all 3 species of viero, lots of movement in warblers, including Black throated gray, orange crowned, both types of yellow- rumps including a hybrid. We had a female acorn woodpecker in the meadow. A flyby Peregrine. A couple purple finch. Rufous and Anna's hummers. We hard a Pac-slope flycatcher. Josh had a unusual flyby of 4 Caspian terns on the river. Our most unusual bird was on the path to the eagles nest where Josh found a quite early Swainson's thrush which I was able to get a photo of , which is on our ebird checklist.

Unfortunately Torrey had to leave. So we headed to Stewart pond which had a sora, common yellowthroat, and a lone male Cinnamon teal which were the highlights.

We next headed to Cantrell and K.R. Neilson where we heard a chipping sparrow, other highlights were some least sandpipers, gadwall, shovelers, green winged teals, a immature peregrine falcon, and lots of savannah sparrows, and common yellowthroats.

We next went to Meadowlark Prairie which had a huge flock of dunlin and Long billed dowitchers, lots of waterfowl, barn Swallow, a surprise acorn woodpecker heading towards royal, and across royal were a surprise pair of Western Kingbirds.

Our last stop was Swallow pond which didn't have much besides some green wing teal, shovelers, and yellow rumps.
Overall a great day with lots of migrants


Alan, Josh, or Torrey can add any other highlights
Good Birding
Tye J.
Sent from my iPhone


Sent from my iPhone
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
FreeLists / Oregon Birders Online
www.freelists.org
OBOL is a listserv dedicated to birding in Oregon, including, but not limited to, rare bird alerts, unusual bird behavior, inquiries for species locations, and upcoming birding events in Oregon.



OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 18:09 pm
From: LLSDIRONS AT msn.com
 
Tye et al.,


I have looked at the photos of the reported Swainson's Thrush from yesterday at Skinner's Butte and to my eye it does not look right for that species. I am looking primarily at the size, color and spacing of the spotting
on the upperbreast, all of which favor Hermit Thrush in my opinion.


First, the spots are rather large and somewhat irregular in size. This is typical of Hermit and not so of russet-backed Swainson's Thrushes, which have smaller spots that seem (at least to my eye) to be more consistent
in size. Second, the spacing of the spots appears to be less dense overall than they normally appear on the upper breast of a Swainson's. On Hermits the spotting seems less organized (if that makes sense) with wide spacing between some spots and others that
abut one another creating a larger splotchsort of the way the spots on the upper breast of a Sooty Fox Sparrow do. Finally, the spots are dark dusky chocolatey brown, looking almost black at a glance. The spots are clearly the darkest brown on the bird when
compared to the brown on the shoulder and crown that can be seen in the photo. On a russet-backed Swainson's (the kind that prevail in western Oregon) the spots are decidedly reddish brown and typically about the same color as the upper parts of the bird.
It's hard to tell, but this bird doesn't seem to have as much buffy wash across the breast as a russet-backed Swainson's should show.


Here is a link to the eBird checklist with the photo of this thrush for those who may want to have a look at it.




https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...





Dave Irons

Beaverton, OR


From: [email protected] <[email protected]> on behalf of Tye Jeske <[email protected]>
Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2018 10:51 PM
To: Tye Jeske
Subject: [obol] Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene



This Mourning and early afternoon Alan Contreras, Joshua Galpern, Torrey Gage-Tomlinson and I birded Skinner's Butte, and then some of Cantrell Neilson and Meadowlark area this Mourning.


Skinner Butte was full of stuff this mourning, and we ended up with 48 species in total. We had all 3 species of viero, lots of movement in warblers, including Black throated gray, orange crowned, both types of yellow- rumps including a hybrid. We had a female
acorn woodpecker in the meadow. A flyby Peregrine. A couple purple finch. Rufous and Anna's hummers. We hard a Pac-slope flycatcher. Josh had a unusual flyby of 4 Caspian terns on the river. Our most unusual bird was on the path to the eagles nest where Josh
found a quite early Swainson's thrush which I was able to get a photo of , which is on our ebird checklist.



Unfortunately Torrey had to leave. So we headed to Stewart pond which had a sora, common yellowthroat, and a lone male Cinnamon teal which were the highlights.



We next headed to Cantrell and K.R. Neilson where we heard a chipping sparrow, other highlights were some least sandpipers, gadwall, shovelers, green winged teals, a immature peregrine falcon, and lots of savannah sparrows, and common yellowthroats.



We next went to Meadowlark Prairie which had a huge flock of dunlin and Long billed dowitchers, lots of waterfowl, barn Swallow, a surprise acorn woodpecker heading towards royal, and across royal were a surprise pair of Western Kingbirds.


Our last stop was Swallow pond which didn't have much besides some green wing teal, shovelers, and yellow rumps.

Overall a great day with lots of migrants



Alan, Josh, or Torrey can add any other highlights

Good Birding

Tye J.

Sent from my iPhone



Sent from my iPhone

POST: Send your post to [email protected]

JOIN OR QUIT:
http://www.freelists.org/list/...




FreeLists / Oregon Birders Online

www.freelists.org

OBOL is a listserv dedicated to birding in Oregon, including, but not limited to, rare bird alerts, unusual bird behavior, inquiries for species locations, and upcoming birding events in Oregon.






OBOL archives:
www.freelists.org/archive/obol

Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Coos Calliope Hummer et al. 4/22/18
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 17:52 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
I forgot to mention thst there was one each of VESPER and CHIPPING SPARROW up Bethel Mtn in SW Coos earlier in the weekend.
Enjoy!Tim

On Sunday, April 22, 2018, Tim Rodenkirk <[email protected]> wrote:
I drove to the SE corner of the county late Saturday afternoon and spent the night camped in Eden Valley on the Siskiyou NF. Today I was able to make it up to the trailhead to Mt Bolivar at 3,000 feet. There was about 6 inches of snow at the trailhead and a fierce east wind so I didnt climb Mt. Bolivar especially as it probably had feet of snow near the top. The road up had scattered snow patches with many down trees; however, someone had cut through the down trees so a pickup could squeeze through.
Best bird was a displaying, male CALLIOPE HUMMER in the Eden Valley meadow. Much flowering manzanita there. The red flowering currant hadnt flowered yet. It was to early for most migrants but went up to try for Calliope which worked out. One female Rufous Hummer apparently on nest in same meadow. Other highlights:
Several calling MT QUAIL, SOOTY GROUSE and one booming RUFFED GROUSE.
Singing Townsends Solitaire. Two Red- breasted Sapsuckers. Six to eight WILSONS SNIPE in the first 1/4 mile of the Mt. Bolivar trail. Only snow queen flowering along trail. Fawn lily up but hadnt flowered yet. Only saw one Hermit Thrush and it was silent.
Back along the Powers Hwy singing OC Warbler and BT Gray Warbler at every stop. Also FOY PS FLY, NR-WINGED SWALLOW, and CASSINS VIREO.
Conspicuously absent any Lesser Goldfinches. Only heard one American on Saturday.
Always a fun trip!Tim Rback in windy Coos Bay



Subject: Coos Calliope Hummer et al. 4/22/18
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 17:26 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
I drove to the SE corner of the county late Saturday afternoon and spent the night camped in Eden Valley on the Siskiyou NF. Today I was able to make it up to the trailhead to Mt Bolivar at 3,000 feet. There was about 6 inches of snow at the trailhead and a fierce east wind so I didnt climb Mt. Bolivar especially as it probably had feet of snow near the top. The road up had scattered snow patches with many down trees; however, someone had cut through the down trees so a pickup could squeeze through.
Best bird was a displaying, male CALLIOPE HUMMER in the Eden Valley meadow. Much flowering manzanita there. The red flowering currant hadnt flowered yet. It was to early for most migrants but went up to try for Calliope which worked out. One female Rufous Hummer apparently on nest in same meadow. Other highlights:
Several calling MT QUAIL, SOOTY GROUSE and one booming RUFFED GROUSE.
Singing Townsends Solitaire. Two Red- breasted Sapsuckers. Six to eight WILSONS SNIPE in the first 1/4 mile of the Mt. Bolivar trail. Only snow queen flowering along trail. Fawn lily up but hadnt flowered yet. Only saw one Hermit Thrush and it was silent.
Back along the Powers Hwy singing OC Warbler and BT Gray Warbler at every stop. Also FOY PS FLY, NR-WINGED SWALLOW, and CASSINS VIREO.
Conspicuously absent any Lesser Goldfinches. Only heard one American on Saturday.
Always a fun trip!Tim Rback in windy Coos Bay



Subject: Re: Malheur NWR birding guide?
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 17:18 pm
From: tc AT empnet.com
 
Steve Shunk in Bend does this. His outfit is Paradise Birding.
Tom Crabtree
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of John Shewey
Sent: Sunday, April 22, 2018 12:59 PM
To: '[email protected]'
Subject: [obol] Malheur NWR birding guide?
Got an email the other day from an out-of-state fellow asking about someone he could hire as a guide for MNWR birdingwith Tim Blount now residing in Arizona, Im at a loss. Suggestions?



Subject: Herbert Farm wetlands?
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 15:24 pm
From: fhkolwicz1 AT gmail.com
 
Has anyone been to the Herbert Farm wetlands south of Corvallis in the
last few days?

Frank
in Monmouth



Subject: Albino collared dove
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 15:09 pm
From: jgalpern17 AT gmail.com
 
I just saw an albino Collared dove as I was looking at swallows at my house
in south Eugene.



Subject: Re: Interesting Sapsucker at Pittock Mansion 4/22
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 15:07 pm
From: pgeorgekline AT gmail.com
 
It's perhaps not possible to be 100% certain from the viewing angle in your photos Angela, but your bird is strongly suggestive of an adult female red-naped sapsucker. Nice find!
Philip Kline
On Sun, Apr 22, 2018, 10:25 AM Angela Calabrese <[email protected]> wrote:
Hello all,
I was birding Pittock Mansion this morning and came across this sapsucker that was unlike the other 2 it was with.It has a clean, white line coming from the bill. The throat was white and red, and the red did not extend onto the breast. The back of the bird had a lot more white on it than I am used to seeing in a Red-breasted Sapsucker.
Since I have done most of my birding in this area, I am most familiar with our Red-breasted Sapsuckers and have little experience identifying other species of sapsucker. Could this be something other than a Red-breasted Sapsucker?
I have attached a photo, as well as a link to a couple other photos. Unfortunately I was only able to get a photo from this angle.
He was moving between trees at the upper end of the parking lot, near the beginning of the path to the water tower.

Thanks
Angelahttps://www.flickr.com/photos/...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...



Subject: Malheur NWR birding guide?
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 14:59 pm
From: shewey AT matchthehatch.com
 
Got an email the other day from an out-of-state fellow asking about someone he could hire as a guide for MNWR birdingwith Tim Blount now residing in Arizona, Im at a loss. Suggestions?



Subject: migration today
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 14:42 pm
From: deweysage AT frontier.com
 
Excellent shorebird migration today!!!! We saw hundreds and hundreds
on northbound CASPIAN TERNS, and flock after flock of northbound
shorebirds. Easily saw tens of thousands of birds today headed
north. This would be off of Bandon Coos Cty. Had at least one large
flock of DOWITCHERS. Many many WESTERN SANDPIPERS, DUNLIN, LEAST
SANDPIPER, and SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, BLACK
TURNSTONE, WHIMBRELS, and at least 304 MARBLED GODWITS.


Cheers

Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein


POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Vesper & Grasshopper Sparrow, Linn County
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 14:38 pm
From: brrobb AT comcast.net
 
Late this morning I found singing VESPER & GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS on Belts Rd in Linn County.
Roger Robb
Springfield, OR



Subject: Yamhill: Baker Creek Dippers fledge for Earth Day
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 14:31 pm
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
https://atowhee.wordpress.com/...
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: 2 FOY and BTGW at Mt Tabor this morning
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 13:50 pm
From: jmaynard AT peak.org
 
Kelli and I got up early and walked the road on the East side of Tabor and saw a Wilsons Warbler, Cassins Vireo, both FOY for us. Also saw second Black-Throated Gray Warbler in as many days, yesterdays at Vanport. Up at the top we saw lots of Pine Siskins and Orange Crowned Warblers. We met a father-son team who had seen a Nashville Warbler, but it eluded us. Other notables were the sheer numbers of Lesser Goldfinch and Hermit Thrush.

Also lots of other birdersIm looking forward to seeing what everyone else might have checked in on eBird.

Jack NE PDX

Sent from my iPhone

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Warbling Vireo at Whitaker Ponds Portland this morning
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 13:30 pm
From: evarmitage AT gmail.com
 
In low shrubs between east and west ponds. Foraging low down, very visible and warbling. FOY for me. Also  Vauxs Swifts, Nashville Warblers among the many Yellow-rumped and a Flicker excavating a nest hole in a snag.
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: N. Goshawk, Ridgefield, Clark Co, WA
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 13:23 pm
From: rflores_2 AT msn.com
 
I get them occasionally and a nice adult male just soared over the house as I sat out here watching the feeder. I am not sure if this is just a random occurance or a movement  but regardless keep those eyes up.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WAPOST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Backyard Birds Near Silverton
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 12:33 pm
From: johnpam AT mtangel.net
 
List of Backyard Birds Here This Past Week. New birds were the OC Warbler, Cowbirds and Chipping Sparrow. Fox Sparrows and Varied Thrush have left.. Junco and sparrow numbers falling fast as they migrate onward... Haven't seen the Harris's this morning so maybe it's gone as well.  ~ John Thomas

ORANGE CROWNED WARBLER Other Creatures: Townsend's Chipmunk, Brush Rabbit, Opossum, Douglas Squirrel
Song Sparrow
White-Throated Sparrow
Golden-Crowned Sparrow
White-Crowned Sparrow
Harris's Sparrow
CHIPPING SPARROW
Spotted Towhee
Dark Eyed Junco
Red-Winged Blackbird
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS
Mourning Dove
EC Dove
House Finch
American Goldfinch
American Robin
California Scrub Jay
BC Chickadee
Anna's Hummingbird
Rufous Hummingbird
RB Nuthatch
Downy Woodpecker
GH Owl
Cooper's Hawk
Red-Tailed Hawk
California Quail
Mallard (2-back ditch)
House Sparrow
European Starling


POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Interesting Sapsucker at Pittock Mansion 4/22
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 12:25 pm
From: cbreseangela AT gmail.com
 
Hello all,

I was birding Pittock Mansion this morning and came across this sapsucker
that was unlike the other 2 it was with.
It has a clean, white line coming from the bill. The throat was white and
red, and the red did not extend onto the breast. The back of the bird had a
lot more white on it than I am used to seeing in a Red-breasted Sapsucker.

Since I have done most of my birding in this area, I am most familiar with
our Red-breasted Sapsuckers and have little experience identifying other
species of sapsucker. Could this be something other than a Red-breasted
Sapsucker?

I have attached a photo, as well as a link to a couple other photos.
Unfortunately I was only able to get a photo from this angle.

He was moving between trees at the upper end of the parking lot, near the
beginning of the path to the water tower.


Thanks

Angela
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...



Subject: Mary's Peak, April 21
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 10:52 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
It is possible to drive a regular car to the top. Snowon the north slope of West Ridge is belly deep on compact cars, but two good ruts of bare pavement make the driveunexciting. Limited bird presence, but plenty of fun species we dont encounter every day. The usual Ravens, then upon getting out of my car at the summit parking lot I heard a Sooty Grouse hooting to the west. Two Juncos on the walk to the top, and a Robin at the meadows edge at the top. Enough bare ground to keep these ground foragers happy. Saturday afternoon on a sunny day meant plenty of people, but I waited to go to the top and had it to myself. A chill wind, that was avoidable by sitting down. After quite a wait a Mountain Quail began to crow far to the west, probably near the campground where they have been regular for years. They were half a mile away (I think two different quail were calling) but sounded very near due to weather conditions. Loud human voices in the campground were equally clear from near the summit.  A flock of White-fronted Geese were Alaska-bound, well above summit elevation(4000ft). There was an undeniable headwind, so I wonder why they picked yesterday afternoon. Turkey Vultures were soaring at eye level well to the east. Returning to the parking lot about 7pm a Pygmy Owl began to toot a short distance to the west. Had I spent the usual minimum time up and down to the summit I would have missed boththe owl and quail.I spent about three hours. A little purple flower I dont know the name of was widespread. Near the summit a very small, yellow Lomatium was in bloom. It looks a lot like a much bigger Lomatium that was blooming in Hood River three weeks ago. Lars



Subject: Re: disappearing hummingbirds
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 10:30 am
From: kcsaxton AT gmail.com
 
This is the third thread with this topic that I know of. G;ad it's not only me. I am back up to about 1 pair of each, but nothing like normal
On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 11:07 PM, Andrew Marshall <[email protected]> wrote:
At my place in Waldport, the hummingbirds also seem to have vanished. I went from 2 male Anna's, at least 3 male Rufous, an assortment of female Anna's and Rufous,to none. Was going through a quart of liquid in the feeders each week to nothing. They are still full after two weeks and I will empty and replace them tomorrow.

On the other hand, in Dallas, among the willows below our pond I have seen a male Anna's today, and can hear a nest full of begging babies somewhere very close to where I like to stand when I watch the pond. usually though I will see and hear at least half a dozen adult birds during a slow circuit of the 5 acres. Today it was just the one, and by extrapolation there must be an adult female somewhere also.

What happened?

Thanks

Andrew



POST: Send your post to [email protected]

JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol

Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Photo Collection : William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 8:53 am
From: photojleonard AT gmail.com
 
Photo Collection taken on April 19, 2018 at William L. Finley NWR. Photos by Jim Leonard. Click on link below for photo collection.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/1oc0...



Subject: disappearing hummingbirds
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 1:07 am
From: andrewm25 AT earthlink.net
 
At my place in Waldport, the hummingbirds also seem to have vanished.  I went from 2 male Anna's, at least 3 male Rufous, an assortment of female Anna's and Rufous,to none.  Was going through a quart of liquid in the feeders each week to nothing.  They are still full after two weeks and I will empty and replace them tomorrow.
On the other hand, in Dallas, among the willows below our pond I have seen a male Anna's today, and can hear a nest full of begging babies somewhere very close to where I like to stand when I watch the pond. usually though I will see and hear at least half a dozen adult birds during a slow circuit of the 5 acres. Today it was just the one, and by extrapolation there must be an adult female somewhere also.
What happened?
Thanks
Andrew


POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Santiam run - Harlequin, Barrow's, Horned Grebes, Common Loons
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 22:31 pm
From: tom AT barbless.com
 
My wife and I ran up Santiam Highway, Linn, OR. Amazingly nice day! The highway was clear of snow, but side logging roads still have 3-12 of car-stopping snow. Of note
Foster Reservoir again yielded 4 Common Loons and 2 Horned Grebes, continuing birds from prior visits by several birders.
Fish Lake yielded 35+ Barrows Goldeneyes and a Harlequin Duck. Pictures at:
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
Trail Bridge Reservoir didnt yield any flycatchers (yet), but the Yellow-rumped Warblers and Ruby-crowned Kinglets were still nice to see, as well as a vocal Osprey.
--tg



Subject: Columbia Estuary Report - 4/21/2018
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 20:31 pm
From: celata AT pacifier.com
 
Columbia Estuary Report - 4/21/2018

The STELLER'S EIDER is still being seen at Seaside Cove. The
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was singing at the spots it has been all
winter.

https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...

The LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE was relocated earlier this week near its original
location at Social Security Beach, but has not been reported since 4/16.
recently. The MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD was still present on 4/17.

A WESTERN KINGBIRD was reported along hwy 101 on the Clatsop Plains
on 4/18. Shorebird diversity is picking up with WHIMBRELS and
MARBLED GODWITS at multiple locations.

PURPLE MARTINS have returned to Ziak House near Knappa. All the
regularly occurring swallow species have now been accounted for in
area. I saw my first BAND-TAILED PIGEONS of the season, as well.

I *MAY* have heard SANDHILL CRANES today, but they were too far away
to verify.

There was an impressive movement of sparrows at Brownsmead this
morning with so many SAVANNAH SPARROWS, the eBird filter complained.
Also big GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW numbers.

The SOOTY GROUSE are singing songs of love on Saddle Mt.


--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
That question...
http://www.surfbirds.com/commu...
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Spanish Head 4/21
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 19:55 pm
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
Seawatch Spanish Head, Lincoln City6:15-7:00 AM
20+ Red-throated Loon800 Pacific Loon3 Common Loon3 Red-necked Grebe3 Western Grebe10 Pelagic Cormorant70 Brandt's Cormorant (S)22 Double-crested Cormorant45 Brant230 Northern Pintail8 Northern Shoveler2 Green-winged Teal2 Black Scoter12 White-winged Scoter150 Surf Scoter35 Black-bellied Plover5+ Semipalmated Plover1 Whimbrel70 Dunlin600 Western Sandpiper (may include small numbers of Least)1 dowitcher sp.7 Red-necked Phalarope6 Bonaparte's Gull2 California Gull40 Western Gull5 Glaucous-winged Gull50 larus sp.3 Caspian Tern200 Common Murre (N)5 Pigeon Guillemot2 Marbled Murrelet
[email protected]



Subject: Common Loons courting - in Yamhill County!
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 18:36 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Today I went up to McGuire Reservoir, McMinnvilles water supply west of Carlton. This is the time of year we often find migrant Common Loons on the reservoir.
At the south end I found one COMMON LOON actively diving and moving about, but no other waterfowl. I also saw 12 Tree Swallows.
Back at the north end, viewed from Meadowlake Rd, I found two more COMMON LOONS. They swam toward each other, one calling softly. Then they went into circling each other, head bobbing, bill dipping, synchronized dives, and more circling. I even heard a yodel. Then another COMMON LOON called from over in the direction of the dam at the NW corner. This latter bird did not approach the pair. This went on for quite some time and the pair moved across the lake east to west. Quite a show for Yamhill County!
Other birds seen:
1 Turkey Vulture
2 Canada Geese may nest on the grassy peninsula?
2 Mallards
5 Am Wigeon
1 Osprey
2 calling BAND-TAILED PIGEONS
1 R-b Sapsucker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
3 Stellers Jays
1 Raven
7 Robins
2 C-b Chickadee
2 Pacific Wrens
1 Common Yellowthroat
1 Spotted Towhee
2 Song Sparrows
1 D-e Junco
Down on Moores Valley Rd I found that the traditional location that has hosted a Western Kingbird nest for years has a whole new electrical transformer, brackets, hardware, etc. Well see if the birds accept the new digs.
Good birding,
Paul Sullivan



Subject: Skinner's Butte/ Cantrell/ Medowlark Prairie Mourning, Eugene
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 17:52 pm
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
This Mourning and early afternoon Alan Contreras, Joshua Galpern, Torrey Gage-Tomlinson and I birded Skinner's Butte, and then some of Cantrell Neilson and Meadowlark area this Mourning.

Skinner Butte was full of stuff this mourning, and we ended up with 48 species in total. We had all 3 species of viero, lots of movement in warblers, including Black throated gray, orange crowned, both types of yellow- rumps including a hybrid. We had a female acorn woodpecker in the meadow. A flyby Peregrine. A couple purple finch. Rufous and Anna's hummers. We hard a Pac-slope flycatcher. Josh had a unusual flyby of 4 Caspian terns on the river. Our most unusual bird was on the path to the eagles nest where Josh found a quite early Swainson's thrush which I was able to get a photo of , which is on our ebird checklist.

Unfortunately Torrey had to leave. So we headed to Stewart pond which had a sora, common yellowthroat, and a lone male Cinnamon teal which were the highlights.

We next headed to Cantrell and K.R. Neilson where we heard a chipping sparrow, other highlights were some least sandpipers, gadwall, shovelers, green winged teals, a immature peregrine falcon, and lots of savannah sparrows, and common yellowthroats.

We next went to Meadowlark Prairie which had a huge flock of dunlin and Long billed dowitchers, lots of waterfowl, barn Swallow, a surprise acorn woodpecker heading towards royal, and across royal were a surprise pair of Western Kingbirds.

Our last stop was Swallow pond which didn't have much besides some green wing teal, shovelers, and yellow rumps.
Overall a great day with lots of migrants


Alan, Josh, or Torrey can add any other highlights
Good Birding
Tye J.
Sent from my iPhone


Sent from my iPhone
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Mallard duck behavior
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 17:00 pm
From: paul AT furzwo.com
 
Saw or first Mallard ducklings today, earliest in many years. A male mallard was intent on having his way with the female. The question is will the male kill the ducklings to be sure genes survive (like lions)??? We live on the Columbia River near the BNSF RR bridge. No goslings yet.

Thanks for any input.

Warm Regards,

Paul
When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.
Jimi HendrixPOST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: OBA Trip Photos - Wallowa County
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 16:35 pm
From: nagi.aboulenein AT gmail.com
 
And, very belatedly, here are some more photos from the OBA Wallowa Field Trip back in January:https://flic.kr/s/aHsmgu4FLk.


Many thanks to Ken Chamberlain for organizing yet another outstanding OBA field trip. Looking forward to the next one, Ken!



Thanks,


Nagi & Taghrid.


On Jan 22, 2018, 4:59 PM -0800, Ken Chamberlain <[email protected]>, wrote:
OBOL Folks


Here are some of my images from the recent Oregon Birding Association - Wallowa Valley field trip. We were pretty lucky!


https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


Many thanks to Nick Mrvelj for his excellent trip report posted earlier today. He sure saved me a lot of typing.


All the best
Ken Chamberlain


PS. Now I really know why theyre called Longspurs, wow. (see photo)



Subject: ?utf-8?Q?Re:_Anna’s_Hummingbirds_disappear?Message-Id: <[email protected]>
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 16:01 pm
From: ticebill7 AT gmail.com
 
Here in Falls City I have 2 pairs of Annas, and these or others are here all year long, although there is a fair amount of jousting while the rufous are here, of which there are 2-3 pairs or so.

Bill Tice. Birding, the best excuse for getting outdoors, and, for avoiding chores. POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Anna's Hunningbirds disappear
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 15:37 pm
From: bcombs232 AT gmail.com
 
I, too, noticed that Annas Hummingbirds were not visiting my feeder any more, about the same time. Lack of interest in the feeder coincided with the blooming of my giant twinberry thicket. I have seen Annas Hummingbirds feeding on its nectar recently. They are hard to detect, though, because they blend in with the green of the bush and are sometimes partially hidden. On a calm day, leaf movement is sometimes the first hint that a hummingbird is active there. I suspect that many hummingbirds are still around, and are indulging themselves on natural food rather than sugar water.

Barbara CombsLane County, Oregon
On Apr 21, 2018, at 12:26 PM, Karen Saxton <[email protected]> wrote:

For awhile all of my hummers left: anna's, selasphorus, the whole kit n kaboodle. I have one pair of Anna's back and one of rufus, but not my normal dodge the hummingbird traffic of previous years. I'm just outside Coquille toward Bandon. Neighbors say the same thing. I'm wondering what happened to all the hummingbirds.
On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 10:16 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <[email protected]> wrote:
A few months ago there was a discussion of when Anna's Hummingbirds nest, as there was plenty of indication that there were juveniles visiting feeders in the middle winter. Here in Bandon Coos Cty, in our yard, Anna's dominate the feeders all winter (as every where). Well within the last couple - three weeks, the Anna's have completely disappeared from our yard. It is silent out there in terms of Anna's. So do these birds move off to the north and breed again much further north, and then return in and winter and breed here also? Or do they disperse north, up in elevation, and not breed?


Wondering.....



Cheers


Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein


POST: Send your post to [email protected]

JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol

Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Anna's Hunningbirds disappear
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 14:27 pm
From: kcsaxton AT gmail.com
 
For awhile all of my hummers left: anna's, selasphorus, the whole kit n kaboodle. I have one pair of Anna's back and one of rufus, but not my normal dodge the hummingbird traffic of previous years. I'm just outside Coquille toward Bandon. Neighbors say the same thing. I'm wondering what happened to all the hummingbirds.
On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 10:16 AM, DJ Lauten and KACastelein <[email protected]> wrote:
A few months ago there was a discussion of when Anna's Hummingbirds nest, as there was plenty of indication that there were juveniles visiting feeders in the middle winter. Here in Bandon Coos Cty, in our yard, Anna's dominate the feeders all winter (as every where). Well within the last couple - three weeks, the Anna's have completely disappeared from our yard. It is silent out there in terms of Anna's. So do these birds move off to the north and breed again much further north, and then return in and winter and breed here also? Or do they disperse north, up in elevation, and not breed?


Wondering.....



Cheers


Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein


POST: Send your post to [email protected]

JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol

Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Anna's Hunningbirds disappear
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 12:17 pm
From: deweysage AT frontier.com
 
A few months ago there was a discussion of when Anna's Hummingbirds
nest, as there was plenty of indication that there were juveniles
visiting feeders in the middle winter. Here in Bandon Coos Cty, in
our yard, Anna's dominate the feeders all winter (as every where).
Well within the last couple - three weeks, the Anna's have completely
disappeared from our yard. It is silent out there in terms of
Anna's. So do these birds move off to the north and breed again much
further north, and then return in and winter and breed here also? Or
do they disperse north, up in elevation, and not breed?

Wondering.....


Cheers

Dave Lauten and Kathy Castelein

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Harris's Sparrow Troutdale
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 10:52 am
From: jrc7219 AT gmail.com
 
NE edge of Company Lake, it didn't hang out for very long. Assuming it's the same bird the black feathers have really filled in on the face. FOY Purple Martin along the river too.A nice interpretive dance by a Mourning Dove to the sounds of a couple of Starlings. One providing Killdeer calls and another doing a Pewee. Very stirring.
Justin



Subject: FOY Vaux’s Swift
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 9:27 am
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
At my house near Eckman Lake yesterday.

Roy
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: A few Coos birds 4/17/18
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 8:31 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
*

I learned the crow of the Mtn Quail just west of the dam at Tahkenitch Lake. That was Memorial Day weekend of 1971. Audubon Society of Corvallis was doing surveys for the BLM as part of the establishment of Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area. California Quail were routine around the Horsfall Beach access(Coos County) in 1976, as they were at the base of Yaquina Bay South Jetty . Im wondering if both were the results of recent ODF&W dumps? A friend sent me recordings of a California Quail
calling a day or two ago from the Coos Bay area, Im not sure exactly where. lpn
> On Apr 21, 2018, at 6:22 AM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
>
> At sunrise on N Spit Coos Bay I had a first for me, a calling MT QUAIL in the forested area at the end of the road near where sand road goes along bay. Any quail species is rare on the spit. We have had this species a few years on the local CBC further inland but it is real rare on the outer coast at least in Coos County.
>
> In Mingus Park there was a singing Wilsons Warbler and there are singing Orange-crowneds around the neighborhood. I noticed on eBird a Wilsons was reported in Bandon on 21 Mar- our earliest spring record in Coos is 9 Apr so this could have been a wintering bird??
>
> Merry migration!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay

POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: A few Coos birds 4/17/18
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 8:22 am
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
At sunrise on N Spit Coos Bay I had a first for me, a calling MT QUAIL in the forested area at the end of the road near where sand road goes along bay. Any quail species is rare on the spit. We have had this species a few years on the local CBC further inland but it is real rare on the outer coast at least in Coos County.
In Mingus Park there was a singing Wilsons Warbler and there are singing Orange-crowneds around the neighborhood. I noticed on eBird a Wilsons was reported in Bandon on 21 Mar- our earliest spring record in Coos is 9 Apr so this could have been a wintering bird??
Merry migration!Tim RCoos Bay



Subject: Cassin's Vireos, Scouters Mountain, Clackamas County
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 1:38 am
From: tjanzen AT comcast.net
 
While birding this morning on Scouters Mountain in Happy
Valley in Clackamas County today I heard 2 CASSINS VIREOS and saw one of
them. This seems a little early for this species for the Portland metro
area based on my experience in previous years. Migration is definitely
underway.


Tim Janzen



Subject: Re: Acorn Woodpecker, Canby
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 1:23 am
From: jack.williamson.jr AT gmail.com
 
On most days you can find a dozen or more Acorn Woodpeckers in the oak grove in the park at the coordinates below. They are easy to locate because they are very vocal right now.
45.2520541,-122.8858191

https://goo.gl/maps/CYCgULeyVP...


....... A first for me anywhere in the vicinity, though eBird shows quite a few recent sightings at Champoeg State Park, which is only about 11 miles (as the woodpecker flies).Photo in eBird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli... CarterCanby--
Sent from my iPhone

- Jack Williamson



Subject: Bend Birding Help
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 23:30 pm
From: mlcash7 AT gmail.com
 
So, my father and I are around in the Bend area this weekend, and we've heard that the Emperor Goose has still been seen recently. Could anyone point us in the right direction to maybe find it?
Also, I remember seeing a report a few days ago about some Pinyon Jays somewhere south of here. Has anyone seen them in the past few days?
These are birds that we'd really love to get and ifanyone could help point the way, I'd really appreciate it.
Thanks!Megan Cash



Subject: Greater White-fronted Geese in migration, Yamhill Co
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 22:14 pm
From: shovzan AT gmail.com
 
Just before 5PM I heard geese over my house outside McMinnville. The
flock of about 200 proved to be Greater White-fronted when I could
hear them clearly. This is the east edge of the Coast Range, and they
were heading north, which indicates to me that we may be seeing more
along this general route this week. I'd be expecting to find flocks
over Amity, Yamhill, and in Polk along a line north from Baskett
Slough.

Pamela Johnston
POST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Re: Tillamook County: Eastern Kingbird?
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 22:11 pm
From: jeffgilligan10 AT gmail.com
 
Very interesting. This is an extremely (unprecedented) date for Eastern Kingbird. Please try to get a photomaybe it is even a more rare kingbird perhaps.
Jeff

On Apr 20, 2018, at 6:34 PM, Andrew Ferre <[email protected]> wrote:Today I had an incidental siting of what I identified as an Eastern Kingbird in Tillamook County near Nehalem. I am very familiar with this species as we see them often in Montana, where I reside. My post to eBird triggered a rare alert which did not surprise me, but after some research I was surprised to find out that this species has never been seen in this area and there are no southerly sightings leading to this area.

As I do not have photo documentation I have elected to remove this report from eBird, but I am hopeful someone else may locate this bird in the future and validate this sighting.

For what it is worth, this was my description in my eBird report:
Larger flycatcher perched on wire, recognized as I commonly see these
in Montana, dark grey wings/white body & throat/ black head
horizontal transition line level with bill and below eye to white cheek
and neck, dark tail with white tip.... unfortunately no pics but
observed for 5 minutes with binoculars

Cheers
Andy Ferre'



Subject: Re: Tillamook County: Eastern Kingbird?
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 21:50 pm
From: af4463 AT gmail.com
 
I received several messages from OBOLers suggesting that if I feel strongly in the ID I should leave it up, also thereby sharing the exact location. I do feel confident in my initial ID and will repost...I was unable to relocate this afternoon when I returned with a camera. Thanks for the encouragement. 
Cheers
Andy Ferre'

On Fri, Apr 20, 2018 at 6:34 PM, Andrew Ferre <[email protected]> wrote:
Today I had an incidental siting of what I identified as an Eastern Kingbird in Tillamook County near Nehalem. I am very familiar with this species as we see them often in Montana, where I reside. My post to eBird triggered a rare alert which did not surprise me, but after some research I was surprised to find out that this species has never been seen in this area and there are no southerly sightings leading to this area.

As I do not have photo documentation I have elected to remove this report from eBird, but I am hopeful someone else may locate this bird in the future and validate this sighting.

For what it is worth, this was my description in my eBird report:
Larger flycatcher perched on wire, recognized as I commonly see these
in Montana, dark grey wings/white body & throat/ black head
horizontal transition line level with bill and below eye to white cheek
and neck, dark tail with white tip.... unfortunately no pics but
observed for 5 minutes with binoculars

Cheers
Andy Ferre'



Subject: Mid-elevation Marion County Detroit Area 4/20/2018
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 20:44 pm
From: roygerig AT gmail.com
 
First, even if I am an old hippie and have always used whatever God gives us, 4/20 is nothing but another day on the calendar
None of the Flycatchers have arrived at Detroit Flats yet, on a nice day. A COMMON LOON and WESTERN GREBE were on the now full reservoir
Above Detroit, along FR 2225 I saw a RUFFED GROUSE at one mile, then heard 5 or more SOOTY GROUSE in the next 2 miles. I saw 3 TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRES.
The Solitaires are my take away from today, so I will speculate
The USFS manages its land with a weighted toward timber approach, but it's not that bad. They are using commercial thinning (where you thin a forest and can sell logs from the thinning to offset the cost) above Detroit, in the viewshed from the Highway.
In those thinned, now more open forests, it is now possible to easily find Townsends Solitaires where it was not so before
Roy Gerig, Salem OR



Subject: Tillamook County: Eastern Kingbird?
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 20:34 pm
From: af4463 AT gmail.com
 
Today I had an incidental siting of what I identified as an Eastern Kingbird in Tillamook County near Nehalem. I am very familiar with this species as we see them often in Montana, where I reside. My post to eBird triggered a rare alert which did not surprise me, but after some research I was surprised to find out that this species has never been seen in this area and there are no southerly sightings leading to this area.

As I do not have photo documentation I have elected to remove this report from eBird, but I am hopeful someone else may locate this bird in the future and validate this sighting.

For what it is worth, this was my description in my eBird report:
Larger flycatcher perched on wire, recognized as I commonly see these
in Montana, dark grey wings/white body & throat/ black head
horizontal transition line level with bill and below eye to white cheek
and neck, dark tail with white tip.... unfortunately no pics but
observed for 5 minutes with binoculars

Cheers
Andy Ferre'



Subject: Acorn Woodpecker, Canby
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 18:50 pm
From: KayCarter AT astound.net
 
Got a real surprise this morning when I spotted an Acorn Woodpecker near my home in Canby this morning. It stuck around just long enough for me to do a double-take, get the camera turned on, and take two (distant) snaps. Then it flew off, roughly eastward, out of the area. A first for me anywhere in the vicinity, though eBird shows quite a few recent sightings at Champoeg State Park, which is only about 11 miles (as the woodpecker flies).
Photo in eBird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
Kay Carter
Canby



Subject: Yamhill--Daily dipper update and questions about feeding technique
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 17:50 pm
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
atowhee.wordpress.com/2018/04/20/april-20-baker-creek-dippers-today/
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: Re: Eugene Townsend's Solitaire and possible female Calliope
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 16:53 pm
From: brandon.green18 AT gmail.com
 
Lars,
I can't speak about the yearly spring abundance of Townsend's Solitaires in the Portland area but, though annual, they're pretty rare at this time of the year in Eugene. This is the first individual I've seen on the Valley floor of Lane County in five years. So what happens in Portland isn't necessarily reflective of what happens down here. They do nest in lower numbers in the Coast Range of Lane County than in the northern portion of the Coast Range, probably owing to the difference in topography and forest density. That may explain why they're more difficult to find down here in April and May.
It's also possible that there are more Townsend's Solitaires than usual on the Valley floor this spring. Time will tell.
-Brandon

On Fri, Apr 20, 2018 at 2:22 PM, Lars Per Norgren <[email protected]> wrote:
*
As many as 4separate Townsends Solitaire were at Mt Tabor Wed. morning. So I doubt Brandons bird need be the same individual as was seen on Skinner Butte. One on Mt Tabor was inside the canopy of a big-leaf maple, same place as the previous week. Same bird? Maybe, but not necessarily. It struck me as out of character, but with the maples in full bloom, thats where the food is. April is a good time to be on the alert and not dismiss all hummers as Annas/Rufous. I believe the bulk of westside Calliope reports come at this season.Certainly my only twoover the decades were in April, one of them atThe Top of Mt Tabor. Lars
On Apr 20, 2018, at 2:15 PM, Wayne Hoffman <[email protected]> wrote:Hi-
Invasive English Ivy is invasive because it is attractive bird food.
Wayne


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Brandon Green <[email protected]> Date: 4/20/18 2:08 PM (GMT-08:00) To: OBOL <[email protected]> Subject: [obol] Eugene Townsend's Solitaire and possible female Calliope
A Townsend's Solitaire is currently eating berries in the ivy that engulfs most of my neighbor's apple tree. (Apparently invasive ivy is good for something.) I live about a mile from Skinner Butte, so it's possible that this is the same one that Roger saw there a couple of days ago.
Also, while at Skinner Butte this morning, I spoke to a woman (didn't get her name) who saw a possible female Calliope Hummer. She described it small and thinner than a Rufous. She said that the breast wasn't as buff as she expected, but my experience is that there's significant variation in coloration there.
BrandonEugene



Subject: Chinook Landing - no Eared Grebe
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 16:45 pm
From: pointers AT pacifier.com
 
hi all ... Gene and I went out to Chinook Landing this morning to look for the Eared Grebe seen there yesterday ... no luck ... we did have a single Caspian Tern however, a first for us for that location ...
Lyn




Lyn TopinkaVancouver, Wa.
NorthwestJourney.comColumbiaRiverImages.comNorthwestBirding.com
Sent from my Galaxy Tab A



Subject: BBS routes now available for Tualatin, Sisters, Elk Lake
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 16:37 pm
From: adamus7 AT comcast.net
 
Birding Colleagues,



An Oregon birder who has driven three of the most attractive Breeding Bird
Survey routes for several years is unable to continue this year due to a job
transfer. Someone who can identify most birds by sound is urgently needed to
cover one or more of these routes this June and hopefully in future years.
Volunteering for this will only take about 5 hours of your early morning
time on a single day of your choice between May 25 and July 4. It is one of
the most important contributions you can make to bird conservation, relative
to the time spent. To volunteer, please email me ASAP.



Paul Adamus

Oregon BBS Coodinator (volunteer)


American Birding Podcast







ABA's FREE Birder's Guide. Get the most recent issue now >>




Contact us.