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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on February 22, 2020, 2:10 pm

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22 Feb: @ 14:04:03  BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 23, 2020 [Ellen Blackstone]
22 Feb: @ 13:14:22  Apparent American Wigeon x Green-winged Teal hybrid at Three Crabs yesterday (2/21) [Brian Pendleton]
22 Feb: @ 11:27:55  Spring 2020 Klickitat County North American Migration Count to be held Saturday, May 9th.. [Bob Hansen]
22 Feb: @ 08:53:58  Siberian Accentor Continues [Scott Downes]
21 Feb: @ 19:04:38  Nice two-fer, razor clan limit and Glaucous Gull [Chazz Hesselein]
21 Feb: @ 15:40:24  Anyone In the Bothell Area Want to Collect a Dead Cooper's Hawk? [Jeremy Schwartz]
21 Feb: @ 11:44:39  Siberian Accentor [Peter H Wimberger]
21 Feb: @ 08:58:17  Eurasian wigeon, Clark Co, WA [Bob]
20 Feb: @ 22:05:03  Skagit County Birding [Hank H]
20 Feb: @ 21:26:07  Snowy Owls [merdave]
20 Feb: @ 20:20:03  Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 02-20-2020 [Denis DeSilvis]
20 Feb: @ 19:13:14  EBird update [AMK17]
20 Feb: @ 18:52:02  Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-20 [birdmarymoor]
20 Feb: @ 17:51:31  Black Ducks? [Richard Walker]
20 Feb: @ 17:44:54  Black Ducks? [Richard Walker]
20 Feb: @ 17:03:33 Re: Siberian Accentor [David Heath]
20 Feb: @ 12:51:22  Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk on 2/19/2020 [Shep Thorp]
20 Feb: @ 12:46:40  Birding By Ear Class [Brian Zinke]
20 Feb: @ 10:06:20  Seattle Audubon Master Birder info meeting [Teri Martine]
20 Feb: @ 07:39:41  Goose Island and drive between heading to Alamo Inn [Vicki Biltz]
19 Feb: @ 16:54:46 Re: Siberian Accentor yesterday [Faye McAdams Hands]
19 Feb: @ 15:02:32  Nesting activity [Anna]
18 Feb: @ 22:46:59  Program in Tacoma - Birding in the Disunited States of America [B B]
18 Feb: @ 20:55:20  RFI: Birding Tulalip Bay [Vicki King]
18 Feb: @ 18:08:21  Town Hall Seattle - Pacific Flyway Wed. 2/19 [Diane Weinstein]
18 Feb: @ 11:58:40  WOS Winter Trip 2/15-2/17 to Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau [Shep Thorp]
18 Feb: @ 10:49:38  Birding 101 Class (kid & adult friendly) [Brian Zinke]
18 Feb: @ 10:26:28  Siberian Accentor [byers345]
18 Feb: @ 09:59:20  Siberian Accentor yesterday [Constance Sidles]
18 Feb: @ 00:04:02  Trip advice sought for Puerto Vallarta [Ian Young]
17 Feb: @ 23:54:46  thanks Will and Louise for directions re: Siberian Accentor [Megan Lyden]
17 Feb: @ 22:36:02  Fir Island Gyrfalcon, etc [Gary Bletsch]
17 Feb: @ 20:36:46 Re: Zeiss customer service - excellent [Patti Loesche]
17 Feb: @ 20:35:23 Re: Bird migration video [Robert O'Brien]
17 Feb: @ 20:29:50 Re: Bird migration video [Robert O'Brien]
17 Feb: @ 19:24:03  Bird migration video [Jennifer Jarstad]
17 Feb: @ 15:56:53 Re: Zeiss post [J Christian Kessler]
17 Feb: @ 15:18:25  Zeiss post [crazydave65]
17 Feb: @ 14:39:34  Zeiss customer service - the other side of the coin [Jim Forrester]
17 Feb: @ 11:53:40  Zeiss customer service, an oxymoron [crazydave65]
17 Feb: @ 01:09:02  Swift-like bird—thoughts? [Dee Dee]
17 Feb: @ 00:04:38 Re: Night Bird ID [Bill Anderson]
16 Feb: @ 23:08:30  Night Bird ID [Dayna yalowicki]
16 Feb: @ 20:33:21  Skagit Eared Grebe [Gary Bletsch]
16 Feb: @ 18:44:36  Long-tailed Duck at Green Lake is dead [Dave Slager]
16 Feb: @ 14:43:59  Siberian Accentor [Michael Eaton]
16 Feb: @ 13:56:42  Siberian Accentor [Ian Paulsen]
16 Feb: @ 02:12:49  National Parks Traveler: Former Interior Officials Urge Bernhardt Not To Change Migratory Bird Act [Dan Reiff]
16 Feb: @ 01:41:45  The Oklahoman: Lesser Prairie Chicken program undergoing changes [Dan Reiff]
16 Feb: @ 01:11:22  Spotting scope for sale [James David Greene]





Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 23, 2020
Date: Sat Feb 22 2020 14:04 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hey, Tweeters,

BirdNote turned 15 on February 21. Here are 15 things you might not have known about the program:
https://www.birdnote.org/blog/...
============================
Heard last week on BirdNote:
* The Crane Wife
http://bit.ly/1PHfbc5
* The Regal Great Blue Heron
http://bit.ly/1vI3oCw
* Mockingbirds Are Southerners
http://bit.ly/38PFt9x
* Cranes' Voices Across the Globe
http://bit.ly/2CueNdu
* Nest Cavities - Book Early! Limited Supply!
http://bit.ly/2G3A5RE
* Pigeons Love Cities - But We Loved Them First
http://bit.ly/2Tii6PF
* How Birds' Names Change
http://bit.ly/2ltKC24
========================Next week on BirdNote: Crow Funerals,
Kirtland's Warbler - A Conservation Success,
Lily-trotters ... Jacanas! -- and more
http://bit.ly/38NeH1K
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:[email protected]
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bird...
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podca...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Apparent American Wigeon x Green-winged Teal hybrid at Three Crabs yesterday (2/21)
Date: Sat Feb 22 2020 13:14 pm
From: kc7wpd AT hotmail.com
 
Ed Newbold, Delia Scholes and I observed an apparent American Wigeon x Green-winged Teal hybrid at Three Crabs yesterday. The bird was a male swimming with several American Wigeon not far off the beach. It was slightly smaller than the wigeon with smaller and darker bill. Overall pattern similar to wigeon but with uniform tan head (including the crown), pinkish gray breast, gray flanks, pale gray bar separating breast from sides, black pointed tail like wigeon but with much more limited and grayish white in front of the black of the tail. The green of the face was slightly more bluish than on American Wigeon. Speculum not seen.
We were not able to get good photos.

Brian Pendleton



Subject: Spring 2020 Klickitat County North American Migration Count to be held Saturday, May 9th..
Date: Sat Feb 22 2020 11:27 am
From: bobhansen AT gorge.net
 
Folks, This is an save the date email regarding the Spring 2020 Klickitat County North American Migration Count. It will be  held Saturday, May 9th..

Thanks to Randy Robinson, you can observe our Spring 2019 (last year) results at ”””>. https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy...

For a history of the Spring results, click here ”> https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy...

More details to follow in April.

Let me know if you are interested and share with others who you think might be interested.

Happy birding,
Bob



Subject: Siberian Accentor Continues
Date: Sat Feb 22 2020 8:53 am
From: downess AT charter.net
 
Seen at 6:43 in the apple tree this morning.

Scott Downes
[email protected]
Yakima Wa
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http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Nice two-fer, razor clan limit and Glaucous Gull
Date: Fri Feb 21 2020 19:04 pm
From: chazz AT hesselein.com
 
I™m at the Grayland State Beach beach vehicle access looking at a Glaucous Gull after getting a quick limit of razor clams. Nice two-fer for the last day of the fishing license year.

Chazz Hesselein
Port Orchard
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Tweeters mailing list
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http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Anyone In the Bothell Area Want to Collect a Dead Cooper's Hawk?
Date: Fri Feb 21 2020 15:40 pm
From: jschwartz1124 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

I work in the North Creek area of Bothell, not far from the UW Bothell
Campus. I'm just east of 405 from the campus.

On a lunch walk just now I discovered a dead Cooper's Hawk in the grass
along one of the stretches of gravel path that threads through the office
park. It looks to be an adult and pretty well intact. No predation that I
can see. There are no windows immediately near the trail, but it could have
theoretically bounced off a nearby office window, flew to a nearby tree and
then collapsed.

I've called the Burke Museum and Seattle Audubon offices, but they both
would require me to keep it and deliver it to them, which is not as
feasible right now with me being at work. Anyone living nearby who might be
able to take it? If anyone is interested, reply to me individually and I
can share my cell phone number.

Thanks, and keep watching the skies!
Jeremy in Bothell
jschwartz1124 AT gmail DOT com



Subject: Siberian Accentor
Date: Fri Feb 21 2020 11:44 am
From: pwimberger AT pugetsound.edu
 
Tweets,
The accentor was seen by a small group this morning at 702 in the Apple tree with some juncos. It flew off shortly afterwards. This may have already been suggested, but I wonder if it likes that spot because the huge clump of bamboo behind the house is similar to some vegetation in the normal China wintering areas?
Peter Wimberger
Tacoma

Phone sent - so short



Subject: Eurasian wigeon, Clark Co, WA
Date: Fri Feb 21 2020 8:58 am
From: rflores_2 AT msn.com
 
Had a male yesterday at 1:30 in a mixed group of waterfowl across Lower River Road from Frenchman's Bar Regional Park.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Skagit County Birding
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 22:05 pm
From: hank.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
> Yesterday we returned from a two day birding trip to Skagit County with a stop in Stanwood on the way.  The weather was beautiful and the birds were very co-operative.  Here are some of our favorite sightings.
>
> Wiley Slough:
> Northern Waterthrush (no photo) and 2 Black Phoebes.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> March Point near Anacortes.
> Very long scoped view of Long-tailed Ducks.
>
> Intersection of Avon Allen & Josh Wilson Roads west of Burlington:
> Golden Eagle.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Across the road from 8840 Thomle Road south of Stanwood.
> 2 Yellow-headed Blackbirds.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Bay View State Park.
> Hermit Thrush (missed 2 photo ops!) and a Hutton's Vireo.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Photo album for the trip.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>



Subject: Snowy Owls
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 21:26 pm
From: merdave AT homenetnw.net
 
Hi,  I was wondering if anyone has seen a Snowy Owl near Atkins Lake this
week? Thanks, Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 02-20-2020
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 20:20 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

It was a gorgeous day for a walk around the frosty JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course - 26degF start to 47degF finish. The major highlight for the nine of us was seeing two RED-TAILED HAWKS carrying nesting material to the established nest at Hodge Lake. (Two young fledged from this nest last year.) In addition, we saw ducks at three different water sites on the course. In addition to the birds, we spotted 12 black-tailed deer (in groups of 4-5-3); one raccoon; and one Douglas squirrel.



Of note for this this week: A JBLM employee showed us a photo of an owl that had been found recently on the ground near the maintenance shed. Rather than the Great Horned Owl we were expecting to see, it was a Barred Owl. Only one Barred Owl has been seen on the JBLM bird walks since 2013, so this might be a species for which we should be on the alert.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

* March 19

* April 16

* May 21

Anyone is welcome to join us!



From the eBird report:

32 species (+1 other taxa)



Canada Goose 4 On ground near the maintenance pond.

American Wigeon 5 Hodge Lake

Mallard 8 Hodge Lake and Maintenance Pond

Ring-necked Duck 9 Pond at 9th hole green and Hodge Lake

Bufflehead 12 Pond at 9th hole green; Hodge Lake; and Maintenance Pond

Anna's Hummingbird 5

Red-tailed Hawk 2 Two adult birds carrying nesting material to established nest at Hodge Lake.

Downy Woodpecker 1

Pileated Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 3

Hutton's Vireo 3

Steller's Jay 16

California Scrub-Jay 2

American/Northwestern Crow 12

Black-capped Chickadee 12

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 5

Bushtit 10

Golden-crowned Kinglet 10

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 10 All feeding together in one loose flock near 13th tee.

Red-breasted Nuthatch 5

Brown Creeper 1

Pacific Wren 8

Bewick's Wren 1

European Starling 4

Varied Thrush 1

American Robin 35

House Finch 7

Fox Sparrow 1

Dark-eyed Junco 16

Golden-crowned Sparrow 1

Song Sparrow 13

Spotted Towhee 4

Red-winged Blackbird 20 Maintenance Pond, then flying north in one flock



View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S6...

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com



Subject: EBird update
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 19:13 pm
From: amk17 AT earthlink.net
 
Any comments on the eBird ap update?  I am not impressed and it makes using the ap an unfriendly annoying experience.  Is there away to restore the old ap as an option?  Does anyone know?

Thanks
AKopitov
Seattle

AMK17
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Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-02-20
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 18:52 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
 
Tweets “ it was a frosty 29 degrees to start the walk, but it warmed due to no wind and bright sunshine.  It feels unfamiliar to even type sun.  Pretty birdy at times too.  The water has mostly receded, though the southern end of the off-leash Dog Area is still closed.  But we were able to get to the boardwalk from the east end.  The boardwalk had only a little water over one section (2), but had a fair amount of debris left from the flooding.  Luckily, while much of it was actually floating for about a week, it managed to settle relatively level.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose “ probably 2000 total, with many landing on the grass soccer fields
b.. American Wigeon “ still a half-dozen in the slough; the remaining interior ponds were iced over
c.. Common Merganser “ 1 or 2 female-type
d.. Green Heron “ one at the Rowing Club
e.. Cooper™s Hawk “ several sightings, at least 2 birds
f.. Barn Owl “ distant views from the Viewing Mound
g.. Short-eared/Long-eared Owl “ since we™ve had sightings of both species this year already, I can™t presume the species from the brief views we had from the Viewing Mound
h.. Hairy Woodpecker “ male at Rowing Club
i.. Northern Shrike “ juvenile in East Meadow
j.. House Finch “ Three flyovers “ probably at least 4 birds! Shocking that that™s shocking
k.. Pine Siskin “ small flock(s), making for a 2-finch day!
l.. Western Meadowlark “ 7-10 in the East Meadow, with singing heard
m.. TOWNSEND™S WARBLER “ one flycatching NE of the Clise Mansion (over the Art Barn). First of Year
We also saw American Beaver predawn, and a dead possum in the Dog Meadow. At the Rowing Club, we had our first RED-EARED SLIDER of the year (first turtle of any kind).

Misses today included Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, and Purple Finch.

For the day, 57 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= [email protected]



Subject: Black Ducks?
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 17:51 pm
From: RichardAWalker AT outlook.com
 
Sorry for the second post, just read the guidelines about including location and email.
Richard Walker
richardawalker at outlook dot com
Olympia WA


Sent from Outlook



Subject: Black Ducks?
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 17:44 pm
From: RichardAWalker AT outlook.com
 
Hello,
Newby here, both on this site and to the world of birding.
Today (2/20/20) my wife and I visited Fort Borst Park in Centralia.
Among the 75 gulls, and about 30 Mallards was a pair of all nearly black ducks.
Their bills were yellow/orange like a Mallard, although not as bright.
When I got a closer look at one of them in direct sunlight, I could see a slight greenish hue to the head, and some slight colors in its wing feather. The other stayed in the shadow of a small bush for the most part, but had the same slight colors to the parts of the wings in the sunlight. Feet were orange-ish, not as bright as the Mallards.
The closest I could find on line is Cayuga Ducks, a domesticated duck.
I did get several good photos but no idea if its possible or how to upload photos here.
Any help?
Thanks,
Richard Walker





Sent from Outlook



Subject: Siberian Accentor
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 17:03 pm
From: drheath82 AT frontier.com
 
I was particularly struck by Connie's description of the Accentor taking
flight. Serendipitously, I just happened to catch exactly such a moment
the day I went to gawk at the bird. For those who haven't seen it on
OBOL, here's the link:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

David
Portland


> And it was. Dark face mask, buffy supercilium, tawny breast, warbler-like bill, plumped-up body, a bird bearing the whiff of Siberian birch and conifer forests. It paused in the tangle of apple branches, then hopped up to the top of the T, just as it has always done. There it surveyed the landscape, taking its time, giving us all fantastic looks, long enough for three people to share my scope. I think our smiles must have brightened the sky itself. Then it spread its wings, pushed off with its tiny feet, and blasted away at great speed into dense vegetation. Oh, oh.
>
> Sometimes chases are the sublimest form of happiness. - Connie, Seattle
>
> [email protected]
>
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Subject: Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk on 2/19/2020
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 12:51 pm
From: shepthorp AT gmail.com
 
Dear Tweets,

we had great weather yesterday for our Wednesday Walk with sunny skies and
temperatures in the 30's to 50's degrees Fahrenheit. There was a Low
7.83ft Tide at 9:35am and a High 12.14ft Tide at 1:51pm. Highlights
included good numbers and singing HUTTON'S VIREO, re-found and showy
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, nesting BALD EAGLEs, transient TREE SWALLOWs, high
count LEAST SANDPIPER with WESTERN SANDPIPER in the mix, and GREAT HORNED
OWL.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, we had nice looks
of RING-NECKED DUCK, GADWALL, BUFFLEHEAD, and HOODED MERGANSER.

The Orchard was fairly active with good sightings of BLACK-CAPPED
CHICKADEE, BROWN CREEPER, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, and
DOWNY WOODPECKER. There were several HUTTON'S VIREOS singing in the area
and we got good looks of at least three individuals, one perched and
preened and provided great observation for 5 minutes. Other species seen
included GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW.

The flooded fields along the Access Road south and west were great for
CACKLING GEESE, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, AMERICAN WIGEON,
GREEN-WINGED TEAL, MALLARD and AMERICAN COOT. Eric re-found our
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK in the tree line along the restricted central access
road in between the old McAllister Creek Road and the Twin Barns. The hawk
was observed perched, hunting and flying providing great looks at
approximately 1/8th mile distance. Since seeing this bird in December,
it's plumage has changed and looks much more adult with red-brown coverts
over the carpi giving a "red-shouldered" appearance. As well, the barring
on the tail and wings is more contrasted than previously seen. As the bird
flew from the hunting grounds to the stand southeast of the access road,
the white translucent crescents of the primaries were prominent and flashy,
helping to demonstrate the more rapid and shallower wing beat of this small
buteo in contrast to the many Red-tailed Hawk at the Refuge. I suspect
that with the warmer weather, the Garter Snakes are sun bathing adjacent to
all our access roads and dikes, providing a improved source of prey for the
Red-shouldered Hawk, in contrast to the very cold and wet weather of late
December, January and early February, were this individual might need to
hunt elsewhere...

The Twin Barns Loop Trail was good for PIED-BILLED GREBE, SPOTTED TOWHEE,
PACIFIC WREN, MARSH WREN and DOWNY WOODPECKER. Its been a couple weeks
since we have seen any Sora or Virginia Rail south of the cut-off to the
Twin Barns.

The Twin Barns Overlook has had some recent work with pressure washing and
the removal of some Alder Trees north across the slough. This allows for
improved visibility onto the surge plain and much better traction for
walking. We had great looks of SONG SPARROW, FOX SPARROW, and additional
Northern Pintail, Green Winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, American Wigeon and
American Coot. We have not been able to relocate the Eurasian Green-winged
Teal seen a few weeks ago.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, a pair of BALD EAGLES from
the south nest sites along McAllister Creek are building a new nest in a
tall Cottonwood along the Nisqually River northeast of the surge plain.
Without leaves, the looks are golden right now, as the pair bonds and
steadfastly reinforces their new "chosen" nest site. Depending on the
tides, best observed between 9ft to 12ft, the surge plain is great for
GREATER YELLOWLEGS, DUNLIN, RING-BILLED GULL, MEW GULL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL,
AMERICAN WIGEON, GADWALL and NORTHERN SHOVELER. In general, the Norther
Shoveler and Northern Pintail tend to prefer the fresh water flooded fields
over the estuary, but depending on the water level, good numbers of
shovelers can be seen in the surge plain and pintail are seen in the
flooded mudflats west of Leschi Slough. Green winged Teal and American
Wigeon prefer the tidally influenced areas and number vary depending on the
tides. In general, as birds begin to migrate, we might be seeing the
beginning in decline of our winter resident numbers as they take flight
north. We also had great looks at NORTHERN HARRIER, WESTERN MEADOWLARK x
2, and approximately 4 TREE SWALLOWS flew overhead. A lot of MARSH WREN
are very active in the fresh water marsh, as well RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. We
may have seen a LINCOLN'S SPARROW along the outside of the dike as we
walked along.

The Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail is also having work done. As many of
you already know, our new longer bridge (from 45ft to 140ft) is in place
over the tributary channel from the mud flats to Shannon Slough. As well,
the photo blind is gone and replaced by an observation deck, to prevent
misuse of this space. From the boards, we had very nice looks of COMMON
GOLDENEYE, BUFFLEHEAD, SURF SCOTER, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER, COMMON MERGANSER, HOODED MERGANSER and BELTED KINGFISHER. The
incoming high tide of 12ft at 1:50pm, while we walked 12p-2p, was perfect
for counting and evaluating high counts of LEAST SANDPIPER approximately
400. From the Observation Tower at the start, to the Puget Sound Viewing
Platform at the terminus, Least Sandpipers were everywhere at the waters
edge. Motivated to find something rare, we picked out 5 WESTERN SANDPIPERs
and 1 DUNLIN in the mix. I suspect this high count is reflective of early
migrants arriving at the Refuge, but I don't know... From the Puget Sound
Viewing Platform we observed good numbers of BLACK BRANT, BRANDT'S
CORMORANT, COMMON LOON, RED-THROATED LOON, HORNED GREBE, GREATER SCAUP,
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, "OLYMPIC" GULL, and many GREAT BLUE HERONS.

On our return, we picked up GREAT HORNED OWL in a large Y shaped Cottonwood
Tree on the inside of the Twin Barns Loop Trail, east side, across from the
"beaver deceiver dam". Only one adult has been seen with no evidence of
young this year, yet...

We observed 66 species and have 91 species for the year. Early spring is
in the air with the arrival of Tree Swallows and singing Hutton's Vireos.
Mammals seen include Eastern Gray Squirrel, and Harbor Seal. Several
Garter Snakes were observed and frogs were croaking.

Until next Wednesday when we will do it all over again, happy birding!

Shep and the Wednesday Walk

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742



Subject: Birding By Ear Class
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 12:46 pm
From: zinke.pilchuck AT gmail.com
 
Greetings all!

Pilchuck Audubon Society is hosting a Birding By Ear class in Everett, WA
on April 21 & 28 (2-part lecture) with an optional field trip on April 26.

For more information on the class and how to register, please use the links
below:

Pilchuck Audubon website:
https://www.pilchuckaudubon.or...

Pilchuck Audubon Facebook event:
https://www.facebook.com/event...

Thanks,

Brian Zinke
Everett, WA
[email protected]

--
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
Pilchuck Audubon Society
[email protected]
www.pilchuckaudubon.org
c: (425) 232-6811



Subject: Seattle Audubon Master Birder info meeting
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 10:06 am
From: terimartine AT me.com
 
Dear birders. If you™re interested in Seattle Audubon™s Master Birder class taught by Dennis Paulson, a one-hour information meeting is coming up this Monday, Feb. 24, 7 p.m. at the Wedgwood Presbyterian Church, 8008 35th NE, at the south end of Seattle Audubon™s block but enter from the cross street, NE 80th. Details about the Master Birder program are on the Seattle Audubon website at https://www.seattleaudubon.org...  Be sure to read the sidebar at the right side of the webpage for upcoming dates, including the March 7 application deadline.The information meeting is an opportunity to learn more about this exceptional program and what it involves. Cheers and good birding,
Teri Martine
Seattle Audubon volunteer
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Goose Island and drive between heading to Alamo Inn
Date: Thu Feb 20 2020 7:39 am
From: vickibiltz AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweets,  Susan and I Started from San Antonio to The Goose Island State
Park area, and then to Alamo Inn on Monday, Feb 17th.
Birds
Great Tailed Grackles, whose counting?
Black Vultures
Turkey Vultures
Red Tail Hawks
White Tailed Hawk
Harris Hawks
Sandhill Cranes 6 or more
Whooping Cranes 8 total
American White Pelicans
Brown Pelicans 2
Curlews 4-5
Greater Yellowlegs 2
Vermillion Flycatcher. 1
Roseate Spoinbills. 30 one location
Yellow Crowned Night Heron juvenile 1
Snowy Egrets a lot
Great Egrets 20 +
Killdeer several pairs
Spotted Sandpiper 1 juvenile
Anhinga 3
Red Headed Ducks. 50+
Blue Winged Teals 30 total
Gadwalls.
Northern Shovelers
Mallard. 1 pair
Pie Billed Grebe 3
American Coots. Large rafts
Ruby Crowned Kinglet 3
Black Crested titmouse. 5 +
Northern cardinals 7+
Great Kiskadee 8-10
Couches Kingbird 1
Eastern Bluebird, 1 pair
Yellow Rumps 10+
Crested Caracaras
Ospreys
Ladder Backed Woodpeckers 1 pair
Laughing Gulls numerous
Herring Gull 1
Eastern phoebe
Mockingbirds many!!!
Brown Headed Cowbirds 6
This was in the little town before you enter the park.
The following day we were accompanied by Mary Beth as our guide and that
list should be on my E-Bird.
That would be the 18.
Yesterday the 19, highlights were
Red Crowned Parrot 5 Valley Nature center
Butterfly Museum was recorded on my EBird as well, 3Audubon orioles being
the highlight, as well as McCalls Eastern Screech Owl.
White Tailed Kite
On the way out of Butterfly Museum

The rest of the day was chilly and damp. Not as much bird activity.
Today it™s rainy so far, so we™re getting a later start. only my cameras
have raincoats
Vicki Biltz
Buckley Wa 97321

Currently We (Susan Davison and I) are at Alamo Inn.
Happy birding





--



[email protected]
http://www.flickr.com/photos/s...



Subject: Siberian Accentor yesterday
Date: Wed Feb 19 2020 16:54 pm
From: zest4parus AT hotmail.com
 
Thank you Connie!
As always, I could see and enjoy every word!

Happy Birding,
Faye


Faye McAdams Hands

Life is Simple -- Eat, Sleep, Bird.

________________________________
From: Tweeters on behalf of Constance Sidles
Sent: Tuesday, February 18, 2020 8:00 AM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Siberian Accentor yesterday

Hey tweets, John and I made our second (and successful) try for the Siberian Accentor early yesterday morning, leaving Seattle at 3:15 a.m. to be sure to arrive before 7:00, when the bird was reliably reported to pop out of hiding on the car side of the road, leap into the apple tree of the poor guy who owns it, perch at the top of a t-shaped branch for a few minutes, then rocket off to other bushes, trees, and stumps, where it would appear briefly to tanatalize birders for the rest of the day.

Our first attempt happened on Saturday, when I led a small group of Birds in Flight intermediate birders on a field trip to Nisqually to study flapping patterns of waterfowl and raptors. Not finding many such flappers on site - a local birder told us the fields have become so flooded that grazing waterfowl have departed for parts unknown, followed by the raptors - we debated about what to do. One student decided to join another group of birders and explore Nisqually, but our car decided to drive over to Woodland Bottoms to find the accentor. Half of us had never chased a bird before; the other half had done so only too many times but didn't want to discourage the newbies by telling the many times we had chased, only to be told:
you should have been here 10 minutes ago;
the bird you want to find is nothing more than an escapee;
the bird is right over there in that tree (one of thousands), you know, the tree with all those branches - can't you see it? Oops, there it goes.

We arrived in a driving rainstorm and joined a group of rather forlorn birders who had missed the bird by 3 minutes, 10 minutes, an hour - the times varied but the facial expressions did not. As we slowly got soaked and cold, a tiny bird way off in a willow tree hopped out briefly among a troop of juncos, then dove back into the brush. I thought it might be the accentor, but my glasses were foggy, my scope was drippy, the light was bad, and the distance was great. Humph.

We waited around for another hour, then climbed back into the car to head for home. "So, that was a chase," remarked one of our passengers. "Now I can say I've been on my first chase. It will also be my last chase."

It takes a special kind of birder to appreciate a rarity chase. For one thing, you have to accept that some chases, even many chases, will end up in disappointment. No bird. And even when you see the bird, the experience is somewhat lacking: you aren't seeing the bird in its accustomed habitat, so you get no sense of how it really lives. You don't understand its being, and for me anyway, this diminishes the sense of connection to the wild that I value so much. If you're a chaser, you're probably also a lister, meaning, you find it fun to tick off new birds on your life list. For dedicated listers, this is enough.

I am a lister. I have always been a lister. I suppressed my list lust for two decades, as I became more and more attached to Montlake Fill and to the birds who come here. In the process, I grew to feel deeply connected to a place. I belong to the Fill. It is my spiritual home. It is where I learn about human nature as well as wild nature. It inspires my writing. The birds here lift me out of my material existence to a plane of pure beauty and joy. But I still love to list.

I've asked myself why this is so. The best answer I can give is, finding new species comforts me when I worry about the impact we humans are having on nature. We are destroying so much that took nature millions of years to create. What sadness, regret, guilt. I yearn to travel back in time to see wonders that no longer exist. Yet the world is still filled with diversity. Life is abundant, resilient. There is hope.

These thoughts ran through my mind as we drove in the dark yesterday. The fat crescent of the moon spilled golden light across the sky, lighting our way. When we reached Stenerson Road, no one stirred. We had arrived a full hour before first light. The night was quiet, with only the occasional train whistle sending lonely cries into the dark. We huddled in the car and tried to sleep, but we were too keyed up. What lay ahead, we did not know: the day could produce a radiant smile on my face, or the little brave smile I paste over my disappointment so the other birders think I am a serious adult.

As the sky began to pale, more birders showed up, until there were nine cars lined up behind us. Then the first note of the dawn chorus sounded, and I sprang out of the car, set up my camp stool and scope, and awaited developments. The light slowly grew brighter, and the fog that clung to the fields drifted over toward us, veiling the grasses and low bushes. A pair of Sandhill Cranes passed overhead, misty swirls of gray parting the fog briefly before disappearing. The sky turned pink, and small birds began to arrive in the apple tree - juncos, a robin, a Song Sparrow, then, "It's him!" cried one of birders.

And it was. Dark face mask, buffy supercilium, tawny breast, warbler-like bill, plumped-up body, a bird bearing the whiff of Siberian birch and conifer forests. It paused in the tangle of apple branches, then hopped up to the top of the T, just as it has always done. There it surveyed the landscape, taking its time, giving us all fantastic looks, long enough for three people to share my scope. I think our smiles must have brightened the sky itself. Then it spread its wings, pushed off with its tiny feet, and blasted away at great speed into dense vegetation. Oh, oh.

Sometimes chases are the sublimest form of happiness. - Connie, Seattle

[email protected]
[email protected]



Subject: Nesting activity
Date: Wed Feb 19 2020 15:02 pm
From: amk17 AT earthlink.net
 
About 4 weeks ago, juncos were gathering nesting material from the yard.  Today, a pair if Bewick™s wrens we™re cautiously constructing a nest in an old kitchen vent that I thought wAs closed enough for house sparrows. But the industrious wrens managed to find just enough room to squeeze in.  Amusing wAtching them try to enter with small twigs but they manage!

Happy birding.

AKopitov
Seattle

Sent from my iPhone with all the auto correct quirks.
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Program in Tacoma - Birding in the Disunited States of America
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 22:46 pm
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
After an unexpected change in plans of the original speaker, I will be giving a Presentation to Tacoma's ABC Group tomorrow (Wednesday February 18). The Program starts at 6:45 p.m. at the UPlace Library. The address is 3609 Market Place W, Suite 100, University Place, WA.
The program is "50/50/50: A Passionate Birding Adventure" and is an account and reflection of my search for diversity and commonality as I looked for 50 species on single days in each of the 50 states in the company of local birders. Everyone is welcome.



Subject: RFI: Birding Tulalip Bay
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 20:55 pm
From: vkbirder AT gmail.com
 
If anyone has birded Tulalip Bay, I would appreciate any information you
can share about what birding there is like.

Thank you,
Vicki King,



Subject: Town Hall Seattle - Pacific Flyway Wed. 2/19
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 18:08 pm
From: diane_weinstein AT msn.com
 
I just learned of the Pacific Flyway Town Hall Seattle event tomorrow evening.  It looks like it will be an interesting and informative program.

Diane Weinstein
Sammamish

https://townhallseattle.org/ev...
[https://122g2g321ipu7384u15dtr...
Pacific Flyway (2/19) Town Hall Seattle
Located in the Forum, The OTTO Bar is a great spot to meet with friends before an event or keep the conversation going afterward. You can purchase beer, wine, and non-alcoholic beverages or bring in your own snacks and non-alcoholic drinks to enjoy.
townhallseattle.org



Subject: WOS Winter Trip 2/15-2/17 to Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 11:58 am
From: shepthorp AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweets!

quick update on another super fun Washington Ornithological Society Winter
Trip to Okanogan Highlands and Waterville Plateau Saturday February 15th
through Monday February 17th. Highlights included CHUKAR, GOLDEN EAGLE,
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL, SNOW BUNTING, GRAY-CROWNED ROSY
FINCH, NORTHERN-SAW-WHET OWL and SNOWY OWL. Misses... for the first time
in the last 10 years we observed NO Sharp-tailed Grouse, and could not
locate Gray Partridge despite extra efforts.

Scott Ramos and I led 19 members of WOS on this annual trip, and really
enjoyed our time in this wonderful region of our great state, the birding
was great and the collaboration and camaraderie was even more rewarding.
Thanks to all the participants for their energy and dedication.

Sat. 2/15: CHUKAR and GOLDEN EAGLE at *Fancher Road* off the
*Tonasket-Havillah
Road*. There are two eagle nests, same breeding pair, on the south east
face of the butte, great photos in morning light. Prairie Falcon was seen
by another group over the weekend. *Siwash Creek Road* was good for PYGMY
NUTHATCH, WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH, CLARKS NUTCRACKER, and low numbers of
RED-CROSSBILL. We observed three NORTHERN-PYGMY OWL on *Havillah
Road*, *Highland
SnoPark*, and *Hungry-Hollow Road*. 400+ SNOW BUNTING seen on *Nealy
Road* around
the first homestead after the turn off from *Havillah Road*, *WARNING- *owner
of homestead is disgruntled with birders stopping adjacent to home and
using optics- recommend stopping before or after the homestead. 200+ SNOW
BUNTING and MERLIN on *Teas Road*. 10+ AMERICAN TREE SPARROW in draw south
of *Chesaw Road* in between *Old Burnham Road* and *This A Way Road*.
On *Davies
Road,* in between *Fields Road *and *Brugh Road,* we observed a fly over of
100 GRAY-CROWNED ROSY-FINCH. Fantastic looks at ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK in all
locations. Despite historical reports, we dipped on Gray Partridge,
Townsends Solitaire, Bohemian Waxwing, and Pine Grosbeak. I've not seen
Sharp-tailed Grouse on Siwash Creek Road this year.

Sun. 2/16: 50+ TURKEYS and 2 NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL in *Conconully*.We located
a 150+ flock of GRAY-CROWNED ROSY-FINCH at the cattle paddock/pasture
across the road from Hess Lake Road. These birds were perched, flying
around, and foraging from the Beech Trees to the pasture, to the gulches on
the slope just west of Hess Lake north of *Conconully Road* - good photos.
Great looks at ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, RED-TAILED HAWK, and NORTHERN HARRIER.
We dipped on Red Crossbills, California Quail, and Pine Grosbeaks in
Conconully and could not find Sharp-tailed Grouse in *Scotch Creek
Wildlife* area
across from *Happy Hill Road* area (seen previously on scout trip three
weeks earlier) - another birder reported seeing 4 grouse at 3pm. The north
side of *Cameron Lake Road* had two RED CROSSBILLS, the only Crossbills
seen on the entire trip. *Washburn Island* was good for CASSIN'S FINCH,
PURPLE FINCH, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, WESTERN MEADOWLARK and water
fowl. *Bridgeport
State Park* was good for two GREAT HORNED OWL and two NORTHERN SAW-WHET
OWL. Many passerines including YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER.

Mon. 2/17: 2 SNOWY OWLS around *Atkins Lake*, 4 AMERICAN TREE SPARROW and
NORTHERN SHRIKE at the abandoned farm on *Heritage Road just south of 172*.
Many ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, RED-TAILED HAWK, and AMERICAN KESTREL on the
plateau, but the HORNED LARK are difficult to observe because there is NO
snow on *Waterville Plateau*. A single HARLANS HAWK was seen on *O Road
north of Waterville*. We also saw GREAT HORNED OWL. We dipped on
Sharp-tailed Grouse on Bridgeport Hill (which were seen on the scout trip
three weeks earlier). We could not relocate the 5 LONG-EARED OWL we
observed at the *Lamoine Windbreak* on 2/14 as I accidentally flushed them
by being too invasive in my search. Please consider birding the windbreak
with a birding buddy from either side of the tree line instead of walking
down the middle to prevent disruption of roosting birds (silence is
golden!). Despite three reports of Gyrfalcon in the northern plateau, we
were not able to relocate this sought after species. We also dipped on
Gray Partridge and Prairie Falcon (seen on scout three weeks earlier).

On 2/14 there were reports of 7 Snowy Owl around Atkins Lake, on 2/16 there
were reports of 4 birds, on 2/17 I could only find 2 birds. No snow and
warm and sunny conditions...

That's the quick report! I hope you have a chance to get out there and
enjoy Waterville Plateau and Okanogan Highlands this winter. Be careful,
drive safely, birding buddy up!

Happy birding,

Shep Thorp and the WOS Winter Trip
--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742



Subject: Birding 101 Class (kid & adult friendly)
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 10:49 am
From: zinke.pilchuck AT gmail.com
 
Greetings all!

Pilchuck Audubon Society is hosting a Birding 101 class in Edmonds, WA on
March 21 with a short field trip as the latter portion of the class. This a
kid friendly class (ages 8 and up), so please pass this along to any
friends and family who may be new to birding or interested in learning more.

For more information on the class and how to register, please use the links
below:

Pilchuck Audubon website:
https://www.pilchuckaudubon.or...

Pilchuck Audubon Facebook event:
https://www.facebook.com/event...
Thanks,

Brian Zinke
Everett, WA
[email protected]

--
Brian Zinke
Executive Director
Pilchuck Audubon Society
[email protected]
www.pilchuckaudubon.org
c: (425) 232-6811



Subject: Siberian Accentor
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 10:26 am
From: byers345 AT comcast.net
 
Hi Tweeters. The Siberian Accentor showed up at about 8:00 am in a tree at the corner of the fenced lot to the northeast of where we were standing at the end of Stenerson road. Charlotte Byers, EdmondsSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Siberian Accentor yesterday
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 9:59 am
From: constancesidles AT gmail.com
 
Hey tweets, John and I made our second (and successful) try for the Siberian Accentor early yesterday morning, leaving Seattle at 3:15 a.m. to be sure to arrive before 7:00, when the bird was reliably reported to pop out of hiding on the car side of the road, leap into the apple tree of the poor guy who owns it, perch at the top of a t-shaped branch for a few minutes, then rocket off to other bushes, trees, and stumps, where it would appear briefly to tanatalize birders for the rest of the day.

Our first attempt happened on Saturday, when I led a small group of Birds in Flight intermediate birders on a field trip to Nisqually to study flapping patterns of waterfowl and raptors. Not finding many such flappers on site - a local birder told us the fields have become so flooded that grazing waterfowl have departed for parts unknown, followed by the raptors - we debated about what to do. One student decided to join another group of birders and explore Nisqually, but our car decided to drive over to Woodland Bottoms to find the accentor. Half of us had never chased a bird before; the other half had done so only too many times but didn't want to discourage the newbies by telling the many times we had chased, only to be told:
you should have been here 10 minutes ago;
the bird you want to find is nothing more than an escapee;
the bird is right over there in that tree (one of thousands), you know, the tree with all those branches - can't you see it? Oops, there it goes.

We arrived in a driving rainstorm and joined a group of rather forlorn birders who had missed the bird by 3 minutes, 10 minutes, an hour - the times varied but the facial expressions did not. As we slowly got soaked and cold, a tiny bird way off in a willow tree hopped out briefly among a troop of juncos, then dove back into the brush. I thought it might be the accentor, but my glasses were foggy, my scope was drippy, the light was bad, and the distance was great. Humph.

We waited around for another hour, then climbed back into the car to head for home. "So, that was a chase," remarked one of our passengers. "Now I can say I've been on my first chase. It will also be my last chase."

It takes a special kind of birder to appreciate a rarity chase. For one thing, you have to accept that some chases, even many chases, will end up in disappointment. No bird. And even when you see the bird, the experience is somewhat lacking: you aren't seeing the bird in its accustomed habitat, so you get no sense of how it really lives. You don't understand its being, and for me anyway, this diminishes the sense of connection to the wild that I value so much. If you're a chaser, you're probably also a lister, meaning, you find it fun to tick off new birds on your life list. For dedicated listers, this is enough.

I am a lister. I have always been a lister. I suppressed my list lust for two decades, as I became more and more attached to Montlake Fill and to the birds who come here. In the process, I grew to feel deeply connected to a place. I belong to the Fill. It is my spiritual home. It is where I learn about human nature as well as wild nature. It inspires my writing. The birds here lift me out of my material existence to a plane of pure beauty and joy. But I still love to list.

I've asked myself why this is so. The best answer I can give is, finding new species comforts me when I worry about the impact we humans are having on nature. We are destroying so much that took nature millions of years to create. What sadness, regret, guilt. I yearn to travel back in time to see wonders that no longer exist. Yet the world is still filled with diversity. Life is abundant, resilient. There is hope.

These thoughts ran through my mind as we drove in the dark yesterday. The fat crescent of the moon spilled golden light across the sky, lighting our way. When we reached Stenerson Road, no one stirred. We had arrived a full hour before first light. The night was quiet, with only the occasional train whistle sending lonely cries into the dark. We huddled in the car and tried to sleep, but we were too keyed up. What lay ahead, we did not know: the day could produce a radiant smile on my face, or the little brave smile I paste over my disappointment so the other birders think I am a serious adult.

As the sky began to pale, more birders showed up, until there were nine cars lined up behind us. Then the first note of the dawn chorus sounded, and I sprang out of the car, set up my camp stool and scope, and awaited developments. The light slowly grew brighter, and the fog that clung to the fields drifted over toward us, veiling the grasses and low bushes. A pair of Sandhill Cranes passed overhead, misty swirls of gray parting the fog briefly before disappearing. The sky turned pink, and small birds began to arrive in the apple tree - juncos, a robin, a Song Sparrow, then, "It's him!" cried one of birders.

And it was. Dark face mask, buffy supercilium, tawny breast, warbler-like bill, plumped-up body, a bird bearing the whiff of Siberian birch and conifer forests. It paused in the tangle of apple branches, then hopped up to the top of the T, just as it has always done. There it surveyed the landscape, taking its time, giving us all fantastic looks, long enough for three people to share my scope. I think our smiles must have brightened the sky itself. Then it spread its wings, pushed off with its tiny feet, and blasted away at great speed into dense vegetation. Oh, oh.

Sometimes chases are the sublimest form of happiness. - Connie, Seattle

[email protected]
[email protected]



Subject: Trip advice sought for Puerto Vallarta
Date: Tue Feb 18 2020 0:04 am
From: ianyoung AT uw.edu
 
Hey Tweets,
My wife and I are planning a trip to Puerta Vallarta, Mexico and I am looking for suggestions of birding places to visit and places to avoid. We will have a car. Please let me know of any suggestions you have by replying to my email. I will tally all results and post them with my trip report.
Thanks in advance,
Ian Young



Subject: thanks Will and Louise for directions re: Siberian Accentor
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 23:54 pm
From: meganlyden AT msn.com
 
Thanks, Will Clemons and Louise Rutter, for such good road directions to the "Accentor" spot...and thanks for details about the bird's movements, Louise....it was a big help!  Of course we knew we were in the right spot when we saw the 30+ birders...that's always reassuring! Got three good looks at the bird around 11:20 today, in "the apple tree" next to the road and in the trees across the street from the house.  Fantastic! Thanks, everyone!

Megan Lyden
Bellevue, WA



Subject: Fir Island Gyrfalcon, etc
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 22:36 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
Today (17 February 2020), Stefan Schlick, April Brown and I birded various spots on Fir Island. Some time around four in the afternoon, Stefan and I had pretty good looks at a Gyrfalcon. We were scanning from the Moore Road Access, and could see the Gyrfalcon flying up and down a road to the south of us, and then fly up and disappear behind a distant row of large conifers.
Before meeting up with Stefan and April, I birded Clear Lake. At the boat launch, a Swamp Sparrow was calling. This was at the same spot where one was a few weeks ago, at the boat launch.
Hutton's Vireos were singing today at both Judy Reservoir and Clear Lake Boat Launch.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch



Subject: Zeiss customer service - excellent
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 20:36 pm
From: patti.loesche AT gmail.com
 
My three experiences with Zeiss customer service have been terrific. Twice in the past I called technical support for minor service for my Victory SF 10x42s (worn eyecups). Both times, I reached a Zeiss rep immediately, who promptly sent replacements, the second time an upgrade.

Recently something "went bad" (technical term). Again I reached tech support (Bill Graham) right away. Bill asked if something in particular had happened to the bins but I could only claim general hard use. He advised me to send them to their Kentucky location for assessment, sent me a shipping label, and offered to ship me loaner bins as soon as they received mine.

I then remembered that Seattle Audubon is a Zeiss dealer and took my binoculars there. Melissa said they would ship to Zeiss and oversee the order, and meanwhile she loaned me a pair of Swarovski 10x42s.

Today, only a few days after Zeiss received my bins, David from Seattle Audubon forwarded me their assessment: my bins must be shipped to Germany for repair (6-12 weeks), under warranty. Again Zeiss offered me a loaner. However, wonderful Audubon is allowing me to continue to use their Swarovskis (thanks, David and Melissa!). I couldn™t be happier with the swift, super support I™ve received from both Zeiss and Sea Audubon.

Patti Loesche
Seattle


> On Feb 17, 2020, at 9:52 AM, crazydave65 wrote:
>
> I remember the first time I looked thru a disco from the old perch at sno falls. Wow! What great glass!
>
> Recently I have had to deal with zeiss customer service. Wow! Boy do they suck!
>
> Should you decide to take the plunge and throw decent bucks out for optics please be certain to include customer service in the decision making process when you make your choice. Then include a zero or negative number in the Ziess column.
>
> My own story is long and boring and I see from a quick net search it is by no means unusual. Forewarned is forarmed.
>
> Regards,
>
> T
>
>
> Crazydave 6 5 at inbox daught com
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Bird migration video
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 20:35 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Neotropicsl

On Monday, February 17, 2020, Robert O'Brien wrote:

> Just happened to see it on the evening news. Absolutely incredible. What
> species can be migrating in such numbers so early? The main near tropical
> migrants aren't for at least another month? Bob O'Brien Portland
>
> On Monday, February 17, 2020, Jennifer Jarstad
> wrote:
>
>> Cool video of bird migration from the National Weather Service.
>>
>> https://www.tampabay.com/news/...
>> -service-radar-captures-massive-bird-migration-over-key-west/
>>
>> Jennifer Jarstad
>> Seattle, WA
>>
>



Subject: Bird migration video
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 20:29 pm
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
Just happened to see it on the evening news. Absolutely incredible.  What
species can be migrating in such numbers so early? The main near tropical
migrants aren't for at least another month? Bob O'Brien Portland

On Monday, February 17, 2020, Jennifer Jarstad
wrote:

> Cool video of bird migration from the National Weather Service.
>
> https://www.tampabay.com/news/...
> weather-service-radar-captures-massive-bird-migration-over-key-west/
>
> Jennifer Jarstad
> Seattle, WA
>



Subject: Bird migration video
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 19:24 pm
From: jennjarstad AT gmail.com
 
Cool video of bird migration from the National Weather Service.

https://www.tampabay.com/news/...

Jennifer Jarstad
Seattle, WA



Subject: Zeiss post
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 15:56 pm
From: 1northraven AT gmail.com
 
yeah, I was wondering what that word had been before Spell Check had
uncorrected it.

Chris Kessler

On Mon, Feb 17, 2020 at 1:17 PM crazydave65 wrote:

> Diascope, not disco.
>
> Sheesh.
>
> T
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson



Subject: Zeiss post
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 15:18 pm
From: crazydave65 AT inbox.com
 
Diascope, not disco.Sheesh.TSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Zeiss customer service - the other side of the coin
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 14:39 pm
From: jimf AT cogenix.com
 
It was a little surprising to read crazydave65's description of poor Zeiss customer service.  That's unfortunate, as ours was top notch!  My wife purchased a pair of mid-range Zeiss 8x40 binoculars in 2003 for around $800, and went on dozens of international and domestic trips with them.  The optics were always excellent, but the body basically melted from bug repellent, sweat, and whatever else.  We sent these binoculars to Zeiss customer service last month to see if they could repair the body.  They wrote back to inform us that the binoculars could not be repaired, but, because they had a lifetime warranty, they could replace them with a new pair of Conquest HD 10x42 binoculars with full warranty at no cost to us!  We received the new Conquest HDs last week, and they're excellent - not top-of-the-line, but at $1000 street price, they're more expensive than the ones we bought all those years ago.



Subject: Zeiss customer service, an oxymoron
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 11:53 am
From: crazydave65 AT inbox.com
 
I remember the first time I looked thru a disco from the old perch at sno falls. Wow! What great glass!Recently I have had to deal with zeiss customer service. Wow! Boy do they suck!Should you decide to take the plunge and throw decent bucks out for optics please be certain to include customer service in the decision making process when you make your choice. Then include a zero or negative number in the Ziess column.My own story is long and boring and I see from a quick net search it is by no means unusual. Forewarned is forarmed.Regards,TCrazydave 6 5 at inbox daught comSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Swift-like bird—thoughts?
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 1:09 am
From: deedeeknit AT yahoo.com
 
Sunday morning (16th) just after 8am, the sky was an even mix of blue and clouds with morning sun lighting up the yard, the air calm after Saturday™s blowing. I was sitting at a north-facing, 2nd story window in my home doing GBBC observations of my yard. I noticed a dark-colored bird a block or two off flying rapidly south towards the house; as it approached, my interest immediately picked up as I better saw the style of its flight. When flapping, there was the appearance that just the outer half/ends of the wings were moving almost in a blur”extremely rapidly. Not sure what it was, I grabbed my little 8x binoculars and had a good look for the moments before it disappeared over the roof and out of my view. It appeared completely dark in color the entire time; the light was good, morning sun coming in low from the east, and the bird was relatively close/low but also somewhat silhouetted against the sky. At one point it made a bit of a stall maneuver, turned a bit, glided a moment and then resumed flapping and gliding in an arcing turn that took it from a SSE heading to more of SSW.  Unfortunately I was not able to get a photo.

Watching it both with and without binoculars, my first impression/thought was oh-my-gosh it™s a Swift! I had a clear view of it™s outline as it flew low almost directly overhead...very narrow, back-curving wings, small head relative to length...it just did not speak to me of anything else in those moments, even though seeing a swift was the last thing I was thinking of that morning. I am always on the lookout for early Spring swallows and knew that juvenile Barn Swallows were recently reported...but that is not what the bird I saw evoked. The narrow wings and flight did not seem right for that. I™ve seen swifts many times, in Europe mostly, and Vaux once up in Monroe. I grew up in a local rural setting and have seen Barn Swallows all my life, and bats in flight on numerous occasions including in good light. I can unequivocally say this was not a bat. This bird also seemed just a bit larger than a Barn Swallow.

So...having learned that Black Swifts are still supposed to be over 2500 miles south of the Puget Sound area at this time of year, I am at a loss what to think and am wondering if anybody else has had a near-swift experience recently, or has any thoughts to share on this situation? Given the wonky status of climate/Mother Nature in general lately, I firmly believe anything is possible, while also realizing there might be a Non-Swift explanation; I am open to input and information.

Dee Warnock
Edmonds



Subject: Night Bird ID
Date: Mon Feb 17 2020 0:04 am
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
The crows that fly in to roost nightly at the UW Bothell campus?

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA

On Sunday, February 16, 2020, 9:08:11 PM PST, Dayna yalowicki wrote:

Over the Safeway parking lot in Bothell near the former Country Village, at about 6 p.m. there was a group of birds circling overhead loudly calling. They sounded like Seagulls. Because of the bright lights, I unfortunately couldn™t see them but they never stopped vocalizing. I looked all over the web, listened to bats, swifts and others but didn™t find anything that sounded the same. I™ll feel silly if it™s Seagulls but do they fly around at night and call in groups like that? If not, what were they?

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa
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Subject: Night Bird ID
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 23:08 pm
From: dlwicki AT comcast.net
 
Over the Safeway parking lot in Bothell near the former Country Village, at about 6 p.m. there was a group of birds circling overhead loudly calling. They sounded like Seagulls.  Because of the bright lights, I unfortunately  couldn™t see them but they never stopped vocalizing. I looked all over the web, listened to bats, swifts and others but didn™t find anything that sounded the same. I™ll feel silly if it™s Seagulls but do they fly around at night and call in groups like that? If not, what were they?

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa
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Subject: Skagit Eared Grebe
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 20:33 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
Today (16 February 2020) there was an Eared Grebe at March Point. The bird was foraging with a bunch of Horned Grebes and other birds, feeding on some slender fish that might have been Sand Launce. The flock was visible from the big, paved pullout on the Fidalgo Bay side--the one that offers a nice view of a long line of black railway oil tank cars. I can't remember the last year when I saw my first Skagit Eared Grebe before my first Western Grebe, but that's the kind of year it's been so far.
Mike Nelson got to see the Eared Grebe, and then he helped me to find a Western Sandpiper that was with a flock of Black-bellied Plover and a couple of Dunlin. This was in a muddy field a few hundred meters south of the Farmhouse Inn Restaurant, on the west side of LaConner-Whitney Road. This wintering flock is usually closer to the dwelling that is south of the restaurant, than it is to the restaurant itself, and that was the case today.
Finally, on Fir Island today, I saw an odd Mew Gull. It was exactly like all the other Mew Gulls in a big flock of them, except that the mantle was about the same color as that of an adult Ring-billed Gull. I had never seen albinism, leucism, or even dilute plumage in a Mew Gull before. This flock was about two hundred meters due north of the Game Range.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch



Subject: Long-tailed Duck at Green Lake is dead
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 18:44 pm
From: dave.slager AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

Thought I'd report that the male Long-tailed Duck reported to eBird
yesterday at Green Lake in Seattle is now dead.

It was looking very unhealthy when seen alive yesterday. I was able to
retrieve the carcass today thanks to a tip-off from Michael E. and will
bring it to the Burke museum on Tuesday.

Dave Slager
Seattle



Subject: Siberian Accentor
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 14:43 pm
From: meeato01 AT gmail.com
 
Hey Tweeters,

Bird was there again this morning. we saw it first at 7 a.m. on the Apple
tree near the front yard. bird wasn't seen again until somewhere between 10
to 10:15 on some larger trees in the back portion of the person's yard.
needed scope to see it at that point. Lifer for me!

Michael Eaton
Seattle, WA
[email protected]
3176253072



Subject: Siberian Accentor
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 13:56 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI:
The bird was reported again today 16 Feb. 2020, if anyone is still
interested.

sincerely
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...
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Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: National Parks Traveler: Former Interior Officials Urge Bernhardt Not To Change Migratory Bird Act
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 2:12 am
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Former Interior Officials Urge Bernhardt Not To Change Migratory Bird Act
Interior Secretary David Bernhardt is being urged by a bipartisan collection of former Interior Department officials not to alter the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Read in National Parks Traveler: https://apple.news/A3Cjwt3EGTB...


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: The Oklahoman: Lesser Prairie Chicken program undergoing changes
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 1:41 am
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Lesser Prairie Chicken program undergoing changes
The Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies promotes the region's outdoorsman lifestyle.

Read in The Oklahoman: https://apple.news/A5c1ExklBS7...


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Spotting scope for sale
Date: Sun Feb 16 2020 1:11 am
From: merlinblu AT yahoo.com
 
I have new, still in the box, Nikon Monarch 82mm angled spotting scope for sale. I have two. Long story.This is a great scope. Wide angle 20 - 60 power eyepiece. The angled format is very comfortable to use. And it is somewhat compact for 82mm. I've got some great digiscoping shots with it.Retail is $1599 plus tax.I'm selling it for $1300.Call or text James at 206 406 1343Happy birding


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