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Washington Tweeters Code 2 Birds

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Yellow-billed Loon (2)Gavia adamsii


White-tailed Hawk (2)Buteo albicaudatus


Zone-tailed Hawk (2)Buteo albonotatus


Gyrfalcon (2)Falco rusticolus


Spruce Grouse (2)Falcipennis canadensis


Sharp-tailed Grouse (2)Tympanuchus phasianellus


Ancient Murrelet (2)Synthliboramphus antiquus


Flammulated Owl (2)Otus flammeolus


Snowy Owl (2)Nyctea scandiaca


Northern Saw-whet Owl (2)Aegolius acadicus


White-winged Crossbill (2)Loxia leucoptera


Yellow-billed Loon (2)Gavia adamsii




    Subject: Yellow-billed Loon at Point Hudson in Port Townsend
    Date: 09 Dec
    From: sduncan AT bsc.edu 
    Hi Tweeters,

    Lonnie Somer and I did a marathon tour of coastal sites between Kingston and Port Townsend today. Best bird was a YELLOW-BILLED LOON seen at Point Hudson (which is within Port Townsend). Other highlights included an EARED GREBE at Fort Flagler State Park - Campground/Beach, and an estimated 50 ANCIENT MURRELETS (and Orcas!!) at Point Wilson Lighthouse. We ended the day with an EURASIAN WIGEON at Kah Tai Lagoon in Port Townsend. Ill try to post more details soon, but wanted to get the word out about the loon.

    Scot Duncan

    White-tailed Hawk (2)Buteo albicaudatus




      Subject: Southern Louisiana October 2017
      Date: 17 Nov
      From: cobirds AT googlegroups.com 
      Greetings All



      If anyone is interested, photos from my 10 day or so trip to southern Louisiana late this October are athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/36088296@N08/sets/72157666457208999




      Highlights of visit, as far as rarities, were Thayer's Gull, Great Black-backed Gull (I know, everywhere it's gulls, gulls, gulls), White-tailed Hawk (sorry, no photos), Say's Phoebe.




      It is interesting to encounter multiple Cave Swallows, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Swainson's Hawks, Vermilion Flycatchers, Bronzed Cowbirds, with nary a reaction from local birders. My guess is that a visit 25 years ago with these birds would have been met with awe.




      Good Birding

      Steven Mlodinow

      Longmont CO (formerly Everett WA)





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      Zone-tailed Hawk (2)Buteo albonotatus




        Subject: Harlan's hawk still in Neah Bay
        Date: 20 Nov
        From: wlrisser AT gmail.com 
        We saw the Harlan's hawk that was reported several days ago by the birders
        who were at Neah Bay for the zone-tailed hawk.

        It was hard to find: we drove up and down Makah Passage Road along the
        grassland between that road and the Cape Flattery Road about 10-12 times at
        various times of day before we found it. It was in the grass just south of
        the Wa'Atch River bridge at 10 AM. It flew across the Cape Flattery Road
        and hunted along the firs on the slope behind that road. We would not have
        seen it if we had not seen it take off.



        It does not have the tail pattern that is shown in the Sibley and the
        National Geo guides. I remembered that Harlan's hawks have remarkable
        variability in their tail patterns. William Clark the hawk expert wrote a
        wonderful discussion of this in the ABA's magazine Birding, with photos. If
        you have access to old issues of Birding, the reference is 2009, vol 41,
        pages 30-36.



        William Clark has another interesting article that I found by searching for
        "Is HARLAN'S HAWK a subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk?" I used Google Scholar.



        More info than you needed but it's here in case that you find this hawk as
        interesting as I do.



        Will Risser, Portland



        Subject: RE: Tweeters Digest, Vol 159, Issue 8
        Date: 13 Nov
        From: quetsal48 AT comcast.net 
        Not all messages.
        Some days I get all the messages and some days only a few. Out of 13 today
        only 4 were viewable. How can I remedy that?

        Craig
        Olympia

        -----Original Message-----
        From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu
        [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of
        tweeters-request@mailman1.u.washington.edu
        Sent: Wednesday, November 8, 2017 12:00 PM
        To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
        Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 159, Issue 8

        Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
        tweeters@u.washington.edu

        To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
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        Today's Topics:

        1. Re: Flycatcher captured on trail cam in Adams County
        (Joshua Glant)
        2. Brown?s Point Snow Bunting (H Heiberg)
        3. Re: Flycatcher captured on trail cam in Adams County (Bob)
        4. Re: Browns Point Snow Bunting (plkoyama@comcast.net)
        5. Re: Merlin(n)ing (Hal Michael)
        6. VARC Fall Blog! (Derek Matthews)
        7. Odd duck (Scott Ramos)
        8. Snow Bunting @ Browns Point Lighthouse Park (Hank H)
        9. Harris Sparrow at Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge (Margee Cooper)
        10. Eurasian Skylark & Zone-tailed Hawk at Neah Bay 11/7/2017
        (Ryan Merrill)
        11. RFI (Roger Moyer)
        12. Harris Sparrow Ridgefield NWR, Clark Co, WA (Bob)
        13. Sandy Point Snowy Ow and Snow Buntings (B B)


        ----------------------------------------------------------------------

        Message: 1
        Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2017 12:12:46 -0800
        From: Joshua Glant
        Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Flycatcher captured on trail cam in Adams
        County
        To: mcallisters4@comcast.net
        Cc: tweeters@u.washington.edu
        Message-ID: <7883B2D6-D477-4D42-98E3-67D4088F4594@gmail.com>
        Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

        Looks like a Western Wood-pewee in a side profile!

        Good birding, Joshua Glant
        Mercer Island, WA



        Sent from my iPhone
        > On Nov 7, 2017, at 11:58 AM, mcallisters4@comcast.net wrote:
        >
        > I don't know what kinds of sounds this flycatcher makes. All I have are
        the photos that I've uploaded to my Flickr account. Please, if anyone has a
        better sense than I of the flycatchers that are typical of the Palouse of
        Washington, during mid-summer, have a look at these pictures and see if you
        can make a high probability guess at the species.
        >
        >
        > https://www.flickr.com/photos/29002564@N08/38248431231/in/dateposted-p
        > ublic/
        >
        > Kelly McAllister
        > Olympia, Washington
        > _______________________________________________
        > Tweeters mailing list
        > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
        > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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        Message: 2
        Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2017 13:34:29 -0800
        From: H Heiberg
        Subject: [Tweeters] Brown?s Point Snow Bunting
        To: Tweeters
        Message-ID:
        Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

        The Snow Bunting was in the grass near the lighthouse at 1:15 today.

        Hank Heiberg
        Lake Joy
        NE of Carnation, WA

        Sent from my iPhone


        ------------------------------

        Message: 3
        Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2017 21:51:39 +0000
        From: Bob
        Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Flycatcher captured on trail cam in Adams
        County
        To: Joshua Glant
        Cc: "tweeters@u.washington.edu"
        Message-ID:



        Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

        Agree with Joshua

        Bob Flores
        Ridgefield, WA

        On Nov 7, 2017, at 12:13, Joshua Glant
        > wrote:

        Looks like a Western Wood-pewee in a side profile!

        Good birding, Joshua Glant
        Mercer Island, WA



        Sent from my iPhone
        On Nov 7, 2017, at 11:58 AM,
        mcallisters4@comcast.net wrote:

        I don't know what kinds of sounds this flycatcher makes. All I have are the
        photos that I've uploaded to my Flickr account. Please, if anyone has a
        better sense than I of the flycatchers that are typical of the Palouse of
        Washington, during mid-summer, have a look at these pictures and see if you
        can make a high probability guess at the species.


        https://www.flickr.com/photos/29002564@N08/38248431231/in/dateposted-public/

        Kelly McAllister
        Olympia, Washington
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        Tweeters@u.washington.edu
        http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
        _______________________________________________
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        Tweeters@u.washington.edu
        http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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        ------------------------------

        Message: 4
        Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2017 14:18:22 -0800
        From:
        Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Browns Point Snow Bunting
        To: "Hans-Joachim Feddern" , "Tweeters"

        Message-ID: <64FBC9E1CE7E47AF98926235BD700100@KoyamaHP>
        Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

        Because they donb

        _______________________________________________
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        Subject: Friday and Saturday Neah Bay Highlights
        Date: 12 Nov
        From: wagtail24 AT gmail.com 
        Hi All,

        Though the darn Zone-tailed Hawk didn't stick around until the end of
        the week, there was plenty of very fine bird sightings in the Neah Bay
        area to more than make up for the no-show hawk.

        As Michael Hobbs previously reported on Friday, the SKYLARK and an
        AMERICAN TREE SPARROW were being seen on that day until the late
        afternoon. To my knowledge, both were not found yesterday.

        On Friday, Ken Lane and Casey McHugh found a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH near
        the car dump yard at the west end of town. Though I did not hear of any
        reports of this bird from yesterday, it easily could be in the area
        given the habitat and their tendency to stick around once noted in November.

        WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILLS and goodly numbers of Red Crossbills were easily
        noted in the Hobuck Beach area on both days frequenting the abundant
        spruce cone crop. White-wings were also noted in very good numbers
        further south in the Tsoo-Yess beach area. It seems quite clear that an
        irruption event is in full swing so checking the spruce forests all
        along our Washington coast would likely pay off. Common Redpolls were
        also noted in the Neah Bay area though I was not able to stumble upon any.

        A lone BOHEMIAN WAXWING, noted initially by Ryan Merrill near Butler's
        Motel, flew around the town a bit before arriving back near Butler's
        Motel a few moments later allowing a handful of birders to view it.

        Penny Rose and her WOS field trip crew found a DICKCISSEL just north of
        the entrance office building of the Hobuck Beach Campground area. It was
        hanging around with a flock of Golden-crowned Sparrows and it was
        observed by other birders later in the early afternoon.

        Charlie Wright, Ryan Merrill and I were fortunate to witness a GYRFALCON
        fly quite near us in the Tsoo-Yess Beach area during mid-morning. It
        continued on south up the valley.

        I think that catches the list of major highlights over the last two days
        up in Neah Bay.

        Cheers and good birding,

        Brad Waggoner

        Bainbridge Island



        Subject: Neah Bay Zone-tailed Hawk
        Date: 06 Nov
        From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net 
        HI ALL:
        Just saw that the Neah Bay Zone-tailed Hawk was refound this morning
        "hunting over town near Butler's and the school."

        sincerely
        --

        Ian Paulsen
        Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
        Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
        https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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        Subject: RBA ZT Hawk in Wash
        Date: 06 Nov
        From: rflores_2 AT msn.com 
        ?

        Bob Flores
        Ridgefield, WA

        Begin forwarded message:

        From: Alan Contreras >
        Date: November 5, 2017 at 15:56:15 PST
        To: OBOL >
        Subject: [obol] RBA ZT Hawk in Wash
        Reply-To: acontrer56@gmail.com

        Matt Dufort reports that Adrian Hinkle and Em Scattaregia found an apparent Zone-Tailed Hawk in #NeahBay Washington. Would be the first for Washington and maybe the first for the northwest region?


        Alan Contreras
        Eugene, Oregon

        acontrer56@gmail.com

        www.alanlcontreras.com


        POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
        JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
        OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
        Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



        Subject: Zone-tailed Hawk in Neah Bay
        Date: 05 Nov
        From: matt.dufort AT gmail.com 
        There's an apparent Zone-tailed Hawk circling over the west side of Neah
        Bay. Found by Adrian Hinkle and Em Scattaregia.

        Good birding,
        Matt Dufort

        Gyrfalcon (2)Falco rusticolus




          Subject: Skagit Gyrfalcon
          Date: 09 Dec
          From: birds AT t-mansfield.com 
          Just flew west over dike toward Padilla Bay.

          Tom Mansfield moving on

          Sent from my iPhone



          Subject: Skagit Gyrfalcon (GYRF)
          Date: 09 Dec
          From: birds AT t-mansfield.com 
          As of the time of this post (11:05 on Sat) the juvenile GYRF is sitting on a pole watching ducks in the first slough on Bayview Edison Rd just north of the highway to Anacortes. Tom Mansfield watching

          Sent from my iPhone



          Subject: Gyrfalcon in the Skagit?
          Date: 07 Dec
          From: stkohl AT msn.com 
          Any updates on the gyr?
          Thanks. Steve Kohl. Seattle

          Sent from my iPhone



          Subject: Thanks to Marv and Mark
          Date: 06 Dec
          From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net 
          Along with the sun, this report is great to see.
          Thanks to both of you.

          Barb Deihl
          Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
          barbdeihl@comcast.net

          ********************************
          Message: 5
          Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 08:28:01 -0800
          From: Mark Ahlness
          Subject: [Tweeters] Gyrfalcon in Skagit County

          Marv Breece asked us to pass this on... This morning at 8:00, he was
          observing a Gyrfalcon perched on a pole, on Bayview Edison Rd, between
          Sullivan and D'Arcy.

          Mark Ahlness
          mahlness@gmail.com
          Seattle, WA



          Subject: Gyrfalcon in Skagit County
          Date: 06 Dec
          From: mahlness AT gmail.com 
          Marv Breece asked us to pass this on... This morning at 8:00, he was
          observing a Gyrfalcon perched on a pole, on Bayview Edison Rd, between
          Sullivan and D'Arcy.

          Mark Ahlness
          mahlness@gmail.com
          Seattle, WA



          Subject: Sensitive species in eBird
          Date: 17 Nov
          From: xjoshx AT gmail.com 
          Hello Tweets,
          I have some pretty strong feelings about eBird's abrupt implementation
          of their "sensitive species" policy. Obviously there are species
          around the world which face immense pressure from poachers whose
          precise locations need to be suppressed either temporarily or
          permanently from consumption by the general public. On the other hand,
          eBird also cast a rather arbitrary net with several North American
          species that has caused a lot of backlash among some of their biggest
          contributors.

          Specifically Gyrfalcon, Great Gray Owl, and Northern Hawk-Owl are all
          species that occur throughout northern Europe, Asia, and America and
          are listed as "least concern" by the International Union for
          Conservation of Nature. Why they ended up on a list along with some of
          the imperiled species is a very perplexing question.

          Unfortunately the inclusion of these species very much limits the
          ability of people with an interest in their historical occurrence,
          habitat preferences, arrival and departure dates, etc. It's really a
          bit of a stab in the back to those of us who have worked countless
          hours to enter data, expecting that they and their peers, as well as
          the scientific community, would get to benefit from it for years to
          come and we're now left wondering what will disappear next.


          Josh Adams
          Cathcart, WA
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          Subject: Sensitive species in eBird
          Date: 17 Nov
          From: 1northraven AT gmail.com 
          Thanks for posting the link.

          The listing of Gyrfalcon raises the question of whether there is evidence
          Gyr in northwestern Washington are being pursued for the falcon trade.
          This is not to cast doubt on the eBird listing, it is to ask about the
          level of security appropriate on other media, including idle chat with
          folks in other vehicles when birding Whatcom, Skagit, & Snohomish
          counties. I'd appreciate informed judgments on this. I've never observed
          such suspicious behavior myself, but poachers are likely to be more
          circumspect than the occasional intrusive birder or photog.

          Chris Kessler
          Seattle

          On Fri, Nov 17, 2017 at 11:52 AM, Philip Dickinson
          wrote:

          > Here is a link to eBird's discussion of how they will treat "sensitive
          > species," including how they will appear in data outputs. They will show in
          > Region Explorer and area range maps but not for specific hotspots or
          > personal locations, and they will be designated "sensitive." Also, if you
          > saw and reported the bird, it will show in your personal data view with a
          > "sensitive" icon.
          >
          > http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/sensitive-species-in-ebird/
          >
          > Phil Dickinson
          > Lake Stevens
          >
          > _______________________________________________
          > Tweeters mailing list
          > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
          >
          >


          --
          "moderation in everything, including moderation"
          Rustin Thompson



          Subject: New E Bird Category- "Sensitve Species"
          Date: 17 Nov
          From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com 
          Perhaps that explains why no specific reports showed up last night when I researched on Ebird for December sightings of Hawk and Great Gray Owls as I thought about a trip to the Okanogan area next month.
          Hmmm...

          Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

          On Fri, Nov 17, 2017 at 7:09 AM, Keith Carlson wrote: #yiv9728773412 body {min-height:100%;color:#000000;font-size:12pt;font-family:arial, helvetica, sans-serif;}I was curious as to why the Gyrfalcon reported on E Bird yesterday did not appear on the Washington Alert List.E Bird has new category, "Sensitive", which is designed to protect vulnerable species.The Gyr is such a species.Please follow the guidelines for "Sensitive Species"in reporting any Gyr sightings.Feel free to contact me for any sighting info, as I tend to try keep track of this wonderful bird in our SE Washington/ North Central Idaho area.I will continue to post any observations on Inland NW birder and Flickr, but will keep locations vague in accordance with the new guidelinesKeithE CarlsonLewiston_______________________________________________
          Tweeters mailing list
          Tweeters@u.washington.edu
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          Subject: New E Bird Category- "Sensitve Species"
          Date: 17 Nov
          From: kec201814 AT cableone.net 
          I was curious as to why the Gyrfalcon reported on E Bird yesterday did not appear on the Washington Alert List.E Bird has new category, "Sensitive", which is designed to protect vulnerable species.The Gyr is such a species. Please follow the guidelines for "Sensitive Species" in reporting any Gyr sightings. Feel free to contact me for any sighting info, as I tend to try keep track of this wonderful bird in our SE Washington/ North Central Idaho area. I will continue to post any observations on Inland NW birder and Flickr, but will keep locations vague in accordance with the new guidelines Keith E CarlsonLewiston

          Spruce Grouse (2)Falcipennis canadensis




            Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 10, 2017
            Date: 09 Dec
            From: ellen AT 123imagine.net 
            Hey, Tweets,

            Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
            * Spruce Grouse - Designed for the Boreal Forest
            https://bit.ly/2AJGdj6
            * Sandhill Cranes and the Gustavus Forelands Preserve
            https://bit.ly/2BqUCNo
            * Snake-Eagles Are Awesome
            (and so is the accompanying photo--)
            https://bit.ly/2AM8MfS
            * Anniversary of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
            https://bit.ly/2zD6YBN
            * Winter on the Columbia
            https://bit.ly/2zTn2DB
            * Male vs. Female Plumage
            Who's Who and How Do They Know?
            https://bit.ly/2ivxIRa
            * Montana Grassland Birds - Where They Go in Winter
            https://bit.ly/2zEiL2E

            View the photos and links for next week's shows:
            https://bit.ly/2B442C7
            ----------------------------
            Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
            mailto:info@birdnote.org
            ========================Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
            Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
            ... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
            Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
            ========================
            You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
            You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

            Thanks for listening,
            Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

            Sharp-tailed Grouse (2)Tympanuchus phasianellus




              Subject: Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse State listing
              Date: 01 Dec
              From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com 
              Tweeters,
              The Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse (STGR) is currently listed as "threatened" in Washington State by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). It is my contention that this species should be listed as "endangered."

              The Fish and Wildlife Commission will play host to the status review of this species at 2PM on Friday, December 8, at the regularly scheduled Commission meeting in Olympia (http://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/meetings/2017/12/agenda_dec0717.html). (See below.) At this meeting, the WDFW Diversity Division will present that the STGR should continued to be listed as "threatened" and not uplisted to "endangered."

              An adjunct to the periodic status review (PSR) of this species indicates that just 608 of these birds remain in eastern Washington, scattered over eight areas, in 2017. This is the lowest the population has been since the year 2000, when an estimated population was 895. According to the state biologist working the PSR, a viable population for this species in a single area should be about 300 birds. The highest estimate currently is 132 birds in the Crab Creek area. The state threshold for uplisting is, I believe, 400 birds. The fact that the population has fallen by one-third in the past 17 years is indicative of a trend that may only be downward for this iconic species. A single wildfire may drive this total population below the threshold, and hearkens back to the status of the Heath Hen on Martha's Vineyard in the early part of the 20th century.

              The Greater Sage Grouse has more visibility in this state, but the Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse is also worthy of consideration and of your support. Please send a message to the Fish and Wildlife Commission urging uplisting this species to "endangered." Better yet, attend the meeting and voice your concern to them. I'll definitely be there to do so.

              //Denis

              ---

              Public can comment on proposed simplified fishing rules, protective status of Columbian sharp-tailed grouse

              OLYMPIA ...

              The commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), also will take public comment on the department's recommendation to continue to classify the Columbian sharp-tailed grouse as threatened under state law.

              ...

              The special meeting will be followed by a two-day meeting Dec. 8-9 in Room 172 of the Natural Resources Building. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 8:30 a.m. on Dec. 8. ...

              An agenda for the meeting is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/commission/.

              ...

              In other business, the commission will hold a public hearing on state wildlife managers' recommendation to continue to classify the Columbian sharp-tailed grouse as threatened under state law.

              The sharp-tailed grouse was listed as a threatened species in Washington in 1998. The remaining populations of sharp-tailed grouse in Washington are small, relatively isolated from one another, and may not persist unless they increase in number.

              The draft review on the Columbian sharp-tailed grouse is available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/endangered/status_review/.

              The commission also will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to rules for compensating commercial livestock owners for animals killed or injured by wolves. The changes, proposed by WDFW, are intended to increase clarity, streamline the process, and provide consistency with state law and the Wolf Conservation and Management Plan.

              In addition, commissioners will take public comment on salmon management in Willapa Bay, and receive briefings on:

              * Target shooting ranges on WDFW-managed lands.
              * A proposed translocation of mountain goats from the Olympic Peninsula to the North Cascades.
              * WDFW's role in regulating private aquaculture net-pen operations that produce Atlantic salmon.
              * The state's Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and future planning efforts.
              * An organizational and management assessment of WDFW.
              * An overview of the department's budget.

              ---
              May all your birds be identified,
              Denis DeSilvis
              avnacrs4birds@outlook.com

              Ancient Murrelet (2)Synthliboramphus antiquus




                Subject: RFI from the Netherlands: winter birds in WA
                Date: 09 Dec
                From: rollie_nl AT yahoo.com 
                Tweeters,I will be visiting my family in Washington state again (after a previous visit in July-August 2016). They now live in Spanaway, south of Tacoma, and we will be visiting for X-mas (between 20 and 27 December).
                As a birder there are still several species that I would very much like to see. Last time, I received a lot of info on how and where I could find info on the web and also info on the 'Where to watch' book (that is now also on the web). So, I am now only soliciting for very recent info on the wintering specialities of WA state in the Tacoma area east to the Cascades (east of the Cascades is not doable this time unfortunately). So does anyone have recent info where, between Seattle, Olympia and the Cascades, it is possible to find:- Rusty Blackbird. I am aware of the Nisqually record earlier this autumn but it seems to have gone. I also read about a record east of the Cascades but that is really too far away. Any other birds around?- Ancient Murrelet. Until mid November regularly reported off Dash Point, but there are no recent reports on ebird or tweeters. Are they still around?- Northern Shrike. The bird at Nisqually seems to be infrequently seen (or reported?). What are its regular spots? I read the North Dike but I cannot find this location on the Nisqually map: is this the Estuary Trail? Are there perhaps other reliable sites where it perhaps has not been reported as it has not been looked for (yet)? Like the restricted areas of Joint Base Lewis-McChord? Would the authorities allow me access to this site as a foreigner?- Northern Saw-whet Owl: the bird(s) in Nisqually have not been reported this month. Are they still being seen?- grouse (Sooty), other owls (Northern Pygmy, Western Screech), woodpeckers (Am. Three-toed) and rosy-finch: which trails at Paradise (Mt. rainier) would be best during winter to try for these? Or indeed elsewhere around Tacoma?

                A lot of questions (again, like last time). If you do not want to share info publicly, please respond in private.I hope you will be as helpful as last time!All the best, Roland van der Vliet, the Netherlands



                Subject: Leach's Storm-Petrel off Discovery Park
                Date: 11 Nov
                From: matt.dufort AT gmail.com 
                Hi Tweets,

                This afternoon, there was a Leach's Storm-Petrel flying far out in the
                Sound off Discovery Park. It disappeared into the fog and rain,
                apparently headed north-northeast.

                The numbers of Ancient Murrelets were impressive, with at least 32
                birds, plus another 11 murrelets that were probably Ancient.

                Also in the park was a single Common Redpoll, presumably the same bird
                seen by Jordan Gunn yesterday. We heard it several times, flying
                around near the Utah wetland and Capehart area, but never got a good
                look at it.

                Despite the mixed weather, it was a great day to be out!

                Good birding,
                Matt Dufort
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                Subject: Snow Bunting at Brown's Point Pierce
                Date: 06 Nov
                From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com 
                There's a Snow Bunting at Brown's Point near Tacoma, last seen near the boxy shed near the lighthouse.
                Also an ANCIENT MURRELET in the cove north of the lighthouse.
                And the Harris's Sparrow was near the end of the parking area along the Hylebos Waterway where it has been seen for the last week.
                - Michael Hobbs

                Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

                Flammulated Owl (2)Otus flammeolus




                  Subject: O.T. RFI Amphibians
                  Date: 10 Dec
                  From: sremse AT comcast.net 
                  Amphibians are part of my Big Year goal in 2018. I should be able to find Pacific Chorus Frog (aka Tree), Red-legged Frog, Western Toad, Long-toed Salamander and possibly Ensatina here on Whidbey Island.I know a trail in the North Cascades that crosses a creek that has Tailed Frogs.

                  I'm hoping some of you can point me to specific locations for ANY species not listed above. Pacific Giant , Olympic Torrent and Western Red-backed Salamanders would all be lifers for me. Rough-skinned Newts are no longer present where we used to find them. Does anyone know what large frog species inhabits Lake Terrell near Ferndale? I'm guessing Green because I've never heard Bullfrogs there.

                  I'm still taking fish spotting suggestions. If you have a locale for some unusual species, please send it my way ( Bridgelip Suckers is totally going to be the name of my next garage band- unless it's The Flammulated Owls). Thank you very much!
                  Regards,
                  ----Steve Ellis
                  Coupeville, Washington
                  sremse@comcast.net

                  Snowy Owl (2)Nyctea scandiaca




                    Subject: Snowy at Sandy Point today?????
                    Date: 10 Dec
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    Friend visiting from Florida. We are wondring if the snowy owl is still at Sandy Point???
                    Peggy Mundy

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



                    Subject: Fwd: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates 
                    Date: 10 Dec
                    From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com 
                    Tweeters,
                    Wells Excellent Summer Adventure
                    Very interesting and detained data maps of the movement of a Snowy owl.
                    Dan Reiff

                    Begin forwarded message:

                    > From: Project SNOWstorm
                    > Date: December 7, 2017 at 9:03:28 AM PST
                    > To: Dan
                    > Subject: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates
                    > Reply-To:
                    >
                    >
                    > Read today's blog entry about cutting edge Snowy Owl research
                    > View this email in your browser
                    >
                    > Wells Excellent Summer Adventure
                    >
                    > Wells spring and summer movements, from late April to the end of October, including her nest site in northern Quebec. (Project SNOWstorm and Google Earth)
                    >
                    > As we mentioned last week, two of our 2016-17 owls have come back south and checked in. Chickatawbut has been quiet since her initial check, likely because her battery is still recharging. But Wells checked in a few days ago and uploaded her entire previous eight months worth of data, all in one enormous batch the first time weve gotten an owls whole summer backlog in one big rush.
                    >
                    > In all, the data trove totaled more than 10,500 GPS locations, tracking her movements in superb detail from southern Quebec last April, up through the middle of Quebec in May and into the Ungava Peninsula. Once there, she quickly settled down, and the data make very clear that she nested part of the huge concentration of snowy owls that were breeding in the Ungava this past summer, and whose offspring make up the bulk of this winters heavy irruption.
                    >
                    > Were still looking carefully at Wells data, but heres a synopsis of a very eventful year for this adult female.
                    >
                    > Shed last connected the end of April, when Wells was near Lac Saint-Jean, about 200 km (125 miles) north of Quebec City. April 22 she began moving steadily north through the boreal forest and muskeg of central Quebec. Even though her flight bouts were typically brief an hour or two, then a rest, which is normal for migrating snowies over the next week she made good time, only stopping for extended periods a couple of times, usually on islands in the immense hydroelectric impoundments that have reshaped the eastern drainage of James Bay.
                    >
                    > By May 1 Wells had moved roughly 1,000 km (600 miles) almost due north, and a few days later she had moved across the Mlezes and Feuilles rivers and into the heart of the Ungava. This vast area of subarctic tundra and rushing rivers is framed by Hudson Bay to the west, Hudson Strait to the north, and Ungava Bay to the east.
                    >
                    >
                    > The general area of Wells nest, covering about 1,000 hectares (2,700 acres). Most of her movements in this area are later in the summer, after the chicks have achieved some independence. (Project SNOWstorm and Google Earth)
                    >
                    > Wells made a final push, then settled down May 17 on the headwaters of the Vachon River and here is where she apparently nested. For the next four months, she rarely moved outside an area of roughly 1,000 hectares (2,700 acres), at the core of which was as 5 hectare (12 acre) nest site, where she spent the vast majority of her time. We have thousands of data points in this tiny area, showing how rarely she strayed from her nest, eggs and later her chicks.
                    >
                    >
                    > Home base the few acres around the nest site. (Project SNOWstorm and Google Earth)
                    >
                    > Along with similar nesting data we collected last summer from Dakota, up in Arctic Nunavut, this is the most detailed movement record of nesting female snowy owls that we know of, and something well be taking as much closer look at in the months ahead. We cant know how many chicks she raised, but the fact that she remained in the area all summer suggests she was guarding and helping to provision a successful clutch of babies.
                    >
                    > Four months to the day after settling down in her breeding territory, Wells began moving again on Sept. 17, and over the next month and a half she wandered in a big, flattened figure-eight some 400 km (250 miles) across northern Ungava, arriving back just south of her nesting site on Oct. 30. At this point she turned south right on time, based in tracks from other owls weve followed, which often commence their southbound migration around the end of October or early November.
                    >
                    > By that time, in that region, daylight is a scarce commodity, with the sun barely clearing the horizon. Wells solar-powered transmitter worked well but eventually the juice ran out, and it went into hibernation Nov. 5, when she was still fairly high up in the Ungava. It kicked to life enough to grab a few points as she headed south on Nov. 20 near the Quebec/Labrador border, and Nov. 22 in western Labrador. Then it woke up enough to send us an initial transmission on Nov. 26, when she was somewhere near the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
                    >
                    > The huge data transmission again depleted Wells battery, but it should be recharging, and when it reconnects next time well start to get current data for her this winter. But in the meantime weve put the huge treasure-trove of her spring, summer and autumn movements on her map page have fun exploring the subarctic landscape in her company!
                    >
                    > The post Wells Excellent Summer Adventure appeared first on Project SNOWstorm.
                    >
                    >
                    > Read in browser
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Recent Articles:
                    > Island Beach and Lenape, Down the Shore
                    > Sterling and Hilton Head West
                    > Chickatawbut and Wells Come Back
                    > On the Shoulders of Giants: Tom McDonald
                    > First of the Season: Hilton!
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                    Subject: FW: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates 
                    Date: 10 Dec
                    From: TRI AT seattleu.edu 
                    HI Tweets, 

                    Im posting on behalf of Dan Reiff, who was unable to share on Tweeters
                    the link for this interesting article on Snowy Owl research. Heres the
                    link for Project Snowstorms current blog post, and you can reach the
                    projects homepage from there:

                    https://www.projectsnowstorm.org/posts/wells-excellent-summer-adventure/

                    Good birding to all,

                    Trileigh
                    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
                    Trileigh Tucker, PhD
                    Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies
                    Seattle University

                    Pelly Valley, West Seattle
                    Natural Presence Arts website: naturalpresencearts.com
                    Photography: flickr.com/photos/trileigh/albums/72157661836833455





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                    Subject: Re: Your message to Tweeters awaits moderator approval
                    Date: 08 Dec
                    From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com 
                    Dear moderator,
                    This is important research regarding Snowy owl movements that I believe will be useful and interesting to many people on Tweeters.
                    Please post.
                    Dan Reiff, PhD

                    > On Dec 8, 2017, at 5:23 AM, tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:
                    >
                    > Your mail to 'Tweeters' with the subject
                    >
                    > Fwd: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates?
                    >
                    > Is being held until the list moderator can review it for approval.
                    >
                    > The reason it is being held:
                    >
                    > Message body is too big: 89272 bytes with a limit of 25 KB
                    >
                    > Either the message will get posted to the list, or you will receive
                    > notification of the moderator's decision. If you would like to cancel
                    > this posting, please visit the following URL:
                    >
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/confirm/tweeters/e70a1dbb945bb1957a03af786110a6e59660c3a3
                    >
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                    Subject: Snowy Owls In Michigan
                    Date: 03 Dec
                    From: rayleeholden AT yahoo.com 
                    Here's an interesting article filed from Detroit in the USA Today about a large flock of Snowys in upper Michigan. Lots of details about their habits and history of migratory outbreaks. Plus pictures.
                    Snowy owl mass migration blanketing parts of Michigan in feathery white


                    |
                    |
                    |
                    | | |

                    |

                    |
                    |
                    | |
                    Snowy owl mass migration blanketing parts of Michigan in feathery white

                    A large flock of migrating snowy owls has made its way into Michigan, with numbers unlike anything seen in some ...
                    |

                    |

                    |




                    Ray Holden
                    Olympia, WA

                    Life is for the birds.



                    Subject: Snowy Owl irruptiion in Michigan article
                    Date: 03 Dec
                    From: csdesilets AT comcast.net 
                    Tweeters,



                    See the link below to a USA Today article about the SNOW irruption now
                    starting in the Michigan upper peninsula. Hopefully we'll see it balloon
                    here in WA as well. We're off to a good start.



                    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/12/02/snowy-owl-mass-mig
                    ration-blanketing-parts-michigan-feathery-white/916685001/



                    Charles Desilets

                    Mukilteo



                    Subject: Bird Locations
                    Date: 02 Dec
                    From: markgirling AT yahoo.com 
                    As you all know, it's now considered wrong to publicly report on vanbcbirds,
                    or anywhere else, the location of any roosting or lingering owl, as that
                    makes it easier for them to be approached/disturbed/harassed by unethical
                    bird photographers. Fortunately most bird photographers are very ethical and
                    do act in the best interests of the birds. Unfortunately however in recent
                    years, there has been a small minority of unethical ones, who have proven
                    they simply do not care about what's in the best interests of the owls, but
                    rather only in getting the best photo possible, by any means possible. I've
                    personally witnessed a few who have actually gotten very mad if someone
                    reminded them why their behaviour is unethical. Sad but true.



                    So at first it might have seemed contradictory to the rules of vanbcbirds,
                    that I reported a Snowy Owl being seen in West Vancouver the other day.
                    However the only reason I felt comfortable reporting it, was because after
                    the person saw it briefly at their private residence, they said it
                    disappeared after dark, never to be seen again. Therefore I knew it was
                    impossible for it to be re-found and subjected to any type of disturbance.
                    So my posting was just meant to let birders know a Snowy Owl had been seen
                    in the region, with no hint whatsoever about where it was seen in West Van.
                    I realize I should have added this explanation to my posting, otherwise it
                    could appear that a moderator of vanbcbirds is ignoring the group's rules.



                    If we do get an irruption of Snowy Owls this year, I hope you all get to see
                    one of these beautiful birds. However, even though most local birders know
                    where the Snowies usually show up during an irruption year, please do not
                    publicly report the location where you saw them.This was a post in the recent Vancouver Birds version of tweeters. This is a subject that has been eating at me as of late. Friday morning at Nisqually I met one such photographer who fits this profile and was totally unapologetic about getting the photograph as he mentioned he was NOT a birder but a photographer. Frankly I think we should go back to the word of mouth when describing specific locations. Texting and emailing the source allows the source to vet who or who does not get the information.The Birding BritMark GirlingSent from Yahoo Mail on Android



                    Subject: Highly recommended reports and updates regarding Snowy Owls------Fwd: Project SNOWstorm
                    Date: 01 Dec
                    From: notcalm AT comcast.net 
                    Tweeters,
                    I spend much enjoyable time with owls. I would highly recommend the following links if you would like to better understand Snowy Owls.

                    The links below are for Project SNOWstorm. They provide excellent information regarding Snowy owls and their movements.
                    They have been using "cutting-edge tracking technology" that allows them and us to track the movements of Snowy owls. The maps with recorded data are outstanding and have resulted in a much more sophisticated understanding of the owls movements, including irruptions than we had even a few years ago.
                    They believe there may be an irruption on the East Coast this year. They also wrote that there could be one in the Pacific Northwest this year-but there appears to be less data for prediction of an irruption here this year.
                    I would recommend that you view the interactive Maps pages and you can also sigh up to receive update emails. See the one on November 16th as a useful starting point. Also see the photo of one study site that shows 78 voles and Lemmings rimming one nest in 2013. Wow!

                    Enjoy!
                    Dan Reiff


                    ----- Original Message -----

                    From: notcalm@comcast.net
                    To: "Dan Reiff, PhD"
                    Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 1:41:34 AM
                    Subject: Project SNOWstorm

                    Project SNOWstorm: Snowy Owl research and conservation
                    www.projectsnowstorm.org/

                    Interactive Maps. We have been tracking snowy owls since 2013. Use these interactive maps to explore the movements of nearly 50 owls in astounding detail. Explore maps ...

                    Tracking Snowy Owls - Project SNOWstorm
                    www.projectsnowstorm.org/tracking-snowy-owls/

                    With cutting-edge tracking technology, we can follow the movements of snowy owls in astounding detail, and for years at a time. This research has been made possible by the generous contributions of the general public and a variety of ornithological and birding organizations. Collaborating scientists in Project SNOWstorm ...



                    Subject: Snowy Owl irruption - early signs are encouraging
                    Date: 28 Nov
                    From: bruce.mccammon AT gmail.com 
                    I am hopeful that Snowy Owls will find their way to the Waterville Plateau
                    again this year. I took this article to be a good sign.

                    https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.spokesman.com%2Fblogs%2Foutdoors%2F2017%2Fnov%2F25%2Fsnowy-owl-brightens-lincoln-county-landscape%2F&h=ATNJSBwYEpD5wDG3Aj2TjqTmKscA7tMTSAgbXSwh95pbtTq69PRFXIgLEg0XgGdSfU_9zKA7VzksjMFE2XL2K2O7-Mjy9_Yz14GdQ-mUksfqh7uoJ_gliYlR1HjVEiFRqFLcYMnctQ20&s=1&enc=AZPBzbYVaVYQESCdZfsJso_tBORPozuYKhbU1b4mWToNIlUsJBJggOG7VT_SJsPX0Yl3vNaAZh4AFxvHxMawNVWERhNr-ein-koNE-Y_npfGpg


                    Bruce McCammon
                    bmccammon.wordpress.com



                    Subject: Edmonds Waterfront & Marsh November Bird Photos
                    Date: 28 Nov
                    From: mcmike0605 AT gmail.com 
                    I've posted some photos of birds on the waterfront and at the marsh in
                    Edmonds this month, as well as my favorite throwback photo of a Snowy Owl on
                    the waterfront from 2012. Hoping we get some Snowy Owls down here again this
                    year!

                    http://mcmikephoto.com/2017/11/edmonds-november-birds-2/

                    Good birding!

                    Mike McAuliffe
                    Edmonds
                    mcmike0605 AT gmail.com



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                    Subject: Re: Sandy Point owl?
                    Date: 24 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    Enjoyed a short-ish visit with the Sandy Point snowy owl today. A couple of local residents, I assume, were walking their dachshund around the spit and flushed the owl, so we had quite a show. She didn't go far, and was still on the spit when we left. I have posted photos on the Western Washington Birders facebook group. It was a bit of a reach for my lens, so the photos are not high quality.
                    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2081553308528701&set=pcb.1859972840980412&type=3&theater&ifg=1

                    Peggy Mundy


                    On Friday, November 24, 2017, 2:18:15 PM PST, Peggy Mundy wrote:

                    She is currently on the east side of the spit. Hunkered down from the wind.
                    Peggy Mundy

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

                    On Fri, Nov 24, 2017 at 1:59 PM, Peggy Mundy wrote: I just arrived at Sandy Point and np one is here. Anyone see the snowy owl today?

                    Peggy MundyBothell WAPeggy_busby@yahoo.com

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



                    Subject: Re: Sandy Point owl?
                    Date: 24 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    She is currently on the east side of the spit. Hunkered down from the wind.
                    Peggy Mundy

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

                    On Fri, Nov 24, 2017 at 1:59 PM, Peggy Mundy wrote: I just arrived at Sandy Point and np one is here. Anyone see the snowy owl today?

                    Peggy MundyBothell WAPeggy_busby@yahoo.com

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



                    Subject: Sandy Point owl?
                    Date: 24 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    I just arrived at Sandy Point and np one is here. Anyone see the snowy owl today?

                    Peggy MundyBothell WAPeggy_busby@yahoo.com

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



                    Subject: RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 24 Nov
                    From: rayleeholden AT yahoo.com 
                    Once they find a place to their liking they often stay put for the entire winter.
                    Ray Holden
                    Olympia, WA

                    Life is for the birds.

                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 10:51:02 AM PST, Jim Forrester wrote:

                    Yes, my wife observed the Snowy Owl at Sandy Point yesterday afternoon; there were several other intrepid souls who braved the howling winds and saw the owl as well. She (the owl) seems to have taken up residence there.

                    -------- Original message --------From: Peggy Mundy Date: 11/23/17 10:02 (GMT-08:00) To: tweeters@u.washington.edu, Jim Forrester , Rick Taylor Subject: Re: RE: [Tweeters] RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Excellent, that works great, thanks Rick.
                    Peggy

                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 9:36:14 AM PST, Rick Taylor wrote:


                    Peggy,



                    It is actually Explore Data -> Species Maps.



                    Happy Thanksgiving!



                    Rick



                    Rick Taylor

                    Everett, WA



                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu]On Behalf Of Peggy Mundy
                    Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 9:25 AM
                    To: tweeters@u.washington.edu; Jim Forrester
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies



                    I am appreciating the incoming tips! Two people have said Explore Data>Explore Species

                    When I go to Explore Data, there is no Explore Species option. I was able to find the Puyallup sighting using Explore a region, as one person suggested. I will keep poking around in eBird and continue learning.



                    Hoping the Sandy Point snowy persists. After seeing my photos from last weekend, one of my sons said he is interested in seeing it, so Friday we may head north in quest of the owl, the PABU, and any other interesting birds.



                    Thankful to have found this community. Happy Thanksgiving, all.



                    Peggy Mundy

                    Bothell WA

                    peggy_busby@yahoo.com





                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 7:20:20 AM PST, Jim Forrester wrote:





                    Interestingly, eBird no longer gives precise location information for species deemed to be under threat, e.g. Great Gray Owl. Here's a link to the page that explains this:http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2885265-sensitive-species-in-ebird. Here's a link to the threatenedspecies list:http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2879207.





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                    Subject: Recent rarity photos
                    Date: 23 Nov
                    From: jimf AT cogenix.com 
                    Here are links to a couple of pictures that my wife Maggie took this past week.  We hope you get a little inspiration to get out and see them!


                    Painted Bunting - https://flic.kr/p/ZJ5YyQ

                    ?Snowy Owl - https://flic.kr/p/DFCUru



                    Subject: RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 23 Nov
                    From: jimf AT cogenix.com 
                    Yes, my wife observed the Snowy Owl at Sandy Point yesterday afternoon; there were several other intrepid souls who braved the howling winds and saw the owl as well.  She (the owl) seems to have taken up residence there.


                    -------- Original message --------
                    From: Peggy Mundy
                    Date: 11/23/17 10:02 (GMT-08:00)
                    To: tweeters@u.washington.edu, Jim Forrester , Rick Taylor
                    Subject: Re: RE: [Tweeters] RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies

                    Excellent, that works great, thanks Rick.

                    Peggy


                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 9:36:14 AM PST, Rick Taylor wrote:



                    Peggy,



                    It is actually Explore Data -> Species Maps.



                    Happy Thanksgiving!



                    Rick



                    Rick Taylor

                    Everett, WA



                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Peggy Mundy
                    Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 9:25 AM
                    To: tweeters@u.washington.edu; Jim Forrester
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies



                    I am appreciating the incoming tips! Two people have said Explore Data>Explore Species

                    When I go to Explore Data, there is no Explore Species option. I was able to find the Puyallup sighting using Explore a region, as one person suggested. I will keep poking around in eBird and continue learning.



                    Hoping the Sandy Point snowy persists. After seeing my photos from last weekend, one of my sons said he is interested in seeing it, so Friday we may head north in quest of the owl, the PABU, and any other interesting birds.



                    Thankful to have found this community. Happy Thanksgiving, all.



                    Peggy Mundy

                    Bothell WA

                    peggy_busby@yahoo.com





                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 7:20:20 AM PST, Jim Forrester > wrote:





                    Interestingly, eBird no longer gives precise location information for species deemed to be under threat, e.g. Great Gray Owl. Here's a link to the page that explains this: http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2885265-sensitive-species-in-ebird. Here's a link to the threatened species list: http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2879207.





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                    Subject: RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 23 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    Excellent, that works great, thanks Rick.
                    Peggy

                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 9:36:14 AM PST, Rick Taylor wrote:


                    Peggy,



                    It is actually Explore Data -> Species Maps.



                    Happy Thanksgiving!



                    Rick



                    Rick Taylor

                    Everett, WA



                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu]On Behalf Of Peggy Mundy
                    Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 9:25 AM
                    To: tweeters@u.washington.edu; Jim Forrester
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies



                    I am appreciating the incoming tips! Two people have said Explore Data>Explore Species

                    When I go to Explore Data, there is no Explore Species option. I was able to find the Puyallup sighting using Explore a region, as one person suggested. I will keep poking around in eBird and continue learning.



                    Hoping the Sandy Point snowy persists. After seeing my photos from last weekend, one of my sons said he is interested in seeing it, so Friday we may head north in quest of the owl, the PABU, and any other interesting birds.



                    Thankful to have found this community. Happy Thanksgiving, all.



                    Peggy Mundy

                    Bothell WA

                    peggy_busby@yahoo.com





                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 7:20:20 AM PST, Jim Forrester wrote:





                    Interestingly, eBird no longer gives precise location information for species deemed to be under threat, e.g. Great Gray Owl. Here's a link to the page that explains this:http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2885265-sensitive-species-in-ebird. Here's a link to the threatenedspecies list:http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2879207.





                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 23 Nov
                    From: taylorrl AT outlook.com 
                    Peggy,

                    It is actually Explore Data -> Species Maps.

                    Happy Thanksgiving!

                    Rick

                    Rick Taylor
                    Everett, WA

                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Peggy Mundy
                    Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 9:25 AM
                    To: tweeters@u.washington.edu; Jim Forrester
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies

                    I am appreciating the incoming tips! Two people have said Explore Data>Explore Species
                    When I go to Explore Data, there is no Explore Species option. I was able to find the Puyallup sighting using Explore a region, as one person suggested. I will keep poking around in eBird and continue learning.

                    Hoping the Sandy Point snowy persists. After seeing my photos from last weekend, one of my sons said he is interested in seeing it, so Friday we may head north in quest of the owl, the PABU, and any other interesting birds.

                    Thankful to have found this community. Happy Thanksgiving, all.

                    Peggy Mundy
                    Bothell WA
                    peggy_busby@yahoo.com


                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 7:20:20 AM PST, Jim Forrester > wrote:



                    Interestingly, eBird no longer gives precise location information for species deemed to be under threat, e.g. Great Gray Owl. Here's a link to the page that explains this: http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2885265-sensitive-species-in-ebird.
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 23 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    I am appreciating the incoming tips! Two people have said Explore Data>Explore SpeciesWhen I go to Explore Data, there is no Explore Species option. I was able to find the Puyallup sighting using Explore a region, as one person suggested. I will keep poking around in eBird and continue learning.
                    Hoping the Sandy Point snowy persists. After seeing my photos from last weekend, one of my sons said he is interested in seeing it, so Friday we may head north in quest of the owl, the PABU, and any other interesting birds.
                    Thankful to have found this community. Happy Thanksgiving, all.
                    Peggy MundyBothell WApeggy_busby@yahoo.com

                    On Thursday, November 23, 2017, 7:20:20 AM PST, Jim Forrester wrote:


                    Interestingly, eBird no longer gives precise location information for species deemed to be under threat, e.g. Great Gray Owl. Here's a link to the page that explains this:http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2885265-sensitive-species-in-ebird. Here's a link to the threatenedspecies list:http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2879207.







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                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: RE: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 23 Nov
                    From: jimf AT cogenix.com 
                    Interestingly, eBird no longer gives precise location information for species deemed to be under threat, e.g. Great Gray Owl.  Here's a link to the page that explains this: http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2885265-sensitive-species-in-ebird.  Here's a link to the threatened species list: http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2879207.



                    Subject: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 23 Nov
                    From: pdickins AT gmail.com 
                    If you want to look for where a species has been seen, like Snowy Owl, you
                    can go to Explore Data>Explore Species. or >Bar Charts. I would opt for Bar
                    Charts because you can easily define the area and time you want to search,
                    then click on the map icon next to Snowy Owl on the species list. Explore
                    Species would work, but you have to zoom in numerous times to get a picture
                    for our area. Red balloons will show sightings within the past 30 days;
                    blue balloons earlier.

                    Phil Dickinson

                    On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 5:36 PM, Peggy Mundy wrote:

                    > Michael,
                    > I appreciate your post, but I was not put off by your original post. We
                    > are good. I understand about trying to send off a quick message and how
                    > brevity can be misunderstood. No worries here.
                    >
                    > I am very new to eBird, however, and I still haven't been able to find the
                    > sighting information. I would like to learn how to use this resource
                    > better, so I'll keep plugging away at it. If anyone has any tips, I am
                    > open to suggestions.
                    >
                    > Happy Thanksgiving to all of you tweeters!
                    >
                    > Peggy Mundy
                    > Bothell, WA
                    > peggy_busby@yahoo.com
                    >
                    >
                    > On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 9:22:35 AM PST,
                    > wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Hello,
                    >
                    > While I was in the doctors office with my father yesterday, I typed off
                    > a quick note on my phone in response to Peggy's question about the
                    > Puyallup Snowy Owl that was seen a couple weeks ago. I probably should
                    > have studied my words thoroughly before hitting send. I would like to
                    > apologize to Peggy, as I was surprise to see that a couple of folks took
                    > offense to my perceived tone. My intent was not to belittle or be rude
                    > to Peggy, but to let her know that the bird she was seeking information
                    > on was indeed in ebird, and that a quick search may have answered her
                    > questions more quickly and thoroughly. I thought it would be helpful for
                    > her to know that the bird was indeed seen once, never seen again, and
                    > that information can be viewed on ebird. No ill intent whatsoever.
                    >
                    > I am not the most eloquent person in print or in person, so please
                    > excuse the perceived negative tone, it was certainly not my aim to
                    > offend. I was trying to be nice in fact. In my regular life as an
                    > aircraft mechanic, my communication is heavily peppered with grunts and
                    > F words, eloquent writing free of profanity does not come easily to me.
                    > Please excuse my poorly worded response. I have had one our office
                    > assistants read this before hitting send, she suggested a couple edits
                    > and it is now approved.
                    >
                    > Have a great day,
                    >
                    > Michael Charest
                    > Tacoma, Washington
                    > mcharest@wamail.net
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    >



                    Subject: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 22 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    Michael,I appreciate your post, but I was not put off by your original post. We are good. I understand about trying to send off a quick message and how brevity can be misunderstood. No worries here.
                    I am very new to eBird, however, and I still haven't been able to find the sighting information. I would like to learn how to use this resource better, so I'll keep plugging away at it. If anyone has any tips, I am open to suggestions.
                    Happy Thanksgiving to all of you tweeters!
                    Peggy MundyBothell, WApeggy_busby@yahoo.com

                    On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, 9:22:35 AM PST, wrote:

                    Hello,

                    While I was in the doctors office with my father yesterday, I typed off
                    a quick note on my phone in response to Peggy's question about the
                    Puyallup Snowy Owl that was seen a couple weeks ago. I probably should
                    have studied my words thoroughly before hitting send. I would like to
                    apologize to Peggy, as I was surprise to see that a couple of folks took
                    offense to my perceived tone. My intent was not to belittle or be rude
                    to Peggy, but to let her know that the bird she was seeking information
                    on was indeed in ebird, and that a quick search may have answered her
                    questions more quickly and thoroughly. I thought it would be helpful for
                    her to know that the bird was indeed seen once, never seen again, and
                    that information can be viewed on ebird. No ill intent whatsoever.

                    I am not the most eloquent person in print or in person, so please
                    excuse the perceived negative tone, it was certainly not my aim to
                    offend. I was trying to be nice in fact. In my regular life as an
                    aircraft mechanic, my communication is heavily peppered with grunts and
                    F words, eloquent writing free of profanity does not come easily to me.
                    Please excuse my poorly worded response. I have had one our office
                    assistants read this before hitting send, she suggested a couple edits
                    and it is now approved.

                    Have a great day,

                    Michael Charest
                    Tacoma, Washington
                    mcharest@wamail.net
                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: Bunting at La Conner-Snowy Owl at Sandy Point
                    Date: 22 Nov
                    From: patforster AT comcast.net 
                    Arrive there at 9:50Am this morning and 10 min later the bunting was at feeder. Seems every ten minutes he cones back. But at 10am he came back at 10:25am..partky sunny and windy.
                    Took a drive up to Sandy Point, never have been there. No snowy owl at 11:45AM! Walked down to the 2 vertical pilings and glassed aroung..zilch. On way back I see him on the logs across the narrow water bay!!! Hooray! Kind of windy also. Not real close, probably 100 yards out.. Used my 500 F4 Canon and 1.4xworks well.
                    Pat Forster

                    Sent from Mail for Windows 10



                    Subject: Snowy Owl Info Apologies
                    Date: 22 Nov
                    From: mcharest AT wamail.net 
                    Hello,

                    While I was in the doctors office with my father yesterday, I typed off
                    a quick note on my phone in response to Peggy's question about the
                    Puyallup Snowy Owl that was seen a couple weeks ago. I probably should
                    have studied my words thoroughly before hitting send. I would like to
                    apologize to Peggy, as I was surprise to see that a couple of folks took
                    offense to my perceived tone. My intent was not to belittle or be rude
                    to Peggy, but to let her know that the bird she was seeking information
                    on was indeed in ebird, and that a quick search may have answered her
                    questions more quickly and thoroughly. I thought it would be helpful for
                    her to know that the bird was indeed seen once, never seen again, and
                    that information can be viewed on ebird. No ill intent whatsoever.

                    I am not the most eloquent person in print or in person, so please
                    excuse the perceived negative tone, it was certainly not my aim to
                    offend. I was trying to be nice in fact. In my regular life as an
                    aircraft mechanic, my communication is heavily peppered with grunts and
                    F words, eloquent writing free of profanity does not come easily to me.
                    Please excuse my poorly worded response. I have had one our office
                    assistants read this before hitting send, she suggested a couple edits
                    and it is now approved.

                    Have a great day,

                    Michael Charest
                    Tacoma, Washington
                    mcharest@wamail.net
                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: Any info on a rumored snowy owl in Puyallup?
                    Date: 21 Nov
                    From: mcharest AT wamail.net 
                    A great tool that would answer you questioning easier and more quickly is ebird. The bird you speak of is on there. 1 snowy owl was seen once in puyallup a couple weeks ago. It was only seen that once

                    Go to ebird, explore data, explore species, type in snow owl. It is that easy and would save you asking questions like this and waiting for people to reply. It is super easy.

                    Have a great day,

                    Michael Charest
                    Mcharest@wamail.net

                    On November 21, 2017 3:36:00 PM PST, Peggy Mundy wrote:
                    >I may have the opportunity to go to Puyallup over the Thanksgiving
                    >weekend. Someone had mentioned to me a week or so ago that there was a
                    >snowy owl in Puyallup, but I haven't seen anything on Tweeters. Anyone
                    >know anything about this? Thanks.
                    >Peggy MundyBothell, WApeggy_busby@yahoo.com

                    --
                    Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.



                    Subject: Any info on a rumored snowy owl in Puyallup?
                    Date: 21 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    I may have the opportunity to go to Puyallup over the Thanksgiving weekend. Someone had mentioned to me a week or so ago that there was a snowy owl in Puyallup, but I haven't seen anything on Tweeters. Anyone know anything about this? Thanks.
                    Peggy MundyBothell, WApeggy_busby@yahoo.com



                    Subject: Snowy still at Sandy Point??
                    Date: 17 Nov
                    From: pdickins AT gmail.com 
                    At least two reports of the Snowy on eBird today.

                    Phil Dickinson

                    On Fri, Nov 17, 2017 at 3:02 PM, Peggy Mundy wrote:

                    > I haven't seen any reports today on the snowy owl. Trying to decide if I
                    > should drive up Saturday morning. Thanks.
                    >
                    > Peggy Mundy
                    > Bothell
                    > Peggy_busby@yahoo.com
                    >
                    > Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    >



                    Subject: Snowy still at Sandy Point??
                    Date: 17 Nov
                    From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com 
                    I haven't seen any reports today on the snowy owl. Trying to decide if I should drive up Saturday morning. Thanks.
                    Peggy MundyBothellPeggy_busby@yahoo.com

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



                    Subject: oops
                    Date: 16 Nov
                    From: dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
                    Sorry for chiming in on the Snowy Owl activity cycle after reading only the first message in the digest when others had done so perfectly adequately before me. From now on Ill read the entire digest before responding to anything!

                    Dennis Paulson
                    Seattle_______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: Snowing Owls Point of Information
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: paul.bannick AT gmail.com 
                    Bob,

                    Good post. From my experience and in conversations with some of the top
                    Snowy Owl researchers in the country, Snowy Owl are most active in the
                    normal nighttime hours, whether it is light or not (theoretical night),
                    although it can vary depending upon what they are feeding upon. Owls
                    feeding upon rats and other nocturnal prey are more strictly nocturnal
                    while those feeding upon seabirds are more flexible. No matter the prey
                    the are usually only active during the middle of the day when dislodged by
                    disturbance from other birds or people.

                    Paul Bannick

                    On Wed, Nov 15, 2017 at 6:36 PM, Bob Sundstrom
                    wrote:

                    > Im not sure were getting the full picture on when Snowy Owls actively
                    > hunt. This passage from the Birds of North America online account gives a
                    > more complete view:
                    >
                    > Hunts any time of day, except in severe weather conditions. Foraging
                    > activity is dictated by individual hunger, season and, if breeding, by the
                    > nutritional demands of the incubating female and nestlings. When hunting
                    > individually, individuals appear to prefer evening into darkness and early
                    > mornings. During 24 h of Arctic light, appears to hunt more actively during
                    > theoretical night (DWH). Less is known about nocturnal hunting, but during
                    > the Arctic winter the birds must hunt in the dark and winter observations
                    > using night vision equipment clearly show an active nocturnal hunting
                    > period (N. Smith, pers. comm.). See also Manniche (1910) and Watson (1957).
                    >
                    > In my own experience watching Snowy Owls in the NW over 30+ years, Ive
                    > seen them most active after sunset, making short flights from day roosts.
                    > Have also seen one tearing apart a gull in mid-morning.
                    >
                    > Good birding, Bob Sundstrom
                    >
                    > Sent from my iPhone
                    >
                    > On Nov 15, 2017, at 5:58 PM, ray holden wrote:
                    >
                    > Like everyone else I'll excited to hear that we are having a visitation
                    > from the North other than Santa and hope some may find their way to the
                    > south sound or Gray's Harbor area.
                    >
                    > Snowy owls are not nocturnal they are diurnal otherwise they wouldn't be
                    > able to eat in the nightless arctic summer. When you see them they will be
                    > active and seem to take cat like naps but you aren't keeping them awake or
                    > keeping them from hunting. During the last big outbreak and the following
                    > year echo the owls at Damon Pt. Ocean Shores were visited by hundreds of
                    > people, dozens a day even, and yet the flock stayed steady for the whole
                    > winter. Dead gulls and ducks on the beach testified that they were
                    > getting plenty to eat despite our human curiosity.
                    >
                    > For the best views take a scope or ask another birder to use theirs. I've
                    > never had anyone say no. Most people who got too close were trying to take
                    > pictures with dinky cameras or cell phone cameras and I think that
                    > generally they weren't birders who would ever read this anyway. For good
                    > pics that don't get too close you need a superzoom or a long lens DSLR and
                    > tripod.
                    >
                    > I sincerely hope to see another owl or two this year. With a roughly 7
                    > year breakout cycle you never know when will be your last time.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Ray Holden
                    > Olympia, WA
                    >
                    > Life is for the birds.
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    >


                    --
                    Now Available:
                    Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls at:
                    http://paulbannick.com/shop/owl-a-year-in-the-lives-of-north-american-owls/


                    Paul Bannick Photography
                    www.paulbannick.com
                    206-940-7835



                    Subject: Snowing Owls Point of Information
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: ixoreus AT scattercreek.com 
                    Im not sure were getting the full picture on when Snowy Owls actively hunt.  This passage from the Birds of North America online account gives a more complete view:

                    Hunts any time of day, except in severe weather conditions. Foraging activity is dictated by individual hunger, season and, if breeding, by the nutritional demands of the incubating female and nestlings. When hunting individually, individuals appear to prefer evening into darkness and early mornings. During 24 h of Arctic light, appears to hunt more actively during theoretical night (DWH). Less is known about nocturnal hunting, but during the Arctic winter the birds must hunt in the dark and winter observations using night vision equipment clearly show an active nocturnal hunting period (N. Smith, pers. comm.). See also Manniche (1910) and Watson (1957).

                    In my own experience watching Snowy Owls in the NW over 30+ years, Ive seen them most active after sunset, making short flights from day roosts. Have also seen one tearing apart a gull in mid-morning.

                    Good birding, Bob Sundstrom

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    > On Nov 15, 2017, at 5:58 PM, ray holden wrote:
                    >
                    > Like everyone else I'll excited to hear that we are having a visitation from the North other than Santa and hope some may find their way to the south sound or Gray's Harbor area.
                    >
                    > Snowy owls are not nocturnal they are diurnal otherwise they wouldn't be able to eat in the nightless arctic summer. When you see them they will be active and seem to take cat like naps but you aren't keeping them awake or keeping them from hunting. During the last big outbreak and the following year echo the owls at Damon Pt. Ocean Shores were visited by hundreds of people, dozens a day even, and yet the flock stayed steady for the whole winter. Dead gulls and ducks on the beach testified that they were getting plenty to eat despite our human curiosity.
                    >
                    > For the best views take a scope or ask another birder to use theirs. I've never had anyone say no. Most people who got too close were trying to take pictures with dinky cameras or cell phone cameras and I think that generally they weren't birders who would ever read this anyway. For good pics that don't get too close you need a superzoom or a long lens DSLR and tripod.
                    >
                    > I sincerely hope to see another owl or two this year. With a roughly 7 year breakout cycle you never know when will be your last time.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Ray Holden
                    > Olympia, WA
                    >
                    > Life is for the birds.
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: Snowing Owls Point of Information
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: rayleeholden AT yahoo.com 
                    Like everyone else I'll excited to hear that we are having a visitation from the North other than Santa and hope some may find their way to the south sound or Gray's Harbor area.
                    Snowy owls are not nocturnal they are diurnal otherwise they wouldn't be able to eat in the nightless arctic summer. When you see them they will be active and seem to take cat like naps but you aren't keeping them awake or keeping them from hunting. During the last big outbreak and the following year echo the owls at Damon Pt. Ocean Shores were visited by hundreds of people, dozens a day even, and yet the flock stayed steady for the whole winter. Dead gulls and ducks on the beach testified that they were getting plenty to eat despite our human curiosity.
                    For the best views take a scope or ask another birder to use theirs. I've never had anyone say no. Most people who got too close were trying to take pictures with dinky cameras or cell phone cameras and I think that generally they weren't birders who would ever read this anyway. For good pics that don't get too close you need a superzoom or a long lens DSLR and tripod.
                    I sincerely hope to see another owl or two this year. With a roughly 7 year breakout cycle you never know when will be your last time.


                    Ray Holden
                    Olympia, WA

                    Life is for the birds.



                    Subject: Re: Snowy Owl
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: poole9561 AT msn.com 
                    Oh no!

                    Donna L. Poole
                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Nov 15, 2017, at 1:12 PM, Doug Brown > wrote:

                    Chirp,

                    The cape at Sandy Point is owned by a bank that is trying to sell it for development.

                    cheers, Doug Brown
                    Bellingham

                    http://www.douglaslbrownphotography.com/

                    https://www.flickr.com/photos/146696747@N03/page1


                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
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                    Subject: Re: Snowy Owl
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: BirdBrain53 AT comcast.net 
                    Chirp,

                    The cape at Sandy Point is owned by a bank that is trying to sell it for development.

                    cheers, Doug Brown
                    Bellingham

                    http://www.douglaslbrownphotography.com/

                    https://www.flickr.com/photos/146696747@N03/page1



                    Subject: Sandy Point access
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: contopus AT telus.net 
                    Tweeters,



                    Yes, the tip of Sandy Point is private property-- owned by a bank at the moment. However, there are no no trespassing signs, and local birders (as well as local Sandy Point residents) have visited this area for many years with no restrictions. In more than 50 visits over the last 5 years, I have never been challenged or asked to leave. Several local birders visit much more often than I do.



                    By the way, Snowy Owls are not nocturnal; they do much more of their hunting in the daytime than at night. The owl may have been sleeping when you saw it, but it is active most of the time in daylight.



                    Mark, it sounds like you are not from Whatcom County. When you post again on Tweeters, please indicate where you are from, in accordance with normal Tweeters policy. Thank you.



                    Wayne C. Weber

                    Delta, BC, Canada

                    contopus@telus.net







                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of tomboulian@comcast.net
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 10:50 PM
                    To: Philip Dickinson; Wally Davis
                    Cc: Tweeters
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)



                    Of course you should all know that all of this area is private propertyeither bought/leased from the Lummi, or owned by the Lummi outright. You can purchase the point for a few million dollars for 12 acres. It appears like a local park, but is not and is posted



                    I was there 10 days agoon the only day the owl wasnt thereand was approached by residents concerned that I might be a burglar and emphasizing there is no public access per se.



                    The back bay is full of waterfowlI asked residents and was welcomed to use end of street and water line access right of ways to viewstill not public property



                    You couldnt 10 days ago access via Slater Rd all the way to Beach Wayit was under construction. You had to detour on Halston (?) Way S to Red River Rd and then back up, before going down south again.



                    Try to spend a few bucks on the reservationThere is a Skippers at the casino gas station, and that certainly is an endangered species--



                    Mind your manners just like on the Makah property in Neah Bay. And mind how close you getremember, this owl is sleeping all day until sunset



                    Mark Tomboulian







                    From: Philip Dickinson

                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:56 PM

                    To: Wally Davis

                    Cc: Tweeters

                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)



                    It has been publicized previously, but this Sandy Point is west of Ferndale in Whatcom County. Take I-5 Exit 260 west on Slater Rd. At end bear left onto Beach Way. Then left on Sucia, left on Thetis and right on Saltspring to parking lot at end.



                    Phil Dickinson

                    Lake Stevens

                    Sent from my iPhone



                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: ucd880 AT comcast.net 
                    It may be a little more complex than that. If it is "owned" by the Lummi Tribe it could well be on reservation. That brings in a whole different set of law. 



                    Hal Michael
                    Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
                    Olympia WA
                    360-459-4005
                    360-791-7702 (C)
                    ucd880@comcast.net

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    thank you for the private property reminder.... hope all use caution and good sense

                    On Tue, Nov 14, 2017 at 10:50 PM, < tomboulian@comcast.net > wrote:



                    Of course you should all know that all of this area is private propertyeither bought/leased from the Lummi, or owned by the Lummi outright. You can purchase the point for a few million dollars for 12 acres. It appears like a local park, but is not and is posted
                    I was there 10 days agoon the only day the owl wasnt thereand was approached by residents concerned that I might be a burglar and emphasizing there is no public access per se.
                    The back bay is full of waterfowlI asked residents and was welcomed to use end of street and water line access right of ways to viewstill not public property
                    You couldnt 10 days ago access via Slater Rd all the way to Beach Wayit was under construction. You had to detour on Halston (?) Way S to Red River Rd and then back up, before going down south again.
                    Try to spend a few bucks on the reservationThere is a Skippers at the casino gas station, and that certainly is an endangered species--
                    Mind your manners just like on the Makah property in Neah Bay. And mind how close you getremember, this owl is sleeping all day until sunset
                    Mark Tomboulian
                    From: Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:56 PM
                    To: Wally Davis
                    Cc: Tweeters
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)
                    It has been publicized previously, but this Sandy Point is west of Ferndale in Whatcom County. Take I-5 Exit 260 west on Slater Rd. At end bear left onto Beach Way. Then left on Sucia, left on Thetis and right on Saltspring to parking lot at end.
                    Phil Dickinson
                    Lake Stevens

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Nov 14, 2017, at 8:39 PM, Wally Davis < wallydavis3@gmail.com > wrote:






                    I used Google Maps to try and locate Sandy Point and was surprised to find half a dozen of them in the US Salish Sea region. Would you please be more specific about where Sandy point is?



                    Wally Davis

                    Snohomish



                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [ mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu ] On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:15 PM
                    To: Tweeters
                    Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)




                    The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day and in two countries is pretty cool.


                    Phil Dickinson


                    Lake Stevens






                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters




                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters







                    --
                    happy birding
                    Twink
                    wilber4818@gmail.com
                    Ferndale, WA
                    in Whatcom County
                    out on the beach

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                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
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                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: gorgebirds AT juno.com 
                    When posting a sighting to TWEETERS please remember to include the county in your message. These reports are read by people not only from Washington but also by birders across the nation who have no idea where Sandy Point or any of our local parks are located. Thank you,Wilson Cady
                    Columbia River Gorge, WA

                    ---------- Original Message ----------
                    From: Twink Coffman
                    To: tomboulian@comcast.net
                    Cc: Tweeters
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2017 11:04:19 -0800


                    thank you for the private property reminder.... hope all use caution and good sense
                    On Tue, Nov 14, 2017 at 10:50 PM, wrote:
                    Of course you should all know that all of this area is private propertyeither bought/leased from the Lummi, or owned by the Lummi outright. You can purchase the point for a few million dollars for 12 acres. It appears like a local park, but is not and is posted I was there 10 days agoon the only day the owl wasnt thereand was approached by residents concerned that I might be a burglar and emphasizing there is no public access per se. The back bay is full of waterfowlI asked residents and was welcomed to use end of street and water line access right of ways to viewstill not public property You couldnt 10 days ago access via Slater Rd all the way to Beach Wayit was under construction. You had to detour on Halston (?) Way S to Red River Rd and then back up, before going down south again. Try to spend a few bucks on the reservationThere is a Skippers at the casino gas station, and that certainly is an endangered species-- Mind your manners just like on the Makah property in Neah Bay. And mind how close you getremember, this owl is sleeping all day until sunset Mark Tomboulian From: Philip DickinsonSent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:56 PMTo: Wally DavisCc: TweetersSubject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s) It has been publicized previously, but this Sandy Point is west of Ferndale in Whatcom County. Take I-5 Exit 260 west on Slater Rd. At end bear left onto Beach Way. Then left on Sucia, left on Thetis and right on Saltspring to parking lot at end. Phil DickinsonLake Stevens

                    Sent from my iPhone
                    On Nov 14, 2017, at 8:39 PM, Wally Davis wrote:

                    I used Google Maps to try and locate Sandy Point and was surprised to find half a dozen of them in the US Salish Sea region. Would you please be more specific about where Sandy point is?

                    Wally Davis
                    Snohomish

                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:15 PM
                    To: Tweeters
                    Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)

                    The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day and in two countries is pretty cool.
                    Phil Dickinson
                    Lake Stevens

                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


                    _______________________________________________
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                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

                    --
                    happy birdingTwinkwilber4818@gmail.comFerndale, WAin Whatcom Countyout on the beach



                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: wilber4818 AT gmail.com 
                    thank you for the private property reminder.... hope all use caution and
                    good sense

                    On Tue, Nov 14, 2017 at 10:50 PM, wrote:

                    > Of course you should all know that all of this area is private
                    > propertyeither bought/leased from the Lummi, or owned by the Lummi
                    > outright. You can purchase the point for a few million dollars for 12
                    > acres. It appears like a local park, but is not and is posted
                    >
                    > I was there 10 days agoon the only day the owl wasnt thereand was
                    > approached by residents concerned that I might be a burglar and emphasizing
                    > there is no public access per se.
                    >
                    > The back bay is full of waterfowlI asked residents and was welcomed to
                    > use end of street and water line access right of ways to viewstill not
                    > public property
                    >
                    > You couldnt 10 days ago access via Slater Rd all the way to Beach Wayit
                    > was under construction. You had to detour on Halston (?) Way S to Red
                    > River Rd and then back up, before going down south again.
                    >
                    > Try to spend a few bucks on the reservationThere is a Skippers at the
                    > casino gas station, and that certainly is an endangered species--
                    >
                    > Mind your manners just like on the Makah property in Neah Bay. And mind
                    > how close you getremember, this owl is sleeping all day until sunset
                    >
                    > Mark Tomboulian
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > *From:* Philip Dickinson
                    > *Sent:* Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:56 PM
                    > *To:* Wally Davis
                    > *Cc:* Tweeters
                    > *Subject:* Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)
                    >
                    > It has been publicized previously, but this Sandy Point is west of
                    > Ferndale in Whatcom County. Take I-5 Exit 260 west on Slater Rd. At end
                    > bear left onto Beach Way. Then left on Sucia, left on Thetis and right on
                    > Saltspring to parking lot at end.
                    >
                    > Phil Dickinson
                    > Lake Stevens
                    >
                    > Sent from my iPhone
                    >
                    > On Nov 14, 2017, at 8:39 PM, Wally Davis wrote:
                    >
                    > I used Google Maps to try and locate Sandy Point and was surprised to find
                    > half a dozen of them in the US Salish Sea region. Would you please be more
                    > specific about where Sandy point is?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Wally Davis
                    >
                    > Snohomish
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > *From:* tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [
                    > mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu
                    > ] *On Behalf Of *Philip
                    > Dickinson
                    > *Sent:* Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:15 PM
                    > *To:* Tweeters
                    > *Subject:* [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point
                    > at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we
                    > also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day
                    > and in two countries is pretty cool.
                    >
                    > Phil Dickinson
                    >
                    > Lake Stevens
                    >
                    > ------------------------------
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    >


                    --
                    happy birding
                    Twink
                    wilber4818@gmail.com
                    Ferndale, WA
                    in Whatcom County
                    out on the beach



                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: Hikersammy AT msn.com 
                    Just a bit of a correction.. this owl is a day time owl (diurnal), not nocturnal.  It's feeding on Greebes and whatnot.    They are not even crepuscular.  It will sleep during part of the day if it's hungry to conserve energy.  BUT it hunts during the day.. so we need to be reminded of that.


                    Sammy


                    ________________________________
                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu on behalf of tomboulian@comcast.net
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 10:50 PM
                    To: Philip Dickinson; Wally Davis
                    Cc: Tweeters
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)

                    Of course you should all know that all of this area is private propertyeither bought/leased from the Lummi, or owned by the Lummi outright. You can purchase the point for a few million dollars for 12 acres. It appears like a local park, but is not and is posted

                    I was there 10 days agoon the only day the owl wasnt thereand was approached by residents concerned that I might be a burglar and emphasizing there is no public access per se.

                    The back bay is full of waterfowlI asked residents and was welcomed to use end of street and water line access right of ways to viewstill not public property

                    You couldnt 10 days ago access via Slater Rd all the way to Beach Wayit was under construction. You had to detour on Halston (?) Way S to Red River Rd and then back up, before going down south again.

                    Try to spend a few bucks on the reservationThere is a Skippers at the casino gas station, and that certainly is an endangered species--

                    Mind your manners just like on the Makah property in Neah Bay. And mind how close you getremember, this owl is sleeping all day until sunset

                    Mark Tomboulian



                    From: Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:56 PM
                    To: Wally Davis
                    Cc: Tweeters
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)

                    It has been publicized previously, but this Sandy Point is west of Ferndale in Whatcom County. Take I-5 Exit 260 west on Slater Rd. At end bear left onto Beach Way. Then left on Sucia, left on Thetis and right on Saltspring to parking lot at end.

                    Phil Dickinson
                    Lake Stevens

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Nov 14, 2017, at 8:39 PM, Wally Davis > wrote:


                    I used Google Maps to try and locate Sandy Point and was surprised to find half a dozen of them in the US Salish Sea region. Would you please be more specific about where Sandy point is?



                    Wally Davis

                    Snohomish



                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:15 PM
                    To: Tweeters
                    Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)



                    The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day and in two countries is pretty cool.

                    Phil Dickinson

                    Lake Stevens

                    ________________________________
                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 15 Nov
                    From: tomboulian AT comcast.net 
                    Of course you should all know that all of this area is private propertyeither bought/leased from the Lummi, or owned by the Lummi outright.  You can purchase the point for a few million dollars for 12 acres.  It appears like a local park, but is not and is posted

                    I was there 10 days agoon the only day the owl wasnt thereand was approached by residents concerned that I might be a burglar and emphasizing there is no public access per se.

                    The back bay is full of waterfowlI asked residents and was welcomed to use end of street and water line access right of ways to viewstill not public property

                    You couldnt 10 days ago access via Slater Rd all the way to Beach Wayit was under construction. You had to detour on Halston (?) Way S to Red River Rd and then back up, before going down south again.

                    Try to spend a few bucks on the reservationThere is a Skippers at the casino gas station, and that certainly is an endangered species--

                    Mind your manners just like on the Makah property in Neah Bay. And mind how close you getremember, this owl is sleeping all day until sunset

                    Mark Tomboulian



                    From: Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:56 PM
                    To: Wally Davis
                    Cc: Tweeters
                    Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)

                    It has been publicized previously, but this Sandy Point is west of Ferndale in Whatcom County. Take I-5 Exit 260 west on Slater Rd. At end bear left onto Beach Way. Then left on Sucia, left on Thetis and right on Saltspring to parking lot at end.

                    Phil Dickinson
                    Lake Stevens

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Nov 14, 2017, at 8:39 PM, Wally Davis wrote:


                    I used Google Maps to try and locate Sandy Point and was surprised to find half a dozen of them in the US Salish Sea region. Would you please be more specific about where Sandy point is?



                    Wally Davis

                    Snohomish



                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:15 PM
                    To: Tweeters
                    Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)



                    The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day and in two countries is pretty cool.

                    Phil Dickinson

                    Lake Stevens



                    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    _______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 14 Nov
                    From: pdickins AT gmail.com 
                    It has been publicized previously, but this Sandy Point is west of Ferndale in Whatcom County. Take I-5 Exit 260 west on Slater Rd. At end bear left onto Beach Way. Then left on Sucia, left on Thetis and right on Saltspring to parking lot at end.

                    Phil Dickinson
                    Lake Stevens

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    > On Nov 14, 2017, at 8:39 PM, Wally Davis wrote:
                    >
                    > I used Google Maps to try and locate Sandy Point and was surprised to find half a dozen of them in the US Salish Sea region. Would you please be more specific about where Sandy point is?
                    >
                    > Wally Davis
                    > Snohomish
                    >
                    > From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
                    > Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:15 PM
                    > To: Tweeters
                    > Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)
                    >
                    > The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day and in two countries is pretty cool.
                    >
                    > Phil Dickinson
                    > Lake Stevens



                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 14 Nov
                    From: wallydavis3 AT gmail.com 
                    I used Google Maps to try and locate Sandy Point and was surprised to find half a dozen of them in the US Salish Sea region.  Would you please be more specific about where Sandy point is?



                    Wally Davis

                    Snohomish



                    From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Philip Dickinson
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:15 PM
                    To: Tweeters
                    Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owl(s)



                    The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day and in two countries is pretty cool.

                    Phil Dickinson

                    Lake Stevens



                    Subject: Snowy Owl(s)
                    Date: 14 Nov
                    From: pdickins AT gmail.com 
                    The Snowy Owl was still hunkered down at the same location at Sandy Point
                    at 2:30 this afternoon. Seen by six of us from Pilchuck Audubon. Today, we
                    also saw a Snowy Owl at the Boundary Bay dike in Delta, BC. Two in one day
                    and in two countries is pretty cool.

                    Phil Dickinson
                    Lake Stevens



                    Subject: Sandy Point Snowy Ow and Snow Buntings
                    Date: 08 Nov
                    From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com 
                    The Snowy Owl continues hunkered down as of 11:20. Also flyover flock of 25+ Snow Buntings

                    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



                    Subject: Douglas County Snowy Owl
                    Date: 06 Nov
                    From: merdave AT homenetnw.net 
                    Hi, Bird lovers.  It looks a lot like winter here in Bridgeport.  Maybe
                    that is why someone saw a Snowy Owl on Dyer Hill above town today. It was
                    on N. Division, between 26 and 28, on the east side of the road. It was
                    described as being quite gray, with dark cap and snow white face. Part of
                    the roads on top were plowed, some have small drifts still. I checked my
                    old records and this is the earliest date I have for one. In 20ll and
                    2012 some were seen in Nov., but at later dates. Meredith Spencer,
                    Bridgeport

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                    Tweeters@u.washington.edu
                    http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

                    Northern Saw-whet Owl (2)Aegolius acadicus




                      Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owl, Nisqually NWR
                      Date: 29 Nov
                      From: shepthorp AT gmail.com 
                      Hi Tweets,

                      Another NSWO has been located at Nisqually with easy access. Seen roosting at 9am in a small cedar tree across from the west entrance of the parking lot between the Visitor Center and Education Center marked with pink ribbon.
                      Happy birding,
                      Wednesday Walk and Shep

                      Shep Thorp, VMD
                      Emergency Clinician, Medical Director
                      I BluePearl Veterinary Partners
                      253.370.3742 mobile
                      253.474.0791 Tacoma
                      bluepearlvet.com



                      Subject: Northern Saw-Whet Owl at Nisqually.
                      Date: 22 Nov
                      From: shepthorp AT gmail.com 
                      West side of Twin Barns Loop Trail, left or west side of trail, 100 feet north of where access road crosses trail. Marked with pink ribbon. 
                      Wednesday Walk with Phil and All
                      Shep

                      Shep Thorp, VMD
                      Emergency Clinician, Medical Director
                      BluePearl Veterinary Partners
                      253.370.3742 mobile
                      253.474.0791 Tacoma
                      bluepearlvet.com

                      White-winged Crossbill (2)Loxia leucoptera




                        Subject: Skylark at Neah Bay - yed
                        Date: 10 Nov
                        From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com 
                        The E. Skylark has been busy working the north quarter mile of Hobuck Beach at Neah Bay. Also seen in the same area: Am. Tree Sparrow and White-winged Crossbill
                        - Michael Hobbs

                        Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


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