ABA's Birding News >> Oregon

Oregon bird news by date

Updated on June 25, 2019, 7:30 pm

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


25 Jun: @ 19:23:42  Request for help from non-OBOL member - bird seen Clatsop county [dawn v]
25 Jun: @ 19:15:29  Re: Comments on Western YB Cuckoo delisting proposal -- request to eBird reviewers [clearwater]
25 Jun: @ 18:14:10  Re: Comments on Western YB Cuckoo delisting proposal -- request to eBird reviewers [Jerry Tangren]
25 Jun: @ 18:13:49  SAS Shorts: Keizer Rapids Park Bird Walk Report [Mike Unger]
25 Jun: @ 18:13:31  Re: Comments are NOT closed on fed site concerning YB Cuckoo [clearwater]
25 Jun: @ 17:55:26  hawk lovers will want to check this out [Harry Fuller]
25 Jun: @ 17:45:24  Coments are closed on fed site concerning YB Cuckoo [howard bruner]
25 Jun: @ 16:50:11  Comments on Western YB Cuckoo delisting proposal -- request to eBird reviewers [clearwater]
25 Jun: @ 15:39:47  Re: [obol] YB Cuckoo at Grand Island, Yamhill County -- good reminder of comment deadline! [clearwater]
25 Jun: @ 15:25:48  [obol] YB Cuckoo at Grand Island, Yamhill County -- good reminder of comment deadline! [clearwater]
25 Jun: @ 12:41:47  YB Cuckoo [Robert Lockett]
25 Jun: @ 03:42:16  Semipalmated Sandpiper, but no Hudsonian Godwit at high tide SJCR &TrestleBay- Fort Stevens SP [David Bailey]
25 Jun: @ 00:18:06  Fwd: [Tweeters] Hudsonian Godwit @ 3 Crabs (Clallam County) [Robert O'Brien]
24 Jun: @ 22:45:40  Hudsonian Godwit from today [Owen Schmidt]
24 Jun: @ 18:13:57  Coos Catbird 6/24/19 [Tim Rodenkirk]
24 Jun: @ 17:36:01  June 24 eBird RBA [Teresa Hertzel]
24 Jun: @ 17:35:39  Coast Shorebirds [Daniel Farrar]
24 Jun: @ 16:59:27  GWF Goose in Central OR [Charles Gates]
24 Jun: @ 16:14:18  RBA Hudsonian Godwit [Owen]
24 Jun: @ 15:22:31  Re: Fwd: Mountain Quail [Alan Contreras]
24 Jun: @ 15:20:02  Re: Fwd: Mountain Quail [Lars Norgren]
24 Jun: @ 14:28:08  Fwd: Mountain Quail [clearwater]
24 Jun: @ 14:03:59  Re: 2019 AOS Supplement [Wayne Hoffman]
24 Jun: @ 13:35:06  Hummingbirds [sandy leaptrott]
24 Jun: @ 09:25:00  2019 AOS Supplement [Bob Archer]
24 Jun: @ 08:54:55  Mountain Quail [Lars Norgren]
23 Jun: @ 22:12:07  Re: Mountain Quail have hatched [Paul Sullivan]
23 Jun: @ 21:44:51  Mountain Quail have hatched [Pamela Johnston]
23 Jun: @ 20:19:47  Just a warning about a Bend hotel [Stefan Schlick]
23 Jun: @ 19:12:28  #9 backyard fledgling in McMinnville [Paul Sullivan]
23 Jun: @ 15:45:48  more on hummers [t4c1x]
23 Jun: @ 15:29:39  Re: Hybrid Rufous Hummers [t4c1x]
23 Jun: @ 14:45:27  June 23 eBird RBA [Teresa Hertzel]
23 Jun: @ 14:30:11  Santiam BBS notes: Good year for Hermit Thrushes, Hammond's Flycatchers [clearwater]
23 Jun: @ 12:23:44  Hybrid Rufous Hummers [Robert O'Brien]
23 Jun: @ 00:08:35  Baskett Slough car break in? [Barbara Millikan]
22 Jun: @ 23:13:19  Lincoln's Sparrow: Lookout Mountain, Hood River County Strike Out [Bob Archer]
22 Jun: @ 22:24:42  Least Flycatcher [Larry S. Goodhew]
22 Jun: @ 20:52:38  Harney County--a picture diary of four days birding [Harry Fuller]
22 Jun: @ 19:30:52  Purple Finch and House Finch Silverton duet [Roger Freeman]
22 Jun: @ 14:32:51  June 22 eBird RBA [Teresa Hertzel]
22 Jun: @ 14:07:58  Re: Coos Grasshopper Sparrow Adios [clearwater]
22 Jun: @ 12:45:16  Coos Migrants and Migrants? 6/22/19 [Tim Rodenkirk]
22 Jun: @ 11:06:35  Re: Coos Grasshopper Sparrow Adios [Alan Contreras]
22 Jun: @ 10:41:46  Re: Coos Grasshopper Sparrow 6/20/19 [Tim Rodenkirk]
22 Jun: @ 10:36:46  Re: Yellow Breasted Chat- Pixieland (Lincoln County) [philliplc]
22 Jun: @ 10:21:09  Coos Grasshopper Sparrow Adios [Tim Rodenkirk]
22 Jun: @ 03:01:54  Re: Oystercatchers & Orcas [David Bailey]
21 Jun: @ 22:09:54  Re: Need help with bird ID [Josh Spice]
21 Jun: @ 21:38:05  Re: Need help with bird ID [Alan Contreras]





Subject: Request for help from non-OBOL member - bird seen Clatsop county
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 19:23 pm
From: d_villa AT mail.com
 
Hi, I received a phone call this afternoon and asked the caller to send me an email with as complete a description as he could do.



He writes:

Last Sunday, 6/23 [at about 9:00am], I was leaving Astoria heading East on highway 30 along the Columbia River. About two or three miles outside Astoria, in a undeveloped area, a bird I have never seen before flew across the road in front of me. I was going slow with no traffic so I was able to get a good look at the bird. The bird appeared to be pure white, with a dark bill and undulated as if flew. The bird was about the size of a house sparrow, maybe
six to seven inches in length. I lost sight of the bird when it flew into the trees. Again, the body, wings and tail feathers of the bird appeared to be pure white; very stunning. There might have been color on its head. At first I thought it could be a Snow Bunting, but I am doubtful because I did not see any black; or maybe a McKay™s Bunting, but I know their habitat is way north.Thank you for any assistance you can provide in helping me identify this bird. No matter what, it was a thrill just seeing it.




Please let me know if you have any thoughts and I will pass them on to him. If you'd like to contact him, please email me off-list and I'll give you his contact information.




dawn v

Lincoln City/Nelscott



Subject: Re: Comments on Western YB Cuckoo delisting proposal -- request to eBird reviewers
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 19:15 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Good comments, Jerry,

I've responded privately at more length.

But for now -- and since the clock is ticking -- I want to keep the ball in the court of eBird reviewers, who are in position to give comments based on their position.

I also just forwarded my comments to Brian Sullivan with a request that he and/or his team comment publicly on the way that these anti-conservation interests have made use of eBird checklists.

Joel Geier



Subject: Re: Comments on Western YB Cuckoo delisting proposal -- request to eBird reviewers
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 18:14 pm
From: kloshewoods AT outlook.com
 
For a long time I did not use eBird because I felt it was only an aid to birders in maintaining their lists. However, in many cases I have used it as I travel to areas unfamiliar to me. Consequently, I have felt it my duty to likewise
submit my lists.


Equally, the science behind eBird is not that bad. However, in many regards it is too coarse-grained for the purposes for which some people try to use it. I believe the yellow-billed cuckoo case is just that. eBird data is not suitable
for describing habitat use by cuckoos no matter how well the data are reviewed. Its the nature of the data.


We just returned from the upper mid-west where habitat mosaics are in many places too fine-grained to allow ready use of the data. We were only able to locate some birds because the submitters described in the comments exactly where
the birds were located, two males in the parking lot at the turn-around. However, I can see how this data would have little use in describing specific habitat requirements.


As for citizen science, the nature of the data needs to be taken into account, and we should not make claims about it that are not true. It will lead to misuse, as in the case of the cuckoos.


Jerry Tangren



Get Outlook for iOS

From: obol-bounce@freelists.org <obol-bounce@freelists.org> on behalf of clearwater@peak.org <clearwater@peak.org>
Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 2:49:36 PM
To: Oregon Birders OnLine
Subject: [obol] Comments on Western YB Cuckoo delisting proposal -- request to eBird reviewers




The petition to de-list Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo, filed by the Arizona Mining Association, the Arizona Cattleman's Association, and the Texas-based "American Stewards of Liberty," and their consulting company, Westland Resources, hinges on two main
lines of argument:


(1) Claimed evidence that this is not a "distinct population segment."



(2) Claimed evidence that cuckoos use habitat other than the primary type (large blocks of cottonwood-willow vegetation in bottomland river systems).




You can read more about this in their their petition (the file FWS-R8-ES-2018-0027-0002.pdf, downloadable from

https://www.regulations.gov/do...


How can eBird reviewers help?


A large share of the "evidence" in support of the latter claim comes from eBird checklists, which a consulting company painstakingly picked through to cherry-pick examples of sightings from outside of the primary critical habitat. See Table 2 which extends
through pages 31-36 of the petition, plus Appendix A on "eBird data."



From various discussions both here on OBOL and in sidebar discussions, it should be evident that many erroneous reports could slip through eBird filters. At least for reports in the USA, the filters are just set up by state and county. The filters are
not currently set up to take account of ecoregions or more detailed habitat types, below the county level.



When you have reports of a species that's expected in a given county, those reports will not necessarily get any attention from an eBird reviewer, even if they're reported from bizarre habitat. I've mentioned some examples of this, including reports of
Barrow's Goldeneyes at Ankeny NWR, a Vesper Sparrow supposedly on a wire in downtown Corvallis, etc., generally with no details to support the record. Currently if you look at June sightings of Hermit Thrushes in the Willamette Valley region, you'll see a
cluster in downtown Salem -- likely innocent mistakes by birders who meant to tick Swainson's Thrush, but they didn't get flagged for review because Hermit Thrushes are regular in June at higher elevations in the same county.


Yellow-billed Cuckoos in Arizona seem to be a similar case. I looked through a bunch of the eBird reports cited as "evidence" by the consulting company, and nearly all of them gave no details. Many appeared to be incidental on checklists where the birders were
seeking local "specialties" in e.g. Madeira Canyon.



In addition, locations of reports can be mismapped (like the recent example of Harlequin Ducks supposedly in downtown Independence, or Canada Jays on Kiger Island south of Corvallis). How many of those YBCU reports were just carelessly mapped for whatever
spot someone happened to be in when they got on their mobile app?



It would certainly be helpful if eBird reviewers can come forward to comment on how likely it is that such reports and their locations were reviewed with any degree of rigor. In private discussions with individual eBird reviewers, I've sometimes heard frank
statements regarding the weakness of the data for this type of issue. "You shouldn't expect too much from a mostly volunteer-run operation," etc.



But to be of any use in protecting Western YBCUs, those kind of statements, from people who have direct experience in the eBird review process, need to be on the record by 9 PM tomorrow.


I think Rich Hoyer is one of the Arizona reviewers, so if anyone's able to get his ear on short notice, please do so. Perhaps the folks at "eBird Central" could also persuaded to chime in with a sober assessment of the applicability of eBird ticks for this
type of issue.



Thanks,

Joel



--

Joel Geier

Camp Adair area north of Corvallis






From: "clearwater" <clearwater@peak.org>
To: "Midvalley Birding Midvalley" <birding@midvalleybirding.org>
Cc: "Oregon Birders OnLine" <obol@freelists.org>
Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 1:25:21 PM
Subject: [midvalleybirds] [obol] YB Cuckoo at Grand Island, Yamhill County -- good reminder of comment deadline!



In addition to being a sighting of interest for local birders, this also serves timely reminder that comments are due on the proposal to de-list Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo as a federal endangered species.



While detections of in our region have become extremely rare, recent detections such as one and others in recent years from the Sandy River Delta area near Portland give hope that cuckoos from the endangered population in California might move northward. They
are late migrants, so June is the best time to listen and watch in appropriate habitat.


Delisting would threaten the California population, which is the best hope for cuckoos to re-establish in the Willamette Valley. You can find further information at:


https://www.federalregister.go...


Public comments on this proposed action are due by June, 29, 2019. Please visit:

https://www.regulations.gov/do...



* From : Robert Lockett <robert.s.lockett@xxxxxxxxx>

* Date : Tue, 25 Jun 2019 10:39:26 -0700


Ed McVicker and I just saw (at 10:02 am) a Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the greenway

at Grand Isle, Yamhill County. It didnt call despite playback. The Greenway is

accessed from SE Upper Island Road.


Bob Lockett



--

Joel Geier

Camp Adair area north of Corvallis



_______________________________________________

birding mailing list

birding@midvalleybirding.org

http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: SAS Shorts: Keizer Rapids Park Bird Walk Report
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 18:13 pm
From: unger730 AT gmail.com
 
*SAS Shorts: Keizer Rapids Park Bird Walk Report*

*June 25, 2019*



I led a bird walk at Keizer Rapids Park on Tuesday morning. I was joined
by 15 other birdwatchers including a family with two young birders. We
walked a total of 1.25 miles along the eastern trail then the trail to the
west. The group was met with a nice morning that started cloudy and a bit
windy but soon became partly sunny and very comfortable. The temperature
was 62 degrees at the start and 64 degrees at the end of the bird walk.
The bird activity was good overall with a total of 30 species identified
(seen and/or heard).



The highlights were as follows:



- We saw a *Hutton™s Vireo* in a tree on one of the trails to the
west of the parking lot. The bird gave several of us real good looks at it;

- Another highlight was seeing an active *Western Wood-Pewee* nest.
The nest was in a likely place *i.e.*, the fork of a horizontal branch away
from the trunk of the tree;

- The river was extremely busy as we saw an *Osprey*, *Great
Egret*, *Bald
Eagle*, several *Great Blue Herons* as well as *Cedar Waxwings *and
swallows catching insects along the river;

- We saw a *Yellow Warbler *and heard another one*. *We also heard a*
Wilson™s Warbler singing*;

- A couple other sightings included a *Rufous Hummingbird* and *Brown
Creeper*;

- As usual there were a lot of *White-crowned Sparrows *with many of
them singing.



The next field trip is the *Minto-Brown Island Park bird walk* on *Thursday,
July 4th at 7:00 a.m.* Meet at Parking Lot #3. The Ankeny NWR field
trip is scheduled for *Saturday, July 20th at 7:00 AM.* Meet at the
Pintail Marsh parking lot off Wintel Rd. The next *SAS Shorts* is at
Minto-Brown Island Park on *Wednesday, July 24th at 7:30 PM.* Meet at
Parking Lot #3. Please join us if you can.



*Note:* Next month we will be including a new sign-up link for our Saturday
birding workshops.



Mike Unger

Keizer, OR



*Keizer Rapids Park Checklist Summary for June 25, 2019*

*Identified Species: 30*

*Checklists included in this summary: 1*


*Checklist (*see link to checklist below*):*
Keizer Rapids Park on Jun 25, 2019 @ 8:54 AM

2 Anna's Hummingbird
1 Rufous Hummingbird
3 Great Blue Heron
1 Great Egret
3 Turkey Vulture
1 Osprey
1 Bald Eagle
1 Red-tailed Hawk
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)
4 Western Wood-Pewee
1 Hutton's Vireo
3 California Scrub-Jay
1 American Crow
2 Tree Swallow
1 Violet-green Swallow
4 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Brown Creeper
2 Swainson's Thrush
12 American Robin
5 Cedar Waxwing
5 House Finch
1 Lesser Goldfinch
4 American Goldfinch
7 White-crowned Sparrow
4 Song Sparrow
4 Spotted Towhee
2 Yellow Warbler
1 Wilson's Warbler
2 Black-headed Grosbeak



https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding@midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: Re: Comments are NOT closed on fed site concerning YB Cuckoo
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 18:13 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Howard & all

Thank you, Howard, for trying to comment. The website is a little confusing -- comments are closed on some things but you can still comment on this petition. I tested this just now (4:05 pm) by submitting an abbreviated and rather hasty version of what will be more detailed comments tomorrow. My comment posted and I received a receipt from USFWS.

Be sure to go to this page:
[ https://www.regulations.gov/do... | https://www.regulations.gov/do... ]

and then click on the "Comment Now" button (here's the URL for the button if you want to jump straight to that):

[ https://www.regulations.gov/co... | https://www.regulations.gov/co... ]

Thanks again and I hope this helps you to get your comments in.

Joel
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding@midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: hawk lovers will want to check this out
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 17:55 pm
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
Russel Smith's fine foto of fearsome Ferrugy foursome.
Four nestlings on hwy 205 in Harney Countyhttps://atowhee.blog/2019/06/2...
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: Coments are closed on fed site concerning YB Cuckoo
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 17:45 pm
From: hbrunerh AT hotmail.com
 
I tried to submit a comment at 3:40 PDT and the website is posted that it is not accepting comments.

H
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding@midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: Comments on Western YB Cuckoo delisting proposal -- request to eBird reviewers
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 16:50 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
The petition to de-list Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo, filed by the Arizona Mining Association, the Arizona Cattleman's Association, and the Texas-based "American Stewards of Liberty," and their consulting company, Westland Resources, hinges on two main lines of argument:
(1) Claimed evidence that this is not a "distinct population segment."

(2) Claimed evidence that cuckoos use habitat other than the primary type (large blocks of cottonwood-willow vegetation in bottomland river systems).

You can read more about this in their their petition (the file FWS-R8-ES-2018-0027-0002.pdf, downloadable from https://www.regulations.gov/do...
How can eBird reviewers help?

A large share of the "evidence" in support of the latter claim comes from eBird checklists, which a consulting company painstakingly picked through to cherry-pick examples of sightings from outside of the primary critical habitat. See Table 2 which extends through pages 31-36 of the petition, plus Appendix A on "eBird data."

From various discussions both here on OBOL and in sidebar discussions, it should be evident that many erroneous reports could slip through eBird filters. At least for reports in the USA, the filters are just set up by state and county. The filters are not currently set up to take account of ecoregions or more detailed habitat types, below the county level.
When you have reports of a species that's expected in a given county, those reports will not necessarily get any attention from an eBird reviewer, even if they're reported from bizarre habitat. I've mentioned some examples of this, including reports of Barrow's Goldeneyes at Ankeny NWR, a Vesper Sparrow supposedly on a wire in downtown Corvallis, etc., generally with no details to support the record. Currently if you look at June sightings of Hermit Thrushes in the Willamette Valley region, you'll see a cluster in downtown Salem -- likely innocent mistakes by birders who meant to tick Swainson's Thrush, but they didn't get flagged for review because Hermit Thrushes are regular in June at higher elevations in the same county.

Yellow-billed Cuckoos in Arizona seem to be a similar case. I looked through a bunch of the eBird reports cited as "evidence" by the consulting company, and nearly all of them gave no details. Many appeared to be incidental on checklists where the birders were seeking local "specialties" in e.g. Madeira Canyon.

In addition, locations of reports can be mismapped (like the recent example of Harlequin Ducks supposedly in downtown Independence, or Canada Jays on Kiger Island south of Corvallis). How many of those YBCU reports were just carelessly mapped for whatever spot someone happened to be in when they got on their mobile app?

It would certainly be helpful if eBird reviewers can come forward to comment on how likely it is that such reports and their locations were reviewed with any degree of rigor. In private discussions with individual eBird reviewers, I've sometimes heard frank statements regarding the weakness of the data for this type of issue. "You shouldn't expect too much from a mostly volunteer-run operation," etc.

But to be of any use in protecting Western YBCUs, those kind of statements, from people who have direct experience in the eBird review process, need to be on the record by 9 PM tomorrow.

I think Rich Hoyer is one of the Arizona reviewers, so if anyone's able to get his ear on short notice, please do so. Perhaps the folks at "eBird Central" could also persuaded to chime in with a sober assessment of the applicability of eBird ticks for this type of issue.

Thanks,
Joel

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis


From: "clearwater" <clearwater@peak.org>
To: "Midvalley Birding Midvalley" <birding@midvalleybirding.org>
Cc: "Oregon Birders OnLine" <obol@freelists.org>
Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 1:25:21 PM
Subject: [midvalleybirds] [obol] YB Cuckoo at Grand Island, Yamhill County -- good reminder of comment deadline!

In addition to being a sighting of interest for local birders, this also serves timely reminder that comments are due on the proposal to de-list Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo as a federal endangered species.

While detections of in our region have become extremely rare, recent detections such as one and others in recent years from the Sandy River Delta area near Portland give hope that cuckoos from the endangered population in California might move northward. They are late migrants, so June is the best time to listen and watch in appropriate habitat.

Delisting would threaten the California population, which is the best hope for cuckoos to re-establish in the Willamette Valley. You can find further information at:
https://www.federalregister.go...

Public comments on this proposed action are due by June, 29, 2019. Please visit:
https://www.regulations.gov/do...


* From : Robert Lockett <robert.s.lockett@xxxxxxxxx>
* Date : Tue, 25 Jun 2019 10:39:26 -0700

Ed McVicker and I just saw (at 10:02 am) a Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the greenway
at Grand Isle, Yamhill County. It didn™t call despite playback. The Greenway is
accessed from SE Upper Island Road.

Bob Lockett


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis


_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding@midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: YB Cuckoo at Grand Island, Yamhill County -- good reminder of comment deadline!
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 15:39 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
P.s. More timely than I realized ... 

The deadline for comments is a minute before midnight Eastern Time tomorrow (June 26, 2019), so 8:59 PM tomorrow.

I must have read the "6" in "26" upside-down when I wrote this up for the Corvallis Audubon newsletter in April. -- joel


From: "clearwater"
To: "Midvalley Birding Midvalley"
Cc: "Oregon Birders OnLine"
Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 1:25:21 PM
Subject: [obol] YB Cuckoo at Grand Island, Yamhill County -- good reminder of comment deadline!

In addition to being a sighting of interest for local birders, this also serves timely reminder that comments are due on the proposal to de-list Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo as a federal endangered species.

While detections of in our region have become extremely rare, recent detections such as one and others in recent years from the Sandy River Delta area near Portland give hope that cuckoos from the endangered population in California might move northward. They are late migrants, so June is the best time to listen and watch in appropriate habitat.

Delisting would threaten the California population, which is the best hope for cuckoos to re-establish in the Willamette Valley. You can find further information at:
https://www.federalregister.go...

Public comments on this proposed action are due by June, 29, 2019. Please visit:
https://www.regulations.gov/do...


* From : Robert Lockett
* Date : Tue, 25 Jun 2019 10:39:26 -0700

Ed McVicker and I just saw (at 10:02 am) a Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the greenway
at Grand Isle, Yamhill County. It didn™t call despite playback. The Greenway is
accessed from SE Upper Island Road.

Bob Lockett


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding@midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: YB Cuckoo at Grand Island, Yamhill County -- good reminder of comment deadline!
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 15:25 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
In addition to being a sighting of interest for local birders, this also serves timely reminder that comments are due on the proposal to de-list  Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo as a federal endangered species.

While detections of in our region have become extremely rare, recent detections such as one and others in recent years from the Sandy River Delta area near Portland give hope that cuckoos from the endangered population in California might move northward. They are late migrants, so June is the best time to listen and watch in appropriate habitat.

Delisting would threaten the California population, which is the best hope for cuckoos to re-establish in the Willamette Valley. You can find further information at:
https://www.federalregister.go...

Public comments on this proposed action are due by June, 29, 2019. Please visit:
https://www.regulations.gov/do...


* From : Robert Lockett
* Date : Tue, 25 Jun 2019 10:39:26 -0700

Ed McVicker and I just saw (at 10:02 am) a Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the greenway
at Grand Isle, Yamhill County. It didn™t call despite playback. The Greenway is
accessed from SE Upper Island Road.

Bob Lockett


--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis


_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding@midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: YB Cuckoo
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 12:41 pm
From: robert.s.lockett AT gmail.com
 
Ed McVicker and I just saw (at 10:02 am) a Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the greenway at Grand Isle, Yamhill County. It didn™t call despite playback. The Greenway is accessed from SE Upper Island Road.
Bob Lockett

Sent from my iPhonePOST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Semipalmated Sandpiper, but no Hudsonian Godwit at high tide SJCR &TrestleBay- Fort Stevens SP
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 3:42 am
From: davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com
 
24 June 2018
Fort Stephens State Park, Clatsop County

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
My younger daughter Rayna and I ventured off to the South Jetty of the Columbia River this evening before and during high tide, after learning earlier in the day of Owen's observation of Hudsonian Godwit (via Mike P.; thanks to you both!) on the flats of Trestle Bay during the earlier low tide.

We started out at the Salacornia flats and tidal channels off of Parking Lot C. at the South Jetty of the Columbia River. There were zero shorebirds, but when we left area, the water was just beginning to flow from under the jetty into the channel that fills the west pond and back channels. Otherwise, in abundance were lots of pretty estuary flowers and plants and Savanna Sparrow songs to brighten our day. Of particular interest to Rayna were the many small crabs concentrated in the remaining few pools dotted throughout the network
of the tidal channels that fracture the lowland pocket.

At Parking lot D we headed out the boardwalk to the Trestle Bay beach past the optimistically named wildlife viewing bunker. The mudflats were submerged, but knowing that shorebirds often stage at high tide east towards the end of the spit, we headed that direction. We weren't disappointed, as peeps and five Whimbrel were roosting at the peninsula terminus. Among the 60 WESTERN SANDPIPER adults was a single adult SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER that afforded great looks in the low light. The entire flock was quite approachable, even come back once flushed after a dog and walker passed between us and the flock.

As we watched the shorebirds, a flock of 10 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS flapped and soared in from the east, circled around the bay, and then set down on the water near the island south of the bunker. This is the first I have ever seen them this far down the Columbia. They proceeded to form a scrimmage line and feed in shallows of the west Trestle Bay.

When we left we paused to listen to the evening chorus in the pine and spruce woodlands where the boardwalk passes through. A YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER was singing unseen, but loudly there that reminded me of the Myrtle Warbler song, but without a visual, I will not be certain. Phil P. I believe was asking recently about Yellow-rumped Warbler breeding status along the pine forests of the coastal lowlands of Oregon, and so here is another data point.

We ended the day with a brief stop at the Hammond Boat Basin so that I could check on the rock walls surrounding it for high-tide roosting shorebirds. I found no shorebirds roosting there, perhaps because of the immature Bald Eagle perched atop the rocks of the upriver jaw of the rock piles.

Birding with an 8 and half year-old requires a flexibility of expectations regarding my personal birding interests and her Rayna interests. Today was no exception, but we both came away quite satisfied. She spotted the sandpiper tracks I later photographed for her and while doing so noticed that I could actually see in the substrate the imprint of the semipalmations (webbing between the toe-bases) of the Western Sandpipers that had passed across the sandy mud there.

David
David C. BaileySeaside, Oregon

David



Subject: Hudsonian Godwit @ 3 Crabs (Clallam County)
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 0:18 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
This from Washington State Tweeters. I guess it qualifies as an invasion.

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Richard Baltierra <wolfbaltierra@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, Jun 24, 2019 at 10:03 PM
Subject: [Tweeters] Hudsonian Godwit @ 3 Crabs (Clallam County)
To: <tweeters@u.washington.edu>


I found a Hudsonian Godwit today at Three Crabs beach access near Sequim in Clallam county. It was loosely associated with 2 Marbled Godwits. Interestingly another HUGO was also found today in Oregon. Photos are included in my eBird checklist:https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
RJ BaltierraPullman, WA

_______________________________________________

Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Hudsonian Godwit from today
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 22:45 pm
From: oschmidt AT att.net
 
Trestle Bay, Clatsop County, around noon today.  With a group of mostly Whimbrels and a few Marbled Godwits, a small flock of Western Sandpipers some in mostly alternate plumage.  From Parking Lot D, across the mudflats fairly close to the trestle.  The bay past the halfway point is much muddier than the sandy near side.  Kiley Elizalde Schmidt.

oschmidt@att.net
Monday, June 24, 2019



Subject: Coos Catbird 6/24/19
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 18:13 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
Still around at Millicoma singing out in open from top of willow at 0515. I was there late, 0615, on Sunday AM and didn™t see it. I waited 10 minutes then finally heard a few calls from the dense blackberry nearby the willow. Day 13 today.
Yesterday at the pond along Hwy 42S near Coquille the six A WIGEON were still around but the GW TEAL were not present nor were there any shorebirds
Merry early migration!Tim RCoos Bay



Subject: June 24 eBird RBA
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 17:36 pm
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
*** Species Summary:

Greater White-fronted Goose (1 Crook)
Cackling Goose (1 Multnomah)
Common Goldeneye (2 Grant, 1 Tillamook)
Black Swift (1 Tillamook)
Cassin's Auklet (2 Columbia)
Least Flycatcher (1 Wallowa)
Gray Flycatcher (1 Wallowa)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (3 Lane)
Lincoln's Sparrow (1 Multnomah)
Baltimore Oriole (1 Harney)

---------------------------------------------
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 24, 2019 11:26 by Charles Gates
- Houston Lakes, Crook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Photo "

Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 11:02 by Duke Tufty
- Vanport Wetlands, Multnomah, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Continuing "

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 13:22 by Jules Evens
- Manzanita, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "One adult male at Nehalem Water Treatment Pond #1. Odd timing, but eat ID. Added 6/24/19"

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 16:58 by David DuBois
- Seneca Sewage Lagoon (Restricted Access), Grant, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Male just starting to molt into eclipse. Continuing. "

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 16:58 by Rachel Bonafilia
- Seneca Sewage Lagoon (Restricted Access), Grant, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Male just starting to molt into eclipse. Continuing. "

Black Swift (Cypseloides niger) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 09:10 by Conor Scotland
- Holly Heights, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Very high flying bird. Drawn back, pointed wings of a swift. All dark plumage. Could not make out tail shape due to distance. The bird spent much of it's time gliding, interspersed with occasional wingbeats as it made semi-circular foraging passes, moving north. The wingbeats were much slower and more languid than those of VASW (though still rapidly swift-like).

Seems awfully late for this bird, though I'm not very familiar with their status in Oregon. I don't think it could be anything else though."

Cassin's Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) (1)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 08:00 by Becky Kent
- Prescott, Columbia, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "This bird was originally seen from Port of Kalama Property north of Steelscape where we had some decent looks at it with bins not too far out in the river. After maybe 10 minutes it flew across the river and landed in the water just off the community of Prescott where we were not able to locate it even with a scope. With bins we saw an very small all gray alcid with little or no neck on the water. As it drifted closer, photos were obtained with a phone through bins. In flight a pale gray belly was observed. Becky will add photos. We were astounded to see this bird this far upstream on the Columbia."

Cassin's Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) (1)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 08:00 by Russell Koppendrayer
- Prescott, Columbia, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "This bird was originally seen from Port of Kalama Property north of Steelscape where we had some decent looks at it with bins not too far out in the river. After maybe 10 minutes it flew across the river and landed in the water just off the community of Prescott where we were not able to locate it even with a scope. With bins we saw an very small all gray alcid with little or no neck on the water. As it drifted closer, photos were obtained with a phone through bins. In flight a pale gray belly was observed. Becky will add photos. We were astounded to see this bird this far upstream on the Columbia."

Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 10:31 by Shawneen Finnegan
- Minam State Park, Wallowa, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Heard singing Che-bek multiple times."

Gray Flycatcher (Empidonax wrightii) (2)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 07:27 by Kathleen Krall
- (45.4150,-116.9472), Wallowa, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Bobbing tail down. Two part song. Photos. "

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (2)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 14:30 by Jennifer Haynes
- Mt. Pisgah Aboretum, Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "The birds have been seen in this area for a few years and are believed to be successfully nesting here (see observations by Dennis Arendt). The nest is far enough off trail that getting a photo is difficult, but the angry, whiny call and song are easy to identify. The birds were heard not seen in the buckbrush area described by Dennis. A male and female were seen by me in the buckbrush area off of trail 6 on April 26."

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (2)
- Reported Jun 24, 2019 08:21 by Forest Tomlinson
- Mt. Pisgah--SE access (Ridgeway Rd.), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Heard only - Call note was given repeatedly from within a thicket that was tucked back in the oaks at the location where these birds have been previously reported. Note was thin and high pitched, given repeatedly with varying two and three syllables. There were two individuals calling. I assume they were keeping track of their whereabouts."

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (4)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 07:45 by Dennis Arendt
- Mt. Pisgah--SE access (Ridgeway Rd.), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 5 Photos
- Comments: "Two adults feeding two almost adult sized young birds in the nest. They have nested here last year. This is the first confirmed successful (so far) nesting in this area. Video of young birds and nest was made. Some still short will be posted later on eBird."

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 12:47 by Anne Sammis & Eric Gropp
- Powell Butte Nature Park, Multnomah, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Juvenile, begging from SAVS adults"

Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) (2)
- Reported Jun 17, 2019 15:45 by Laurie S
- OR - Malheur The Narrows - 33468 Sodhouse Ln, Princeton US-OR (43.2580,-118.9569), Harney, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Male and female in plain sight"*** Species Summary:

Greater White-fronted Goose (1 Crook)
Cackling Goose (1 Multnomah)
Common Goldeneye (2 Grant, 1 Tillamook)
Black Swift (1 Tillamook)
Cassin's Auklet (2 Columbia)
Least Flycatcher (1 Wallowa)
Gray Flycatcher (1 Wallowa)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (3 Lane)
Lincoln's Sparrow (1 Multnomah)
Baltimore Oriole (1 Harney)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Oregon Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Oregon. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 24, 2019 11:26 by Charles Gates
- Houston Lakes, Crook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Photo "

Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 11:02 by Duke Tufty
- Vanport Wetlands, Multnomah, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Continuing "

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 13:22 by Jules Evens
- Manzanita, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "One adult male at Nehalem Water Treatment Pond #1. Odd timing, but eat ID. Added 6/24/19"

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 16:58 by David DuBois
- Seneca Sewage Lagoon (Restricted Access), Grant, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Male just starting to molt into eclipse. Continuing. "

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 16:58 by Rachel Bonafilia
- Seneca Sewage Lagoon (Restricted Access), Grant, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Male just starting to molt into eclipse. Continuing. "

Black Swift (Cypseloides niger) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 09:10 by Conor Scotland
- Holly Heights, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Very high flying bird. Drawn back, pointed wings of a swift. All dark plumage. Could not make out tail shape due to distance. The bird spent much of it's time gliding, interspersed with occasional wingbeats as it made semi-circular foraging passes, moving north. The wingbeats were much slower and more languid than those of VASW (though still rapidly swift-like).

Seems awfully late for this bird, though I'm not very familiar with their status in Oregon. I don't think it could be anything else though."

Cassin's Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) (1)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 08:00 by Becky Kent
- Prescott, Columbia, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "This bird was originally seen from Port of Kalama Property north of Steelscape where we had some decent looks at it with bins not too far out in the river. After maybe 10 minutes it flew across the river and landed in the water just off the community of Prescott where we were not able to locate it even with a scope. With bins we saw an very small all gray alcid with little or no neck on the water. As it drifted closer, photos were obtained with a phone through bins. In flight a pale gray belly was observed. Becky will add photos. We were astounded to see this bird this far upstream on the Columbia."

Cassin's Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) (1)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 08:00 by Russell Koppendrayer
- Prescott, Columbia, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "This bird was originally seen from Port of Kalama Property north of Steelscape where we had some decent looks at it with bins not too far out in the river. After maybe 10 minutes it flew across the river and landed in the water just off the community of Prescott where we were not able to locate it even with a scope. With bins we saw an very small all gray alcid with little or no neck on the water. As it drifted closer, photos were obtained with a phone through bins. In flight a pale gray belly was observed. Becky will add photos. We were astounded to see this bird this far upstream on the Columbia."

Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 10:31 by Shawneen Finnegan
- Minam State Park, Wallowa, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Heard singing Che-bek multiple times."

Gray Flycatcher (Empidonax wrightii) (2)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 07:27 by Kathleen Krall
- (45.4150,-116.9472), Wallowa, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Bobbing tail down. Two part song. Photos. "

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (2)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 14:30 by Jennifer Haynes
- Mt. Pisgah Aboretum, Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "The birds have been seen in this area for a few years and are believed to be successfully nesting here (see observations by Dennis Arendt). The nest is far enough off trail that getting a photo is difficult, but the angry, whiny call and song are easy to identify. The birds were heard not seen in the buckbrush area described by Dennis. A male and female were seen by me in the buckbrush area off of trail 6 on April 26."

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (2)
- Reported Jun 24, 2019 08:21 by Forest Tomlinson
- Mt. Pisgah--SE access (Ridgeway Rd.), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Heard only - Call note was given repeatedly from within a thicket that was tucked back in the oaks at the location where these birds have been previously reported. Note was thin and high pitched, given repeatedly with varying two and three syllables. There were two individuals calling. I assume they were keeping track of their whereabouts."

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) (4)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 07:45 by Dennis Arendt
- Mt. Pisgah--SE access (Ridgeway Rd.), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 5 Photos
- Comments: "Two adults feeding two almost adult sized young birds in the nest. They have nested here last year. This is the first confirmed successful (so far) nesting in this area. Video of young birds and nest was made. Some still short will be posted later on eBird."

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 12:47 by Anne Sammis & Eric Gropp
- Powell Butte Nature Park, Multnomah, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Juvenile, begging from SAVS adults"

Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) (2)
- Reported Jun 17, 2019 15:45 by Laurie S
- OR - Malheur The Narrows - 33468 Sodhouse Ln, Princeton US-OR (43.2580,-118.9569), Harney, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Male and female in plain sight"



Subject: Coast Shorebirds
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 17:35 pm
From: jdanielfarrar AT gmail.com
 
On Sunday I saw exactly one shorebird (not counting snowies, which are lovely shorebirds) on the beach between Siltcoos River, Lane co. and Tahkenitch Cr, Douglas co. It was a WESTERN SANDPIPER. Today I saw multiple flocks, mostly in the Oregon Dunes Overlook area of Douglas county. Early around 8ish I saw 3 groups of Westerns in flocks of 6, 8, and 22. Also one SANDERLING. On the way back through that area around 11 there was a flock of 41 WESTERNS. There were 3 SANDERLING down by Tahkenitch Cr. One GREATER YELLOWLEGS was flying around Siltcoos estuary around 7.Daniel Farrar
Dunes City, Oregon
jdanielfarrar@gmail.com



Subject: GWF Goose in Central OR
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 16:59 pm
From: cgates326 AT gmail.com
 
I found a Greater White-fronted Goose at Houston Lake today in Crook
County. It's possible this is the same individual that was seen on 5/29.
There is a lot of deep grass and many places for a goose to hide. If so,
it may be injured and might not have been able to make the journey
north. I only know of one other June record for WF Goose in Central
Oregon and that was June 7th, 2018 by Craig Miller at the Crooked River
Wetlands. There are no July records for this species of which I'm aware
so I'll check for it on July 1.

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

--
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.
Mark Twain

Chuck Gates
Prineville Bird Club
541-280-4957
Powell Butte,
Central Oregon Oregon Birding Site Guide
http://www.ecaudubon.org/birdi...
Oregon County Checklists
http://www.ecaudubon.org/count...


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: RBA Hudsonian Godwit
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 16:14 pm
From: oschmidt AT att.net
 
...... Trestle Bay, Clatsop County, one in alternate plumage. About noon. Kiley Elizalde Schmidt.

Sent from my iPhone
POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Re: Fwd: Mountain Quail
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 15:22 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
I think Birds of Oregon, that famous reference from long-ago 2003, is pretty good on Mountain Quail in Oregon.


Alan Contrerasacontrer56@gmail.comEugene, Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com



On Jun 24, 2019, at 1:19 PM, Lars Norgren <larspernorgren@gmail.com> wrote:This is good to know, and not a real surprise. I only made the statement because the very lengthy account in Birds of North America , from the Cornell Lab, which l paid for, makes no mention of the Oregon literature. It wouldn't surpriseme if many of the blank spots in the Cornell account of Mountain Quail( and there are a lot) might be filled if the author(s) had checked the Oregon research. There are lots of citations in the lengthy Cornell account, the most recent l could find being 1998. So the Sapsucker brand is no guarantee of cutting edge ornithology. This is sort of disappointing. The advantage of a digital reference is supposed to be it's up to date content.
On Mon, Jun 24, 2019, 12:28 PM <clearwater@peak.org> wrote:
Dave Budeau noticed this morning's commentary from Lars Norgren on Mountain Quail research, and asked me to forward some comments on ODFW's role in research on this species:


On Mon, 2019-06-24 at 10:33 -0700, Dave Budeau wrote:


... I believe an argument can be made that over the 20 years (1997-2017] ODFW invested more in the conservation, and understanding of mountain quail ecology, than any other entity within the range of the bird.


This effort began in earnest in 1997 with significant ODFW financial support of Dr. Michael Pope™s work, which resulted in many peer-reviewed scientific publications, and continued with an active ODFW trap and translocation effort from 2001 - 2017 which supported grad students in OR, WA, and ID.


For those with a genuine interest in mountain quail, a simple search in Google Scholar with the words Oregon mountain quail will locate several of these studies.


Regarding the simultaneous multi-clutches, in Oregon almost half the mountain quail nests were incubated by males, males generally incubated larger clutches, and the males hatched slightly more chicks (see a summary at:
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.o...


POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org

JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol

Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Re: Fwd: Mountain Quail
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 15:20 pm
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
This is good to know, and not a real surprise. I only made the statement because the very lengthy account in Birds of North America , from the Cornell Lab, which l paid for, makes no mention of the Oregon literature. It wouldn't surpriseme if many of the blank spots in the Cornell account of Mountain Quail( and there are a lot) might be filled if the author(s) had checked the Oregon research. There are lots of citations in the lengthy Cornell account, the most recent l could find being 1998. So the Sapsucker brand is no guarantee of cutting edge ornithology.   This is sort of disappointing. The advantage of a digital reference is supposed to be it's up to date content.
On Mon, Jun 24, 2019, 12:28 PM <clearwater@peak.org> wrote:
Dave Budeau noticed this morning's commentary from Lars Norgren on Mountain Quail research, and asked me to forward some comments on ODFW's role in research on this species:


On Mon, 2019-06-24 at 10:33 -0700, Dave Budeau wrote:


... I believe an argument can be made that over the 20 years (1997-2017] ODFW invested more in the conservation, and understanding of mountain quail ecology, than any other entity within the range of the bird.


This effort began in earnest in 1997 with significant ODFW financial support of Dr. Michael Pope™s work, which resulted in many peer-reviewed scientific publications, and continued with an active ODFW trap and translocation effort from 2001 - 2017 which supported grad students in OR, WA, and ID.


For those with a genuine interest in mountain quail, a simple search in Google Scholar with the words Oregon mountain quail will locate several of these studies.


Regarding the simultaneous multi-clutches, in Oregon almost half the mountain quail nests were incubated by males, males generally incubated larger clutches, and the males hatched slightly more chicks (see a summary at:
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.o...


POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org

JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...

OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol

Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Fwd: Mountain Quail
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 14:28 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Dave Budeau noticed this morning's commentary from Lars Norgren on Mountain Quail research, and asked me to forward some comments on ODFW's role in research on this species:

On Mon, 2019-06-24 at 10:33 -0700, Dave Budeau wrote:

... I believe an argument can be made that over the 20 years (1997-2017] ODFW invested more in the conservation, and understanding of mountain quail ecology, than any other entity within the range of the bird.

This effort began in earnest in 1997 with significant ODFW financial support of Dr. Michael Pope™s work, which resulted in many peer-reviewed scientific publications, and continued with an active ODFW trap and translocation effort from 2001 - 2017 which supported grad students in OR, WA, and ID.

For those with a genuine interest in mountain quail, a simple search in Google Scholar with the words Oregon mountain quail will locate several of these studies.

Regarding the simultaneous multi-clutches, in Oregon almost half the mountain quail nests were incubated by males, males generally incubated larger clutches, and the males hatched slightly more chicks (see a summary at:
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.o...

POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Re: 2019 AOS Supplement
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 14:03 pm
From: whoffman AT peak.org
 
Hi -


Thanks for the heads-up. The link in the first paragraph unfortunately brings up last year's supplement. The summary in your link, prepared for Birding magazine does not discuss several of the proposals under consideration, so I imagine they were not accepted. I did not expect Harlan's Hawk to be split off, but I was hopeful about the proposal for apostrophe-free names. The NACC committee members' comments should be posted before long (anonymous, likely) on the AOS website and so we can get some insight into their thinking.
Wayne
On 6/24/2019 10:25:21 AM, Bob Archer <rabican1@gmail.com> wrote:Hi:
http://blog.aba.org/2019/06/ao...
Northern Fulmar is still one species. AOS agrees that there are three White-winged Scoter species, look for Stejneger's now as a species not a subspecies. Bummer that they left 's at the end of bird names. Harlan's (Harlan) Hawk is still a Red-tailed.

Bob ArcherPDX



Subject: Hummingbirds
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 13:35 pm
From: sandyleapt AT comcast.net
 
Hi all,

the hummingbirds in my garden are ignoring the feeder in favor of perennial flowers I grow.

Has anyone in the Portland area been seeing Calliope Hummingbirds? I haven't seen one in my garden for close to 10 years. Recently (yesterday) I have seen, three times now, a tiny, pastel rufous-colored hummingbird slipping among the flowers, its favorite plant being a Centrantus ruber that is in full bloom. Its so much smaller than the Rufous and Anna's hummingbirds it stands out. I suspect it is an immature male Calliope. Perhaps I can get a photo, its been around a week or more, I should have written the first and second sighting on the calendar, its just I didn't expect to see it again.

Other birds: I now have a flock of bushtits in the garden after just having two for so long. I am making the assumption this is a pair of adults with fledglings.

Combine bushtits, black-capped chickadees and hummingbirds and the back garden is a pretty lively place.

Cheers
Sandy Leaptrott
NE Portland



Subject: 2019 AOS Supplement
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 9:25 am
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
Hi:
http://blog.aba.org/2019/06/ao...
Northern Fulmar is still one species. AOS agrees that there are three White-winged Scoter species, look for Stejneger's now as a species not a subspecies. Bummer that they left 's at the end of bird names. Harlan's (Harlan) Hawk is still a Red-tailed.

Bob ArcherPDX



Subject: Mountain Quail
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 8:54 am
From: larspernorgren AT gmail.com
 
The first three comprehensive studies of the species, presumably funded by state fish and game agencies, were not published, and all the data from two of the studies is lost. Paul's revelation of simultaneous double-clutching is fascinating. I believe this was best documented in Idaho, where the species is in serious trouble. I suspect the life histories vary significantly depending on geography. The species nests from sea level to 3,000m and in areas of 150mm to 3,000mm precipitation.    A sad commentary on ODF&W that a fortune was spent in my lifetime trying to introduce exotic game birds to the Oregon Coast Range, but no serious research ever focused on the species fully adapted to this environment. A Mountain Quail was in my yard yesterday morning. Funny what a high percentage of detections l make here on Sundays(l have worked most Saturdays the past 27 years, and start earlier than weekdays). I generally don't detect any in the month of June. Incubation is 24-25 days, nearly 10 percent longer than the much bigger domestic chicken. I have seen downy young twice, both times July 1/2.   Heavy spring rain improves breeding success in southern California, has the opposite effect in northern Oregon. Seven western Washington Counties are now officially in a state of drought, but western Oregon is about normal. One recent warm dry spring resulted in me seeing dozens of Mountain Quail every visit to Marys Peak in July and August that year.lpn



Subject: Re: Mountain Quail have hatched
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 22:12 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
Pam,
You perhaps know that Mountain Quail have a special reproductive strategy. The female lays two clutches of eggs in two nests. It takes a month. Then she incubates one clutch and her mate incubates the other.
This is their insurance policy if something happens to one nest. They do this instead of doing one nest and if something happens to it, renesting.
So maybe your female got her clutch hatched first and the male is still incubating?
Paul Sullivan
From: YamhillBirders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:YamhillBirders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, June 23, 2019 7:44 PM
To: OBOL <obol@freelists.org>; YamhillBirders <YamhillBirders@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [YamhillBirders] Mountain Quail have hatched

Today I got home about 1PM and was greeted at the door by my husband, who said I had to see the Quail. From the kitchen window we saw one, presumably female, quail and 8 or 9 tiny chicks.
She made herself broad and low to the ground and all the chicks found a place under her wings and body. Her shape was like a curling stone with a broad tail added on. Her crest feather was down flat. These birds disappear without going away.
My husband sees Quail from his shop behind the house, more often than I do, and I agree with his conclusion that the male is missing. Normally a foray into the open areas at this end of the yard would include a male to stand watch. I think that may be why the female spent an hour or so sheltering the chicks on their way to forage under the cover of low shrubs.
Pamela Johnston, outside McMinnville
__._,_.___



Subject: Mountain Quail have hatched
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 21:44 pm
From: shovzan AT gmail.com
 
Today I got home about 1PM and was greeted at the door by my husband, who said I had to see the Quail. From the kitchen window we saw one, presumably female, quail and 8 or 9 tiny chicks.
She made herself broad and low to the ground and all the chicks found a place under her wings and body. Her shape was like a curling stone with a broad tail added on. Her crest feather was down flat. These birds disappear without going away.
My husband sees Quail from his shop behind the house, more often than I do, and I agree with his conclusion that the male is missing. Normally a foray into the open areas at this end of the yard would include a male to stand watch. I think that may be why the female spent an hour or so sheltering the chicks on their way to forage under the cover of low shrubs.
Pamela Johnston, outside McMinnville



Subject: Just a warning about a Bend hotel
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 20:19 pm
From: greenfant AT hotmail.com
 
I dont want to go into the nasty details, but pretty much everything valuable I own was stolen out of my motel room at the Shilo Inn in Bend while taking out an Audubon group from Florida. Avoid if you can.

I dont know why, but I continued the tour. We found 191 species in 7 days of birding, with many of the expected birds. Unusual were several Pacific Loons off shore in Seaside and off Silver Point, a drake Common Goldeneye in Tillamook
and an Eastern Kingbird at the Detroit Flats. A very drab singing solitary vireo was at Malheur HQ, presumed to be a Cassins, but I have not seen the pix on a good enough screen to judge.


Stefan Schlick
Hillsboro, OR



Subject: #9 backyard fledgling in McMinnville
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 19:12 pm
From: paultsullivan AT onlinenw.com
 
9. Spotted Towhee “ 6/238. Lesser Goldfinch “ 6/4
7. Robin “ 5/31
6. House Finch “ 5/31
5. Starling - 5/28
4. Bushtit - 5/25
3. Dark-eyed Junco “ 5/21
2. Purple Finch - 5/20
1. Bewick™s Wren - 5/20
Ah, Spring
Paul Sullivan
Rummel St
McMinnville, OR



Subject: more on hummers
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 15:45 pm
From: t4c1x AT peak.org
 
While on a walk on the farm earlier this year, I observed something I had never seen before. In a half-acre patch of salmonberry in peak bloom, I saw or heard fifty or sixty (estimated) Rufous Hummingbirds. There were about ten displaying males, and eight to ten hummers within twenty feet of me throughout the area. There may have been even more than I estimated, as there was another acre of the same kind of habitat above me on a ridge.I went back the next day for another look, but the birds were gone. I suspect the occurrence is a one day event, whichhappens each spring at a specific time. Shame on me for not writing down the date of the event, but at least I have some idea of when to be on the watchfor it, as it occurred at the time the salmonberry was in its fullest bloom.
Darrel



Subject: Re: Hybrid Rufous Hummers
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 15:29 pm
From: t4c1x AT peak.org
 
I'm not qualified to speak on hybrid Selasphorus hummers, since my birding on the south coast has been extremely limited. In fact,I can make no claim to ever having seen an Allen's, pure or otherwise. But for years I have wondered about the difference between Rufous and Allen's, primarily because the field guide descriptionsof dive displays do not seem to match with what I have observedat Thornton Creek in LIncoln County. We are well north of the known range of Allen's, yet I consistently see male Rufous doinga shuttle display prior to their dive. Supposedly this trait is typical for Allen's. I have no reason to think these bird are anything other than Rufous..Maybe I am simply misunderstanding the information in the field guides or misinterpreting the display, .The shuttle display seems to be given most frequently by the males when they are right in front of a perched female. I wonder if this behavior by Rufous males has been noted by other observers further north.

Darrel

From: "Robert O'Brien" <baro@pdx.edu>
To: "obol" <obol@freelists.org>
Sent: Sunday, June 23, 2019 10:27:13 AM
Subject: [obol] Hybrid Rufous Hummers

On the subject of hybrid Rufous Hummers, I've been watching feeder hummers here for 45 years+ and in that time have seen huge increasesin numbers but only 2standout, 'unusual' ones.
About 20 years ago i had a bright male Rufous with a green back............ A subadult?About 15 years ago I had an 'obvious' hybrid Rufous/Anna's male. Mostly like a Rufous but with a bright red forehead and intermediate in size.This is a 'known' hybrid, originally illustrated and named as Florescii's Hummingbird by the famous British ornithologist/artist/publisher John Gould in 1861.
Rather dated for some young 'uns of course (1961) but certainly not by my standards.https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def...

Hummers usually stick around feeders awhile, but in both instances they were one observation wonders so no photos were obtained. Darn.
Bob OBrienCarver (SE of Portland) OR



Subject: June 23 eBird RBA
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 14:45 pm
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
*** Species Summary:

Trumpeter Swan (1 Lane)
Black Swift (1 Tillamook)
Black-chinned Hummingbird (1 Crook)
Mew Gull (1 Lane)
Northern Goshawk (1 Benton)
Red-naped Sapsucker (1 Deschutes)
Ash-throated Flycatcher (1 Lane)
Red-eyed Vireo (1 Benton)
Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (2 Lane)
Red Crossbill (Douglas-fir or type 4) (1 Multnomah)
Fox Sparrow (Thick-billed) (1 Jackson)
Fox Sparrow (2 Lane)
Lincoln's Sparrow (3 Lane)
Tricolored Blackbird (1 Union)
Great-tailed Grackle (1 Crook)

---------------------------------------------
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 17:47 by Tye Jeske
- Forcia and Larsen Reservoir, Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Continuing, has become regular at this location."

Black Swift (Cypseloides niger) (1)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 08:13 by Cliff Cordy
- E. Foley Ridge Rd. (45.6725,-123.7999), Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "We both saw this bird well for about a minute. Shape of the wings indicated it was a swift. All dark. It seemed to be a larger than a Vaux's, but there were no other birds around for a direct comparison. The slower rate of the wing beats is how we ruled out Vaux's. For most of the time we watched this bird it glided without flapping. Silent."

Black-chinned Hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri) (1)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 09:30 by Sharon Peters
- 13401 NE Lawson Rd, Crook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Hummingbird with black chin"

Mew Gull (Larus canus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 16:18 by Tye Jeske
- Port of Siuslaw Campground and Marina, Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing late bird resting on dock, first found on June 1, very small, and had clean yellow bull with no markings."

Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) (1)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 14:02 by Jim Fairchild
- Alder Spring tract (restricted access), Benton, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Karan discerned a difference between our diverse single call notes of young STJA, which I attributed the single fairly soft "ke" notes, repeated 3-4 times at ~10 sec. intervals. All other birds were quiet. Then from near same sound source tree top (140ft.) a large accipiter flew north to south. Nearly as large as a RTHA, long tail, rounded wing tips, against the sun white plumose fringes of undertail coverts showing well on either side of tail base. Wingbeat regular but open and almost languorous with the N breeze. Nesting swallows did not announce alert, as common with COHA or SSHA."

Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 09:46 by Danielle Lordi
- Calliope Crossing, Deschutes, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Nest, feeding."

Ash-throated Flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens) (1)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 11:26 by Tom Mickel
- Little Groundhog Mtn USFS Rd #2309 (43.5773,-122.3338), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Calling from rocky hillside above road. I heard one call, Allison heard a second a few minutes later, and then we both heard a couple more calls. Completely unexpected in this high Cascades habitat!"

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 08:22 by William Proebsting
- 44.58107_-123.37359, Benton, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Only a brief encounter of a bird singing a fairly rapid "cheri-cheroo" repetitively for several seconds. Timbre and pattern matched Red-eyed Vireo. Have never heard our usual vireos sing anything remotely similar. Nor Black-headed Grosbeak. Moved through my area, heading north and no further contact."

Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (Loxia curvirostra (type 3)) (3)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 12:00 by Mark Kudrav
- Hwy 242--Pioneer Mailman pullout, Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "(Rare) Crossbills calling burry and softer than the pygmy nuthatch-like Ponderosa type, or the stronger squeakier Douglas Fir-type. I think this is the expected type higher up in the Sisters region."

Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (Loxia curvirostra (type 3)) (3)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 12:00 by Matt Cahill
- Hwy 242--Pioneer Mailman pullout, Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "(Rare) Crossbills calling burry and softer than the pygmy nuthatch-like Ponderosa type, or the stronger squeakier Douglas Fir-type. I think this is the expected type higher up in the Sisters region."

Red Crossbill (Douglas-fir or type 4) (Loxia curvirostra (type 4)) (2)
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 08:04 by Philip Kline
- Larch Mountain, Multnomah, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "The loudest calls in the flock were Type 4 - Douglas Fir based on the shape of their call note on the spectrograph."

Fox Sparrow (Thick-billed) (Passerella iliaca [megarhyncha Group]) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 07:50 by Tim Shelmerdine
- (42.0743,-122.6432), Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Observed one singing in manzanita on slope. "

Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) (3) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 10:27 by Tom Mickel
- Juniper Ridge USFS Rd 2135 (43.5593,-122.3365), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Singing on breeding territory."

Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 09:43 by Tom Mickel
- USFS Rd #439, overlooking unnamed lake (43.5557,-122.3858), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "On nest territory "

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (6) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 07:40 by Torrey Gage-Tomlinson
- Blair Lake Trail (No. 3553), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Appropriate habitat. Singing. At least three pair in different locations. Photos."

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (4) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 10:27 by Tom Mickel
- Juniper Ridge USFS Rd 2135 (43.5593,-122.3365), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Singing on breeding territory. A conservative count."

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (5) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 11:26 by Tom Mickel
- Little Groundhog Mtn USFS Rd #2309 (43.5773,-122.3338), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Singing and chasing each other in a wet meadow on their breeding territory."

Tricolored Blackbird (Agelaius tricolor) (1)
- Reported Jun 23, 2019 09:00 by Valerie Goss
- Back yard, Union, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 1 Photo

Great-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 22, 2019 by Central Oregon Historical Records
- Powell Butte Zalunardo Pond, Crook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: ""Large blackbird. Almost crow-sized. Very long tail twisted to one side making it look vertically oriented instead of horizontal like other blackbirds. And I thought magpies have a long tail... flew in (a fluttery flight trailing that long tail) to the pond by our mailbox, hopped around from boulder to boulder at the south end of the pond with its tail-paddle turned 90 degrees. After 10 minutes flew up and away across Williams Road to the west out of sight. Fun!" Cindy Zalunardo"



Subject: Santiam BBS notes: Good year for Hermit Thrushes, Hammond's Flycatchers
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 14:30 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Hi all,

Daughter Martha and I just got back from running the Santiam Breeding Bird Survey in the western Cascades of Linn County. This route mostly follows the Crabtree Creek drainage from where it starts above Lacomb, then jogs over to the Roaring River drainage, comes out of the hills at the Larwood Bridge, then fishhooks around via a bit of Meridian Rd. and the Snow Peak mainline.

We always camp out the night before the count, on BLM land near Crabtree Lake at the top end of the route, around 3400 ft elevation. When we arrived there last evening at about 5 pm, we were surprised to hear a chorus of 5 or 6 HERMIT THRUSHES, then saw two more hopping along the road. A former BLM staffer who came by to hike the trail with her partner also commented on hearing Hermit Thrushes. Usually we hear a handful at this spot, but normally they're far outnumbered by Swainson's Thrushes and Varied Thrushes. Perhaps lingering snow from this winter's heavy snow caused more Hermit Thrushes to nest slightly lower than usual in the western Cascades.

Along the route we also heard better-than-usual numbers of HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHERS. This can probably be chalked up to recent BLM thinning projects over the past several years, which have produced tracts of relatively open timber, with enough room between trees to suit this species' foraging habits. As usual, we also found PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS in denser/mixed forest, and lots of WILLOW FLYCATCHERS in areas that were clearcut and replanted in the past 8-12 years, and are now at the stage that Willow Flycatchers seem to thrive in.

We only heard two OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHERS along the survey route; one calling from old-growth forest at our campsite last evening didn't make it onto the count. Likewise a NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL that sang at dusk, and briefly again at first light, didn't register his presence for the survey, but we heard two others calling lower down.

We only heard two COMMON NIGHTHAWKS (one "booming" in his mating display dive). Between stops we encountered a RUFFED GROUSE mom watching over at least one tiny chick along the edge of a mostly-overgrown road.

A loose flock of nine or ten VAUX'S SWIFTS skimmed sips of water from the surface of Crabtree Lake in early evening. We also watched several ROUGH-SKINNED NEWT in their aquatic stage lunging like little sharks to grab bites off of a large DRAGONFLY that was floating on the surface (apparently already dead). The wildflowers on the volcanic rock outcrops above the lake are still in peak bloom -- I'll post some photos on Mid-valley Nature in a couple of days when I get time to offload them from my camera.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
_______________________________________________
birding mailing list
birding@midvalleybirding.org
http://midvalleybirding.org/ma...



Subject: Hybrid Rufous Hummers
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 12:23 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
On the subject of hybrid Rufous Hummers, I've been watching feeder hummers here for 45 years+ and in that time have seen huge increasesin numbers but only 2standout, 'unusual' ones.
About 20 years ago i had a bright male Rufous with a green back............ A subadult?About 15 years ago I had an 'obvious' hybrid Rufous/Anna's male. Mostly like a Rufous but with a bright red forehead and intermediate in size.This is a 'known' hybrid, originally illustrated and named as Florescii's Hummingbird by the famous British ornithologist/artist/publisher John Gould in 1861.
Rather dated for some young 'uns of course (1961) but certainly not by my standards.https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def...

Hummers usually stick around feeders awhile, but in both instances they were one observation wonders so no photos were obtained. Darn.
Bob OBrienCarver (SE of Portland) OR



Subject: Baskett Slough car break in?
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 0:08 am
From: barbara.millikan AT gmail.com
 
Someone just posted on the Dallas community bulletin board that they found various items at Baskett Slough. Has anyone had a problem there?The notice is here:https://www.facebook.com/group...



Subject: Lincoln's Sparrow: Lookout Mountain, Hood River County Strike Out
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 23:13 pm
From: rabican1 AT gmail.com
 
In support of Mr Hunter's efforts down south, I decided to check out High Prairie for Lincoln's Sparrows today. High Prairie sits on the north flank of Lookout Mtn, just at the end of the road you can drive up. (45.348046, -121.526652). It is a collection of wet and dry meadows edged by mixed firs. The meadows are of various sizes, from very small to about 4 acres. They sit at about 6100-6200 feet in elevation.
Several of the meadows looked great for Lincoln's but none found. Tons of Chipping sparrows, Juncos, and Pine Siskins.
At 1 pm I was done and went down to about 4800 feet in elevation to check out Horkelai Meadows. There I had Wood Pewees, House Wrens and Lazuli Bunting, no Lincoln's.
Ebird has my sightings.
Bob ArcherPDX



Subject: Least Flycatcher
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 22:24 pm
From: lsg AT surfin-g.com
 
Went to the place one was told of on e-bird We spent about an hour and
saw the bird many times. Tried to put it on e-bird but there was no
place to list it. Not sure why e-bird is so hard to do. It was found
about 500 ft west of the mile post #13 on Cayuse RD. East of Mission, Or.

Larry and Jacque Goodhew Walla Walla

POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Harney County--a picture diary of four days birding
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 20:52 pm
From: atowhee AT gmail.com
 
in early June, from Steens to Devine Canyon, nothing rare...https://atowhee.blog/2019/06/2...
--
Harry Fullerauthor of: San Francisco's Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:https://ecowise.wordpress.com/...
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/... of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com



Subject: Purple Finch and House Finch Silverton duet
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 19:30 pm
From: freemanbecard AT gmail.com
 
We usually only have Purple Finch at our place  but this year, we™ve been
discovered by House Finches. They both are nesting nearby and today I was
able to catch a male of each singing in a duet. Listen to the attached
recording.

Roger Freeman
East of Silverton



Subject: June 22 eBird RBA
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 14:32 pm
From: teresa.hertzel AT gmail.com
 
*** Species Summary:

Blue-winged Teal (2 Jackson)
Common Goldeneye (1 Tillamook)
Least Sandpiper (2 Jackson)
Northern Goshawk (1 Jackson)
Red-naped Sapsucker (1 Deschutes, 1 Klamath)
Eastern Kingbird (1 Crook, 1 Marion)
Bank Swallow (1 Lane)
California Thrasher (3 Jackson)
Grasshopper Sparrow (1 Coos)
Chipping Sparrow (1 Coos)
Fox Sparrow (1 Multnomah)
White-throated Sparrow (1 Klamath)
Sagebrush Sparrow (1 Wasco)
Lincoln's Sparrow (2 Lane)

---------------------------------------------
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 13:45 by Terry Little
- Kirtland Rd.--Ponds, Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Continuing "

Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 13:45 by Joshua Little
- Kirtland Rd.--Ponds, Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Continuing "

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jun 17, 2019 13:20 by Marta Magellan
- Bay City Oyster Company, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Adult male, green head with a white cheek spot, identified by Stefan Schlick. ID photo will be submitted by June, 25"

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 13:45 by Terry Little
- Kirtland Rd.--Ponds, Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Peep, smaller than nearby SPSA with different flight settle, calling in flight which alerted us to it, warm brown coloration, bib. Odd time for one "

Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 13:45 by Joshua Little
- Kirtland Rd.--Ponds, Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Peep, smaller than nearby SPSA with different flight settle, calling in flight which alerted us to it, warm brown coloration, bib. Odd time for one "

Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) (1)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 15:50 by Frank Lospalluto
- (42.1767,-122.8785), Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Begging juvenile at nest"

Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) (1)
- Reported Jun 16, 2019 06:35 by Drew Meyer
- Black Butte Ranch, Deschutes, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Very good look, defintiely a Red-naped. Upper half of body distinctly different from RBSA, being mostly black-and-white with Red confined to crown, throat, and back of head. Noted very crisp white belly, which corroborates red on back of head to eliminate YBSA. In poplars along bike path."

Red-naped Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) (1)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 10:22 by Jeffrey Roth
- Moore Park, Klamath, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "much less red than red-breasted, red top of head and back of neck, black around eyes with white stripe across face, red front of neck with black beliw; the two species seen clearly together, allowing direct comparison; photo to follow in about a week"

Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 18, 2019 12:20 by Stefan Schlick
- Detroit Flats, Marion, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Single bird seen and perched on bare branches, white line on the tail and photos taken"

Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) (3)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 19:20 by Tyler Groo
- Paulina--Dorschied Butte, Crook, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "3 kingbirds "dogfight" in close yard; ID by white terminal tailband, confirm by photo; individual photographed appears to be juv by rounded and lighter head/back, grey on breast and flanks, light color at base of bill."

Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia)
- Reported Jun 16, 2019 16:41 by Christopher Nichols
- Lane, Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

California Thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 09:54 by Trask Colby
- 855 Holton Rd, Talent US-OR (42.2136,-122.8037), Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Singing loudly from top of tree"

California Thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 11:18 by Joshua Little
- stakeout California Thrasher, Talent (2019), Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Continuing, was silent for the first 20 mins then began singing his head off. Stayed out of sight most of the time but I did manage a few poor photos. I™m surely the last Oregon birder to see it, grateful it hung around for me!"

California Thrasher (Toxostoma redivivum) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 11:18 by Terry Little
- stakeout California Thrasher, Talent (2019), Jackson, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Continuing, was silent for the first 20 mins then began singing his head off. Stayed out of sight most of the time but I did manage a few poor photos. I™m surely the last Oregon birder to see it, grateful it hung around for me!"

Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) (1)
- Reported Jun 20, 2019 19:10 by Russ Namitz
- 44008“44862 Highway 242, Myrtle Point US-OR (42.9214,-124.1172), Coos, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Singing. Known to be at location. Long insect buzz song without the extra notes at the end that a Savannah Sparrow has. "

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) (1)
- Reported Jun 20, 2019 19:10 by Russ Namitz
- 44008“44862 Highway 242, Myrtle Point US-OR (42.9214,-124.1172), Coos, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Singing. Known to breed here. "

Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) (2)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 13:54 by William Holton
- Mill Pond Park, Multnomah, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Larger sparrow. Mainly solid dark on tail back and head. Heavy streaking breast, coalesing in somewhat of a central spot. tail held high. Active on the ground. Can move fast. Wooded area with some lawn."

White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) (1)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 05:10 by Martn Lpez Aguilar
- 7Mile, Klamath, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Oh sweet Canada Canada Canada song heard repeatedly just before sunrise and throughout the morning."

Sagebrush Sparrow (Artemisiospiza nevadensis) (1)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 09:00 by William Tice
- Rest Area on Hwy 197, Wasco, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Heard first and repeated song matched playback. Bird seen at about 50 yards: mostly clear whitish breast except small dark center, dark/gray upper parts, white moustach area"

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (6)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 07:40 by John Sullivan
- Blair Lake Trail (No. 3553), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Appropriate habitat. Singing. At least three pair in different locations. Photos."

Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) (6)
- Reported Jun 21, 2019 07:40 by Forest Tomlinson
- Blair Lake Trail (No. 3553), Lane, Oregon
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
- Comments: "Appropriate habitat. Singing. At least three pair in different locations. Photos."

***********



Subject: Re: Coos Grasshopper Sparrow Adios
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 14:07 pm
From: clearwater AT peak.org
 
Some of the Grasshopper Sparrow nesting sites in the Willamette Valley (and even more so in the Umpqua Valley) are on grazing land with livestock, usually cattle. Examples include Ward Butte near Lebanon, along Goodrich Hwy north of Sutherland, and along Belts Rd. south of Brownsville. However none of those sites are regularly mowed for hay. Mowing is far more perilous for ground-nesting birds than livestock (which can be advantageous in other ways, in some circumstances in western Oregon).

Off-hand I can think of a couple of Willamette Valley sites in recent years where Grasshopper Sparrows were detected briefly, then disappeared after a field was mowed.

--
Joel Geier
Camp Adair area north of Corvallis

POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Coos Migrants and Migrants? 6/22/19
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 12:45 pm
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
There is a pond on Hwy 42S about a 1/2 mile from Coquille that I checked out on my way back to Coos Bay this AM. On it there were two GREATER YELLOWLEGS which I assume are early southbound migrants. Also on the pond were six American Wigeon (five males and a female) and three GW Teals (one male, two females). Not sure what to think on their status? We have had nonbreeding A. Wigeon oversummer before but never six birds. The earliest southbound arrivals I know of are in early July and latest "spring" date is 28 June but that was just a single bird. No breeding records. The earliest arrival for GW Teal is 1 July and the latest date is 20 June so these birds could be either or possibly nonbreeders? One breeding record for Green-wings. If these dux are southbound birds (failed breeders or whatever) they are really early or northbound birds- really late!?!
Merry Summertime,Tim RodenkirkCoos Bay



Subject: Re: Coos Grasshopper Sparrow Adios
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 11:06 am
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Fern Ridge sites are not hayed. Now and then they have intended burns.

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

acontrer56@gmail.com

www.alanlcontreras.com



> On Jun 22, 2019, at 8:20 AM, Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
>
> If you drive the Hwy from Myrtle Point to Powers you follow the valley of the South Fork of the Coquille River. This valley is loaded with ranchlands and there are many ag fields with livestock and other fields used for growing hay.
>
> In Wednesday I happened to hear a Grasshopper Sparrow in one of the few fields that hadn™t be cut already for hay or that was being grazed by livestock. This bird species was definitely not on my radar. On Thursday I decided to verify it and easily taped the bird in. Russ Namitz got to hear it later that day. On Friday I only stopped and listened for a minute but didn't hear it. When I got to the field at 0700 this morning they had cut about a quarter of it and would probably have it completely cut in a few hours. Guess I was lucky to hear the bird when I did- this valley wouldn™t be a particularly good spot for this species to breed because of the livestock and haying.
>
> In the Willamette Valley where this species breeds it must be in areas where the grass is not cut for hay- right?
>
> On a more positive note the singing catbird at Millicoma brightened my day pre-sunup. I wonder if it will find a mate? I watched it sing out in the open for a few minutes. It then flew into some dense elderberry next to me, meowed a few times, then flew back to the willow and continued singing- fun stuff!
>
> Merry summertime,
> Tim Rodenkirk
> Coos Bay
POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Re: Coos Grasshopper Sparrow 6/20/19
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 10:41 am
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
David and Darrel et al.

I attached a picture of the grassy field before it was cut today. Tree on
left is a Oregon white oak along main road. More fields to left also on
other side of road (not in photo). On other side of meadow is SF of the
Coquille with forest above. Many Lazuli Buntings in this habitat as well as
both goldfinch species.

The sparrow was a nice surprise for sure!
Tim

On Thu, Jun 20, 2019 at 3:52 PM David Bailey
wrote:

> I am curious about the habitat Tim. Any chance you could snap a few
> landscape photos next time you run by the GRSP spot? Great find! I will be
> listening for them up in Clatsop.
>
> David
>
> On Thu, Jun 20, 2019, 12:04 Tim Rodenkirk wrote:
>
>> Same location as yesterday along Powers Hwy about 3 miles before Powers-
>> I had great looks at it this AM to confirm ID. My second new county bird
>> this spring!
>>
>> Catbird still singing at Millicoma Marsh before sunrise this AM.
>>
>> Happy birding all!
>> Tim R
>> Coos Bay
>>
>



Subject: Re: Yellow Breasted Chat- Pixieland (Lincoln County)
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 10:36 am
From: philliplc AT charter.net
 
I had 2 Chats singing in stereo along the green gateroad early this morning 6/22. Nice find for the area,hopefully they are colonizing there.
Phil


-----------------------------------------From: "Evan Hayduk"
To: "OBOL BIRD LISTSERVE"
Cc:
Sent: Friday June 21 2019 4:44:53PM
Subject: [obol] Yellow Breasted Chat- Pixieland (Lincoln County)


All,




Was early to a volunteer work party at the former Pixieland site (near Otis) and heard, then eventually saw, a Yellow Breasted Chat. A nice surprise out there this morning!





Incidental report here:





https://ebird.org/view/checkli...





Evan Hayduk


Waldport


@gmail.com>



Subject: Coos Grasshopper Sparrow Adios
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 10:21 am
From: timrodenkirk AT gmail.com
 
If you drive the Hwy from Myrtle Point to Powers you follow the valley of the South Fork of the Coquille River. This valley is loaded with ranchlands and there are many ag fields with livestock and other fields used for growing hay.
In Wednesday I happened to hear a Grasshopper Sparrow in one of the few fields that hadn™t be cut already for hay or that was being grazed by livestock. This bird species was definitely not on my radar. On Thursday I decided to verify it and easily taped the bird in. Russ Namitz got to hear it later that day. On Friday I only stopped and listened for a minute but didn't hear it. When I got to the field at 0700 this morning they had cut about a quarter of it and would probably have it completely cut in a few hours. Guess I was lucky to hear the bird when I did- this valley wouldn™t be a particularly good spot for this species to breed because of the livestock and haying.
In the Willamette Valley where this species breeds it must be in areas where the grass is not cut for hay- right?
On a more positive note the singing catbird at Millicoma brightened my day pre-sunup. I wonder if it will find a mate? I watched it sing out in the open for a few minutes. It then flew into some dense elderberry next to me, meowed a few times, then flew back to the willow and continued singing- fun stuff!
Merry summertime,Tim RodenkirkCoos Bay



Subject: Re: Oystercatchers & Orcas
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 3:01 am
From: davidcbaileyoregon AT gmail.com
 
That was awesome. It looks like Bonaparte's Gulls came to the scene towards the end of your video. Was that your impression?
On Thu, Jun 20, 2019, 18:41 Nature's Coast Oregon <info@naturescoast.org> wrote:







A few days ago I was filming a Black Oystercatcher nest on the coast, which would have been perfectly on-topic here ... when suddenly appeared a pod of Orcas just offshore, pulling my camera decidedly off-topic. But since it does start out with the sound of Oystercatchers in the foreground, and I know members here whose interest in nature encompasses many things in addition to birds, I thought I would take a chance and offer a link to the video below, in case other birders might also enjoy seeing a pod of Orcas (having a rather graphic encounter with a Harbor Seal, full disclosure) just a stone's throw from the bird nest.


If I'm fortunate enough to "be there" for the hatch, I'll hope to have some beautiful new Black Oystercatcher footage to share here soon ... but seeing the Orcas served well to remind me that, sometimes, the "other things" I see on my way to watch birds are equally inspiring. So here's the link (scroll down slightly on the page to the Orca image), and I hope others are as amazed to see this incredible natural display as I was. Next time, birds ” I promise.

https://naturescoast.org/


Howard Shippey

South Beach



Subject: Re: Need help with bird ID
Date: Fri Jun 21 2019 22:09 pm
From: joshspice AT gmail.com
 
It doesnt *exactly* match up with PALO but what in the world else could it
be?!

On Fri, Jun 21, 2019, 16:32 sharilyn cohn wrote:

> This bird was seen this afternoon, 6/21/19, at the Charleston (Coos Bay)
> boat docks. Sorry for the poor photo. Can anyone ID it? Thank you so much.
> Sharilyn Cohn
>



Subject: Re: Need help with bird ID
Date: Fri Jun 21 2019 21:38 pm
From: acontrer56 AT gmail.com
 
Looks like a Pacific Loon.


Alan Contrerasacontrer56@gmail.comEugene, Oregon
www.alanlcontreras.com


On Jun 21, 2019, at 7:31 PM, sharilyn cohn <mthcohn@gmail.com> wrote:<what am i.jpg>


American Birding Podcast


 




ABA Recommended

Reviewed December 3, 2018







ABA's FREE Birder's Guide. Get the most recent issue now >>




Contact us.