NEW VERSION OF BIRDING NEWS TO BE RELEASED SOON!!
GET THE DETAILS HERE >>

ABA's Birding News >> Oregon

Oregon bird news by date

Updated on April 15, 2021, 5:05 am

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


15 Apr: @ 04:59:13  Cooper's Hawk display flight [Mark Rudolph]
15 Apr: @ 04:41:55  Lane County Great Gray [Harry Fuller]
14 Apr: @ 19:52:17  Re: Violet green swallows missing [Sandy Mico]
14 Apr: @ 19:25:05  Re: Violet green swallows missing [Cindy Tofflemoyer]
14 Apr: @ 18:39:39  Survey of US Birders [Jason A. Crotty]
14 Apr: @ 17:49:46  Re: Violet green swallows missing [larspernorgren]
14 Apr: @ 16:55:47  Re: Violet green swallows missing [Pat Truhn]
14 Apr: @ 16:30:52  Violet green swallows missing [Sandy Mico]
14 Apr: @ 15:44:36  In search of...... [Sarah Sloane]
14 Apr: @ 10:18:24  Wednesday eBird RBA [Teresa Hertzel]
14 Apr: @ 03:19:39  Wing below Peregrine feeding perch [Carolyn Featherston]
14 Apr: @ 03:13:47  Peregrine flying in with kill [Carolyn Featherston]
14 Apr: @ 02:13:43  Re: Wing ID [David Bailey]
14 Apr: @ 01:54:58  Wing ID [Liz]
14 Apr: @ 01:16:44  Shorebirds [Roy Lowe]
13 Apr: @ 21:04:07  Minto-Brown...rich mix of birds; FOY Green Heron [Harry Fuller]
13 Apr: @ 20:29:18  Great Gray Owl sighting: McKenzie Bridge [Bruce Newhouse]
13 Apr: @ 19:23:55  Coos Coastal Migrants of LATE [Tim Rodenkirk]
13 Apr: @ 18:07:21  Tip on eBird checklist sharing [Thomas Gilg]
13 Apr: @ 17:59:59  Re: Aleutian Cackler Extravaganza 4/13/21 [David Bailey]
13 Apr: @ 17:15:41  Re: American goldfinch [Jeff and Lauretta Young]
13 Apr: @ 16:48:33  Re: Aleutian Cackler Extravaganza 4/13/21 [Phil Pickering]
13 Apr: @ 16:22:26  American goldfinch [Mark Greenfield]
13 Apr: @ 15:35:59  Aleutian Cackler Extravaganza 4/13/21 [Tim Rodenkirk]
13 Apr: @ 15:21:02  NB Caspian Terns this morning Lincoln City [dawn v]
13 Apr: @ 10:08:18  Tuesday eBird RBA [Teresa Hertzel]
13 Apr: @ 05:55:54  response to Shrike query [sjoygene]
13 Apr: @ 01:10:37  Re: coos snowy yes [Alan Contreras]
13 Apr: @ 01:06:54  Re: coos snowy yes [David Bailey]
13 Apr: @ 00:06:50  Re: Talent CA Thrasher?? [Karl Schneck]
12 Apr: @ 23:52:47  Re: coos snowy yes [Karen Saxton]
12 Apr: @ 22:07:16  Cabin Lake [Tom Lawler]
12 Apr: @ 22:00:34  Salem Audubon's Birder's Night -- Tuesday, April 13, 7:00 PM [Tim Johnson]
12 Apr: @ 20:55:55  Scope for sale [Ken Logan]
12 Apr: @ 18:50:02 Re: New eBird Policy [Doug Santoni]
12 Apr: @ 18:28:13  Nashville Warbler - Linn County near Crabtree [Jeff Harding]
12 Apr: @ 17:07:18  New eBird Policy [Robert O'Brien]
12 Apr: @ 11:06:53  Another Snippet of Mallard Life [Robert O'Brien]
12 Apr: @ 10:38:42  Monday eBird RBA [Teresa Hertzel]
12 Apr: @ 10:30:59  Re: Swainson's thrush reports: Alert reports vs. confirmed sightings [Robert O'Brien]
12 Apr: @ 07:23:19  Re: Talent CA Thrasher?? [Jamie Simmons]
12 Apr: @ 03:41:17  Re: Avain Keratin Disorder [Michael Murphy]
12 Apr: @ 03:00:55  Re: Talent CA Thrasher?? [Karl Schneck]
12 Apr: @ 02:55:46  Re: Talent CA Thrasher?? [Darrel Faxon]
12 Apr: @ 02:49:38  Southern Oregon Trip Report [Angela Calabrese]
12 Apr: @ 01:24:45  Re: Talent CA Thrasher?? [George Neavoll]
12 Apr: @ 01:16:27  Talent CA Thrasher?? [cgates326]
12 Apr: @ 00:52:19  Fairview Wetlands in Salem OR 4/11/21 [Roy Gerig]
11 Apr: @ 22:40:56  Chip sparrow Mult Co [ed mcv]
11 Apr: @ 20:37:47  Re: Swainson's thrush reports: Alert reports vs. confirmed sightings [Karen Saxton]





Subject: Cooper's Hawk display flight
Date: Thu Apr 15 2021 4:59 am
From: woodenappleturner AT gmail.com
 
This afternoon I watched a COOPER'S HAWK doing its almost owl-like display
flight. I've seen this behavior before, but my undocumented recollection
was that it was a couple of weeks later. The observation was in the Santa
Clara area of Eugene.

Rudi



Subject: Lane County Great Gray
Date: Thu Apr 15 2021 4:41 am
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
seen last weekend by Jared Purch


https://atowhee.blog/2021/04/1...
--
Harry Fuller
author of: *San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:*
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of *Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA*:
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of *Freeway Birding*: *freewaybirding.com
*
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: Re: Violet green swallows missing
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 19:52 pm
From: sandracmico AT gmail.com
 
Thank you everyone.  I passed this on to my friend.  Sandy

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 14, 2021, at 12:25 PM, Cindy Tofflemoyer <75catlover06@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> ?
> Happy chattering and stunt flying are filling my skies here in Springfield.
>
>> On Wed, Apr 14, 2021, 11:29 AM Maria Michalczyk wrote:
>> I have been seeing them ???? for a couple of days up in the vineyard hills around Sherwood.
>>
>> Maria Michalczyk, MA, RN
>>
>>
>> From: obol-bounce@freelists.org on behalf of larspernorgren
>> Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 10:49 AM
>> To: sandracmico@gmail.com ; obol@freelists.org
>> Subject: [obol] Re: Violet green swallows missing
>>
>> It's really only 2 weeks since April 1st, and if the boxes are normally occupied within a week, that puts them a single week behind average. I have heard them over my house in the forest a similar distance west of Portland for a few days now. Rufous Hummingbirds were easily 10 days behind average in much of western Oregon this year. I feel the same about Orange-crowned Warblers. It was unseasonably cold until the present week.
>> The swallows that died in the southern Rockies presumably bred in the Rockies further north. Or the Black Hills, or Cypress Hills. Our V-g Swallows were happily catching flying ants over the Coast Range at the time, getting rather fat l hope.
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Sandy Mico
>> Date: 4/14/21 9:30 AM (GMT-08:00)
>> To: obol@freelists.org
>> Subject: [obol] Violet green swallows missing
>>
>> A friend who lives near the Woman’s Forum out of Corbett puts her violet green swallow nest boxes up just as the first ones arrive in her yard, which was around April 1. Normally the boxes are occupied within a week, but this year none are occupied three weeks later. Is anyone seeing disruption to VGS migration this year? I seem to recall they were the dominant species that died last spring in AZ/TX.
>>
>> Sent from my iPad*******
>> UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
>> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
>> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>>



Subject: Re: Violet green swallows missing
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 19:25 pm
From: 75catlover06 AT gmail.com
 
Happy chattering and stunt flying are filling my skies here in Springfield.

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021, 11:29 AM Maria Michalczyk
wrote:

> I have been seeing them ???? for a couple of days up in the vineyard hills
> around Sherwood.
>
>
> *Maria Michalczyk, MA, RN *
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* obol-bounce@freelists.org on behalf
> of larspernorgren
> *Sent:* Wednesday, April 14, 2021 10:49 AM
> *To:* sandracmico@gmail.com ; obol@freelists.org <
> obol@freelists.org>
> *Subject:* [obol] Re: Violet green swallows missing
>
> It's really only 2 weeks since April 1st, and if the boxes are normally
> occupied within a week, that puts them a single week behind average. I have
> heard them over my house in the forest a similar distance west of Portland
> for a few days now. Rufous Hummingbirds were easily 10 days behind average
> in much of western Oregon this year. I feel the same about Orange-crowned
> Warblers. It was unseasonably cold until the present week.
> The swallows that died in the southern Rockies presumably bred in
> the Rockies further north. Or the Black Hills, or Cypress Hills. Our V-g
> Swallows were happily catching flying ants over the Coast Range at the
> time, getting rather fat l hope.
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Sandy Mico
> Date: 4/14/21 9:30 AM (GMT-08:00)
> To: obol@freelists.org
> Subject: [obol] Violet green swallows missing
>
> A friend who lives near the Woman’s Forum out of Corbett puts her violet
> green swallow nest boxes up just as the first ones arrive in her yard,
> which was around April 1. Normally the boxes are occupied within a week,
> but this year none are occupied three weeks later. Is anyone seeing
> disruption to VGS migration this year? I seem to recall they were the
> dominant species that died last spring in AZ/TX.
>
> Sent from my iPad*******
> UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
>



Subject: Survey of US Birders
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 18:39 pm
From: jasonacrotty AT gmail.com
 
A while back, Bruce Dugger posted a link to a survey of US birders
(thanks!), but the survey overview itself was rather long and daunting. I
distilled some of the findings that I thought birders might find
interesting below. The survey included over 30,000 eBirders, so the
results are likely quite robust.

https://www.10000birds.com/a-s...

Apologies for the perhaps slightly off-topic post, but I thought it would
be of interest to the group, as I have found that birders like to read
about birder surveys and birder demographics.

To lessen the potential offense, I can report from my home office in NE
Portland that the local crows are assiduously ferrying nesting materials to
some of the larger trees.

Jason Crotty
Portland



Subject: Re: Violet green swallows missing
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 17:49 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
It's really only 2 weeks since April 1st, and if the boxes are normally occupied within a week, that puts them a single week behind average. I have heard them over my house in the forest a similar distance west of Portland for a few days now. Rufous Hummingbirds were easily 10 days behind average in much of western Oregon this year. I feel the same about Orange-crowned Warblers.  It was unseasonably cold until the present week.        The swallows that died in the southern Rockies presumably bred in the Rockies further north. Or the  Black Hills,  or Cypress Hills. Our V-g Swallows were happily catching flying ants over the Coast Range at the time, getting rather fat l hope.Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Sandy Mico Date: 4/14/21 9:30 AM (GMT-08:00) To: obol@freelists.org Subject: [obol] Violet green swallows missing A friend who lives near the Woman’s Forum out of Corbett puts her violet green swallow nest boxes up just as the first ones arrive in her yard, which was around April 1. Normally the boxes are occupied within a week, but this year none are occupied three weeks later.  Is anyone seeing disruption to VGS migration this year?  I seem to recall they were the dominant species that died last spring in AZ/TX.  Sent from my iPad*******UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obolOBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obolContact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Re: Violet green swallows missing
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 16:55 pm
From: pat.truhn AT gmail.com
 
In Wilsonville we have a pair getting a nest box ready.  They arrived about
a week ago. Also, have one pair of barn swallows on a nest in the barn.


On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 9:31 AM Sandy Mico wrote:

> A friend who lives near the Woman’s Forum out of Corbett puts her violet
> green swallow nest boxes up just as the first ones arrive in her yard,
> which was around April 1. Normally the boxes are occupied within a week,
> but this year none are occupied three weeks later. Is anyone seeing
> disruption to VGS migration this year? I seem to recall they were the
> dominant species that died last spring in AZ/TX.
>
> Sent from my iPad*******
> UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
>



Subject: Violet green swallows missing
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 16:30 pm
From: sandracmico AT gmail.com
 
A friend who lives near the Woman’s Forum out of Corbett puts her violet green swallow nest boxes up just as the first ones arrive in her yard, which was around April 1. Normally the boxes are occupied within a week, but this year none are occupied three weeks later.  Is anyone seeing disruption to VGS migration this year?  I seem to recall they were the dominant species that died last spring in AZ/TX.

Sent from my iPad*******
UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: In search of......
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 15:44 pm
From: sloane AT maine.edu
 
……Leitz 10x40 binocs adjusted for close-focus.

Hi all,

I apologize if this is an inappropriate use of this listerve, but I am in a dilemma! My trusty 1986 10x40 Leitz binocs lost a lens in the field and are no longer functional. As my research season (bushtits) is upon me, I am missing these a great deal and wondered if there is someone out there with a pair they’d be willing to sell. All the fancy new binocs are either too heavy for me to use all day or the eyes are too far apart for my little face.

Back in the day when I bought my pair new, there was the option of having them adjusted so that the close-focus was pretty good. I need pair that has that adjustment already.

Anybody??

Thank you,
Sarah


&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

Dr Sarah A. Sloane
Associate Professor
Dept. of Biology
Division of Natural Sciences
University of Maine at Farmington
Farmington, Maine 04938

sloane@maine.edu
207-778-7484 (office)
207-500-3733 (cell)

https://bushtitsrule.blogspot....

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&



Subject: Wednesday eBird RBA
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 10:18 am
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
https://ebird.org/alert/summar...


*** Species Summary:

Mandarin Duck (2 Clackamas)
Blue-winged Teal x Northern Shoveler (hybrid) (2 Benton)
Redhead (1 Josephine)
Vaux's Swift (1 Klamath)
Marbled Godwit (1 Douglas)
Western Sandpiper (1 Benton, 1 Klamath)
Lesser Yellowlegs (4 Multnomah)
Snowy Egret (2 Coos)
Northern Goshawk (1 Lane)
Red-naped x Red-breasted Sapsucker (hybrid) (1 Klamath)
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (1 Deschutes)
Say's Phoebe (2 Lincoln)
Oak Titmouse (2 Klamath)
Juniper Titmouse (1 Klamath)
Lark Sparrow (1 Klamath)
White-crowned x Golden-crowned Sparrow (hybrid) (1 Benton)
Great-tailed Grackle (1 Klamath)



Subject: Wing below Peregrine feeding perch
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 3:19 am
From: carolynfeatherston AT hotmail.com
 
Yaquina Interpretative center parking lot today 4/13/21

[cid:5EE0377C-7ABC-4084-950D-D7B1075DD366]


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Peregrine flying in with kill
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 3:13 am
From: carolynfeatherston AT hotmail.com
 
[cid:3EF9B803-2805-4248-80F9-5D63326C3B53]


[cid:BA859769-F241-4000-8BF2-231C0F03972B]


[cid:4AFF721A-769A-4CEE-A1EF-97FD9A32035B]


[cid:24D9BFF0-384D-4104-9E64-DAF0C988BFCC]


[cid:D49C547D-7A2F-4B11-8AB7-62BA0BFDE55A]


[cid:02FEC17D-79C3-481D-B38D-499D88F960DF]


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Re: Wing ID
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 2:13 am
From: davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com
 
Possibly it belonged to a Whimbrel.

David C. Bailey
Seaside, Oregon

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021, 18:54 Liz wrote:

> This wing was found at Yaquina Head visitor center parking lot yesterday.
> Maybe food from the Peregrines? Can anyone identify it?
>
> Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Wing ID
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 1:54 am
From: eholencik AT gmail.com
 
This wing was found at Yaquina Head visitor center parking lot yesterday. Maybe food from the Peregrines?  Can anyone identify it?



Subject: Shorebirds
Date: Wed Apr 14 2021 1:16 am
From: roy.loweiii AT gmail.com
 
As noted by others shorebirds are moving along the coast now and some are looking pretty dapper in their breeding plumage.  Yesterday, I was on the beach north and south of the Alsea Bay mouth and had small flocks of shorebirds on the beach including western sandpipers, dunlin, sanderlings, black-bellied plovers, and whimbrels.  Western sandpipers were the most numerous species yesterday.  Today, I did a round robin from Driftwood SP to Seal Rock and encounter more flocks on the beach although today dunlin were the most numerous species.  I encountered a single marbled godwit on the beach that was having great success forage on sand worms.  On the rocks at Seal Rock I observed a pair of black oystercatchers feasting on mussels, a few surfbirds and some sharp-looking black turnstone (see attached).

Roy Lowe
Waldport, OR



Subject: Minto-Brown...rich mix of birds; FOY Green Heron
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 21:04 pm
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
Green Heron flew over our car at the downhill end of Croisan Creek Road.
At west end of Minto-Brown this morning were OC Warbler, yellowthroat,
pipit in field across from the park, ditto six snipe, five crossbills and
many resident species in pairs.

https://atowhee.blog/2021/04/1...

--
Harry Fuller
author of: *San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:*
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of *Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA*:
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of *Freeway Birding*: *freewaybirding.com
*
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: Great Gray Owl sighting: McKenzie Bridge
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 20:29 pm
From: newhouse AT efn.org
 
A friend shared with me a photo he took near McKenzie Bridge last
weekend of a GREAT GRAY OWL sitting on a fence post looking at him!

I believe Harry told me a few years ago that GRGOs breed in that area. 
(Harry, the friend of mine knows you from years past, I believe.)

Bruce Newhouse in Eugene


*******
UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Coos Coastal Migrants of LATE
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 19:23 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
Joe Metzler jumped a SHORT-EARED OWL at the mouth of Tenmile Creek this AM.
This is a rare coastal migrant in April in Coos County- we have seven
records now. This species sometimes winters in the county (none reported
this last winter though), but those birds are usually gone by late February
although we do have a single record of an overwintering bird present
into early April one year.

As for shorebirds, I have been seeing my first flocks of Dunlins, Westerns,
BB Plovers and Greater Yellowlegs on the beach in the last week. The peak
of the migration is usually the last week of April or first week of May
when staggering numbers can go by in usually just a single day or two.
That isn't to say you cannot find shorebirds before or after the dates
mentioned, just not in the hundreds of thousands. It is interesting that we
have a period of clear weather now on the south coast with intense north
winds which is exactly what the shorebirds really seem to move on later in
the month most years (when the weather is good for the migration ad not wet
and soggy). Yesterday we had peak winds of 27 with gusts to 38mph at North
Bend. Although somewhat brutal to bird in, the shorebirds seem to move
quite a bit when we get these winds. However, as Phil P mentioned, NNE
winds may move birds further offshore than the NNW winds. Right now we
have NNE winds in North Bend again. There were a few shorebirds on the
beach at N Spit Coos Bay early today though, and I saw more offshore flocks
zipping by but did not have time to really spend ocean scoping. The
mudflats at New River Coos are pretty awesome now since the river breached
and, at low tide, the whole river is one long mudflat adjacent to the
ocean This won't last long as the north winds will soon close the breach
and the river will turn into a lake. In the meantime, the New River area
can be accessed at mp 283 on Hwy 101 (about 8 miles south of Bandon) where
there is a sign for it. If you drive down to the gate you can park and
either walk to an overlook of the river to the south or to the boat ramp to
the north. Although most birds just zip by this time of year, these
mudflats could get crowded in the next few weeks before the breach closes
up.

Did see a CHIPPING SPARROW on the coast the other day. They are rare but
regular in April on the outer coast in Coos. It is a bit confusing in
eBird to see them on the rare bird report for SE Coos where they are
regular breeders. They were flagged because we had a problem of Chippers
showing up in odd locations at odd times in the county- turns out that
immature WC Sparrows appear to get IDed as Chippers by less experienced
birders sometimes so flagging them seemed like a good idea.

Sometimes we get wet, nasty weather at month's end and we do not see much
of the peak of the shorebird migration or they migrate out of view
offshore which is why going out when the weather is halfway decent now can
be pretty fun even if there are not huge numbers on the beach. Oh, and the
offshore migration should start cranking up soon too.

Dave Lauten and Cathy Castelein had a couple LAPLAND LONGSPURS on Coos Bay
N Spit about a week also, another rare but almost regular spring migrant
too on the beach. Also Daniel Farrar had a LB CURLEW on the beach in NW
Coos yesterday also.

Happy shorebirding!
Tim Rodenkirk
Coos Bay



Subject: Tip on eBird checklist sharing
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 18:07 pm
From: tom AT barbless.com
 
Maybe well known, but when you share an eBird checklist to someone else, the URL in the e-mail they get can be used *by anyone* to adopt said checklist.

Here is an example from Main Audubon (2/3rds down page) where they posted a pelagic trip report and attendees could view the resulting checklists and choose to adopt the checklists into their account.

https://maineaudubon.org/news/...

Having failed to get everyone's eBird handle while keeping the lists on several 2018 OBA outings, I wish I knew the 'adopt me' URL could have been forwarded by others, and even posted to some OBA web real estate.

--tg



Subject: Re: Aleutian Cackler Extravaganza 4/13/21
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 17:59 pm
From: davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com
 
Phil, are you seeing Rufous Hummingbirds moving north at all during your
seawatches? There's been an obvious northbound moment of Rufous
Hummingbirds moving through Seaside in Clatsop yesterday and today.

David C. Bailey
Seaside, Oregon

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021, 09:48 Phil Pickering wrote:

> Coastal migration seems to be just getting started here on
> the central coast. As was mentioned good flight of Terns
> today and many yesterday. First noticeable sustained
> offshore flight of shorebirds this morning, but mostly
> Dunlin, Black-bellied, & S-b Dowitchers. No numbers
> of Westerns yet. Also no significant loon movement
> to this point. Wind has been more cold NE here which
> tends to fan stuff far offshore, so not ideal yet.
>
> Phil
>
>
>
> > This clear windy weather with winds out of the northwest really has the
> shorebirds moving too as well as Caspian Terns and Pacific Loons. The peak
> is usually later in month but if this weather persist I expect the
> northward movement could peak earlier than normal?
>
> Merry migration!
> Tim R
> Coos Bay
>



Subject: Re: American goldfinch
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 17:15 pm
From: jeffandlaurettayoung AT comcast.net
 
In general the migration seems “late”

we were just at the San Pedro River where the hummingbirds from the south go along the river to their northern most breeding places

the hummingbird banders noted a marked decrease compared to the prior years and speculated it has to do with the severe drought in the southern US and Mexico with no annual rains for two years

Here at our pond in Bethany area we noted a much much later arrival of the numbers of Tree Swallows which are just starting to show numbers and interest in the bird houses that usually occur much earlier in the year ( like early to mid March) over the past week

Lauretta

> On Apr 13, 2021, at 9:22 AM, Mark Greenfield wrote:
>
> It seems very late this year, but the first American Goldfinch just arrived this morning at our property on Sauvie Island.
>
> Mark Greenfield
> Markgreenfield333@gmail.com
> Sent from my iPhone*******
> UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>

*******
UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Re: Aleutian Cackler Extravaganza 4/13/21
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 16:48 pm
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
Coastal migration seems to be just getting started here on the central
coast. As was mentioned good flight of Ternstoday and many yesterday.
First noticeable sustainedoffshore flight of shorebirds this morning,
but mostlyDunlin, Black-bellied, & S-b Dowitchers. No numbersof
Westerns yet. Also no significant loon movement to this point. Wind
has been more cold NE here whichtends to fan stuff far offshore, so
not ideal yet.
Phil

> This clear windy weather with winds out of the northwest really has
the shorebirds moving too as well as Caspian Terns and Pacific Loons.
The peak is usually later in month but if this weather persist I
expect the northward movement could peak earlier than normal?
Merry migration! Tim R Coos Bay



Subject: American goldfinch
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 16:22 pm
From: sauviemark AT gmail.com
 
It seems very late this year, but the first American Goldfinch just arrived this morning at our property on Sauvie Island.

Mark Greenfield
Markgreenfield333@gmail.com
Sent from my iPhone*******
UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Aleutian Cackler Extravaganza 4/13/21
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 15:35 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
Terry Wahl reports the Aleutians are pouring overhead this morning at the
family ranch near Cape Blanco. He said mostly larger flocks of several
hundred and as soon as one flock passes he can see the next one coming in
the distance. They don’t stop at Terry’s because wrong type of grass
(orchard) and it is to tall so they head north and usually stop and feed on
other ranches north of Floras Lake where grass is a different type and
grazed shorter. Terry said that Rick McKenzie guesstimated 40,000 on his
ranch (west of Langlois and north of Floras Lake) yesterday- should be many
more than that today!

Always an awesome spectacle on the south coast when they are around!!!!

This clear windy weather with winds out of the northwest really has the
shorebirds moving too as well as Caspian Terns and Pacific Loons. The peak
is usually later in month but if this weather persist I expect the
northward movement could peak earlier than normal?

Merry migration!
Tim R
Coos Bay



Subject: NB Caspian Terns this morning Lincoln City
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 15:21 pm
From: d_villa AT mail.com
 
Steady northbound flight of Caspian Terns this morning. First noticed them flying low and barking directly overhead as I was taking out the trash earlier. 

dawn v
Lincoln City/Nelscott


--
Sent from my Android phone with mail.com Mail. Please excuse my brevity.



Subject: Tuesday eBird RBA
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 10:08 am
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
https://ebird.org/alert/summar...


*** Species Summary:

Cackling Goose (minima) (1 Umatilla)
White-throated Swift (1 Umatilla)
Long-billed Curlew (1 Deschutes, 2 Jefferson)
Snowy Egret (1 Coos, 1 Klamath)
White-faced Ibis (1 Malheur)
Short-eared Owl (1 Tillamook)
Red-naped Sapsucker (1 Deschutes)
Western Wood-Pewee (1 Wasco)
Say's Phoebe (7 Lincoln)
Blue Jay (2 Union)
Oak Titmouse (1 Klamath)
Bushtit (Pacific) (1 Clatsop)
White-breasted Nuthatch (Pacific) (1 Klamath)
Purple Finch (Western) (1 Clatsop)
White-crowned x Golden-crowned Sparrow (hybrid) (1 Benton)
Swamp Sparrow (2 Marion)
Orange-crowned Warbler (lutescens) (1 Umatilla)
Nashville Warbler (1 Linn)



Subject: response to Shrike query
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 5:55 am
From: dmarc-noreply AT freelists.org
 
Thanks to those who responded to my request for the identity of the Shrike.  I learned a lot from the responses and added a life bird to my list at the same time.  Thank you all.
Joy



Subject: Re: coos snowy yes
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 1:10 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Egret

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56@gmail.com

www.alanlcontreras.com


> On Apr 12, 2021, at 6:06 PM, David Bailey wrote:
>
> ?
> Snowy Egret, Owl, Plover, Day?
>
>> On Mon, Apr 12, 2021, 14:54 Karen Saxton wrote:
>> at redmon pond



Subject: Re: coos snowy yes
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 1:06 am
From: davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com
 
Snowy Egret, Owl, Plover, Day?

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021, 14:54 Karen Saxton wrote:

> at redmon pond
>



Subject: Re: Talent CA Thrasher??
Date: Tue Apr 13 2021 0:06 am
From: keschneckdds AT gmail.com
 
I tried again this afternoon and no luck. I'll probably try a few more
times since I live within bicycling distance to the Thrasher site.

Karl Schneck
Ashland, Oregon
"As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but
nature's sources never fail." John Muir
?( '<
/ )? )
// " "


On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 12:23 AM Jamie Simmons wrote:

> Besides Karl's stopping by, the eBird hotspot was also visited by Matt
> Cahill on March 25 with no success. (hotspot name is: stakeout
> California Thrasher, Talent (2019) )
> It was last reported on September 5 and prior to that, July 6th by
> myself. I waited over 5.5 hours to see it and it never sang, but it
> did call. The homeowner was gone for the day and her dogs were
> (unplanned by her) out in the yard, so lots of dog barking.
>
> Jamie Simmons
> Corvallis
>
> On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 8:01 PM Karl Schneck
> wrote:
> >
> > I checked for the CATH about a week ago and no luck... I'll probably
> check again in the next few days and let you know if I have any luck.
> >
> > Karl Schneck
> > Ashland, Oregon
> > "As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but
> nature's sources never fail." John Muir
> > ?( '<
> > / )? )
> > // " "
> >
> >
> > On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 7:55 PM Darrel Faxon wrote:
> >>
> >> Just a heads up. When Laura and I were there last spring, the
> homeowner, whose yard the thrasher(s) have used for seven years, told us
> she planned to sell out and move. I don't know if that has happened, but it
> is a possibility there might be new owners who are less friendly to birders.
> >> Darrel
> >>
> >> ________________________________
> >> From: "Charles Gates"
> >> To: "obol"
> >> Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 6:16:21 PM
> >> Subject: [obol] Talent CA Thrasher??
> >>
> >> I’m wondering if anyone has checked on the California Thrasher spot
> near Talent this year. Anyone looked yet?
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Chuck Gates
> >> Prineville Bird Club
> >> Crooked River Wetlands Volunteer
> >> 541-280-4957
> >> Powell Butte,
> >> Oregon Birding Site Guide
> >> http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
> >> Oregon County Checklists
> >> http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
>



Subject: Re: coos snowy yes
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 23:52 pm
From: kcsaxton AT gmail.com
 
I've seen snowys there several times at different times of the year. Since
we work in Bandon a couple days a week, we try to hit it up at least once a
week

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 4:49 PM HARVEY W SCHUBOTHE
wrote:

> Karen
>
> We used to have a snowy each year at Redmon. Usually should up later, like
> around the 4th of July. But it was a regular. Probably not the same bird
> given the timing and the number of years we have not seen it. But it was an
> automatic for our Shorebird Festival and audubon field trips. One year we
> had a juvie black crowned night heron and the snowy that used the same
> snag. Unfortunately Redmon has lost a lot of those snags.
>
> Harv Schubothe
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* obol-bounce@freelists.org on behalf
> of Karen Saxton
> *Sent:* Monday, April 12, 2021 2:54 PM
> *To:* OBOL
> *Subject:* [obol] coos snowy yes
>
> at redmon pond
>



Subject: Cabin Lake
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 22:07 pm
From: tjlawler AT crestviewcable.com
 
It appears that Cabin Lake survived another winter. The water is now turned on. The lower bowl is somewhat orange while the rust drains from the tank. This happens every year. It just give the birds a good iron boost!

So...people need to be considerate about the blinds. Before COVID the blinds were for all and could not be just taken over by one (or a party) individual. As with last year, if the blind is occupied it is first-come first-serve. If they feel comfortable letting you in then great. If not then you should just understand it is because of the COVID situation.

Pretty quiet but got 10 species in the hour I was up there.

Species for the day.


1 Turkey Vulture
1 Northern Flicker
1 American Kestrel
1 Pinyon Jay
1 Steller's Jay
2 Mountain Chickadee
2 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 Pygmy Nuthatch
4 Western Bluebird
1 White-crowned Sparrow

Tom





-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Groups.io Links: You receive all messages sent to this group.
View/Reply Online (#3834): https://groups.io/g/COBOL/mess...
Mute This Topic: https://groups.io/mt/82051145/...
Group Owner: COBOL+owner@groups.io
Unsubscribe: https://groups.io/g/COBOL/unsu... [abamailinglists@gmail.com]
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-



Subject: Salem Audubon's Birder's Night -- Tuesday, April 13, 7:00 PM
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 22:00 pm
From: tim.the.fisherman AT gmail.com
 
Hi all,

Please join us tomorrow night for Salem Audubon's Birder's Night, featuring
research by four of Willamette University's talented biology students, and
Biology Professor David Craig.

The link for pre-registering for the Birder's Night program is:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webina...

*Title: *The Wandering Phoenix; Birds, Hooping, and Adversity; Top 20
Photos of 2020; and Aspects of Oregon Oaks That Are Important to
Slender-billed White-breasted Nuthatches—Dr. David Craig and Students

*Presentations: *

Dr. David Craig, Willamette University Biology Professor, and four of his
undergraduate collaborators will share recent research with the Birder's
Night audience. All of these students are members of the lab group CORAX,
named using the scientific name for the common raven (corvus corax), a
brilliant bird, famous in folklore, poetry, and academic research. CORAX
stands for Craig’s Outstanding Research Associates in X. The X is primarily
for the cross of behavior and ecology and includes projects focused on
intersections of natural and cultural history, art and science, and actions
to reduce racism and sexism. Dr. Craig is pleased to introduce these four
early career scientists.

Janet Flores '23 is a Biology major with interest in medicine, engineering,
and helping others. While a student at our local McKay High School, she
contributed leadership to fundraising for Taylor's House, an emergency
overnight shelter for homeless youth. She used her bilingual skills to
promote voter registration in our immigrant communities and is one of the
student workers for Willamette's Grounds Crew, making our campus beautiful
for people and birds. She has started research on campus birds by focusing
on behavior and anatomy to create avian artwork for science communication.
Janet will present "The Wandering Phoenix: How bird art rises above
burnout."

DeMarco Reed '23 is declared a Civic Communications and Media major and is
also very interested in mathematics. As a student, athlete, BLM
protagonist, and Black birder in the making, he has been working to bring
people from many walks of life together in the time of COVID 19. He will
present "Birds, Hooping, and Adversity" to connect his birding, basketball,
and Black Lives Matter movement expertise. His interest in this project
specifically was learning more about birds, educating others, and spreading
awareness about people battling adversity by incorporating many different
fields of expertise and bringing it all together. DeMarco has lived all
over the world but counts San Antonio as his hometown. DeMarco also has a
great tattoo of his favorite bird, the Peregrine Falcon.

Juan Vargas '23 is a talented cross-country and long-distance runner with
notable records at both South Salem High School and Willamette U. Majoring
in Exercise Science on his way to a biomedical career he has volunteered at
the Salem Public Library, Salem Hospital, and for local soccer teams as a
coach or referee. He has years of outdoor experience working local
vineyards and Willamette's campus. His research has focused on photography
on our campus and at local wildlife hotspots. In addition to documenting
action photos like the peregrine falcons courting in downtown Salem, he has
been building a catalog of individual mallards resident to campus that may
be useful for tracking these ducks over time. Juan will share his "Top 20
Photos of 2020."

Rose Wilkinson, '22, grew up in San Diego, California, is an accomplished
flute player, and has been focused on ecology, evolution, and conservation
of both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. In the past, she has worked at
an exotic bird sanctuary, done invasive weed control, and collected data on
the golden spotted oak borer beetle in oak woodlands of Southern
California. In Oregon, she has studied the adaptive significance of gall
morphology in our local white oak ecosystems and helped develop the
protocols around salvaging Oregon oak tree-ring data from the February ice
storm that damaged so many old heritage trees. She is currently focused on
"Aspects of Oregon oaks that are important to slender-billed white-breasted
nuthatch."

*How to Join Our ZOOM Webinar to be held Tuesday, April 13 at 6:30 PM*:

1. As an audience member, you do not need any special software or hardware.

2. All participants will need to “Pre-Register” in advance of the event by
clicking on a link which will be provided in the Kestrel, on the Salem
Audubon Society website, and on the SAS Facebook page.

The link for pre-registering for the Birder's Night is:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webina...

3. Once registered, you will immediately receive a confirmation email which
will include your personal link to use to join the meeting. Please keep
track of it and do not use another person’s link. You will receive a
reminder email on the day of the program which will also have your link. A
few minutes before the program’s start time, pull up your invitation on a
PC, Mac or smart device, click on the meeting link and enter the Zoom
session. It's that easy.

4. As an audience member/participant, your microphone will be automatically
muted during the program and your camera disabled to avoid background noise
and distractions. During the program, Tim Johnson will be available through
the “Chat” function to help you with any technical problems: Find the “chat
button” on your computer screen, click on it, then type in a description of
your problem. In addition, use “Chat” to type in questions for the speakers
during the program. Questions submitted for the speakers will be read to
them during the Q and A.

5. For technical questions, please email Tim Johnson,
tim.the.fisherman@gmail.com . For other questions, email Eugenia Becker,
Chair, Birder’s Night Committee, heronflight99@gmail.com.

Eugenia Becker
Chair, Salem Audubon's Birder's Night Committee
heronflight99@gmail.com



Subject: Scope for sale
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 20:55 pm
From: logan5417 AT comcast.net
 
Swarovski ATM65 spotting scope with 20-60X-S eyepiece and Swarovski cover, plus Manfrotto 190CX3 carbon fiber tripod with Manfrotto 128RC video head. Comes with original packaging and literature. Pristine condition. $1500 OBO.*******
UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: New eBird Policy
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 18:50 pm
From: dougsantoni AT gmail.com
 
Fellow Tweeters — Seeing the message below, I wanted to remind folks that eBird is just one of the many great things that’s being done by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  Please keep them in mind when you're considering charitable giving!  

Doug Santoni
Doug Santoni at gmail dot com
Seattle, WA


> On Apr 12, 2021, at 10:07 AM, Robert O'Brien wrote:
>
> Recently I've been forced occasionally to log in to eBird in order to use some features. I queried eBird about the situation. Here is the response.
>
> Thanks for reaching out to eBird with your question.
>
> Over the past year, the eBird website has experienced unusually high server loads as bird enthusiasts around the world contribute to and explore eBird data. This increased web activity has caused us to exceed the limits of the Google Maps platform used by some of our Explore tools. To reduce this unanticipated burden on our map-based features, it was necessary to restrict access to some parts of the Explore page to users with registered eBird accounts.
>
> This action allows us to keep eBird observations safe and accessible, so we can continue to provide fully functional data exploration tools completely for free.
>
> Fortunately, creating an eBird account is 100% free and easy. To get started, go to the eBird homepage , and click on the green 'Create account' button in the top right corner of the page. You will be asked to provide your first and last name, your email address, and to create a username and password (8 characters or more).
>
> Thanks again for getting in touch! eBird.
>
> I guess success has its price. My original concern was that birders who don't like to sign up for anything might be prevented from using , getting used to, and eventually joining eBird. Such is life. Bob OBrien Carver OR
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Nashville Warbler - Linn County near Crabtree
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 18:28 pm
From: jeffharding AT centurytel.net
 
There was a Nashville Warbler along the South Santiam River where it passes
under Highway 226 west of Crabtree, Linn County this morning. Northern
Rough-winged Swallows are going in and out of drain holes under the bridge,
as they do here in April through July. I assume they nest in there.



Here's my list, with photos:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S8...



Good birding,

Jeff



Subject: New eBird Policy
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 17:07 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Recently I've been forced occasionally to log in to eBird in order to use
some features. I queried eBird about the situation. Here is the response.


*Thanks for reaching out to eBird with your question.*

*Over the past year, the eBird website has experienced unusually high
server loads as bird enthusiasts around the world contribute to and explore
eBird data. This increased web activity has caused us to exceed the limits
of the Google Maps platform used by some of our Explore tools. To reduce
this unanticipated burden on our map-based features, it was necessary to
restrict access to some parts of the Explore page to users with registered
eBird accounts.*

*This action allows us to keep eBird observations safe and accessible, so
we can continue to provide fully functional data exploration tools
completely for free.*

*Fortunately, creating an eBird account is 100% free and easy. To get
started, go to the eBird homepage , and click on
the green 'Create account' button in the top right corner of the page. You
will be asked to provide your first and last name, your email address, and
to create a username and password (8 characters or more).*

*Thanks again for getting in touch! eBird.*

I guess success has its price. My original concern was that birders who
don't like to sign up for anything might be prevented from using , getting
used to, and eventually joining eBird. Such is life. Bob OBrien Carver
OR



Subject: Another Snippet of Mallard Life
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 11:06 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Well after sunset last night I observed a pair of Mallards approach at
about 150 ft. They disappeared from view in a wide circle over the house
but only one reappeared to complete the circle, flying off alone.
As is well known, duck procreation has several steps.
1. Courtship
2. Cohabitation/mating
3. Nest building/egg laying.
4. Incubation, hatching, rearing.

The male skips out some time during item 4 and the female soldiers on as
illustrated in a couple of previous posts last year.
https://www.freelists.org/post...
https://www.freelists.org/post...

Undoubtedly the same female as last year, but still being accompanied by
the (same??) male? Unlikely, but who knows?
Is she still laying and only incubating at night? Or were they returning
from a feeding flight before settling in for the night in their separate
ways?

Bob OBrien Carver OR

PS In the second, previous (pond) photo I just noticed for the first time,
a female Wood Duck near the proud mom..
I must have looked at that photo a zillion times in posting it to OBOL
originally; and never noticed it. Always something new (or old) under the
sun.



Subject: Monday eBird RBA
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 10:38 am
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
https://ebird.org/alert/summar...


*** Species Summary:

Cackling Goose (minima) (1 Umatilla)
Tundra Swan (1 Gilliam)
Green-winged Teal (Eurasian) (1 Multnomah)
Red-breasted Merganser (1 Morrow)
White-throated Swift (1 Malheur, 1 Umatilla)
Black-chinned Hummingbird (1 Deschutes)
Rufous Hummingbird (1 Harney)
Allen's Hummingbird (6 Curry)
Pacific Golden-Plover (1 Lane)
Long-billed Curlew (3 Deschutes, 1 Jefferson)
Snowy Egret (3 Coos)
White-faced Ibis (1 Malheur)
Rough-legged Hawk (1 Benton)
Red-naped Sapsucker (1 Deschutes)
Red-naped x Red-breasted Sapsucker (hybrid) (1 Klamath)
Hammond's Flycatcher (1 Multnomah)
Pacific-slope Flycatcher (1 Deschutes, 1 Multnomah)
Say's Phoebe (2 Lincoln)
Hutton's Vireo (1 Klamath)
Black-capped Chickadee (1 Deschutes, 3 Klamath)
Bank Swallow (3 Malheur)
Mountain Bluebird (8 Multnomah, 8 Tillamook)
Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (1 Lane, 3 Polk)
Chipping Sparrow (1 Coos)
Fox Sparrow (Sooty) (6 Klamath)
Great-tailed Grackle (1 Josephine)
Orange-crowned Warbler (lutescens) (1 Umatilla)
Nashville Warbler (1 Lane, 2 Umatilla)



Subject: Re: Swainson's thrush reports: Alert reports vs. confirmed sightings
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 10:30 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
As to thrush ID, there are a few more characteristics. Behavioral.
Hermit Thrushes in my experience are confiding little birds that are happy
to be viewed.
They frequently flick their wings/tails to attract a birder who will duly
appreciate their grace and beauty.. Especially flickering after their
short flights.
At which point they often run a few steps.
Swainson's Thrushes are not happy to be seen and prefer to remain
incognito..
Ergo. If you can actually watch a thrush, it's not a Swainson's, it's a
Hermit!
Bob OBrien Carver OR.


On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 11:33 AM Wayne Weber wrote:

> Darrel, Tim, and Oregon birders,
>
>
>
> Looking at eBird maps this morning, I do not see ANY confirmed records of
> Swainson’s Thrush in Oregon this year.
>
>
>
> It appears that some of you are looking at eBird Alerts, not at confirmed
> eBird sightings. It is very important to remember that Alerts include ALL
> sightings reported to eBird, whether confirmed or not. This is expressly
> stated in the Alert messages. Many sightings reported to eBird are
> erroneous or questionable, and if eBird editors are doing their job (which
> they nearly always are), 98% or 99% of these questionable reports are never
> confirmed.
>
>
>
> We should ALWAYS treat sightings in eBird Alerts with a grain of salt,
> unless subsequently confirmed, but it seems that some of us may have
> forgotten this basic rule of eBird!
>
>
>
> Wayne Weber
>
> Delta, BC, Canada
>
> contopus@telus.net
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* obol-bounce@freelists.org [mailto:obol-bounce@freelists.org] *On
> Behalf Of *Darrel Faxon
> *Sent:* Sunday, April 11, 2021 7:42 AM
> *To:* obol
> *Subject:* [obol] swainson's thrush reports
>
>
>
> What's up with all the Swainson's thrush reports? I see bunches of them on
> e-bird. I'm with Tim Rodenkirk, that the species is not expected before
> early May. I probably should be the last person on earth to cast doubt on
> someone else's report, but are people really seeing Swainson's this early?
>
> Darrel
>



Subject: Re: Talent CA Thrasher??
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 7:23 am
From: sapsuckers AT gmail.com
 
Besides Karl's stopping by, the eBird hotspot was also visited by Matt
Cahill on March 25 with no success. (hotspot name is: stakeout
California Thrasher, Talent (2019) )
It was last reported on September 5 and prior to that, July 6th by
myself. I waited over 5.5 hours to see it and it never sang, but it
did call. The homeowner was gone for the day and her dogs were
(unplanned by her) out in the yard, so lots of dog barking.

Jamie Simmons
Corvallis

On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 8:01 PM Karl Schneck wrote:
>
> I checked for the CATH about a week ago and no luck... I'll probably check again in the next few days and let you know if I have any luck.
>
> Karl Schneck
> Ashland, Oregon
> "As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but nature's sources never fail." John Muir
> ?( '<
> / )? )
> // " "
>
>
> On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 7:55 PM Darrel Faxon wrote:
>>
>> Just a heads up. When Laura and I were there last spring, the homeowner, whose yard the thrasher(s) have used for seven years, told us she planned to sell out and move. I don't know if that has happened, but it is a possibility there might be new owners who are less friendly to birders.
>> Darrel
>>
>> ________________________________
>> From: "Charles Gates"
>> To: "obol"
>> Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 6:16:21 PM
>> Subject: [obol] Talent CA Thrasher??
>>
>> I’m wondering if anyone has checked on the California Thrasher spot near Talent this year. Anyone looked yet?
>>
>>
>>
>> Chuck Gates
>> Prineville Bird Club
>> Crooked River Wetlands Volunteer
>> 541-280-4957
>> Powell Butte,
>> Oregon Birding Site Guide
>> http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
>> Oregon County Checklists
>> http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...
>>
>>
>>
>>
*******
UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Re: Avain Keratin Disorder
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 3:41 am
From: murphym AT pdx.edu
 
You should send the BCCH photo to Colleen Handell (cmhandel@usgs.gov).
She's been working on this issue for over a decade.
Michael Murphy

On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 12:16 PM Owen Schmidt wrote:

>
> …….. Black-capped Chickadee, my backyard near Grant High, Portland,
> Multnomah County. So sad.
>
> oschmidt@att.net
> Sunday, April 11, 2021
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: Re: Talent CA Thrasher??
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 3:00 am
From: keschneckdds AT gmail.com
 
I checked for the CATH about a week ago and no luck... I'll probably check
again in the next few days and let you know if I have any luck.

Karl Schneck
Ashland, Oregon
"As age comes on, one source of enjoyment after another is closed, but
nature's sources never fail." John Muir
?( '<
/ )? )
// " "


On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 7:55 PM Darrel Faxon wrote:

> Just a heads up. When Laura and I were there last spring, the homeowner,
> whose yard the thrasher(s) have used for seven years, told us she planned
> to sell out and move. I don't know if that has happened, but it is a
> possibility there might be new owners who are less friendly to birders.
> Darrel
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Charles Gates"
> *To: *"obol"
> *Sent: *Sunday, April 11, 2021 6:16:21 PM
> *Subject: *[obol] Talent CA Thrasher??
>
> I’m wondering if anyone has checked on the California Thrasher spot near
> Talent this year. Anyone looked yet?
>
>
>
> Chuck Gates
> Prineville Bird Club
> Crooked River Wetlands Volunteer
> 541-280-4957
> Powell Butte,
> Oregon Birding Site Guide
> http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
> Oregon County Checklists
> http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...
>
>
>
>



Subject: Re: Talent CA Thrasher??
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 2:55 am
From: t4c1x AT peak.org
 
Just a heads up. When Laura and I were there last spring, the homeowner, whose yard the thrasher(s) have used for seven years, told us she planned to sell out and move. I don't know if that has happened, but it is a possibility there might be new owners who are less friendly to birders.
Darrel


From: "Charles Gates"
To: "obol"
Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2021 6:16:21 PM
Subject: [obol] Talent CA Thrasher??



I’m wondering if anyone has checked on the California Thrasher spot near Talent this year. Anyone looked yet?



Chuck Gates
Prineville Bird Club
Crooked River Wetlands Volunteer
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Oregon Birding Site Guide
[ http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi... | http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi... ]
Oregon County Checklists
[ http://www.ecaudubon.org/count... | http://www.ecaudubon.org/count... ]



Subject: Southern Oregon Trip Report
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 2:49 am
From: cbreseangela AT gmail.com
 
First, I want to thank everyone who responded to my email request with
advice about where to find birds. I received an outstanding amount of
emails, and I apologize if I did not get back to you directly.

I left Portland on Monday, March 29th and returned Saturday, April 3rd.

I started out with a couple days in Klamath Falls. The spectacle I most
wanted to see was Clark's or Western Grebes rushing. I was delighted that
within a half an hour of arriving at Putnam's Point, I witnessed a pair of
Western Grebes rushing. I visited Putnam's point several times over the
next couple of days and saw rushing several times. Click here for a photo

of a pair of Clark's Grebes rushing. The most numerous birds there were
Northern Shovelers, but I also saw several Common Mergansers, Lesser Scaup,
White Pelicans, and Ruddy Ducks.

While in Klamath Falls I walked Moore Park and found my lifer California
Towhee high on the powerline trail. I birded from Stateline Rd in Lower
Klamath NWR and found 3 Rough-legged Hawks in a field. Large flocks of
Greater White-fronted Geese and Snow Goose were present. At Tule Lake I saw
more Bald Eagles than I ever have before. I drove A Dike Rd along the water
and found that it was covered in discarded Snow Goose wings from eagle
meals. On one morning I visited Eagle Ridge County Park, where I heard a
distant Northern Pygmy-Owl hooting.

Along the Wingwatcher's Trail next to Hwy 97 I found a colony of almost 30
Black-crowned Night-Herons. I also saw my first Osprey pair of the trip.

After Klamath Falls I moved west to Ashland. I took Dead Indian Memorial
Road and the views were beautiful. The road was a little icy in some spots
but overall well plowed. I saw Sandhill Cranes in the snow. I spent the
afternoon at the south end of Emigrant Lake County Park. I found my lifer
Oak Titmouse there. I also found a cavity in a tree with several Acorn
Woodpeckers going in and out. I noticed that they would not enter once I
got close, so I left them alone in case they were nesting there.That
evening I met up with my friend Claire. The next morning (Thurs the 1st) we
drove up to Howard Prairie and were able to get distant views of our lifer
Great Gray Owl hunting in a meadow (click here for photo
).
What a spectacular bird! While up there we heard several woodpeckers, Brown
Creepers, Mountain Chickadee, and a single Varied Thrush.

After a celebratory breakfast in Ashland, we headed to Lower Table Rock. We
mostly birded around the Savannah Loop since the weather was warming up,
and we were trying to get photos of Acorn Woodpeckers and Lewis's
Woodpeckers. We also saw a great deal of Wild Turkeys who were displaying
frequently. We found several Oak Titmouse and 2 California Towhees here (I
guess I should have just come here for my lifers!). We ran into a couple of
other birders who told us to go to nearby Whetstone Savannah to try for a
Northern Mockingbird and a shrike that had been seen there recently. We
didn't see either but we did get some great looks at a pair of Lark
Sparrows.

The next day a local friend took us to do some birding around Josephine
County. We found a known Northern Mockingbird, saw some beautiful Red
Crossbills, and found several other new county ticks for me. (Since it was
my first time birding Josephine County, technically all were new county
birds for me). We saw an Osprey gathering sticks, but he did not pick them
up off the ground as I would have thought. He flew full speed at a limb in
a tree, and would then grab it with his talons. There would be a moment
when he stalled in the air, and then the limb either broke off or he let go.

On our last morning, we headed back to Lower Table Rock to try again for
photos of Acorn and Lewis's Woodpeckers, but they were much more shy this
morning. We made a quick stop at Ti'lomikh Falls, hoping to add a couple of
last minute county birds. A pair of Wrentits came out and were very
cooperative for photos. Click here for a photo.

It was great to get such great looks at this skulky species.

All in all, a wonderful trip, and I hope to get back down there again to do
more birding in the near future. Thanks again to all who offered their
knowledge! I am always astounded and humbled by the friendliness of birders
and their willingness to share bird knowledge. It's a wonderful community
to be a part of.



Subject: Re: Talent CA Thrasher??
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 1:24 am
From: gneavoll AT comcast.net
 
I’ve wondered the same thing. If it didn’t perish in the fires, I’m betting that it’s back, or soon will be.

George Neavoll
S.W. Portland

> On Apr 11, 2021, at 6:16 PM, wrote:
>
> I’m wondering if anyone has checked on the California Thrasher spot near Talent this year. Anyone looked yet?
>
> Chuck Gates
> Prineville Bird Club
> Crooked River Wetlands Volunteer
> 541-280-4957
> Powell Butte,
> Oregon Birding Site Guide
> http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
> Oregon County Checklists
> http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...



Subject: Talent CA Thrasher??
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 1:16 am
From: cgates326 AT gmail.com
 
I'm wondering if anyone has checked on the California Thrasher spot near
Talent this year. Anyone looked yet?



Chuck Gates
Prineville Bird Club
Crooked River Wetlands Volunteer
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Oregon Birding Site Guide

http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
Oregon County Checklists

http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...



Subject: Fairview Wetlands in Salem OR 4/11/21
Date: Mon Apr 12 2021 0:52 am
From: roygerig2.0 AT gmail.com
 
This morning I walked about a half mile of the Fairview Wetlands Scenic
Trail and encountered about 35 bird species. Most surprising were 9 RED
CROSSBILLS in the willows that are blooming now. When they flew they did
not sound like the presumed Type 4 RECR that I have heard so often in the
coast range. The flight call was softer and less bouncy and much different
than that

The RED CROSSBILLS looked like hanging Christmas tree ornaments when I
first saw them hanging on skinny willow branches. I have never seen that
in all my Crossbill experience before

There were two pairs of NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS with other swallows,
and a SORA called sometimes

A very nice bird walk, it's here in town
Roy Gerig Salem OR



Subject: Chip sparrow Mult Co
Date: Sun Apr 11 2021 22:40 pm
From: ed.mcvicker AT gmail.com
 
At least 3 Chipping Sparrows are hanging out (yesterday and today) around
the parking area of the community garden at SW 46th & Taylors Ferry. Near
one of the sheds.



Subject: Re: Swainson's thrush reports: Alert reports vs. confirmed sightings
Date: Sun Apr 11 2021 20:37 pm
From: kcsaxton AT gmail.com
 
I dont' expect to see them until after I've heard them... and nary a water
droplet peep to be heard here

On Sun, Apr 11, 2021 at 1:04 PM Jay Withgott wrote:

>
> Ah, yes. Time to revisit the perennial discussion of out-of-season
> Swainson’s Thrush reports! Wayne is correct: almost none of the
> super-early Swainson’s reports on the eBird RBA alerts actually end up
> getting confirmed. You can explore the true picture by consulting summaries
> of confirmed eBird data such as in the chart here, which shows percentage
> of outings recording SWTH in Oregon, week by week:
> https://ebird.org/barchart?r=U... 21&spp=swathr
> .
>
> In terms of total SWTH records ever accepted in eBird in the state of
> Oregon….
> * There has never been one before the week of 8 April.
> * There has been only 1 in the week of 8 April.
> * There have been only 17 in the week of 15 April.
> * There have been only 69 in the week of 22 April.
> * There have been 1075 in the week of 1 May.
> * They then skyrocket to counts of 3993, 8067, 16917, etc. in following
> weeks.
>
> In my home county, Multnomah, which gets lots of coverage by many great
> birders, there has never been a SWTH acceptably documented in eBird before
> the week of 22 April.
>
> Swainson’s Thrush is a species with very strict migration timing. It is
> worth looking at the map of migration timing of the species modeled from
> eBird data, in the Birds of the World account, here:
> https://birdsoftheworld.org/bo...
>
> As an eBird reviewer for Multnomah and other counties, I have had to be
> “the bad guy” many times by turning down out-of-season reports. In most
> cases people have been very understanding and appreciative of learning
> something, which is wonderful. It is possible that some of these reports
> are valid, of course, but documentation is almost always lacking, and I try
> to make the point that SWTH is SUCH a rare bird out-of-season that such
> records pretty much require photo/video/audio documentation.
>
> Documentation often is lacking simply because many birders do not realize
> the magnitude of an early or late SWTH — thus the value of these perennial
> discussions on OBOL.
>
> I’ll hasten to state that there are some very good reasons that we birders
> have trouble with SWTHs, namely:
> (1) by Sound: The ease with which stray Song Sparrow notes can be
> confused for the “water-drop” call of SWTH, as was just pointed out on this
> forum, and has been previously noted here by myself, Tom McNamara, and
> others. This ID hazard is very frequent in our region, almost as much as
> the Western Tanager call notes that are actually Lesser Goldfinches
> mimicking them, and the Pewee call notes that are actually Starlings
> mimicking them.
> (2) by Sight: The fact that the subspecies of Swainson’s and Hermit
> Thrush that occur in western Oregon tend to look more similar to one
> another than the subspecies that occur in eastern North America. Thus,
> birders who hastily consult a few images online or in a continent-wide
> field guide and focus on photos from the East can easily get the impression
> that telling these two species apart is easy: why, Hermit Thrush has a
> bright reddish tail that contrasts sharply with the back, and Swainson’s
> doesn’t! Easy! …. Well, not in the West. Our “russet-backed" Swainson’s
> have tails that are in fact slightly redder than the back, and our
> "guttatus-group” Hermits often show duller tails and less tail-to-back
> contrast than those clean-cut Eastern birds. Thus — especially given a view
> in mediocre lighting or at limited angles — it can be easy to convince
> yourself that one of these species is actually the other.
>
> Bottom line, anytime we encounter a Swainson’s Thrush in Oregon anytime in
> April or anytime after earliest October, let’s all please try to obtain
> solid documentation. This goes for the most experienced birders as well as
> the beginners; indeed, note that the few late-season reports accepted with
> documentation are from experts such as Shawneen Finnegan, Alan Contreras,
> and Rich Hoyer, who provide good models in how to document a rare bird.
> Documentation of out-of-season SWTHs will help eBird reviewers with their
> jobs, keep the eBird database cleaner and more informative, greatly boost
> the chance that one’s valid sightings will be accepted, and help us all
> learn more precisely what the actual migration timing and likelihood of
> true outliers is.
>
> Jay Withgott
> Portland
>
>
>


American Birding Podcast


 

 

ABA Recommended

ABA Book Reviews









Flight Calls:
ABA Newsletter Signup

Name:
Email:

Contact us.