ABA's Birding News >> Virginia

Virginia bird news by date

Updated on February 27, 2017, 10:55 pm

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27 Feb: @ 22:50:26  Hypothesis re. 2 RHW Luria park and prov rec. ctr.: Falls Church [Stuart via va-bird]
27 Feb: @ 22:01:20  Woodcocks @ Huntley Meadows [Rich Rieger via va-bird]
27 Feb: @ 20:03:12  Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk Addendum [Harry Glasgow via va-bird]
27 Feb: @ 17:25:50  Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk [Harry Glasgow via va-bird]
27 Feb: @ 13:56:45  Loudoun County [Gerco H]
27 Feb: @ 12:11:50  Greater White-fronted Goose at Belvoir Pond, Marshall, Fauquier County [Dave Larsen - Birding]
27 Feb: @ 08:58:47  Breeding Codes into Atlas Portal [Ashley Peele]
27 Feb: @ 02:08:56  Test [Jeff Blalock]
26 Feb: @ 21:57:49 Re: Red-Headed Woodpeckers in Falls Church, VA [Vineeta Anand]
26 Feb: @ 21:36:53  Fwd: eBird Report - Dutch Gap Conservation Area/Henricus Historical Park, Feb 26, 2017 [James Winkelmann]
26 Feb: @ 21:01:31  Pohick Bay this afternoon - lingering Tundra Swans [Howard Wu]
26 Feb: @ 20:47:48  Red-Headed Woodpeckers in Falls Church, VA [janet anderson via va-bird]
26 Feb: @ 17:50:58  Merrimac Farm [Harry Glasgow via va-bird]
26 Feb: @ 16:22:51  American Woodcocks [Scott Byrd via va-bird]
26 Feb: @ 13:47:35  Fw: eBird Report - Occoquan Bay NWR, Feb 26, 2017 [Marc Ribaudo]
26 Feb: @ 13:27:50  Rusty Blackbirds, Union Springs, R'ham County [Kevin Shank]
26 Feb: @ 12:48:56  Lots of ducks! [Linda Millington]
26 Feb: @ 11:34:39  Great Falls Bird Walk 02/26/17 (Fairfasx County) [Dendroica--- via va-bird]
26 Feb: @ 11:20:56  Fw: eBird Report - Grandview Nature Preserve, Feb 25, 2017 [Pete & Charm]
26 Feb: @ 11:07:09  Signs (songs) of spring at Huntley Meadows yesterday, and more book recommendations. [Pam and Ben via va-bird]
26 Feb: @ 10:48:04  Pine Warblers Singing Fairfax Co. [Quinn Emmering]
26 Feb: @ 10:36:08  FOS Pine Warbler Feb. 25--western Albemarle [MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird]
26 Feb: @ 09:40:14  First-of-season turkey gobbling!!!! [MARLENECONDON--- via va-bird]
26 Feb: @ 08:42:01  Wilson's Snipe [Robyn A. Puffenbarger]
25 Feb: @ 21:49:29  scaup off Chippokes Plantation SP, Surry Co., 2/25/17 [nicholas]
25 Feb: @ 19:45:48  Pine Warbler, Union Springs, R'ham County [shaphan@naturefriendmagazine.com]
25 Feb: @ 19:12:24  Banshee Reeks, Loudoun County [Gerco H]
25 Feb: @ 15:17:40  Fwd: eBird Report - Mason Neck State Park, Feb 25, 2017 [Phil Silas via va-bird]
25 Feb: @ 14:12:24  Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship [Joe Coleman]
25 Feb: @ 11:09:50  Sully Woodlands Phoebe and Shrike [Howard Wu]
25 Feb: @ 07:29:49 Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Dixie Sommers via va-bird]
24 Feb: @ 19:46:41  Eagles -Waterfowl: Mason Neck SP; Pohick Bay [Donald Sweig]
24 Feb: @ 09:01:53 Re: Saw-whet Owls, Shenandoah Nat. Park [Diane L via va-bird]
24 Feb: @ 06:25:08  Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County [Brian Taber via va-bird]
23 Feb: @ 20:52:41  Lynchburg Baltimore oriole still here!! New record?? [Ashley Lohr]
23 Feb: @ 20:00:12  The best way to reply to a thread? [Howard Wu]
23 Feb: @ 19:53:31  Woodcocks calling at Difficult Creek Natural Area Preserve [Eric Harrold via va-bird]
23 Feb: @ 19:24:17 Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Dixie Sommers via va-bird]
23 Feb: @ 17:51:18  Florida Trip Part III - Sweetwater Wetlands Gainesville [Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick']
23 Feb: @ 17:19:48 Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Scott Jackson-Ricketts]
23 Feb: @ 10:02:53  Yard Birds - Purple Finch and Fox Sparriw [Gerco H]
22 Feb: @ 18:14:07 Re: Where the Alcids be? [Karen Kearney via va-bird]
22 Feb: @ 17:20:38 Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Bill Hohenstein]
22 Feb: @ 16:25:28 Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Ashley Lohr]
22 Feb: @ 15:45:22  Where the Alcids be? [Lee Atwood via va-bird]
22 Feb: @ 15:18:49  Florida Trip Part II - Tarpon Springs Area [Rowe, Richard A, 'Dick']
22 Feb: @ 12:47:29  eBird -- Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve -- Feb 22, 2017 [Thomas Nardone]
22 Feb: @ 12:46:48  Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County [Brian Taber via va-bird]
22 Feb: @ 09:25:45  Painted Bunting adult male [David Gibson]
22 Feb: @ 09:03:02 Re: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list. [Daniel Joslyn]





Subject: Hypothesis re. 2 RHW Luria park and prov rec. ctr.: Falls Church
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 22:50 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
Hi all:

Last year, I observed a juv. Red-headed woodpecker at the park behind the Providence Rec. Ctr.

I have recently learned that there are 2 RHW at Luria Park.  Likely a breeding pair.

Is it possible that one or both of these woodpeckers have been using the Holmes Run water table
as sort of a singles meeting corridor between the Prov. Rec. Ctr.  and Luria Park.

The water table almost intersects both parks.

Just a thought from my one remaining brain cell.

Good birding all!

Stuart Merrell
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Subject: Woodcocks @ Huntley Meadows
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 22:01 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
Fairfax Co.

Posted up at the "original" Woodcock meadow this evening around 5:30p - thought I might get skunked when I didn't hear anything by six w. overcast skies and no wind...

First peent did not happen until 6;15 then two birds started simultaneously. Third one started on far side of meadow but only picked up flight displays from first two. As I was headed out, another bird was peenting close to or on the bike path. Shined my light that way, but could not find it.

Think this next front might bring in a wave for more action... we'll see.

Rich Rieger
Alexandria
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Subject: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk Addendum
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 20:03 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
I failed to include an important announcement in the Monday Morning Birdwalk report just sent:  The Monday Morning Walk will revert to its summer hours on March 20.  Starting on that date, the walk will begin at 7AM. 
Please forgive the omission.   


Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows
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Subject: Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 17:25 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
The Huntley Meadows Monday Morning Birdwalk attracted another large group of over 25 birders on today's walk.  We detected 45 species, with a number of highlights.  Over 20 Wood Ducks made their appearance after a long absence, and were joined by a pair of Pied-billed Grebes, a Ring-billed Duck, 3 Hermit Thrushes, 35 Rusty Blackbirds, and a large flock of Common Grackles.
Canada Goose  14
Wood Duck  24
Mallard  10
Northern Shoveler  6
Northern Pintail  6
Ring-necked Duck  1
Hooded Merganser  4
Pied-billed Grebe  2
Great Blue Heron  2
Turkey Vulture  1
Bald Eagle  3
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
American Coot  12
Ring-billed Gull  8
gull sp.  2
Mourning Dove  7
Red-headed Woodpecker  6
Red-bellied Woodpecker  15
Downy Woodpecker  8
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  10
Fish Crow  3
crow sp.  2
Carolina Chickadee  9
Tufted Titmouse  10
White-breasted Nuthatch  7
Winter Wren  3
Carolina Wren  6
Golden-crowned Kinglet  7
Eastern Bluebird  6
Hermit Thrush  3
American Robin  4
White-throated Sparrow  20
Song Sparrow  3
Swamp Sparrow  7
Eastern Towhee  5
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  25
Rusty Blackbird  35
Common Grackle  250
American Goldfinch  2

The Monday Morning Birdwalk has been a weekly event at Huntley Meadows since 1985. It takes place every week, rain or shine (except during electrical storms, strong winds, or icy trails), at 8AM (7AM from March  through November), is free of charge, requires no reservation, and is open to all. Birders meet in the parking lot at the Park's entrance at 3701 Lockheed Blvd, Alexandria, VA. Questions should be directed to Park staff during normal business hours at (703)768-2525.

Harry GlasgowFriends of Huntley Meadows Park

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Subject: Loudoun County
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 13:56 pm
From: drgerco AT hotmail.com
 
This morning was interesting bird wise.


A male purple finch was seen at the feeder at home.

An early Eastern Phoebe was heard singing in the yard (it also was reported by my neighbor earlier on eBird).

A couple of Northern Harriers were observed while driving to work.

Brown-headed Cowbirds have been seen in the yard. Likewise more Common Grackles have been seen flying over in the past few days.

Eastern Bluebirds are checking out the various nest boxes in the yard.


Winter or Spring? Who knows what it really is.


Happy birding!


Gerco

Leesburg, VA
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Subject: Greater White-fronted Goose at Belvoir Pond, Marshall, Fauquier County
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 12:11 pm
From: hirundo AT comcast.net
 
When the pond was allowed to refill this fall after the dam repairs were completed, I made regular trips there in anticipation of all the waterfowl that would be attracted. The empty pond had morphed from a series of muddy pools (great for shorebirds) to a grassy meadow with tall weeds. On each visit I was disappointed to find it empty of birds or at most with a pair of Mallards.

After seeing the report from the weekend of a flock of Ring-necked Ducks I headed out there this morning. Yes, there were hundreds of Ring-necks, and even more Canada Geese. Out of this mob I was able to find two Northern Shovelers, a male Wood Duck, a Ruddy Duck, several Buffleheads, several Coots, and a Greater While-fronted Goose. There were at least two Harriers in the adjacent fields.

Dave Larsen
Haymarket

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Breeding Codes into Atlas Portal
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 8:58 am
From: ashpeele AT vt.edu
 
Good morning on this chilly Monday! 



With such unusually warm late winter weather, bird breeding activity is popping up all over VA.  As a result, many breeding codes are showing up on checklists, which is great to see!  However, many of these lists are being entered into the ‘regular’ eBird or Virginia eBird portals.  Please remember that the VA Breeding Bird Atlas project needs any and all of your breeding observations as we enter our second season of the Atlas project. 



If you’re an Atlas volunteer, it’s time to switch your default eBird portal back to the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas (on your smartphone or computer).  If you’re not signed up for the Atlas project, we’d still like to receive your breeding observations!  We’d ask you to also submit any checklists with breeding codes to the Atlas eBird portal.  Don’t forget that you can also shift previously entered checklists into the Atlas portal from your computer.  Just open the checklist, click the ‘Change Portal’ button at the bottom right corner of the screen, and select ‘Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas’ from the dropdown list of portals.



Check out this eBird article, Atlasing vs. eBirding, for more information on when and how to submit breeding observations to the Atlas portal! 



If you have questions about when it is appropriate to submit data to the Atlas, feel free to email myself, your regional coordinator, or post your question to our Facebook page.  For those folks who are already Atlas volunteers, remember to post questions via our Atlas mailing list or Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/group...



Happy birding in this early, incredibly spring-like weather!



Ashley Peele, PhD

Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Coordinator

www.vabba2.org | ebird.org/atlasva

www.facebook.com/vabba2

---

Conservation Management Institute, Virginia Tech

1900 Kraft Drive, Suite 250

Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-9182 office

(540) 231-7019 fax

ashpeele@vt.edu

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Subject: Test
Date: Mon Feb 27 2017 2:08 am
From: jcbabirder AT gcronline.com
 
This is a test to see if I'm back on the list

From my iPhone

May God Bless and Keep You

Jeff Blalock
103 Elizabeth Court
South Boston VA 24592
434-572-8619 Home
434-470-4352 Cell
jcbabirder@gcronline.com



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Subject: Red-Headed Woodpeckers in Falls Church, VA
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 21:57 pm
From: vineetaa AT gmail.com
 
I saw the male yesterday morning as well a pair of very active Downy woodpeckers and a Red-bellied woodpeckers. It's a gem of a park. Vineeta Anand.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2017, at 9:36 PM, janet anderson via va-bird wrote:
>
> February 24, 2017 -
>
> 2 Red-Headed Woodpeckers seen at Luria Park in Falls Church, Fairfax
> County, VA
>
> Janet M. Anderson
> City of Falls Church, VA
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Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Dutch Gap Conservation Area/Henricus Historical Park, Feb 26, 2017
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 21:36 pm
From: james.winkelmann AT gmail.com
 
Walked the long loop at Dutch Gap in Chesterfield today, cooler and breezy
but otherwise a lovely sunny day, tallied 52 species. Of note was
diminished presence of wintering waterfowl, a red fox running up the flyash
pond hill, and 3 firsts of year: Tree Swallow, Field Sparrow, and Eastern
Meadowlark.

James Winkelmann
Richmond



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From:
Date: Sun, Feb 26, 2017 at 7:08 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Dutch Gap Conservation Area/Henricus Historical
Park, Feb 26, 2017
To: james.winkelmann@gmail.com


Dutch Gap Conservation Area/Henricus Historical Park, Chesterfield,
Virginia, US
Feb 26, 2017 10:09 AM - 3:21 PM
Protocol: Traveling
6.0 mile(s)
52 species

Canada Goose 25
Wood Duck 7
Gadwall 12
American Wigeon 9
American Black Duck 3
Mallard 16
Northern Shoveler 14
Northern Pintail 6
Ring-necked Duck 85
Bufflehead 19
Hooded Merganser 5
Ruddy Duck 1
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Double-crested Cormorant 16
Great Blue Heron 7
Black Vulture 4
Turkey Vulture 28
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
American Coot 18
Killdeer 5
Ring-billed Gull 145
Mourning Dove 3
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 4
Downy Woodpecker 9
Northern Flicker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 1
American Crow 5
Tree Swallow 7
Carolina Chickadee 21
Tufted Titmouse 12
White-breasted Nuthatch 4
Brown Creeper 5
Carolina Wren 11
Golden-crowned Kinglet 9
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 7
Eastern Bluebird 1
Hermit Thrush 1
American Robin 7
Brown Thrasher 3
Northern Mockingbird 4
Pine Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 11
Field Sparrow 5
Dark-eyed Junco 11
White-throated Sparrow 35
Song Sparrow 11
Northern Cardinal 8
Red-winged Blackbird 4
Eastern Meadowlark 1
American Goldfinch 6

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch
ecklist/S34820512

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
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Subject: Pohick Bay this afternoon - lingering Tundra Swans
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 21:01 pm
From: howiewu1 AT gmail.com
 
Hi,

This afternoon I made brief stops at Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge
(Great Marsh Trail, not the State Park), then at Pohick Bay Regional Park,
around 3-5pm.

I was expecting to see some eagles at Pohick Bay, but saw none; I wasn't
expecting to see Tundra Swans, and at Great Marsh Trail I scanned briefly
(and not very carefully) and did not see any. However, at Pohick Bay, I was
rather surprised to see a small group across the water from the boat launch
area. They were very far, and because of the wind and water vapor, I only
got very fuzzy pictures of them, but I think they were distinctly Tundra
Swans.

Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
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Subject: Red-Headed Woodpeckers in Falls Church, VA
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 20:47 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
February 24, 2017 -

2 Red-Headed Woodpeckers seen at Luria Park in Falls Church, Fairfax
County, VA

Janet M. Anderson
City of Falls Church, VA
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Subject: Merrimac Farm
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 17:50 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
Merrimac Farm was bright and chilly as 7 birders set out on the Prince William Conservation Alliance Last-Sunday-of-the-Month birdwalk.  We tallied 35 species with highlights being one Barred Owl, a dozen Wild Turkeys found rummaging on the Cedar Run flood plane, and growing groups of White-throated Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos looking as if they are getting ready to head north.   
Canada Goose  6
Wild Turkey  12
Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  5
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Killdeer  1
Ring-billed Gull  90
Herring Gull  5
Mourning Dove  6
Barred Owl  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  3
Northern Flicker  1
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  5
Carolina Chickadee  12
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Brown Creeper  1
Carolina Wren  2
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
American Robin  3
European Starling  7
Yellow-rumped Warbler  4
Field Sparrow  3
Dark-eyed Junco  20
White-throated Sparrow  15
Song Sparrow  2
Eastern Towhee  3
Northern Cardinal  4
Red-winged Blackbird  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
House Finch  1

The Prince William Conservation Alliance birdwalks at the Merrimac Farm Wildlife Management Area in Nokesville take place at 8 AM on the final Sunday of every month.  Birders meet at the Area's entrance located at the stonehouse at the end of Deepwood Drive.  Questions may be directed to the Alliance at 703.499.4954,  or alliance@pwconserve.org

Harry GlasgowNancy Vehrs
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Subject: American Woodcocks
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 16:22 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
One of the best things about my home in King George is the large, grassy field that my home backs up to. In the summer the field is home to Eastern Meadowlarks and Grasshopper Sparrows. I love drinking a cup of coffee on my deck first thing in the morning while listening to the calls of both species. Occasionally they even pay me a visit in my yard. Yesterday morning a new (for me) species made its presence known to me from the fields. As the sun began to rise I was standing on my deck and heard the telltale "peent" call of an American Woodcock. Not too long after that I heard its melodic flight song. The cycle repeated itself one more time before the bird went silent. Unfortunately, I didn't actually see the Woodcock, but just hearing it was treat enough. With luck I will hear it again and maybe even catch a glimpse of its decent towards earth.

Good birding to all!
Scott Byrd
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Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Occoquan Bay NWR, Feb 26, 2017
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 13:47 pm
From: moribaudo AT verizon.net
 
Birding at Occoquan Bay NWR was a pure delight this morning.  I tallied 62
species. Highlights were a great horned owl on a nest (can be seen from the
parking lot; a better look with some hiking), the Lincoln's sparrow at the
end of Easy Road, a tree sparrow right next to the parking lot at the start
of Fox Rd., huge numbers of lesser scaup, and an otter fishing in Marumsco
Bay, seen from Deep Hole Point Rd. The list is below.

Marc Ribaudo

Occoquan Bay NWR, Prince William, Virginia, US
Feb 26, 2017 7:28 AM - 11:23 AM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
62 species

Canada Goose 60
Wood Duck 2
American Black Duck 15
Mallard 10
Northern Shoveler 2
Green-winged Teal 4
Canvasback 6
Greater Scaup 2
Lesser Scaup 3000
Bufflehead 30
Red-breasted Merganser 25
Ruddy Duck 9
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Horned Grebe 1
Double-crested Cormorant 4
Great Blue Heron 5
Black Vulture 1
Turkey Vulture 12
Bald Eagle 12
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Killdeer 2
Ring-billed Gull 30
Herring Gull 5
Great Black-backed Gull 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
Mourning Dove 3
Great Horned Owl 1
Belted Kingfisher 2
Red-headed Woodpecker 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 6
Downy Woodpecker 7
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 12
Blue Jay 3
American Crow 4
Fish Crow 6
Carolina Chickadee 6
Tufted Titmouse 4
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
Winter Wren 4
Carolina Wren 8
Golden-crowned Kinglet 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Eastern Bluebird 6
American Robin 5
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 2
American Tree Sparrow 1
Field Sparrow 1
Fox Sparrow 1
Dark-eyed Junco 2
White-throated Sparrow 12
Savannah Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 14
Lincoln's Sparrow 1 Continuing bird
Swamp Sparrow 2
Eastern Towhee 1
Northern Cardinal 8
Red-winged Blackbird 14
Rusty Blackbird 1
Common Grackle 4
House Finch 2

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: Rusty Blackbirds, Union Springs, R'ham County
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 13:27 pm
From: birds AT naturefriendmagazine.com
 
We had 4 Rusty Blackbirds feeding around our yard in Union Springs about an
hour ago. New yard bird for us.



Shaphan Shank

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Subject: Lots of ducks!
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 12:48 pm
From: millington.linda AT gmail.com
 
Birders,
Yesterday afternoon, Andy Martin, Carole Miller and I visited Belvoir Pond
in Fauquier County. We found approximately 500 Ring-necked Ducks, 2
American Coots, and 3 Bufflehead. Carole had stopped by in the AM and had
seen 2 Northern Shoveler as well.

In addition, we were pretty sure that we had a good-sized flock of Rusty
Blackbirds mixed in with a big flock of Red-winged Blackbirds in the fields
next to Wakefield School just outside of The Plains on the Rt. 66 side.

I had about 200 Common Grackles in my back yard this morning!

Linda Millington
Upperville VA
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Subject: Great Falls Bird Walk 02/26/17 (Fairfasx County)
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 11:34 am
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
Keith Huffman led today's walk.  The highlight was 80 Great Blue  Herons as
described in the listing below.
We meet every Sunday at 8 AM in the visitors center parking lot. All
birders are welcome to join us.

Ralph Wall

The list:

Canada Goose 20
American Black Duck 6
Mallard 3
Ring-necked Duck 12
Bufflehead 10
Common Merganser 1
Great Blue Heron 80 Conn Island on the Potomac River is an annual
nesting ground for Great Blue Herons. At about 8 15 AM an estimated 80 rose
out of the trees and circled overhead for 5 minutes before settling back on
the island. Five walk participants viewed the phenomenon for its duration.
Turkey Vulture 4
Mourning Dove 2
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 6
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 3
Downy Woodpecker 4
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
American Crow 2
Carolina Chickadee 6
Tufted Titmouse 10
White-breasted Nuthatch 3
Carolina Wren 1
Eastern Bluebird 4
American Robin 4
Dark-eyed Junco 2
Northern Cardinal 4
Red-winged Blackbird 3

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
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Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Grandview Nature Preserve, Feb 25, 2017
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 11:20 am
From: rwpeterman AT verizon.net
 
Below is the ebird report for the quarterly survey of Grandview Island.
Weather was clear and warm, climbing into the 70s. Tide was going out as
high tide was 8:05 and low tide was 2:29. The flock of Brants remained all
day on and close to shore. Gannets were moving from south to north as there
was a brisk southerly wind.
Pete Peterman
Hampton Roads Bird Club

-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist@cornell.edu
Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2017 11:47 AM
To: rwpeterman@verizon.net
Subject: eBird Report - Grandview Nature Preserve, Feb 25, 2017

Grandview Nature Preserve, Hampton, Virginia, US
Feb 25, 2017 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
6.0 mile(s)
Comments: Quarterly Survey for Grandview Island, part of the
Virginia-designated IBA Western Shore Marshes
28 species (+2 other taxa)

Brant 66
Canada Goose 3
Gadwall 8
American Wigeon 1
Mallard 2
Surf Scoter 7
Bufflehead 140
Red-throated Loon 7
Common Loon 14
Horned Grebe 1
Northern Gannet 120
Double-crested Cormorant 27
Brown Pelican 30
Bald Eagle 2
Clapper Rail 1
American Oystercatcher 2
Ruddy Turnstone 1
Sanderling 300
Dunlin 200
Ring-billed Gull 45
Herring Gull 59
American Crow 3
Carolina Wren 1
European Starling 140
Yellow-rumped Warbler 4
Nelson's/Saltmarsh Sparrow (Sharp-tailed Sparrow) 2
White-throated Sparrow 3
sparrow sp. 1 Believe it was a Lark Sparrow as it had a white on the
edges of its long tail. Only saw from rear. Flew from long dry grass to
another large area of long dry grass
Northern Cardinal 2
Red-winged Blackbird 2

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: Signs (songs) of spring at Huntley Meadows yesterday, and more book recommendations.
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 11:07 am
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
First singing PHOEBE and RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET of the season.  Deafening
chorus of southern leopard frogs. Two garter snakes, one eating a large
frog that looked to have been dead for a while. A pair of what were
probably question mark butterflies.



Other interesting notes: found a feather pile that was probably a immature
COOPER'S HAWK (wonder what got it). And MERLIN down Barnyard Run.



By the way, can anyone recommend a frog call app?



Regarding the threat about book recommendations, one each obvious and
obscure additions. The obvious: A Sand County Almanac, by Aldo Leopold.
Anyone interested in nature, or the art of writing, must read this book.
The obscure: The Lord's Woods, by Robert Arbib. An elegy to a childhood
haunt by a naturalist who was unable to save it. Beautiful, and
coincidentally written by a friend of the man I was name after, birder and
orchidist Ben Berliner.



Ben Jesup

Alexandria

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Subject: Pine Warblers Singing Fairfax Co.
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 10:48 am
From: qemmering AT gmail.com
 
Two (maybe three) pine warblers were singing at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetlands Refuge, Fairfax County, on Saturday, Feb. 25.  The two birds were on either side of the pond in pine stands.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Cheers,

Quinn Emmering
Alexandria, VA
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Subject: FOS Pine Warbler Feb. 25--western Albemarle
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 10:36 am
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
Hi,

Forgot to mention in my previous e-mail about this morning's turkey (which
was in western Albemarle by the way--forgot to mention that too!) that a
Pine Warbler was singing beautifully at my house yesterday morning.

Sincerely,
Marlene
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Subject: First-of-season turkey gobbling!!!!
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 9:40 am
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
First-of-season turkey gobbling this morning about 6:25 AM!!!!!  It
started up just as my local woodcock called it a day (night?). Also a Fox
Sparrow sang once from the woodcock field.

Sincerely,
Marlene
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Subject: Wilson's Snipe
Date: Sun Feb 26 2017 8:42 am
From: rpuffenb AT bridgewater.edu
 
Hello -

I am teaching an every other year elective in biology for Bridgewater College, ornithology, with a full class of 11 students. This is the first year I had to turn away potential students since the one lab (and one van!) was already full. I hope that is a harbinger of things to come for the demand for the class. I have to say that I hope being out last Thursday without gloves, hat or jacket in Feb. with temps of 50F at 7 am is not a sign of things to come!

We are out on Thursdays, 7-10:30 am. This week, at Leonard's Pond (Faught's Road) off Cross-Keys Road on east side of I-81, we had two Wilson's Snipe. One was right close to the van at the pond edge, and both were present again on Saturday. We also had two Eastern Towhees in a walnut tree right at the pull off for Lake Campbell at Masanetta Springs.

Cheers -
Robyn Puffenbarger, Ph.D. | Chair, Biology | Associate Professor of Biology
phone: 540-828-5713 | fax: 540-828-5661 | online: bridgewater.edu
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Subject: scaup off Chippokes Plantation SP, Surry Co., 2/25/17
Date: Sat Feb 25 2017 21:49 pm
From: flicknanders AT hotmail.com
 
Hey all, Elisa and I enjoyed seeing a raft of approximately 2000 scaup in the James River (Cobham Bay) off Chippokes Plantation State Park in Surry County this afternoon. Due to distance most were left as scaup sp., although a couple small groups flew in close enough to ID as Lesser Scaup. Few ducks other than scaup were present in the raft: a handful each of Ruddy Ducks and Gadwall, 1 Hooded Merganser. At least 4 Lesser Black-backed Gulls scoped from the Park as well.


Nick Flanders

Portsmouth, VA
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Subject: Pine Warbler, Union Springs, R'ham County
Date: Sat Feb 25 2017 19:45 pm
From: shaphan AT naturefriendmagazine.com
 

We had our FOS Pine Warbler today (2/25) in our yard in Union Springs. This beats our previous early date by 17 days!

Shaphan Shank
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Subject: Banshee Reeks, Loudoun County
Date: Sat Feb 25 2017 19:12 pm
From: drgerco AT hotmail.com
 
Today's VMN Class (Banshee Reeks Chapter) birding trip, in conjunction with the Introduction Ornithology class spend a lovely hour exploring birds west of the visitor's center at Banshee Reeks. Many of the participants were new to birding and were on their first trip. Fortunately the birds were very active. A nice large kettle of Turkey Vultures was seen and a few Black Vulture were found too. Many gulls, mostly ring-billed but a few herring were seen flying towards the local dump and the nearby Dulles wetlands. A group of Canada Geese surprised us, because a single Cackling Goose was mixed in. The size difference was noticeable.  The biggest surprise I thought was a pair of Northern Bobwhite's. They were probably as startled as we were. The birds (a male and female) slowly moved deeper in the brush and disappeared from sight. Several of the participants got nice looks of these birds, not even 10 ft away from us.

Near the visitor's center a tree was full of yellow-bellied sapsucker sap holes and eventually we did find a sapsucker elsewhere during our walk. As always it is fun to see this woodpecker.

We ended up with 28 species during our 55 minute walk. The full list is shown below.

Gerco
Leesburg, VA


Cackling Goose 1

Canada Goose 26

Northern Bobwhite 2

Black Vulture 5

Turkey Vulture 20

Ring-billed Gull 50

Herring Gull 2

Mourning Dove 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker 1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1

Blue Jay 4

American Crow 2

Fish Crow 1

Carolina Chickadee 1

Tufted Titmouse 1

White-breasted Nuthatch 1

Carolina Wren 1

Eastern Bluebird 5

American Robin 1

Northern Mockingbird 1

European Starling 3

Field Sparrow 1

Dark-eyed Junco 25

White-crowned Sparrow 5

Song Sparrow 3

Northern Cardinal 2

Common Grackle 1

House Finch 3

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Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Mason Neck State Park, Feb 25, 2017
Date: Sat Feb 25 2017 15:17 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 

VA-Birders,

Twenty birders with the Northern Virginia Bird Club joined me and co-leader David Ledwith at Mason Neck State Park this balmy winter morning. We tallied 51 species, and many saw their personal high total of Bald Eagles. They were very active and scopes revealed many perched across Belmont Bay toward Meadowood. Waterfowl were abundant with a group of Red-breasted Mergansers providing close views from the beach far down the Bay View Trail. On the wetland side, Wood Ducks were seen behind the not-so-shy Mallards. The Red-headed Woodpeckers and Hermit Thrush were a treat, as were the returning Tree Swallows. Complete checklist follows.
Phil Silas
Woodbridge, Va.



-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist
To: epsdcva
Sent: Sat, Feb 25, 2017 2:50 pm
Subject: eBird Report - Mason Neck State Park, Feb 25, 2017

Mason Neck State Park, Fairfax, Virginia, US
Feb 25, 2017 8:00 AM - 10:47 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.1 mile(s)
51 species

Canada Goose 40
Wood Duck 7
Gadwall 100
American Wigeon 8
American Black Duck 4
Mallard 21
Northern Shoveler 60
Canvasback 10
Redhead 12
Ring-necked Duck 8
Lesser Scaup 3000
Bufflehead 20
Hooded Merganser 6
Red-breasted Merganser 36
Ruddy Duck 80
Pied-billed Grebe 9
Double-crested Cormorant 36
Great Blue Heron 4
Turkey Vulture 6
Bald Eagle 36 About 2/3 were scoped from Visitor Center across Belmont Bay from near Frenchman's Point to where Belmont Landing Rd ends. One nest visible just W of a stand of bamboo. Most were perched but many were fishing. Another dozen were flying over the bay, perched across at Occoquan Bay NWR, or seen flying/perched as we walked the open portion of the Bay View trail. Conservative count.
American Coot 1000
Ring-billed Gull 30
Herring Gull 20
Great Black-backed Gull 11
Mourning Dove 8
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-headed Woodpecker 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 5
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 1
American Crow 5
Fish Crow 2
Tree Swallow 8 Just arrived in numbers
Carolina Chickadee 11
Tufted Titmouse 6
White-breasted Nuthatch 4
Carolina Wren 5
Golden-crowned Kinglet 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Eastern Bluebird 14
Hermit Thrush 1
American Robin 20
Dark-eyed Junco 24
White-throated Sparrow 12
Song Sparrow 6
Eastern Towhee 1
Northern Cardinal 4
Red-winged Blackbird 15
American Goldfinch 4

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship
Date: Sat Feb 25 2017 14:12 pm
From: joecoleman AT rstarmail.com
 
Twelve people showed up at the Blue Ridge Center for Environmental
Stewardship in northwestern Loudon for the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy's
regular (every 4th Saturday of the month) bird walk. After meeting at the
Education Center on the north side we drove to the parking area at the end
of Sawmill Rd. After walking there for a couple of hours about half of us
drove over to where Arnold Rd crosses under the power lines to see if we
could add a 7th woodpecker species to the six we'd already found (while we
didn't succeed we did see another American Kestrel, an Eastern Meadowlark, &
a Red-tailed Hawk). The highlights of the walk included two American
Kestrels, 5 Ring-billed Gulls (unusual in western Lo Co & generally only
seen during migration), numerous flocks of between 150 & 200 Canada Geese
flying north high in the sky for the first hour or so, and a single Eastern
Meadowlark.



For a complete list of the birds see the eBird list below.



Information on the Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship can be
found at http://www.blueridgecenter.org.
Information on the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy and its many free activities
can be found at www.loudounwildlife.org.

Joe Coleman & Del Sargent



Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship, Loudoun, Virginia, US Feb
25, 2017 7:45 AM - 10:45 AM

Protocol: Traveling

1.7 mile(s)

Comments: Regularly scheduled bird walk at BRCES; met at Education
Center & drove down to the parking lot at the end of Sawmill. After walking
there about 1/2 of us went over to Arnold Rd where it goes under the
powerline & had great views of open fields and saw another Am Kestrel, an
Eastern Meadowlark, a Red-tailed Hawk, and a few more species.

38 species



Canada Goose 800 for the first hr or so observed several flocks of
between a 150 and 200 geese each flock migrating north high in the sky

Black Vulture 10

Turkey Vulture 12

Red-shouldered Hawk 2

Red-tailed Hawk 1

Killdeer 8

Ring-billed Gull 5

Mourning Dove 4

Red-bellied Woodpecker 2

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 2

Downy Woodpecker 4

Hairy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 2

Pileated Woodpecker 2

American Kestrel 2

Blue Jay 3

American Crow 20

Fish Crow 1

Carolina Chickadee 12

Tufted Titmouse 12

White-breasted Nuthatch 2

Carolina Wren 8

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1

Eastern Bluebird 8

American Robin 2

Northern Mockingbird 1

European Starling 5

Field Sparrow 4

Fox Sparrow 1

White-throated Sparrow 8

Song Sparrow 8

Swamp Sparrow 2

Eastern Towhee 1

Northern Cardinal 5

Red-winged Blackbird 6

Eastern Meadowlark 1

Common Grackle 2

American Goldfinch 2



View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...



This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Subject: Sully Woodlands Phoebe and Shrike
Date: Sat Feb 25 2017 11:09 am
From: howiewu1 AT gmail.com
 
Hi,

This morning, before the wind picked up, I made a brief visit to Sully
Woodlands in Fairfax County again (8:15AM - 9AM).

What first caught my attention was a couple of singing Eastern Phoebes near
the barn. These early migrants have arrived and spring is at hand; it also
makes me wonder if the Northern Shrike will stick around for long.

But the Northern Shrike was there. In fact, I got one of the best pictures
of it, in the beautiful early morning sunlight. I've seen and photographed
this bird quite a few times now, but now, with the advancing season, every
time I see it, I know it may be my last, for a while at least. Soon it will
fly north, to its breeding grounds in in taiga and tundra. I bide it
godspeed and wish it well!

My eBird listing is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

My rolling update of my observations of the Northern Shrike can be seen at
the following location:
http://www.travelerathome.com/...

Cheers,
Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
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Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Date: Sat Feb 25 2017 7:29 am
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
I hear the link below for Jennifer Ackerman's presentation on The Genius of
Birds does not work. Sorry. Try this one.

http://audubonva.org/asnv-even...
-ackerman

-----Original Message-----
From: Dixie Sommers [mailto:dixiesommers@cs.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 8:14 PM
To: 'VA-Bird'
Subject: RE: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.

While we are on bird literature, I'll make a pitch for The Genius of Birds
by Jennifer Ackerman. This book is all about birds' incredible cognitive
abilities, from finches to the amazing crow family.

"There's a kind of bird that creates colorful designs out of
berries, bits of glass, and blossoms to attract females, and another kind
that hides up to thirty-three thousand seeds scattered over dozens of square
miles and remembers where it put them months later. There's a species that
solves a classic puzzle at nearly the same pace as a five-year old child,
and one that's an expert at picking locks. There are birds that can count
and do simple math, make their own tools, move to the beat of music,
comprehend basic principles of physics, remember the past, and plan for the
future."

You can come meet Jennifer Ackerman at the Audubon Society of Northern
Virginia's Audubon Afternoon:
Sunday, March 5, 3:00pm - 5:00pm,
National Wildlife Federation building,
11100 Wildlife Center Drive
Reston, VA

http://audubonva.org/asnv-even...
-ackerman

And it is free!

See you there

Dixie Sommers

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+dixiesommers=c.com@listserve.com] On
Behalf Of Scott Jackson-Ricketts
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 6:10 PM
To: Bill Hohenstein
Cc: VA-Bird
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.

Bernd Heinrich should be known to all nature readers, especially regarding
his work on ravens. His new book, *One Wild Bird at a Time*, is rich and
worth every minute.

Love this conversation.................

Scott Jackson-Ricketts

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 6:16 PM, Bill Hohenstein wrote:

> Any DC area birder should seek out a book by Louis Halle called
> "Spring in Washington". It was published in 1947 and chronicles the
> emergence of spring from a birders perspective. He starts in the dead
> of winter and notes the movement of birds through the DC region, with
> special sections on the Potomac, Dyke Marsh, Rock Creek, and the GW
> Parkway. It is an amazing book and this is the perfect time to pick it
up.
>
> Many of his observations will be familiar to local birders,
> Bonaparte's Gulls on the Potomac and the sounds of thrushes in the
> woods. Others have become too infrequent... marsh wrens at Dyke Marsh
> and Kentucky Warblers inside the beltway. A very cool book and a must
> read for those counting the days until spring.
>
> Bill
>
> ________________________________
> From: va-bird on
> behalf of Ashley Lohr
> Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:22 PM
> To: Jim G
> Cc: VA-Bird
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
>
> While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination
> in the
> Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a
> man who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until
> they're old enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he
> observes and records a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities.
> It's an eye-opening and thought-provoking book. I just finished
> reading it since I'm studying wild turkeys for my Master's research
> project, and I couldn't believe how absorbed I became in his world! I
> feel like I have a better understanding of my study species now.
>
> There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a
Turkey"
> that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)
>
> Cheers,
> Ashley Lohr
> Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA
>
> Ashley Lohr
> Virginia Tech Class of 2015
> Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor aklohr@vt.edu
>
> On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G wrote:
>
> > Good Evening Birders,
> >
> > With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough
> > time to go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly
> > satisfy my insatiable birding desires.
> >
> > Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must
> > read Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was
> > published in
> 1997,
> > some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an
> > entertaining, educational and even emotional read for this 31 year
> > novice birder. In fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up
> > unfamiliar birds mentioned
> by
> > Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
> >
> > Other books on my list include:
> >
> > The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman The Thing With Feathers -
> > Noah Strycker Snapper - Brian Kimberling
> >
> > Have fun,
> >
> > Jim Gould
> > Southern Shores, NC
> >
> > Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr@vt.edu. If you wish to
> > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
> VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a
> forum for reporting ...
>
>
>
> >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as elliety@msn.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/l... *** VA-bird
> Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a
> forum for reporting ...
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as scottjr@ls.net. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
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>
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Subject: Eagles -Waterfowl: Mason Neck SP; Pohick Bay
Date: Fri Feb 24 2017 19:46 pm
From: skybirds.d AT gmail.com
 
 I arrived at Mason Neck State Park about 8:30 this morning, hoping to get some photographs of the Tundra Swans I had seen last Friday, last Saturday, and last Monday.  Regrettably, I found none.  I assume that they had left on there northward migration.  I did see several large skeins of Canada Geese flying north, as well as one group of Tundra Swans headed in the same direction.

Scoping the bay, I found that more than 50%, perhaps as many as 60% or 70%, of the thousands of ducks that I saw when I was last there, I could not find today. What I did find was a lot of Bald Eagles. Standing by the visitor center at Mason Neck State Park,
I scoped the trees on the other side of the bay from as far up near Keanes Creek as I could see, all the way down and across the mouth of the Occoquan, all of the trees on the Occoquan refuge, and continued up the trees on the same side of the bay where I was standing: I counted 42 perched Bald Eagles and 5 or 6 flying around as well. I did not see any fishing activity.

On the way out, I stopped at the Pohick Bay Regional Park. From the boat launch at the end of the parking lot , I scoped as much of the far side of Pohick Bay as I could see. I found only five perched Bald Eagles ( last year on this date the count was at least 60).
As I was leaving I heard a bunch of "eagle chatter" down the bay, and finally discovered what appeared to be 6 or 8 Bald Eagles In a couple of trees on the point at the very extreme edge of the park, down past the children's play area and where they rent canoes. Because of the sun angle I could only get silhouettes of the birds, but they did all appear to be eagles, and there was lots of Eagle chatter coming from those trees.
Donald Sweig
Falls Church, Virginia

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Saw-whet Owls, Shenandoah Nat. Park
Date: Fri Feb 24 2017 9:01 am
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
It's great to have a record of the Saw-whets in the Park.

Food for thought for anyone not aware of, or not considering, the possible risk to Saw-whets: Barred Owls, common in the SNP, prey on Saw-whets. So in exposing a Saw-whet's location or playing a call, we might well be calling in both predator and prey...offering up an unintended dining experience!

Diane Lepkowski
Harrisonburg
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Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County
Date: Fri Feb 24 2017 6:25 am
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
After a few brief appearances over the past 5 weeks, the Clay-colored Sparrow was at my feeder all afternoon yesterday and was there first thing today. If I'm not home, feel free to walk around the right side of the house, where you can see the feeder.


Brian Taber
103 Exeter Court Williamsburg
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Subject: Lynchburg Baltimore oriole still here!! New record??
Date: Thu Feb 23 2017 20:52 pm
From: aklohr AT vt.edu
 
The Lynchburg adult male Baltimore oriole is still hangin' around at a
private residence! Today potentially marks a new record for overwintering
Baltimore orioles in this area. The longest documented Lynchburg area
oriole previously was 12-15-07 to 2-22-08, so this oriole beat it by # of
days and has set the new late-date for the winter (please correct me if I'm
wrong on this!). We're pretty excited :)

Ashley Lohr
Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA
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Subject: The best way to reply to a thread?
Date: Thu Feb 23 2017 20:00 pm
From: howiewu1 AT gmail.com
 
Hi,

I am subscribed to this mailing list, but I opted to not receive emails.
Instead, I use the following links to browse:

http://digest.sialia.com/?rm=o... (this does not even require
log-in; I booked marked it so I can easily browse)

http://digest.sialia.com/?rm=o... (this requires log-in and it
allows me to browse older emails)

They worked fine .. except when I want to reply to an email thread. Since I
don't receive the emails, I cannot reply, and these sites do not allow me
to do that either.

Given my situation, what's the best way to reply to a thread?

BTW, the MD list is a Google group, so that is easier to reply (not trying
to imply anything, just stating a fact).

Howard Wu
Herndon, VA
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Subject: Woodcocks calling at Difficult Creek Natural Area Preserve
Date: Thu Feb 23 2017 19:53 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
Had 3-4 woodcocks peenting as we finished up our prescribed burn on Tuesday evening. They were calling from the pine thicket on the opposite side of the gas line at the entrance to the preserve units. There is parking space where we stage our equipment for prescribed burns. 
Eric HarroldHays, NC
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Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Date: Thu Feb 23 2017 19:24 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
While we are on bird literature, I'll make a pitch for The Genius of Birds
by Jennifer Ackerman. This book is all about birds' incredible cognitive
abilities, from finches to the amazing crow family.

"There's a kind of bird that creates colorful designs out of
berries, bits of glass, and blossoms to attract females, and another kind
that hides up to thirty-three thousand seeds scattered over dozens of square
miles and remembers where it put them months later. There's a species that
solves a classic puzzle at nearly the same pace as a five-year old child,
and one that's an expert at picking locks. There are birds that can count
and do simple math, make their own tools, move to the beat of music,
comprehend basic principles of physics, remember the past, and plan for the
future."

You can come meet Jennifer Ackerman at the Audubon Society of Northern
Virginia's Audubon Afternoon:
Sunday, March 5, 3:00pm - 5:00pm,
National Wildlife Federation building,
11100 Wildlife Center Drive
Reston, VA

http://audubonva.org/asnv-even...
-ackerman

And it is free!

See you there

Dixie Sommers

-----Original Message-----
From: va-bird [mailto:va-bird-bounces+dixiesommers=c.com@listserve.com] On
Behalf Of Scott Jackson-Ricketts
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 6:10 PM
To: Bill Hohenstein
Cc: VA-Bird
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.

Bernd Heinrich should be known to all nature readers, especially regarding
his work on ravens. His new book, *One Wild Bird at a Time*, is rich and
worth every minute.

Love this conversation.................

Scott Jackson-Ricketts

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 6:16 PM, Bill Hohenstein wrote:

> Any DC area birder should seek out a book by Louis Halle called
> "Spring in Washington". It was published in 1947 and chronicles the
> emergence of spring from a birders perspective. He starts in the dead
> of winter and notes the movement of birds through the DC region, with
> special sections on the Potomac, Dyke Marsh, Rock Creek, and the GW
> Parkway. It is an amazing book and this is the perfect time to pick it
up.
>
> Many of his observations will be familiar to local birders,
> Bonaparte's Gulls on the Potomac and the sounds of thrushes in the
> woods. Others have become too infrequent... marsh wrens at Dyke Marsh
> and Kentucky Warblers inside the beltway. A very cool book and a must
> read for those counting the days until spring.
>
> Bill
>
> ________________________________
> From: va-bird on
> behalf of Ashley Lohr
> Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:22 PM
> To: Jim G
> Cc: VA-Bird
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
>
> While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination
> in the
> Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a
> man who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until
> they're old enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he
> observes and records a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities.
> It's an eye-opening and thought-provoking book. I just finished
> reading it since I'm studying wild turkeys for my Master's research
> project, and I couldn't believe how absorbed I became in his world! I
> feel like I have a better understanding of my study species now.
>
> There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a
Turkey"
> that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)
>
> Cheers,
> Ashley Lohr
> Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA
>
> Ashley Lohr
> Virginia Tech Class of 2015
> Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor aklohr@vt.edu
>
> On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G wrote:
>
> > Good Evening Birders,
> >
> > With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough
> > time to go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly
> > satisfy my insatiable birding desires.
> >
> > Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must
> > read Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was
> > published in
> 1997,
> > some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an
> > entertaining, educational and even emotional read for this 31 year
> > novice birder. In fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up
> > unfamiliar birds mentioned
> by
> > Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
> >
> > Other books on my list include:
> >
> > The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman The Thing With Feathers -
> > Noah Strycker Snapper - Brian Kimberling
> >
> > Have fun,
> >
> > Jim Gould
> > Southern Shores, NC
> >
> > Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr@vt.edu. If you wish to
> > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
> VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a
> forum for reporting ...
>
>
>
> >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as elliety@msn.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/l... *** VA-bird
> Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a
> forum for reporting ...
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as scottjr@ls.net. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
>
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unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
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Subject: Florida Trip Part III - Sweetwater Wetlands Gainesville
Date: Thu Feb 23 2017 17:51 pm
From: RoweRA AT vmi.edu
 
All - On our way down to St. Pete's we happened to stop at Sweetwater Wetlands Preserve in Gainesville.  It was pure luck that we stopped there, and I'll say that it is a fantastic birding spot. Sweetwater was developed as a natural water filtering system and the main in-flow is Sweetwater Creek which runs through Paynes Prairie.  The Preserve was built about 3-4 years ago with numerous impoundments and a series of dykes with walking paths. They have planted native wetland plants, so the area looks very natural - plus it has several very large alligators.  At Sweetwater we saw Sandhill Cranes (perhaps saw 150, heard many - the count was 1200 by the park ranger), Common Gallinules (lots), Coots (lots), perhaps 20 Wood Storks, 20-30 White Ibis, 10 Glossy Ibis, a few Great Blue, Little Blue, and Louisiana Herons, Great and Snowy Egrets, and best of all - 2 American Bitterns, a Sora in the open and at close range, Limpkins (12-14) at close range, and about 40-50 Black-bellied Whi
stling Tree Ducks. If you are passing through that area, I really recommend stopping. I would think during migration the area is full of birds. The Ranger said that in January they had about 900 Whistling Tree Ducks along with other ducks.

I've posted some, actually quite a few, photos from Sweetwater. Almost all of the photos I took were excellent and it was hard to reduce the number.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology
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Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Date: Thu Feb 23 2017 17:19 pm
From: scottjr AT ls.net
 
Bernd Heinrich should be known to all nature readers, especially regarding
his work on ravens. His new book, *One Wild Bird at a Time*, is rich and
worth every minute.

Love this conversation.................

Scott Jackson-Ricketts

On Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 6:16 PM, Bill Hohenstein wrote:

> Any DC area birder should seek out a book by Louis Halle called "Spring in
> Washington". It was published in 1947 and chronicles the emergence of
> spring from a birders perspective. He starts in the dead of winter and
> notes the movement of birds through the DC region, with special sections on
> the Potomac, Dyke Marsh, Rock Creek, and the GW Parkway. It is an amazing
> book and this is the perfect time to pick it up.
>
> Many of his observations will be familiar to local birders, Bonaparte's
> Gulls on the Potomac and the sounds of thrushes in the woods. Others have
> become too infrequent... marsh wrens at Dyke Marsh and Kentucky Warblers
> inside the beltway. A very cool book and a must read for those counting
> the days until spring.
>
> Bill
>
> ________________________________
> From: va-bird on behalf
> of Ashley Lohr
> Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:22 PM
> To: Jim G
> Cc: VA-Bird
> Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
>
> While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination in the
> Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a man
> who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until they're old
> enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he observes and records
> a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities. It's an eye-opening and
> thought-provoking book. I just finished reading it since I'm studying wild
> turkeys for my Master's research project, and I couldn't believe how
> absorbed I became in his world! I feel like I have a better understanding
> of my study species now.
>
> There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a Turkey"
> that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)
>
> Cheers,
> Ashley Lohr
> Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA
>
> Ashley Lohr
> Virginia Tech Class of 2015
> Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor
> aklohr@vt.edu
>
> On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G wrote:
>
> > Good Evening Birders,
> >
> > With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> > go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> > insatiable birding desires.
> >
> > Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> > Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in
> 1997,
> > some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> > educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder. In
> > fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned
> by
> > Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
> >
> > Other books on my list include:
> >
> > The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> > The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> > Snapper - Brian Kimberling
> >
> > Have fun,
> >
> > Jim Gould
> > Southern Shores, NC
> >
> > Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> > *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr@vt.edu. If you wish to
> > unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> > http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
> VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum
> for reporting ...
>
>
>
> >
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as elliety@msn.com. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
> VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com listserve.com/listmanager/listinfo/va-bird>
> mailman.listserve.com
> Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia.
> It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum
> for reporting ...
>
>
>
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as scottjr@ls.net. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
>
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Subject: Yard Birds - Purple Finch and Fox Sparriw
Date: Thu Feb 23 2017 10:02 am
From: drgerco AT hotmail.com
 
This morning, the bird show at the feeder was interesting with a few notable visitors, including


Red-winged Blackbird - This is a very irregular visitor

Purple Finch - A lone male is still hanging out

Fox Sparrow - Unexpected nice surprise.


The number of American Goldfinch seems to fluctuate these days. Down to 6 this morning We had 29 a few days ago.


Happy birding!


Gerco

Leesburg
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Subject: Where the Alcids be?
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 18:14 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
I checked Rudee Inlet, made a very quick stop at Ft Story, and walked the beach at First Landing S.P. this morning. The only Alcids I saw were four Razorbills at Rudee Inlet and two at Ft Story. Nothing else of interest, but hundreds of RB Mergansers at First Landing. No Western Grebe.

Karen Kearney

Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 22, 2017, at 4:38 PM, Lee Atwood via va-bird wrote:
>
> Just finished a run from Ft Story to Rudee and not an alcid in sight.OBX?
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Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 17:20 pm
From: elliety AT msn.com
 
Any DC area birder should seek out a book by Louis Halle called "Spring in Washington".  It was published in 1947 and chronicles the emergence of spring from a birders perspective.  He starts in the dead of winter and notes the movement of birds through the DC region, with special sections on the Potomac, Dyke Marsh, Rock Creek, and the GW Parkway.  It is an amazing book and this is the perfect time to pick it up.

Many of his observations will be familiar to local birders, Bonaparte's Gulls on the Potomac and the sounds of thrushes in the woods. Others have become too infrequent... marsh wrens at Dyke Marsh and Kentucky Warblers inside the beltway. A very cool book and a must read for those counting the days until spring.

Bill

________________________________
From: va-bird on behalf of Ashley Lohr
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:22 PM
To: Jim G
Cc: VA-Bird
Subject: Re: [Va-bird] Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.

While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination in the
Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a man
who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until they're old
enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he observes and records
a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities. It's an eye-opening and
thought-provoking book. I just finished reading it since I'm studying wild
turkeys for my Master's research project, and I couldn't believe how
absorbed I became in his world! I feel like I have a better understanding
of my study species now.

There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a Turkey"
that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)

Cheers,
Ashley Lohr
Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA

Ashley Lohr
Virginia Tech Class of 2015
Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor
aklohr@vt.edu

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G wrote:

> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in 1997,
> some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder. In
> fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
> Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>
> Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr@vt.edu. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com
mailman.listserve.com
Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia. It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum for reporting ...



>
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VA-bird Info Page - ListServe.com
mailman.listserve.com
Va-bird is a forum for reporting interesting bird sightings in Virginia. It is a service of the Virginia Society of Ornithology. Va-bird is a forum for reporting ...



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Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 16:25 pm
From: aklohr AT vt.edu
 
While we're on this wonderful topic, I would recommend "Illumination in the
Flatwoods: A Season with the Wild Turkey" by Joe Hutto. It's about a man
who raises ~14 orphaned, human-imprinted wild turkeys until they're old
enough to leave their "mom." They remain wild, but he observes and records
a plethora of turkey behaviors and personalities. It's an eye-opening and
thought-provoking book. I just finished reading it since I'm studying wild
turkeys for my Master's research project, and I couldn't believe how
absorbed I became in his world! I feel like I have a better understanding
of my study species now.

There's also a documentary based on the book entitled "My Life as a Turkey"
that's apparently on Netflix. It's next on my list. :)

Cheers,
Ashley Lohr
Loudoun County/Lynchburg/Athens, GA

Ashley Lohr
Virginia Tech Class of 2015
Wildlife Conservation major / Entomology minor
aklohr@vt.edu

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G wrote:

> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in 1997,
> some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder. In
> fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
> Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>
> Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
> *** You are subscribed to va-bird as aklohr@vt.edu. If you wish to
> unsubscribe, or modify your preferences please visit
> http://mailman.listserve.com/l... ***
>
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Subject: Where the Alcids be?
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 15:45 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 
Just finished a run from Ft Story to Rudee and not an alcid in sight.OBX?
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Subject: Florida Trip Part II - Tarpon Springs Area
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 15:18 pm
From: RoweRA AT vmi.edu
 
I was able to bird a few of the local parks in the Tarpon Springs area.  There must be 10 local parks and State Parks within about 30 minutes of where we were staying and all have the potential to be good birding spots.  Two of the parks, Honeymoon Island and Fred Howard are islands in the Gulf with connecting causeways.  Honeymoon Island is a eBird hotspot, but we didn't see much the day we were there.  I can see how it would be a great birding spot and worth visiting.  There are a number of trails that would allow easy birding if you were looking for song birds.  There was one large inlet/bay that had a few shorebirds and a Reddish Egret.  Access was limited and I slogged through a lot of oozy mangrove stuff to get some of the shots.  Fred Howard St. Park is in Tarpon Springs and really is just an small island with parking lot and a causeway.  Along the beach there was a cluster of larger shorebirds that were rather tame (used to people).  I was able to walk right up to the
birds for photography. There were about 10 Marbled Godwits, Willets, Laughing Gulls, a single Black-bellied Plover, a few Least SP, and 2 Whimbrels. I've worked hard to get Whimbrel photos at Chincoteague, so to have them at about 20ft and not moving was fun. On our way to Fred Howard park we drove past the water treatment plant - there must have been 1000 Redheads on one of the ponds. I've never seen so many in one place.

We visited Phillipe Park on Safety Harbor (north end of the Tampa Bay complex) in search of spoonbills. No luck with the spoonbills, but there were lots of Wh. Ibis, Little Blue and Louisiana Herons, and a Great Horned Owl on a nest. The owl nest was in a lovely, huge live oak with Spanish moss - quintessential southern sprawling live-oak tree. The tree was literally in one of the parking lots at Phillipe and photos were easy to get. We went to the other side of Safety Harbor - to Mobbly Point/Park to look for a Brown Booby that had been reported hanging out on the high tension towers - there could have been one there but I have no evidence other than a sort of suggestive photograph.

Tarpon Springs is known for the sponge docks (it is a major sponge harvesting port) and for manatees. There is a park in town with an inlet from the Gulf that the manatees frequent in cold weather. It wasn't cold that day but we did see 3 manatees - I took some photos but really they just look like blobs of grey flesh in the water.

I've post some photos from the Tarpon Springs area on Flickr if you are interested:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Dick Rowe
VMI Biology
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Subject: eBird -- Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve -- Feb 22, 2017
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 12:47 pm
From: nardonet AT verizon.net
 
Seven people participated in the Northern Virginia Bird Club walk at Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve this morning.  We had a good outing; the highlight was a Merlin seen preening on a snag across the inlet near footbridge on Hull road.  The complete list is shown below.


Feb 22, 2017
8:30 AM
Traveling
2.50 miles
206 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.4.2 Build 114

500 Canada Goose
3 American Wigeon
50 Mallard
3 Northern Shoveler
4 Ring-necked Duck
300 Lesser Scaup
5 Bufflehead
9 Common Merganser
5 Red-breasted Merganser
25 Double-crested Cormorant
9 Great Blue Heron
2 Turkey Vulture
1 Cooper's Hawk
4 Bald Eagle
250 Ring-billed Gull
1 Herring Gull
2 Great Black-backed Gull
4 Mourning Dove
6 Red-bellied Woodpecker
6 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Pileated Woodpecker
1 Merlin
12 Blue Jay
17 American Crow
17 Fish Crow
12 Carolina Chickadee
6 Tufted Titmouse
1 Brown Creeper
1 Winter Wren
9 Carolina Wren
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
25 American Robin
1 Northern Mockingbird
7 European Starling
6 White-throated Sparrow
3 Song Sparrow
1 Swamp Sparrow
4 Northern Cardinal
8 Red-winged Blackbird
22 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
1 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 44


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow in James City County
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 12:46 pm
From: va-bird AT listserve.com
 

The Clay-colored Sparrow was again at my feeder today. If anyone has an interest in more details, feel free to email me directly.

Brian Taber
CVWO
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Subject: Painted Bunting adult male
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 9:25 am
From: 20cabot AT gmail.com
 
Hi all, We were fortunate (the right place at the right time) to look out
our living room window this a.m. to discover a yellow-rumped and the
bunting both bathing in our front yard bird bath. The bunting then flew off
to the back of a hedge to preen. I was able to get some so-so photos (sharp
photos of the hedge, not so much the bird). Hopefully the bird will stick
around. Dave Gibson, Chesapeake
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Subject: Kingbird Highway - another book for the life list.
Date: Wed Feb 22 2017 9:03 am
From: djoslyn48 AT gmail.com
 
I just finished and would recommend Life List by Olivia Gentile, which is a
biography of Phoebe Snetsinger, the woman who was given a year to live with
cancer and decided to go birding around the world and ended up breaking the
all-time record for most species.

Sincerely,
Daniel Joslyn
Arlington, VA

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 7:44 PM, Jim G wrote:

> Good Evening Birders,
>
> With work, budgets and other constraints, I don't get near enough time to
> go birding. Luckily, I have found that reading can partly satisfy my
> insatiable birding desires.
>
> Without going into detail, I can say with conviction that you must read
> Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman. Considering this was published in 1997,
> some might think I'm a little late, but it was certainly an entertaining,
> educational and even emotional read for this 31 year novice birder. In
> fact, using my smartphone to quickly look up unfamiliar birds mentioned by
> Kenn, made the book so much more enjoyable. I recommend that approach.
>
> Other books on my list include:
>
> The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
> The Thing With Feathers - Noah Strycker
> Snapper - Brian Kimberling
>
> Have fun,
>
> Jim Gould
> Southern Shores, NC
>
> Born and raised and still bird in Hopewell, VA.
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