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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on March 30, 2020, 2:55 pm

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30 Mar: @ 14:50:15 Re: Newfoundland Adventure [Dennis Paulson]
30 Mar: @ 14:45:01 Re: book recommendations [Peter H Wimberger]
30 Mar: @ 11:47:57 Re: Another good Read [Lonnie Somer]
30 Mar: @ 10:31:05  Protection and Smith Island Rats [Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney]
30 Mar: @ 03:30:47  Book Review: The Falcon Thief: A True Tale Of The Hunt For The Perfect Bird [Devorah the Ornithologist]
29 Mar: @ 22:40:03  Another good Read [Hans-Joachim Feddern]
29 Mar: @ 20:49:33  Rats on Protection and/or Smith Islands? [BRAD Liljequist]
29 Mar: @ 18:45:30 Re: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic [Nadine Drisseq]
29 Mar: @ 17:44:02 Re: Goldfinches Galore; n plants [Dee Dee]
29 Mar: @ 14:52:21  slight correction to WOS April 6 meeting sing-in [cynthia burrell]
29 Mar: @ 14:20:38  reminder announcement for April 6 WOS meeting [cynthia burrell]
29 Mar: @ 14:11:47  Union Bay Watch } A Backyard Bird [Hubbell]
29 Mar: @ 13:55:29  PNW Birds in Motion video [Al Wagar]
29 Mar: @ 13:42:45 Re: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic [Penny L Koyama]
29 Mar: @ 11:05:47 Re: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic [Devon Comstock]
28 Mar: @ 21:34:14  Newfoundland Adventure [Constance Sidles]
28 Mar: @ 21:16:15 Re: Tweeters is the BEST! [Bob Sundstrom]
28 Mar: @ 21:15:46  Say's Phoebe [Dan McDougall-Treacy]
28 Mar: @ 20:58:31  Marbled Murrelets, Rhinos, Long-tailed Ducks (interesting plumage) photos, Semiahmoo Bay, Blaine WA [Eric Ellingson]
28 Mar: @ 20:32:08 Re: Tweeters is the BEST! [Larry Marsh]
28 Mar: @ 20:18:40  Curlews in Coulee City [heapbigdoc]
28 Mar: @ 19:50:48 Re: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic [beneteau]
28 Mar: @ 17:48:33  Of a Feather by Weidensaul is a page-turner [Ed Newbold]
28 Mar: @ 17:03:14 Re: Tweeters is the BEST! [[email protected]]
28 Mar: @ 17:00:45  Books - reading list additions [Sharon Howard]
28 Mar: @ 16:11:02 Re: Say's Phoebe Union Bay [Stephan Fjelstad]
28 Mar: @ 15:15:23  Tweeters is the BEST! [Tom and Carol Stoner]
28 Mar: @ 15:12:01  Goldfinches Galore [Jack Nolan]
28 Mar: @ 15:06:57  Subject: Re: News story about Skagit group [Gibbins/ Crockett]
28 Mar: @ 15:00:42  Stay home, stay healthy [Claire Acord]
28 Mar: @ 14:52:34  Earth Day And Beyond [Jeff Gibson]
28 Mar: @ 14:46:55  Band-tailed Pigeon [John Gatchet]
28 Mar: @ 14:39:26  Saw-whets [Gary Bletsch]
28 Mar: @ 14:15:14  A passel of Varied Thrush [mary hrudkaj]
28 Mar: @ 14:03:12  BirdNote, last week and the week of Mar. 29, 2020 [Ellen Blackstone]
28 Mar: @ 12:50:37 Re: What bird book are you currently reading? [Ed Dominguez]
28 Mar: @ 12:30:57 Re: News story about Skagit group [Marv Breece]
28 Mar: @ 12:17:27  Varied Thrushes in Edmonds [Bill Anderson]
28 Mar: @ 12:03:06  Nesting Bewick's Wrens [Jill Freidberg]
28 Mar: @ 11:51:53 Re: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home? [Kevin Lucas]
28 Mar: @ 11:46:06 Re: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home? [Steve Loitz]
28 Mar: @ 11:31:20  Bird paparazzi [Robert Gray]
28 Mar: @ 11:19:10  Varied Thrushes in Shoreline [Claudia Turner]
28 Mar: @ 11:15:53  Say's Phoebe Union Bay [Michael Eaton]
28 Mar: @ 11:08:49 Re: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home? [Larry Marsh]
28 Mar: @ 10:02:59 Re: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home? [bill shelmerdine]
28 Mar: @ 09:09:09  Union Bay Shrike [Michael Eaton]
28 Mar: @ 07:48:41 Re: Bird sing opera [morgan]
27 Mar: @ 22:26:47  hums on my feeder [Linda Talman]
27 Mar: @ 20:54:02 Re: Books! [Diane Yorgason-Quinn]





Subject: Newfoundland Adventure
Date: Mon Mar 30 2020 14:50 pm
From: dennispaulson AT comcast.net
 
Thanks, Connie.

You always know the right things to say. Hopefully all of us will have a headful of past adventures to reflect upon, and hopefully well illustrated with photos.

And I agree entirely with what several people have written of not fussing at other people who go birding. Life is difficult enough without us turning on one another, sadly becoming more and more a feature of our society.

One of your many admirers,

Dennis Paulson
Seattle

> On Mar 29, 2020, at 12:01 PM, [email protected] wrote:
>
> Date: Sat, 28 Mar 2020 19:36:59 -0700
> From: Constance Sidles >
> To: Tweeters >
> Subject: [Tweeters] Newfoundland Adventure
> Message-ID: >
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Hey tweets,
>
> As I write this, we are nearing the end of two weeks of self-distancing on account of the novel corona virus. One day slides into another, with nothing to mark the passage of time, making it difficult to remember what day it is. I began this self-imposed exile believing I could relieve the tedium with bird walks around my favorite place on Earth, Montlake Fill. A Say's Phoebe is there now, so I hear, and a shrike I would like to see but have not. I grow increasingly uncomfortable with these walks, as I find too many people who ignore or cannot maintain the requisite six feet of separation from my CO2 aura.
>
> So instead, each morning I get up, while John bakes the newspaper in a 200-degree oven for 25 minutes, in case a virus somehow attached itself to the newsprint. I read the dismal news, avoid the internet because what is the point, compulsively surf the net anyway, read a book, dust a shelf, watch as Ra sails Ma-nedjet, his solar boat, slowly across the sky from east to west before sinking into the netherworld at sunset. I watched him yesterday, I watched him today, I watched him tomorrow. No need for differentiating tenses anymore. Past tense will do. I like it better than the eternal present. It implies someday this will all be behind us.
>
> In the meantime, the governor is telling us we might have to watch Ra from our home fortresses until he rises as high in the sky as he ever will. Summer.
>
> This was supposed to be our Year of Adventure, but the corona virus outbreak was not the adventure I had envisioned when John gifted me with his offer to take us to otherworldly places for a year. We have already lost a distant cousin to the onslaught. We fear.
>
> To counter the fear and create some sense of normal, I find my mind drifting back to our last happy adventure, a January trip to Newfoundland. Oh, I am carried away from the dismal present by my memories. Perhaps you will be, too.
>
> Contrary to its name, Newfoundland is not a new land. It is old - old geologically, old historically. Five hundred millions years ago, a piece of the supercontinent Gondwanaland floated over the ocean, kissed the shore of Canada, and wedded itself there. Millenia later, when the glaciers of the last Ice Age retreated from the land, archaic peoples arrived here to hunt and fish for a living. People have been living here ever since, one wave of culture sweeping away another.
>
> The first Europeans to arrive were the Vikings, who were attracted by some of the richest fishing grounds in the world. We went there to see Dovekies, the smallest alcid in the Atlantic Ocean. Dovekies are black-and-white footballs smaller than robins. They are the only member of their genus (Alle), and a good candidate for the cutest bird in all the world. Ordinarily, Dovekies stay far out to sea in winter, but in the innumerable harbors that serrate the eastern coast of Newfoundland, Dovekies come close to shore to dive in the shallows for tiny fish, mollusks, and crustaceans.
>
> Our adventure began with a long flight to St. John's, the largest city on the island. There, we were met by our Wings tour guide, Jared Clarke, a preeminent birder with the eyes of a hawk, the patience of a heron, and the affability of nearly all the Canadians we have ever met. We joined three other birders who had all come to this northern outpost to see a world as different from ours as you can imagine. Eastern Newfoundland is a land pummeled by the Atlantic. Each winter the turbulent waves try to claw their way through the granite that lines the shore, to no avail. The silent rocks resist. Inland lies the tundra, its flat tableland covered with snow, scoured by blizzards that blow rivulets of ice along the surface, long, restless streamers colored pale pink, blue, and yellow by the low-lying sun.
>
> Every day for 10 days, I got dressed in so many layers of arctic gear that I looked like the Michelin Man. After the first long day driving in the van, alternating with walking in the snow, I realized I should not drink any fluids for breakfast. I was the only woman aboard, and bushes were few, far between, and sparsely leaved.
>
> But who can be bothered by cold or any other kind of discomfort when you walk to the edge of a black sand dune, and there, foraging at your feet on the shore among the rounded granite rocks is a flock of Purple Sandpipers, chattering to each other as they discuss their menu of worms and bugs? Who cares that the wind is gusting at 80 mph and that you lost contact with your own feet hours ago, when you can round another bend and see Dovekies diving for fish only two feet from shore? We came upon just such a flock in a protected bay. Fishing must have been very fine, because birds were everywhere - Long-tailed Ducks, Red-breasted Mergansers, Iceland Gulls, and Dovekies, lots and lots of Dovekies.
>
> John and I wanted to see these little alcids in our scope, but when they are busy foraging, Dovekies stay up for only three or four seconds, then dive back underwater again for long minutes at a time. They weren't up long enough for us to focus the scope. Then we realized Dovekies tend to come up to breathe very close to where they dove. So John focused the scope on one bird's ripples while I acted as spotter. "Dovekie up," I would say, "Dovekie down. Dovekie up, Dovekie down." Soon we both learned how to move the scope quickly enough to see a bird's every feather, the gleam in its black eye, the tiny webs on its feet, its minuscule tail the last to disappear when it dove again.
>
> A memory to warm the heart in the cold of a Newfoundland winter, or in the grim chill of pandemic crisis. Here's wishing you similar memories of birds past.
>
> - Connie, Seattle



Subject: book recommendations
Date: Mon Mar 30 2020 14:45 pm
From: pwimberger AT pugetsound.edu
 
Hi Tweets,
Continuing the bird recommendation thread... A book that my wife and I both thoroughly enjoyed was "The Sun is a Compass" by Caroline van Hemert. Van Hemert is an ornithologist and creative writer; the book is about an epic human-powered trip she and her husband take from Bellingham to the Canadian Arctic Ocean and then across the Brooks Range to Kotzebue. Most adventure books are fun to read for the adventure and not so much for the writing. Van Hemert is a beautiful writer, and birds make regular appearances throughout their adventure.
https://www.carolinevanhemert....

And if you haven't already read it, "The Forest Unseen" by David Haskell is a beautifully written and really interesting set of meditations on forest ecology and evolution told through observations of a 1 meter circle of Tennessee forest. There are some birds in it too.

And I'll leave you with what for me was a novel observation - my wife and I were watching two dippers over the weekend. One of them caught a small fish (sculpin we think) and proceeded to beat it senseless on rocks before eating it. I'd always thought of dippers as eating only aquatic macroINvertebrates, not vertebrates.

Take care everyone,
Peter
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[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Another good Read
Date: Mon Mar 30 2020 11:47 am
From: mombiwheeler AT gmail.com
 
My all time favorite birding-related mystery is "The Birdwatcher" by
William Shaw. I recently finished a non-mystery fiction book titled
"Border Songs" in which the protagonist is a birder. It's by Washingtonian
author Jim Lynch, set in Blaine, which was a fun read.

Lonnie Somer
Seattle

On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 8:39 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern
wrote:

> Here is another book I recently read, you might enjoy: "A Siege of
> Bitterns" by Steve Burrows - also on the Birder Murder Series. It is a
> murder mystery dealing with a police inspector - a born Canadian and a
> birder - being assigned to a small town in The Norfolk Marshes of England.
> He investigates a murder and suspects birdwatching lists have something to
> do with it.
>
> --
> *Hans Feddern*
> Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
> [email protected]
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: Protection and Smith Island Rats
Date: Mon Mar 30 2020 10:31 am
From: festuca AT comcast.net
 
bradliljequist asked:  "... if anyone here is aware of the status of rats on these islands, and their potential impact on nesting birds."

The US Fish & Wildlife Service administers Protection Island, and prepared the "Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges Comprehensive Conservation Plan and San Juan Islands Wilderness Stewardship Plan" in 2010. There is detailed information on their management of the islands in the document:
https://www.fws.gov/pacific/pl...

As far as rats:
"Approximately 93% of bird species or subspecies that have become extinct since the 1800s were found
on island habitats and 42% of those occurred due to predation by introduced mammals (Courchamp et
al. 2003). Rats are present on approximately 80% of the world™s islands and are responsible for at least
50% of global extinctions and countless local extinctions (Dolan and Heneman, 2007). There is no
indication that rats are present on Refuge islands, however they could potentially colonize an island via
a shipwreck or by accessing the island via authorized vessels."

Hope this helps,
Jon. Anderson
OlyWA
https://jonsperegrination.blog...



Subject: Book Review: The Falcon Thief: A True Tale Of The Hunt For The Perfect Bird
Date: Mon Mar 30 2020 3:30 am
From: birdologist AT gmail.com
 
Hello everyone,

do you need some distraction during these challenging times? I always find
comfort in books, and I just read an amazing book that I know you will also
enjoy. This book is a meticulously researched crime adventure based on the
true story of a charming rogue who steals endangered birds and their eggs
from the wild to sell on the global black market ” and of the British
wildlife crime detective determined to stop him.

The Falcon Thief: A True Tale Of The Hunt For The Perfect Bird
https://www.forbes.com/sites/g...
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/s53oxnb

I hope you enjoy it and find it educational. As always, please do share
this link with your friends and colleagues, on social media and twitter.

cheers,
--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist
[email protected]
Blogs: Forbes | Medium

Book reviews: GoodReads

sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]



Subject: Another good Read
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 22:40 pm
From: thefedderns AT gmail.com
 
Here is another book I recently read, you might enjoy: "A Siege of
Bitterns" by Steve Burrows - also on the Birder Murder Series. It is a
murder mystery dealing with a police inspector - a born Canadian and a
birder - being assigned to a small town in The Norfolk Marshes of England.
He investigates a murder and suspects birdwatching lists have something to
do with it.

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
[email protected]



Subject: Rats on Protection and/or Smith Islands?
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 20:49 pm
From: bradliljequist AT msn.com
 
Hi all,

I am just curious if anyone here is aware of the status of rats on these islands, and their potential impact on nesting birds. Not intending to start rumors, just curious.



Subject: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 18:45 pm
From: drisseq.n AT gmail.com
 
From what I can gather, birding is OK as long as it's at home with no
driving involved,

"Inslee described the Army health care workers as heroes Saturday and urged
Washington residents to be part of the 627 by staying home in accordance
with the emergency order he issued Monday. En route to the Seattle news
conference, Frankly, there were way too many cars on I-5, he said.

I want to ask Washingtonians to do something, which is to take a little
picture out of the newspaper of a nurse, the governor added. Tape it on
your dashboard and before you start your car look at that nurse and say,
˜Do I really want to put this person at risk?' by leaving home."

https://www.seattletimes.com/s...

Be safe and be well.
Nadine.


On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 5:50 PM beneteau wrote:

> Just to be clear, Gov Inslee's order does NOT prohibit going out, even on
> trails (if open). His web page states, "People can still participate in
> activities such as bike rides, gardening, and dog walking ” as long as they
> follow social distancing rules. So, it's the gathering that is
> prohibited and folks need to stay at least 6+ feet apart.
>
> I've already noticed some"shaming" of birders for going out at all (on
> Tweeters, for example) and that isn't appropriate either.
>
> We've appropriately cancelled sponsored events. That's in keeping with the
> "no gathering" edict but let's not pile on if someone goes out on their own
> and then reports a "find."
>
> Jim Beneteau
> Arlington, Wa
>
> On 3/28/2020 7:55 AM, Cynthia Easterson wrote:
>
> I may have spoken to soon on the Trip report... JONATHAN, Please accept my
> apologies. I see now that that trip happened before we cancelled trips.
> PLEASE POST and PUBLISH Jonathan's report.
>
> I've just been getting so much push back on how birders think they should
> be out and about I went off before checking the date. So sorry!!!
> Cindy
>
> Cindy Easterson, President
> *PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY*
> (425) 876-1055
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 7:28 AM Cynthia Easterson
> wrote:
>
>> I hope this finds you all safe and well.
>>
>> I'm writing to ask our PAS leadership to please model appropriate
>> behavior during these challenging times. I understand that we are a group
>> that values our outdoor experiences but that is why it is even more
>> important that we, as leaders of the organization, should be adhering to
>> the rules and guidelines asked of us to keep our communities safe.
>>
>> We will not publish the March 20, 2020 trip report...it was NOT a
>> Pilchuck Audubon Society sponsored event. Please don't ignore trail/area
>> closed signs and if you find yourself on a path or area where you cannot
>> practice safe social distancing please leave the area. While I recognize
>> that this new "not normal" is less satisfying, it is still possible to get
>> exercise and enjoy the outdoors without compounding the problem.
>>
>> It looks like we may be in this situation for a while longer. Please
>> don't put yourself or the organization at risk by ignoring the stay home,
>> stay safe order.
>>
>> Cindy Easterson, President
>> *PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY*
>> (425) 876-1055
>>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Pilchuck Audubon Extended Leadership Team" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to [email protected]
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/ms...
>
> .
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: Goldfinches Galore; n plants
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 17:44 pm
From: deedeeknit AT yahoo.com
 
We live just north of Shoreline (Edmonds area) and Goldfinches have visited our two sunflower-chip feeders all winter. We only started putting winter feeders out two years ago, relying previously more on bird-friendly plants in the yard. The Goldfinches (and many other birds) also really love the sunflower patch we™ve started planting each spring, starting two years ago.

Regarding Jack™s question about changing the Goldfinches™ migration habits, don™t know if it helps, but will share that when I lived in Juanita years ago, I would see winter-plumage flocks of Goldfinches gleaning in, for example, a clump of birch trees in Juanita Bay Park in the dead of winter. So at least some stay here year-round. They are indeed a treat to see, and it has been interesting this year to be able to daily watch the gradual change in plumage. Right now they provide a welcome burst of bright yellow cheer in the yard off and on, all day long, as they come and go”making it easier to bid farewell to the daffodils.

Along the separate topic of planting native plants to support our beleaguered environment and its denizens, I have to suggest one of my favorites, our Pacific NW Evergreen Huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum). When we moved into this house over 10 years ago, I immediately planted two small-at-the-time shrubs, which I now, with a bit of judicious pruning, maintain at about 5 feet tall while trying to keep as natural a shape as possible. Their evergreen leaves have an attractive mix of green and light burgundy, the abundant berries are tasty for humans as well as birds, and the branches provide good cover, even down to ground level for the low foragers. I once watched a Flicker take a 10-minute nap (eyes closed the whole time) wedged into the branches of one of the bushes only 3 feet above the ground.
Over the years, almost every morning just at or after sunup, I have seen an Anna™s Hummingbird hovering at the tiny blossoms (in season, which is as early as February in our yard, despite being said to be April through May) as well as searching the shrubs throughout the year for insects. In season, have also had Rufous Hummingbirds visit them the same way. A versatile, drought-tolerant, low-maintenance, and attractive shrub, year-round.

Touching on books, I also thoroughly enjoyed Thor Hanson™s book Feathers...the Evolution of a Natural Miracle.

Will end this post by reporting species we™ve seen from our dining room windows over the last few weeks”at our feeders, in the yard in general, or in/flying through the neighborhood (about a block east of the Sound and a bit north of Edmonds). Pine Siskin, Bushtit, Chestnut-backed and Black-capped Chickadee, Goldfinch, House Finch, Song Sparrow, Fox Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, Golden-crowned Sparrow, Oregon Junco (including a recognizable leucistic male), Spotted Towhee (including a recognizable leucistic male), Bewick™s Wren, Rufous and Anna™s Hummingbirds, Stellar's Jay, Northern Flicker (normal Red-shafted as well as an assortment of several intergrades), Cooper™s Hawk, Bald Eagle, Crow, Red-winged Blackbird, Starlings, Rock Dove, Eurasian Collared-Dove, Canada Goose, sea gull assortment, and hundreds of fast-flying ducks on their way to and from wherever it is they go (primarily morning and evening) besides the lawn and cattail wetland-ditch next to Olive Garden up on 196th in Lynnwood (...it™s closed so the ones who beg there must be going somewhere else currently...). These are all pretty much regulars, most seen year-round in our yard. We had 4 Yellow-rumped Warblers visiting the suet feeder daily all winter but have not seen them for several days now...am missing them! I am likely forgetting someone but enough said for now.

Wishing you all safe and mindful distancing (both to and from others) as you exercise or go out for essentials, and enjoyment keeping a closer eye than usual on your own neighborhoods/ backyards.... Having had unexpected visits from a Sage Thrasher, Wilson™s Snipe and Warbling Vireo over the past few years in our very urban-suburban yard (depending on your perspective), it™s something to consider”you might be surprised at what you see!

Happy birding, Dee Warnock
Edmonds


> Message: 8
> Date: Sat, 28 Mar 2020 13:11:16 -0700
> From: Jack Nolan
> To: [email protected]
> Subject: [Tweeters] Goldfinches Galore
>
> I'm struck by how long the gold finch have been visiting my yard this year.
> I'm thinking we are going on week 4 of them flooding my feeders.? I hope
> I'm not messing with their natural migration instincts, but they are
> beautiful.
> When the males first arrived they were dull in color.? Now they are just
> brilliant.
>
> Jack
> Shoreline,WA

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Tweeters mailing list
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Subject: slight correction to WOS April 6 meeting sing-in
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 14:52 pm
From: cinnyb AT yahoo.com
 
Hey tweeters,

If you would like to (virtually) attend the April 6 WOS meeting, please go to the WOS website for sign in instructions:
http://wos.org/about-wos/month...

thank you!
cinny
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: reminder announcement for April 6 WOS meeting
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 14:20 pm
From: cinnyb AT yahoo.com
 
Hello Tweeters,

Looking forward to sharing this virtual birding experience with you all next Monday night!

WOS Monthly Meeting - Tom Bancroft, April 6, 2020
Panama™s Cloud Forest - the junction of bird communities

Mon, Apr 6, 2020
7:15 PM - 9:00 PM (PDT)

"The mountains of Western Panama are a mixing pot for birds: Neotropical migrants come to winter or pass through on their travels, altitudinal migrants move in and out with the seasons, and then there are the permanent residents, making up a complex and diverse community. Central America is an active geological area, and over the last ten million years the formation of the Isthmus has had a profound influence on the bird communities found throughout North and South America, including those in Washington State.
Join WOS (virtually) on April 6th to learn more about this fascinating place and its influence on the Western Hemisphere. Enjoy stunning images of the flora and fauna of Panama and listen to sounds from the cloud forest!

When: April 6th 7:15pm sign-in (meeting begins at 7:30)

Where: On-Line Only (no in-person attendance)

Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com...

New to GoToMeeting? Get the app now and be ready when the meeting starts:
https://global.gotomeeting.com...

You can also dial in using your phone
United States: +1 (872) 240-3412

Access Code: 996-937-949

Not a WOS member? Please join today at www.wos.org

(In an effort to support a greater number of birders during this uncertain time, WOS invites the broader Tweeters Community to attend this meeting via GoToMeeting. There are spots for 150 attendees.)

Hoping everyone is staying healthy and enjoying birding locally!

Cinny Burrell
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Union Bay Watch } A Backyard Bird
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 14:11 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

How many broods can a single pair of House Finch produce in one year? Take your best guess, then read this week™s post to find the answer. I am betting you will be surprised.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay or in your own backyard!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: PNW Birds in Motion video
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 13:55 pm
From: jalanwagar AT gmail.com
 
For what it™s worth in these cooped-up times here™s link to an online version of a DVD we put out 10 years ago, with 222 species and 90 minutes of video with a good deal of sound & behavior.  It™s only standard definition, has lots of big easy-to-shoot birds but fewer of the little guys who flit away just as you get lined up on them.

https://youtu.be/Oe950J0XIM8

If you want the index/timeline, I can email it. At 816 kb it™s too big for Tweeters postings.

Al Wagar
Shoreline



Subject: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 13:42 pm
From: plkoyama AT comcast.net
 
Tweets, 
Per Scott Downes™ earlier kindly worded plea, can™t we just stop this lecturing? Even as someone stuck home with a sick person and awaiting test results, this has all gotten way too much. Let™s just enjoy the birds whether they are in our yards or 6 ft away from others somewhere else, read books about birds, or watch bird shows on Netflix. Please, per the mission of Tweeters, let™s keep our focus on birds, rather than each other.
Penny Koyama, Bothell

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 29, 2020, at 9:04 AM, Devon Comstock wrote:
>
> Right, but it's also travel outside your local area which is discouraged too. Though admittedly some of Inslee's language was a bit vague. The primary point is stay home and stay local except for essential travel.
>
>
>
>> On Sat, Mar 28, 2020, 17:50 beneteau wrote:
>> Just to be clear, Gov Inslee's order does NOT prohibit going out, even on trails (if open). His web page states, "People can still participate in activities such as bike rides, gardening, and dog walking ” as long as they follow social distancing rules. So, it's the gathering that is prohibited and folks need to stay at least 6+ feet apart.
>>
>> I've already noticed some"shaming" of birders for going out at all (on Tweeters, for example) and that isn't appropriate either.
>>
>> We've appropriately cancelled sponsored events. That's in keeping with the "no gathering" edict but let's not pile on if someone goes out on their own and then reports a "find."
>>
>> Jim Beneteau
>> Arlington, Wa
>>> On 3/28/2020 7:55 AM, Cynthia Easterson wrote:
>>> I may have spoken to soon on the Trip report... JONATHAN, Please accept my apologies. I see now that that trip happened before we cancelled trips. PLEASE POST and PUBLISH Jonathan's report.
>>>
>>> I've just been getting so much push back on how birders think they should be out and about I went off before checking the date. So sorry!!!
>>> Cindy
>>>
>>> Cindy Easterson, President
>>> PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY
>>> (425) 876-1055
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 7:28 AM Cynthia Easterson wrote:
>>>> I hope this finds you all safe and well.
>>>>
>>>> I'm writing to ask our PAS leadership to please model appropriate behavior during these challenging times. I understand that we are a group that values our outdoor experiences but that is why it is even more important that we, as leaders of the organization, should be adhering to the rules and guidelines asked of us to keep our communities safe.
>>>>
>>>> We will not publish the March 20, 2020 trip report...it was NOT a Pilchuck Audubon Society sponsored event. Please don't ignore trail/area closed signs and if you find yourself on a path or area where you cannot practice safe social distancing please leave the area. While I recognize that this new "not normal" is less satisfying, it is still possible to get exercise and enjoy the outdoors without compounding the problem.
>>>>
>>>> It looks like we may be in this situation for a while longer. Please don't put yourself or the organization at risk by ignoring the stay home, stay safe order.
>>>>
>>>> Cindy Easterson, President
>>>> PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY
>>>> (425) 876-1055
>>> --
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Pilchuck Audubon Extended Leadership Team" group.
>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected]
>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/ms...
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> [email protected]
>> http://mailman11.u.washington....
> _______________________________________________
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> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic
Date: Sun Mar 29 2020 11:05 am
From: devonc78 AT gmail.com
 
Right, but it's also travel outside your local area which is discouraged
too. Though admittedly some of Inslee's language was a bit vague. The
primary point is stay home and stay local except for essential travel.



On Sat, Mar 28, 2020, 17:50 beneteau wrote:

> Just to be clear, Gov Inslee's order does NOT prohibit going out, even on
> trails (if open). His web page states, "People can still participate in
> activities such as bike rides, gardening, and dog walking ” as long as they
> follow social distancing rules. So, it's the gathering that is
> prohibited and folks need to stay at least 6+ feet apart.
>
> I've already noticed some"shaming" of birders for going out at all (on
> Tweeters, for example) and that isn't appropriate either.
>
> We've appropriately cancelled sponsored events. That's in keeping with the
> "no gathering" edict but let's not pile on if someone goes out on their own
> and then reports a "find."
>
> Jim Beneteau
> Arlington, Wa
>
> On 3/28/2020 7:55 AM, Cynthia Easterson wrote:
>
> I may have spoken to soon on the Trip report... JONATHAN, Please accept my
> apologies. I see now that that trip happened before we cancelled trips.
> PLEASE POST and PUBLISH Jonathan's report.
>
> I've just been getting so much push back on how birders think they should
> be out and about I went off before checking the date. So sorry!!!
> Cindy
>
> Cindy Easterson, President
> *PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY*
> (425) 876-1055
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 7:28 AM Cynthia Easterson
> wrote:
>
>> I hope this finds you all safe and well.
>>
>> I'm writing to ask our PAS leadership to please model appropriate
>> behavior during these challenging times. I understand that we are a group
>> that values our outdoor experiences but that is why it is even more
>> important that we, as leaders of the organization, should be adhering to
>> the rules and guidelines asked of us to keep our communities safe.
>>
>> We will not publish the March 20, 2020 trip report...it was NOT a
>> Pilchuck Audubon Society sponsored event. Please don't ignore trail/area
>> closed signs and if you find yourself on a path or area where you cannot
>> practice safe social distancing please leave the area. While I recognize
>> that this new "not normal" is less satisfying, it is still possible to get
>> exercise and enjoy the outdoors without compounding the problem.
>>
>> It looks like we may be in this situation for a while longer. Please
>> don't put yourself or the organization at risk by ignoring the stay home,
>> stay safe order.
>>
>> Cindy Easterson, President
>> *PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY*
>> (425) 876-1055
>>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Pilchuck Audubon Extended Leadership Team" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to [email protected]
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/ms...
>
> .
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: Newfoundland Adventure
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 21:34 pm
From: constancesidles AT gmail.com
 
Hey tweets,

As I write this, we are nearing the end of two weeks of self-distancing on account of the novel corona virus. One day slides into another, with nothing to mark the passage of time, making it difficult to remember what day it is. I began this self-imposed exile believing I could relieve the tedium with bird walks around my favorite place on Earth, Montlake Fill. A Say's Phoebe is there now, so I hear, and a shrike I would like to see but have not. I grow increasingly uncomfortable with these walks, as I find too many people who ignore or cannot maintain the requisite six feet of separation from my CO2 aura.

So instead, each morning I get up, while John bakes the newspaper in a 200-degree oven for 25 minutes, in case a virus somehow attached itself to the newsprint. I read the dismal news, avoid the internet because what is the point, compulsively surf the net anyway, read a book, dust a shelf, watch as Ra sails Ma-nedjet, his solar boat, slowly across the sky from east to west before sinking into the netherworld at sunset. I watched him yesterday, I watched him today, I watched him tomorrow. No need for differentiating tenses anymore. Past tense will do. I like it better than the eternal present. It implies someday this will all be behind us.

In the meantime, the governor is telling us we might have to watch Ra from our home fortresses until he rises as high in the sky as he ever will. Summer.

This was supposed to be our Year of Adventure, but the corona virus outbreak was not the adventure I had envisioned when John gifted me with his offer to take us to otherworldly places for a year. We have already lost a distant cousin to the onslaught. We fear.

To counter the fear and create some sense of normal, I find my mind drifting back to our last happy adventure, a January trip to Newfoundland. Oh, I am carried away from the dismal present by my memories. Perhaps you will be, too.

Contrary to its name, Newfoundland is not a new land. It is old - old geologically, old historically. Five hundred millions years ago, a piece of the supercontinent Gondwanaland floated over the ocean, kissed the shore of Canada, and wedded itself there. Millenia later, when the glaciers of the last Ice Age retreated from the land, archaic peoples arrived here to hunt and fish for a living. People have been living here ever since, one wave of culture sweeping away another.

The first Europeans to arrive were the Vikings, who were attracted by some of the richest fishing grounds in the world. We went there to see Dovekies, the smallest alcid in the Atlantic Ocean. Dovekies are black-and-white footballs smaller than robins. They are the only member of their genus (Alle), and a good candidate for the cutest bird in all the world. Ordinarily, Dovekies stay far out to sea in winter, but in the innumerable harbors that serrate the eastern coast of Newfoundland, Dovekies come close to shore to dive in the shallows for tiny fish, mollusks, and crustaceans.

Our adventure began with a long flight to St. John's, the largest city on the island. There, we were met by our Wings tour guide, Jared Clarke, a preeminent birder with the eyes of a hawk, the patience of a heron, and the affability of nearly all the Canadians we have ever met. We joined three other birders who had all come to this northern outpost to see a world as different from ours as you can imagine. Eastern Newfoundland is a land pummeled by the Atlantic. Each winter the turbulent waves try to claw their way through the granite that lines the shore, to no avail. The silent rocks resist. Inland lies the tundra, its flat tableland covered with snow, scoured by blizzards that blow rivulets of ice along the surface, long, restless streamers colored pale pink, blue, and yellow by the low-lying sun.

Every day for 10 days, I got dressed in so many layers of arctic gear that I looked like the Michelin Man. After the first long day driving in the van, alternating with walking in the snow, I realized I should not drink any fluids for breakfast. I was the only woman aboard, and bushes were few, far between, and sparsely leaved.

But who can be bothered by cold or any other kind of discomfort when you walk to the edge of a black sand dune, and there, foraging at your feet on the shore among the rounded granite rocks is a flock of Purple Sandpipers, chattering to each other as they discuss their menu of worms and bugs? Who cares that the wind is gusting at 80 mph and that you lost contact with your own feet hours ago, when you can round another bend and see Dovekies diving for fish only two feet from shore? We came upon just such a flock in a protected bay. Fishing must have been very fine, because birds were everywhere - Long-tailed Ducks, Red-breasted Mergansers, Iceland Gulls, and Dovekies, lots and lots of Dovekies.

John and I wanted to see these little alcids in our scope, but when they are busy foraging, Dovekies stay up for only three or four seconds, then dive back underwater again for long minutes at a time. They weren't up long enough for us to focus the scope. Then we realized Dovekies tend to come up to breathe very close to where they dove. So John focused the scope on one bird's ripples while I acted as spotter. "Dovekie up," I would say, "Dovekie down. Dovekie up, Dovekie down." Soon we both learned how to move the scope quickly enough to see a bird's every feather, the gleam in its black eye, the tiny webs on its feet, its minuscule tail the last to disappear when it dove again.

A memory to warm the heart in the cold of a Newfoundland winter, or in the grim chill of pandemic crisis. Here's wishing you similar memories of birds past.

- Connie, Seattle

[email protected]
[email protected]



Subject: Tweeters is the BEST!
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 21:16 pm
From: ixoreus AT scattercreek.com
 
I concur, The Ascent of Birds is a remarkable resource for understanding how the bird world fits together, post the great genome crunch of recent years.  As the lead writer for BirdNote, it has also been a rich source for radio stories.

While you are hanging out close to home, here™s a timely book: Nature™s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in Your Yard (by Douglas W. Tallamy).

Good reading, Bob Sundstrom

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 28, 2020, at 3:04 PM, "[email protected]" wrote:
>
>
> Another suggestion of a stimulating book about brds.
>
> Two years ago I read The Ascent of Birds by John Reilly (2018), an exploration of many intriguing questions about birds, with emphasis on recent advances in understanding of bird ecology, biogeography, evolution, physiology, and behavior. In 27 chapters averaging about 10 pages/chapter, Reilly introduces a bird species (hoatzin, oilbird, godwit) or group (tinamous, waterfowl, hummingbirds, storm petrels, owls, parrots, manakins, crows, thrushes, sparrows, crossbills, tanagers, and many more). Each chapter is "a pithy essay describing some special features" of the species or group. The role of geologic and biogeographic events in evolution of each group is coupled with special features such as morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations and, when known, their genetic underpinnings. For example, how do Bar-headed Geese fly over the Himalayan Mountains or Bar-tailed Godwits fly non-stop from Alaska to New Zealand (more than 7,000 miles) in 9 days? What ecological and biogeographic factors underpin the extraordinary diversification of hummingbirds in South America? How does hummingbird metabolism sustain a heart that beats 1200 times per minute during flight? How do albatrosses find enough food to sustain themselves and their nestlings in apparently featureless expanses (up to 5.9 million square miles) of open ocean? Why are falcons closer to parrots than hawks in recent field guides? And so on.
>
> Reilly™s stated goal in the book was "to increase the general public™s awareness of the wonders of evolution as illustrated by birds. Some of the concepts are a little challenging but the book includes a comprehensive glossary, list of sources for each chapter, and a comprehensive index. He shows how geography, ecology, and lots of time answer the question How did the incredible diversity of more than 10,000 living bird species come to be?
>
> Reilly™s profession involved biochemistry and medicine with specialization in causes and treatment of various blood cancers. He has also been a keen birder all his life. Since developing an interest in avian evolution, he has concentrated on tracking down and photographing species that have important evolutionary studies to tell. And he tells those stories very well.
>
> As a practicing ornithologist, now retired, I learned much from this book. Now I™m having fun leading a monthly lecture/discussion group (Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society, OPAS) on the spectacular diversity of birds based on Ascent of Birds.
>
> You too might be enthralled by the story of the ascent of birds as a way to spice up the isolation required during this global pandemic.
>
> Jim Karr
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Say's Phoebe
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 21:15 pm
From: danmcdt AT gmail.com
 
Seen Saturday around 5:00 p.m. Gray back, very pale orange breast - color
more pronounced near vent. Dark tail. Black bill. Dark shading around eyes.
Flat head. Within fenced area south of greenhouses, perched on traffic cone
near weather station.. then moved to sallying for ground insects from atop
nearby posts close to hanging gourd houses. Vocalized a faint tyew

Dan McDougall-Treacy
Seattle, WA
[email protected]
206.402.9426



Subject: Marbled Murrelets, Rhinos, Long-tailed Ducks (interesting plumage) photos, Semiahmoo Bay, Blaine WA
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 20:58 pm
From: abriteway AT hotmail.com
 
A week ago, Saturday 3/21 I took another social distancing skiff ride from Birch Bay Marina. This time about 5 miles north toward Semiahmoo Resort area. Cool, calm and sunny weather.

Of note were:

Long-tailed Ducks, 35. One of the photos in the linked album has a long-tail in a plumage I've not seen or at least not often. An interesting molting cycle for those that find that stuff interesting.

Horned Grebes, when my skiff was still a long way off they would get up and fly/run on the water in a different direction. Behaviour I do not see other times of the year, when they are more approachable and dive to get out of the way.

Marbled Murrelets, 2. After seeing a pair the day before about 15 miles south from today's location, I was very pleased to see another pair let alone have such a good view & photos.

Rhinoceros Auklet, 1. Today's viewing was of one non-breeding bird. Orange bill, no whiskers, etc. Interesting that the previous days viewing of about 17, all were in breeding plumage.

Black Oystercatchers, 2. A pair looks to be setting up a nest in their usual spot.

Double-crested Cormorants. Many showing off their double-crests.

Link to photos: https://flic.kr/ps/2WdJ37


Enjoy
Eric Ellingson



Subject: Tweeters is the BEST!
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 20:32 pm
From: larrydmarsh AT gmail.com
 
I just read the Feather Thief in the last few months.... an excellent read.

Larry

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 28, 2020, at 1:15 PM, Tom and Carol Stoner wrote:
>
>
> A huge thank you to all the Tweeters for their book suggestions. You have directed me to many things, both serious and distracting, that I have added to my ebook list. The Feather Thief by Kirk W. Johnson, The Feather Quest by Pete Dunne are two more possibilities.
>
> Birding my dog walk patch in West Seattle--
> Carol Stoner
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Curlews in Coulee City
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 20:18 pm
From: heapbigdoc AT netscape.net
 
There was a herd of 10 Long-billed Curlews in the circle irrigated fields southwest of the intersection of Fordair Rd. and Hwy 155 in Coulee City, Grant Co., WA at 1:18 PM today. Happy Spring!
-Roy Myers, Electric City, WA



Subject: Please model appropriate behavior during this pandemic
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 19:50 pm
From: beneteau AT wavecable.com
 
Just to be clear, Gov Inslee's order does NOT prohibit going out, even
on trails (if open). His web page states, "People can still participate
in activities such as bike rides, gardening, and dog walking ? as long
as they follow social distancing rules. So, it's the gathering that is
prohibited and folks need to stay at least 6+ feet apart.

I've already noticed some"shaming" of birders for going out at all (on
Tweeters, for example) and that isn't appropriate either.

We've appropriately cancelled sponsored events. That's in keeping with
the "no gathering" edict but let's not pile on if someone goes out on
their own and then reports a "find."

Jim Beneteau
Arlington, Wa

On 3/28/2020 7:55 AM, Cynthia Easterson wrote:
> I may have spoken to soon on the Trip report... JONATHAN, Please
> accept my apologies. I see now that that trip happened before we
> cancelled trips. PLEASE POST and PUBLISH Jonathan's report.
>
> I've just been getting so much push back on how birders think they
> should be out and about I went off before checking the date. So sorry!!!
> Cindy
>
> Cindy Easterson, President
> *PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY*
> (425) 876-1055
>
>
> On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 7:28 AM Cynthia Easterson
> > wrote:
>
> I hope this finds you all safe and well.
>
> I'm writing to ask our PAS leadership to please model appropriate
> behavior during these challenging times. I understand that we are
> a group that values our outdoor experiences but that is why it is
> even more important that we, as leaders of the organization,
> should be adhering to the rules and guidelines asked of us to keep
> our communities safe.
>
> We will not publish the March 20, 2020 trip report...it was NOT a
> Pilchuck Audubon Society sponsored event. Please don't ignore
> trail/area closed signs and if you find yourself on a path or area
> where you cannot practice safe social distancing please leave the
> area. While I recognize that this new "not normal" is less
> satisfying, it is still possible to get exercise and enjoy the
> outdoors without compounding the problem.
>
> It looks like we may be in this situation for a while longer.
> Please don't put yourself or the organization at risk by ignoring
> the stay home, stay safe order.
>
> Cindy Easterson, President
> *PILCHUCK AUDUBON SOCIETY*
> (425) 876-1055
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Groups "Pilchuck Audubon Extended Leadership Team" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send
> an email to [email protected]
> .
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/ms...
> .



Subject: Of a Feather by Weidensaul is a page-turner
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 17:48 pm
From: ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all,
I think many tweeters are already familiar with this book, "Of a Feather- A brief History of American Birding."
What was genuinely surprising about it to me was to discover that it's a page-turner!

Also, it touched our hearts as it begins with a mention of Raymond Von Buskirk, the charismatic and talented young birder from Albuquerque and the tragic fact of the death of his friend Ryan in an automobile crash that they were both in while headed out to birdwatch, still in high school. Every Christmas Delia and I would look forward to seeing these two very nice young birders at the Portal AZ and Peloncillo Mountain New Mexico Bird Count, but one Christmas it was sadly only Raymond.


Cheers, Happy Sheltering,

Ed Newbold



Subject: Tweeters is the BEST!
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 17:03 pm
From: jrkarr AT olypen.com
 
Another suggestion of a stimulating book about  brds.

Two years ago I read The Ascent of Birds by John Reilly (2018), an exploration of many intriguing questions about birds, with emphasis on recent advances in understanding of bird ecology, biogeography, evolution, physiology, and behavior. In 27 chapters averaging about 10 pages/chapter, Reilly introduces a bird species (hoatzin, oilbird, godwit) or group (tinamous, waterfowl, hummingbirds, storm petrels, owls, parrots, manakins, crows, thrushes, sparrows, crossbills, tanagers, and many more). Each chapter is "a pithy essay describing some special features" of the species or group. The role of geologic and biogeographic events in evolution of each group is coupled with special features such as morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations and, when known, their genetic underpinnings. For example, how do Bar-headed Geese fly over the Himalayan Mountains or Bar-tailed Godwits fly non-stop from Alaska to New Zealand (more than 7,000 miles) in 9 days? What ecological and biogeographic factors underpin the extraordinary diversification of hummingbirds in South America? How does hummingbird metabolism sustain a heart that beats 1200 times per minute during flight? How do albatrosses find enough food to sustain themselves and their nestlings in apparently featureless expanses (up to 5.9 million square miles) of open ocean? Why are falcons closer to parrots than hawks in recent field guides? And so on.

Reilly™s stated goal in the book was "to increase the general public™s awareness of the wonders of evolution as illustrated by birds. Some of the concepts are a little challenging but the book includes a comprehensive glossary, list of sources for each chapter, and a comprehensive index. He shows how geography, ecology, and lots of time answer the question How did the incredible diversity of more than 10,000 living bird species come to be?

Reilly™s profession involved biochemistry and medicine with specialization in causes and treatment of various blood cancers. He has also been a keen birder all his life. Since developing an interest in avian evolution, he has concentrated on tracking down and photographing species that have important evolutionary studies to tell. And he tells those stories very well.

As a practicing ornithologist, now retired, I learned much from this book. Now I™m having fun leading a monthly lecture/discussion group (Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society, OPAS) on the spectacular diversity of birds based on Ascent of Birds.

You too might be enthralled by the story of the ascent of birds as a way to spice up the isolation required during this global pandemic.

Jim Karr



Subject: Books - reading list additions
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 17:00 pm
From: clmssh AT comcast.net
 
Thank you all for the book ideas.   Right now I™m finishing Feathers The Evolution of a Natural Miracle by Northwest author, Thor Hanson.  Next up will be The Snoring Bird by Bernd Heinrich from 2007 or Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufman, 1997 or maybe The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben. Too many great choices.  Many more bird/environement-related books still on the shelf.  Also, I do enjoy the mysteries of journalist/environmentalist/birder Steve Burrows.
Happy reading, everyone. Stay safe.
Sharon Howard
Ballard
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Say's Phoebe Union Bay
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 16:11 pm
From: stephanfjelstad AT gmail.com
 
My partner, Kris Draper, and I observed a Say's Phoebe (presumably the same
bird) in the same area Michael Eaton reports, in fact perched on the same
traffic cones and metal posts until it flew off to the southeast. This was
approximately 9:00am this morning.
Did also see the N. Shrike on the same island previously reported at about
11:15a.

Stephan Fjelstad

On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 9:16 AM Michael Eaton wrote:

> Hi Tweeters,
>
> I was out at Union Bay to see the Shrike, as I was heading back to the
> parking lot of the horticultural center I spotted a Say's Phoebe at the
> south end of the horticultural area, where the greenhouses are, perched on
> some traffic cones and metal posts. I got some photos on my checklist if
> you want to see it. Please if you go see the bird follow good social
> distancing practices for the safety of all. Thanks and happy birding.
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S6...
>
> Michael Eaton
> Seattle, WA
> [email protected]
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: Tweeters is the BEST!
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 15:15 pm
From: tcstonefam AT gmail.com
 
A huge thank you to all the Tweeters for their book suggestions.  You have
directed me to many things, both serious and distracting, that I have
added to my ebook list. *The Feather Thief* by Kirk W. Johnson, *The
Feather Quest* by Pete Dunne are two more possibilities.

Birding my dog walk patch in West Seattle--
Carol Stoner



Subject: Goldfinches Galore
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 15:12 pm
From: jacknolan62 AT comcast.net
 
I'm struck by how long the gold finch have been visiting my yard this year.

I'm thinking we are going on week 4 of them flooding my feeders. I hope
I'm not messing with their natural migration instincts, but they are
beautiful.

When the males first arrived they were dull in color. Now they are just
brilliant.

Jack

Shoreline,WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Subject: Re: News story about Skagit group
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 15:06 pm
From: binary_star85 AT yahoo.com
 
Hi Tweeters,
One of the people in the Skagit Valley Chorale was a friend™s grandmother. She was a vibrant 80-yr. old, still working part time in the family business, teaching music lessons, and singing in the choir. She died last Saturday, on her 81st birthday.

No one in that choir had symptoms, and they followed social distancing. Please don™t take this virus lightly. The life you save may be your own, but it might be many other people™s lives.

On another topic brought up today, I cannot fathom how people can think it™s OK to violate birding ethics and put birds in danger to get the perfect photo. Birds face threats on all fronts these days. Birders should not be contributing to this.

Hunkered down at Lake Joy,
Paula Crockett
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Stay home, stay healthy
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 15:00 pm
From: cacord AT gmail.com
 
Good afternoon tweeters,
The current stay-at-home situation offers a great opportunity to spend some
time enhancing any plots of land attached to our residences to make them
more bird friendly. Plans can be made and supply lists organized, any
preliminary site work completed, and actually many gardening supplies and
plants can be ordered on-line. Great exercise, and chance to create, and
good for our precious birds...win, win & win.
This is a good place to start finding out about enhancing bird habitat, and
of course there are many books on the subject as well.
https://extension.wsu.edu/snoh...
stay well
Claire
Making a brush pile on Whidbey Island



Subject: Earth Day And Beyond
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 14:52 pm
From: gibsondesign15 AT gmail.com
 
"The history of Everett is a casebook study of the destruction of an environment by rampant free Enterprise (from "A guide to architecture in Washington state™- UW Press). Truer words were never written. The absentee landlords of the place back in late 1800s and early 1900s, people like Rockefeller, Rucker and other people that they named streets after, just trashed the place for timber profits followed by development. They didn't leave a single tree standing.

One of my favorite historical photos of Everett at the turn-of-the-century shows vast clear-cuts from around what was probably going to be Hewitt Street, looking North to a shaggy old growth forest-very tall trees and lots of snags. They got to those later.

Earth Day 2019 found me in Everett working on my old front yard. Holly and I are divorced now but still good friends. She wound up with the house. In the 13 or so years I lived there I cleaned up a lot of weed trees like Laburnum etc.. Also a whole lot of English ivy. The front lawn was sort of de facto, with plenty of wildflowers (dandelions in spring and hieracium in summer). I thought they were quite attractive. As a landscape designer I was constantly coming up with schemes for a real showcase Front yard, which never happened.I always had a leaning towards using native plants but before I could decide I was divorced and out of a house.

Then in 2016 Holly called me up and asked if would put in a wildlife Garden in the front yard. I had already come up with some schemes from the past but sort of refigured things as I went along. Along with paying off some back taxes I was also going to get paid and Holly was going to buy the plants. That's my favorite kind of landscaping-using other peoples money. So in the summer 2016 I got started. Although I had acquired Parkinson's by this time and was about Half the man I used to be I was able to do most of the work. I got some young guys to strip off the sod and carry in rocks and gravel for paths and sitting areas. In the fall 2016 we planted the first plants. By the fall of 2017 all the plants had grown a lot. By fall of 2019 the growth was amazing. Fall by the way is a great time to plant since you don't have to water much except at planting time. Aside from the initial fertilizing at planting time it's never needed any more fertilizer.

We did have some native plants here, originally including a row of tall Pacific dogwoods and a few holodiscus and around 2008 planted a Tall Mahonia hedge between us and the park next door. Now the front yard, roughly 30 x 50 ft
Has 25 species of native plants all native to Everett or were native to Everett in the past probably. (Bunchberry Dogwood and Campanula rotundifolia)

An original thought I had years ago was that I wanted suitable yard for a towhee to nest in. So I planted bunches of Snowberry ,Nootka Rose,,Salal and Thimbleberry to make dense tickets that may harbor a towhee or junco nest. I saw a White-crowned Sparrow fly into a Douglas fir trees so maybe it's nesting in there. The Douglasfir grew 4ft this year!

There's not too much bare Earth left in the yard therefore no more weeds or very few.

Back to earth day 2019 when I was working on spreading mulch. I didn't realize it was Earth Day till later. I wasn't being much of a do-gooder for the local Hymenoptera. First I buried a small patch of little burrows of some small Mining Bee™s ( About a quarter inch long) which haplessly searched for their missing burrows. Other hymenoptera were more pissed off -several yellow jackets orbiting my head at eye-level. I mulched elsewhere for a while.


As far as trees go on my small plot I've got one Douglas fir, a big leaf Maple, four Vine Maples, couple of Bitter cherries, and some big shrubs like holodiscus. Should be interesting to see how it all grows -editing Will be needed, but that's the fun part. Can't wait to see what's happening this year.

Jeff Gibson
changing the world
In Everett Washington




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Subject: Band-tailed Pigeon
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 14:46 pm
From: jfgatchet AT gmail.com
 
I had four BAND-TAILED PIGEON at one of my feeders yesterday. I am recovering from a broken hip and housebound. I am enjoying the yard birds  There has been a big increase of RHINOCEROS AUKLET on Discovery Bay this last week. They are showing their white plumes.

John F. Gatchet
Gardiner Beach

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Saw-whets
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 14:39 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
Just last November, a Northern Saw-whet Owl finally made itself known at my rural dwelling in Skagit County, near Cockreham Island. I had always expected one to show up, because I had once picked up a road-killed Saw-whet about 150 meters from where I now live--years before I had any inkling that I'd end up living here.
Then on this past Thursday night, the 26 of March, I heard a Saw-whet tooting from my front porch. The sound was coming from an isolated cluster of big conifers, just south and east of the house. It kept up tooting for over an hour. That was at about half-past ten at night.
The next day, the 27th, my wife and I walked the dog on the trail there, at Etach Slough. This was around noontime. She asked me if I would like to search for the owl. I said that, no, it is too hard to look for Saw-whets in the daytime, and those conifers are in a rather swampy spot. One would have to wear gumboots, presumably spending hours craning one's neck and peering into thick cedar foliage.
Then she asked me if maybe we might be able to hear it. I quickly rejoined that, no, they don't vocalize during the day.
Within two seconds of the end of that rejoinder, the Saw-whet starting tooting--in the broad daylight of noon! It did so for about fifteen to twenty seconds, and then went silent. As usual, Mr. Bletsch had been wrong, Mrs. Bletsch right.
No, this wasn't a Northern Pygmy Owl. It was a Saw-whet.
When I got home, I checked through all of my records, and verified that that was the sole time I'd ever heard a Saw-whet in the daytime. I'd heard them at dusk and dawn a few times over the years, but never during the day. Wow!
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch



Subject: A passel of Varied Thrush
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 14:15 pm
From: mch1096 AT hotmail.com
 
When I got up from a session of quilting I was amazed to see a passel, in this case a passel equals 8, Varied Thrush feeding in the area outside my family/work room window.  Often two or three might be around but this morning there must have been a late breakfast meeting of thrush.  Sometimes when I go out early, just about the time birds can see to fly, I will hear two or three thrush calling from the immediate area.  Their clear bell-like call piercing the cold morning air and making me momentarily forget the cold and rain.

Guess if we can't go to the birds we must enjoy the ones we have in our yards or on our daily walks. The one thing I'll miss this Spring is my annual trip to E. WA around Othello, down lower Crab Creek Rd and up onto Saddle Mountain just north of Mattawa as well as those favorite haunts of everyone around Cle Elum, down Hwy 10 to Ellensburg then down the Old Vantage Hwy to the Columbia. Sometimes we have to let our memories and/or our mind's eye envision where we'd all be and doing relative to birds this time of year.

Mary Hrudkaj
Belfair/Tahuya



Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Mar. 29, 2020
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 14:03 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hello, Tweeters,

Heard last week on BirdNote:
* Spring, The Sky Rippled with Geese - With Maria Schneider
And a poem by Ted Kooser
http://bit.ly/1hVWzTG
* Elf Owl - Fierce Little Predator
http://bit.ly/2n7SAxU
* The Myth of Syrinx and the Satyr
https://bit.ly/2xyY1go
* Dawn Song - Emily Dickinson
http://bit.ly/2TypN7h
* Red-winged Blackbird Harem
http://bit.ly/24zLlgc
* Great Tinamou, Eerie Voice in the Jungle
https://bit.ly/2UUX3U7
* Thirsty Hummingbirds
http://bit.ly/1SnAy25
========================Next week on BirdNote: The Beauty of Webbed Feet,
A Walk Down an Arroyo, Winter Wren in a Carolina Cathedral,
and more! https://bit.ly/2WPrvRZ
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:[email protected]
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bird...
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podca...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Subject: What bird book are you currently reading?
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 12:50 pm
From: edomino.ed AT gmail.com
 
The Falcon Thief by Josh Hammer is a true detective story of a dogged
English police detective to pursues a daredevil egg thief around the globe
trying to nail him for stealing raptor eggs and selling them to Arabs. A
real thriller, good ornithological info and TRUE...I recommend it. Co
hosted the author at Third Place Books a few weeks ago.

Ed Dominguez
Seward Park Audubon Center

On Fri, Mar 27, 2020 at 1:18 PM Diann MacRae wrote:

> Hi, Tweets
>
> In between walking my elkhound and trying some new recipes, I'm reading
> "Urban Raptors" and Pete Dunne's "Gulls" book - sort of back and forth.
> When I did some research on migrating seabirds past Point Reyes,
> California, I knew my gulls very well; unfortunately, I'm not so good any
> more, too much raptor-looking, but Pete's book is great. The raptor book
> emphasizes a lot of stuff I knew and a lot I didn't. I also read mysteries,
> but those are for more relaxed reading at night.
>
> Cheers, Diann
>
> Diann MacRae
> Olympic Vulture Study
> 22622 - 53rd Avenue S.E.
> Bothell, WA 98021
> [email protected]
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: News story about Skagit group
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 12:30 pm
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
Whether your position is stay at home or bird safely, it is important to understand just how contagious this coronavirus is. Please take a moment to read the message below that Janeanne Houston and Mark Ahlness sent to Tweeters yesterday. 

For those of you who believe this whole virus thing is a hoax, I urge you to think again. If not for yourself, then for the ones you love.
For those of you who feel you can bird safely, make damn sure you do!

Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
[email protected]


From: "Mark Ahlness"
To: "Tweeters"
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2020 9:08:01 AM
Subject: [Tweeters] News story about Skagit group
Because the area is such a popular birding destination, sending this on.... From the NY Times yesterday, about an incident in Skagit County on March 10:


March 26, 2020, 6:15 p.m. ETMarch 26, 2020
March 26, 2020
By [ https://www.nytimes.com/by/mik... | Mike Baker ]

[ https://www.nytimes.com/live/2... | A choir group had 60 people show up for practice. Now 45
are sick. ]

Before social distancing requirements were in place in Washington State earlier this month, members of a choir group took their own coronavirus precautions. They told singers not to attend practice if they had even a hint of illness.

Yet the virus has devastated the Skagit Valley Chorale, based in the rural valley north of Seattle that is famous for its tulip production. Of the 60 people who attended a March 10 practice, 45 have developed symptoms and 27 so far have tested positive, officials said. One of the group™s members has died, another has been hospitalized and others have struggled to overcome their illness.

Polly Dubbel, the communicable disease and environmental health manager at Skagit County Public Health, said the case was a disturbing example of how contagious coronavirus can be and how it can spread among groups even when no one is symptomatic.

It™s really too high risk for people to gather close together, Ms. Dubbel said. This just really illustrates that.

Ruth Backlund, a co-president at the Skagit Valley Chorale, said the group was monitoring public health guidelines at the time of the practice and had asked people to stay home if they showed even minor signs of illness. The group gathered in rows facing a piano and a choir director. They were all in individual chairs and had space to keep separated. Ms. Backlund had made sure there were extra soap dispensers in the bathrooms for people to wash their hands.

Nobody was sick. Nobody touched anybody. Nobody shook hands. Nobody hugged everybody like you might do in a group. There was none of that, Ms. Backlund said.
--
Mark Ahlness
[ mailto:[email protected] | [email protected] ]
Seattle, WA

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Subject: Varied Thrushes in Edmonds
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 12:17 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Earlier this week I posted that Tuesday morning I had the shelter-in-place trifecta visit my backyard in Edmonds: a pair of varied thrushes, a pair of pileated woodpeckers, and a pair of Douglas' squirrels. Photos can be seen by scrolling down this page:Birds of Edmonds, WA. 2020

|
|
| |
Birds of Edmonds, WA. 2020

My first time out in ages. I was getting cabin fever and asked my wife drive Daren and me down to the marsh on...
|

|

|

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Nesting Bewick's Wrens
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 12:03 pm
From: jill.freidberg AT gmail.com
 
I live in Seattle™s Central District and I™ve just discovered a pair of Bewick™s building a nest in my Mason bee box. I can watch the (steady) progress from my kitchen window, which is a welcome distraction during these frightening days of isolation. 

They™re in a box like this one I™ve heard that House Sparrows and even Song Sparrows will predate their nests and that there™s some kind of guard that can be attached to nest boxes to reduce the likelihood of that. I mean, now that I think about it, I guess crows and rats (of which we have many in the CD) would also be a threat. Now, I™m no stranger to the food chain, and I know that sometimes nature is ugly. For example, I assume that wren nestlings will eat any Mason bee larvae that share the box. Oh well. But life is sad and scary right now, and I™d love to watch this wren family thrive without having to witness too much carnage. Any suggestions on a quick and non-intrusive guard I could rig over this box to give them some added protection?

Also, *do* rats eat wren eggs around here? Ugh.

Thanks!
Jill



Subject: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 11:51 am
From: vikingcove AT gmail.com
 
Thank you for these posts, and thank you to Tweeters members and moderators
who allow such posts. Without these posts, posts of praise and celebration
would be worthless.

Unlike many birds, bird watchers with their binoculars, scopes, and attire
are often easy to spot & identify & observe from a great distance, like
utility line workers and emergency responders. Observers can safely guess
and assume why utility line workers and emergency responders are out there,
and be grateful to see them.

Sincerely,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, Yakima County, WA
https://www.aba.org/aba-code-o...

On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 8:02 AM bill shelmerdine wrote:

> Thanks BB for posting that!
>
> If you had people (friends and family) in the Hot Zone, I guarantee you
> would not take this lightly. I know the vast majority are thoughtful in
> there actions, but... Our actions speak volumes and mean so much more than
> how we explain our actions to other people and our communities. Doing
> everything we can is the least we can do... If we find ourselves having to
> explain why it is OK for us to go, while those around us should stay
> perhaps we should re-think... Sorry for the preachy tone. For some this
> may be among the most important decisions we ever make. Enough said (or
> perhaps more than enough...)
>
> Be safe, stay close, good luck
> [email protected]
>
> From: B B >
> Subject: [Tweeters] Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
> Date: March 26, 2020 at 2:01:44 PM PDT
> To: "[email protected]" >
> Reply-To: "[email protected]" >
>
> There continue to be numerous Ebird and Tweeters reports of birding in
> many places around the state. Maybe some are on permitted walks or visits
> to groceries, BUT are from remote destination areas. I understand that the
> chances of acquiring or transmitting COVID-19 are small or nil in these
> areas, but we are all in this together and if this is the response of the
> birding community what kind of example is this for other communities and
> individuals who may feel they too can ignore the order to do something they
> like and just maybe endanger themselves and others?
>
> Disappointed...
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 11:46 am
From: steveloitz AT gmail.com
 
Link to WA Governor's Proclamation



Language salient to birding: "Essential activities permitted under this
Proclamation are limited to the following: * * * 4) Engaging in outdoor
exercise activities, such as walking, hiking, running or biking, but only
if appropriate social distancing practices are used."

Steve Loitz
Ellensburg, WA

On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 9:08 AM Larry Marsh wrote:

> Lighten up folks! If one is out by themselves on a trail I think that is a
> good example! That is the plan.... be separate! Tell me how that is a
> problem!
>
> Larry
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 28, 2020, at 8:02 AM, bill shelmerdine wrote:
>
>
> Thanks BB for posting that!
>
> If you had people (friends and family) in the Hot Zone, I guarantee you
> would not take this lightly. I know the vast majority are thoughtful in
> there actions, but... Our actions speak volumes and mean so much more than
> how we explain our actions to other people and our communities. Doing
> everything we can is the least we can do... If we find ourselves having to
> explain why it is OK for us to go, while those around us should stay
> perhaps we should re-think... Sorry for the preachy tone. For some this
> may be among the most important decisions we ever make. Enough said (or
> perhaps more than enough...)
>
> Be safe, stay close, good luck
> [email protected]
>
> From: B B >
> Subject: [Tweeters] Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
> Date: March 26, 2020 at 2:01:44 PM PDT
> To: "[email protected]" >
> Reply-To: "[email protected]" >
>
> There continue to be numerous Ebird and Tweeters reports of birding in
> many places around the state. Maybe some are on permitted walks or visits
> to groceries, BUT are from remote destination areas. I understand that the
> chances of acquiring or transmitting COVID-19 are small or nil in these
> areas, but we are all in this together and if this is the response of the
> birding community what kind of example is this for other communities and
> individuals who may feel they too can ignore the order to do something they
> like and just maybe endanger themselves and others?
>
> Disappointed...
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>


--
Steve Loitz
Ellensburg, WA
[email protected]



Subject: Bird paparazzi
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 11:31 am
From: robertgary02 AT aol.com
 
Although I'm sure there is no shortage of people out right now trampling through essential wildlife habitat in search of the perfect photograph I thought I would post this anyway.East 90 near Edison is the place that I have seen the most egregious examples of this poorbehavior so I'll focus on this spot particularly. Those owls and other birds lead a precarious existence. Those fields are their essential hunting grounds and every time someone tramps through those grounds the margin of survival gets thinner for the objects of your obsession. With those lenses you can exercise patience and get excellent photographs from the road without invading essential habitat and causing prey to conceal themselves.I cannot fathom that the people I see out there don't see themselves as I do: wildlife paparazzi willing to endanger the livelihood of their subjects in a mindless pursuit of the perfect digital image. Maybe some can do better once the danger from coronavirus subsides.



Subject: Varied Thrushes in Shoreline
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 11:19 am
From: cjmackturner1 AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweets,

The Varied Thrushes are normally gone by March but over the last week our neighborhood near Shoreline Community College is filled with their song & calls, morning & dusk. I™ve never seen this in the many years I™ve lived in Shoreline. My understanding is that they prefer to breed in higher altitudes. I guess the next few weeks will determine if they™re really going to stick aroundanyone else noticing this lowland presence?

Thanks,
Claudia Turner
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Say's Phoebe Union Bay
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 11:15 am
From: meeato01 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

I was out at Union Bay to see the Shrike, as I was heading back to the
parking lot of the horticultural center I spotted a Say's Phoebe at the
south end of the horticultural area, where the greenhouses are, perched on
some traffic cones and metal posts. I got some photos on my checklist if
you want to see it. Please if you go see the bird follow good social
distancing practices for the safety of all. Thanks and happy birding.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S6...

Michael Eaton
Seattle, WA
[email protected]



Subject: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 11:08 am
From: larrydmarsh AT gmail.com
 
Lighten up folks! If one is out by themselves on a trail I think that is a good example! That is the plan.... be separate! Tell me how that is a problem!

Larry



Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 28, 2020, at 8:02 AM, bill shelmerdine wrote:
>
>
> Thanks BB for posting that!
>
> If you had people (friends and family) in the Hot Zone, I guarantee you would not take this lightly. I know the vast majority are thoughtful in there actions, but... Our actions speak volumes and mean so much more than how we explain our actions to other people and our communities. Doing everything we can is the least we can do... If we find ourselves having to explain why it is OK for us to go, while those around us should stay perhaps we should re-think... Sorry for the preachy tone. For some this may be among the most important decisions we ever make. Enough said (or perhaps more than enough...)
>
> Be safe, stay close, good luck
> [email protected]
>
> From: B B >
> Subject: [Tweeters] Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
> Date: March 26, 2020 at 2:01:44 PM PDT
> To: "[email protected]" >
> Reply-To: "[email protected]" >
>
> There continue to be numerous Ebird and Tweeters reports of birding in many places around the state. Maybe some are on permitted walks or visits to groceries, BUT are from remote destination areas. I understand that the chances of acquiring or transmitting COVID-19 are small or nil in these areas, but we are all in this together and if this is the response of the birding community what kind of example is this for other communities and individuals who may feel they too can ignore the order to do something they like and just maybe endanger themselves and others?
>
> Disappointed...
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 10:02 am
From: georn1 AT hotmail.com
 
Thanks BB for posting that!

If you had people (friends and family) in the Hot Zone, I guarantee you would not take this lightly. I know the vast majority are thoughtful in there actions, but... Our actions speak volumes and mean so much more than how we explain our actions to other people and our communities. Doing everything we can is the least we can do... If we find ourselves having to explain why it is OK for us to go, while those around us should stay perhaps we should re-think... Sorry for the preachy tone. For some this may be among the most important decisions we ever make. Enough said (or perhaps more than enough...)

Be safe, stay close, good luck
[email protected]

From: B B >
Subject: [Tweeters] Did I Miss a Birding Exemption to Stay At Home?
Date: March 26, 2020 at 2:01:44 PM PDT
To: "[email protected]" >
Reply-To: "[email protected]" >

There continue to be numerous Ebird and Tweeters reports of birding in many places around the state. Maybe some are on permitted walks or visits to groceries, BUT are from remote destination areas. I understand that the chances of acquiring or transmitting COVID-19 are small or nil in these areas, but we are all in this together and if this is the response of the birding community what kind of example is this for other communities and individuals who may feel they too can ignore the order to do something they like and just maybe endanger themselves and others?

Disappointed...



Subject: Union Bay Shrike
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 9:09 am
From: meeato01 AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters,

Northern Shrike was present at 7am this morning at the fill. Lifer for me!
Spotted on dead tree on thin island south of osprey platform.

Michael Eaton
Seattle, WA
[email protected]



Subject: Bird sing opera
Date: Sat Mar 28 2020 7:48 am
From: morgan AT assurant.com
 
Hi,

Thanks for getting back to us. Unfortunately, there was not an attachment included with your message. Please attach the insurance document and send it back to us so we can update the account.

If you have any questions, you can reply to this email, or you can give us a call at the number below.

Assurant Insurance Service Center
On behalf of Morgan Properties
Phone 1.800.243.4491
Email [email protected]



------------------- Original Message -------------------
From: Faye McAdams Hands
Received: Thu Mar 26 2020 14:40:19 GMT-0400 (Eastern Daylight Time)
To: Marcia Ian; [email protected]
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bird sing opera

Thank You so much for sharing this Marcia!

Happy Birding,
Faye


Faye McAdams Hands

Life is Simple -- Eat, Sleep, Bird.

________________________________
From: Tweeters on behalf of Marcia Ian
Sent: Thursday, March 26, 2020 11:23 AM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Bird sing opera

I hope its ok to send this...?

https://eur04.safelinks.protec...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
https://eur04.safelinks.protec...

**********************************************************************
This e-mail message and all attachments transmitted with it may contain legally privileged and/or confidential information intended solely for the use of the addressee(s). If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any reading, dissemination, distribution, copying, forwarding or other use of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender immediately and delete this message and all copies and backups thereof. Thank you.



Subject: hums on my feeder
Date: Fri Mar 27 2020 22:26 pm
From: linda.talman AT gmail.com
 
We have more hummingbirds than normal this year - rufous and Anna's. The
former are not being their usual aggressive selves. Maybe it's the nature
of our new normal as we notice humans being so careful with each other - if
I might anthropomorphize a bit.

But my question is this - at dusk today and yesterday we noticed a bunch of
Anna's loading up at are feeders. Is that just when they feed or are they
likely to be migrating. Or are they using the nesting material we put out
and only going out at that time to keep their nests safer.
My husband and I have to switch ends of the table nowr and then to give our
necks a break!

Nice to live in a small town these days where a social safe distance allows
you to greet neighbors on porches or out for a walk -- or gardening.
Cheers,


--





*The only real job of a public official is to make their grandchildren
proud. That's called vision..... Linda*

Linda Z. Talman
PO Box 392
La Conner, WA

360 840 1714



Subject: Books!
Date: Fri Mar 27 2020 20:54 pm
From: avosetta AT hotmail.com
 
I am impressed by the reading material that you are all perusing.  Alas, my mood is different.  After putting away Birds of Spain by de Juana and Varela when my trip in May was canceled, I need something lighter to try to improve my mood.  So I'm reading birder mysteries, of which there are more every day.  I do find it hard sometimes to finger a birder as a murderer, but I always feel better when justice prevails.

Thanks to the Tweeter who mentioned mysteries earlier!

Here's a good list of birder mysteries, although not complete (doesn't include Steve Burrows' books starting with A Siege of Bitterns): https://www.cozy-mystery.com/b...

Diane Yorgason-Quinn
Gig Harbor, WA
[email protected]

________________________________
From: Tweeters on behalf of Becky Galloway
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2020 4:35 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: [Tweeters] Books!

As soon as I saw the book recommendations I went to thriftbooks.com and in 8-10 days I will be receiving:

-Gulls Simplified : A Comparative Approach to Identification

-Peterson Reference Guide to Seawatching : Eastern Waterbirds in Flight

Thanks for the suggestions! (Much sooner than that, I will be getting some new mysteries and sci-fi. I heart me some thrifty books!)

--
Rebecca Galloway
Shoreline


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