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White-tailed Ptarmigan (2)Lagopus leucurus


Flammulated Owl (2)Otus flammeolus


Black Swift (2)Cypseloides niger


White-tailed Ptarmigan (2)Lagopus leucurus




    Subject: Paradise, Mt Rainier NP - WT Ptarmigan & snow level.
    Date: 18 Jul
    From: marcus AT rainierconnect.com 
    Hi Tweets, 

    A beautiful Saturday hike to Panorama Point at Paradise greeted us with singing circling displays by American Pipits, repeated encounters with Gray-crowned Rosy-Finches and a calling White-tailed Ptarmigan.

    All these birds were on the talus slope hillside where the trail makes a giant uphill switchback to Panorama Point - a nice mix of forbs, heather, boulders and melting snow.

    It is a 2 mile hike one way and 1200™ and VERY popular. The snow is still quite deep. The first and last 1/4 mile is patches of snow on the trail and the remaining 1 1/2 miles is all on snow field.

    Arriving early - we were there by 7 am and the parking lot was half full. The upper lot often fills by 8 am. The snow was still crusty and icy through, especially the first tree section. And a lot less people.

    Arriving later on a sunny day means the snow is much softer and a fair number of folks from everywhere were managing in tennis shoes to the glacier overlook.

    The big switchback is a bit steep on the snow, but a set of poles would get most people up the trail. If not, there is a small rock outcropping poking out of the snow that is a good place to look for birds from. We looked for that Ptarmigan from above and below, but never could locate it. However, the bonus up top while looking was having Rosy-finches keep flying by us.

    Did I mention how massively popular this hike is? It looks like a trekking expedition as the day progresses. Fortunately, there is plenty of room to spread out on the snowfield.

    FYI: SUNRISE is now open. The trail to Fremont Lookout is clear. The trail to 1st & 2nd Burroughs Mountain still has smallish patches of snow on 1st and a much larger field to 2nd.

    Good birding!

    Marcus Roening
    Tacoma WA

    Sent from my iPhone

    Flammulated Owl (2)Otus flammeolus




      Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 2, 2020
      Date: 01 Aug
      From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com 
      Hello, Tweeters,

      Heard last week on BirdNote:
      * Wilson's Phalarope - An Anomaly in So Many Ways
      http://bit.ly/1HTtVCI
      * Peregrine-Shorebird Interaction
      http://bit.ly/NsC8hN
      * Indigo Bunting - Bird of the "Ecotone"
      http://bit.ly/15pr0Oj
      * Small Birds Mob Big Ones
      http://bit.ly/2OfWpMB
      * Soaring with Red-tails
      http://bit.ly/13XLhtG
      * A Trip to the Field Museum in Chicago,
      Watching Young Artists Studying
      (and Making Illustrations of) Birds
      https://bit.ly/3gdBnMd
      * Flammulated Owl, Summer Visitor
      http://bit.ly/2LITa2x
      ========================Next week on BirdNote: Working Turnstones Do Turn Stones
      + David Sibley on Habitat Shifts, Wilson's Plovers' Lives on the Beach,
      and more: https://bit.ly/3gjzf5x
      --------------------------------------
      Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
      Please let us know. mailto:info@birdnote.org
      ------------------------------------------------
      Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
      Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
      ... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
      or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
      Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
      ========================
      BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
      https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
      There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
      http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
      -----------------------------------------------------------------
      You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
      You'll find 1600+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

      Thanks for listening,
      Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
      _______________________________________________
      Tweeters mailing list
      Tweeters@u.washington.edu
      http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



      Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 2, 2020
      Date: 01 Aug
      From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com 
      Hello, Tweeters,

      Heard last week on BirdNote:
      * Wilson's Phalarope - An Anomaly in So Many Ways
      http://bit.ly/1HTtVCI
      * Peregrine-Shorebird Interaction
      http://bit.ly/NsC8hN
      * Indigo Bunting - Bird of the "Ecotone"
      http://bit.ly/15pr0Oj
      * Small Birds Mob Big Ones
      http://bit.ly/2OfWpMB
      * Soaring with Red-tails
      http://bit.ly/13XLhtG
      * A Trip to the Field Museum in Chicago,
      Watching Young Artists Studying
      (and Making Illustrations of) Birds
      https://bit.ly/3gdBnMd
      * Flammulated Owl, Summer Visitor
      http://bit.ly/2LITa2x
      ========================Next week on BirdNote: Working Turnstones Do Turn Stones
      + David Sibley on Habitat Shifts, Wilson's Plovers' Lives on the Beach,
      and more: https://bit.ly/3gjzf5x
      --------------------------------------
      Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
      Please let us know. mailto:info@birdnote.org
      ------------------------------------------------
      Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
      Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
      ... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
      or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
      Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
      ========================
      BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
      https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
      There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
      http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
      -----------------------------------------------------------------
      You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
      You'll find 1600+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

      Thanks for listening,
      Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
      _______________________________________________
      Tweeters mailing list
      Tweeters@u.washington.edu
      http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

      Black Swift (2)Cypseloides niger




        Subject: Black Swift nest
        Date: 21 Jul
        From: krtrease AT gmail.com 
        When I replied to Larry's post about the Black Swift nest I forgot to
        include a link to a photograph of the bird:
        https://www.flickr.com/photos/cavuken/



        Subject: Now do you want to see a Black Swift?
        Date: 21 Jul
        From: krtrease AT gmail.com 
        Hi Tweeters,
        Based on Larry's excellent directions I headed up to Skykomish early this
        morning looking for the Black Swift nest. It took a little searching but I
        found it and managed a few grainy but diagnostic photos. It was a
        beautiful sunny morning along a remote mountain stream and I spent two
        hours watching this single nestling. Black Swift nests are generally very
        difficult to find and to get a view of one that didn't involve rock
        climbing or rappelling was a real thrill for me. Thanks again to Larry for
        posting.


        On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 8:04 PM Larry Schwitters
        wrote:

        > Tweeters,
        >
        > Eric and I got a very nice email from Bill Voss thanking us for posting
        > the directions to a Black Swift nest. That was in late August of 2018. The
        > nest is currently occupied. So if this is an adventure you would be
        > interested in you will need to find that old post that gave the directions.
        >
        > Just kidding. Here it is again.
        >
        > I™m posting this for Oregon™s Eric Horvath who has now photographed 26 WA
        > sites (all waterfalls) that show a bird on a nest.
        > Here he gives you directions to an easy one.
        >
        > Hi Tweeters. As part of a search for Black Swifts nesting in Washington
        > state, I have found a new site that is easily accessible and easily seen
        > from a gravel road. There is only one Black Swift nest here at this
        > waterfall, and the chick is getting near to fledging age; it will probably
        > fledge about 10 September, guesstimate.
        > If you visit here, please be on your best American Birding Association
        > code of ethics and do not disturb the bird with sounds, or camera flash, or
        > climbing around on the cliffs to get closer!
        >
        > Location: Lennox Ridge Falls, near to Skykomish, King County, WA.
        > Directions: Turn off Hwy 2 onto the Old Cascades Hwy at signs pointing
        > to Money Creek Campground, which is just under three miles west of
        > Skykomish and about ten miles east of Index. After a mile turn right onto
        > Miller River Road, then in another 300 feet turn right again onto Money
        > Creek Road, and follow it for 4.6 miles to where the falls are visible to
        > the left. A small pullout on the opposite side of the road provides room
        > for 2 cars, and there is further parking 300 feet up the road. Money
        > Creek Road is known for washouts, but current conditions are good for low
        > clearance cars if you drive with care. When you are standing on the road
        > looking across Money Creek at the waterfall, you may find a cairn. At
        > this point you can see the falling water of Lennox Ridge Falls, and the
        > black swift can be plainly seen with 10 x binoculars. That is, I can see
        > the bird but I have a refined search image. You should bring your
        > spotting scope and come in morning light on a sunny day if you want photos
        > and digiscoping. Forget about your SLR camera for this site, it is just
        > too far away. digiscoping is the only option. To find the nest, you
        > will have to look carefully, as these birds are well hidden even if in the
        > open. The chick is dark gray with white feather edgings, and the wingtips
        > look like little white chevrons cause of the edging. So to the
        > detailsyou™re there on the road with your tripod and scope, looking at the
        > falling water. Look along the cliff left of the falling water, just a
        > little bit above eye level from where you stand on the road. The nest is
        > right below a maidenhair fern clump, under a rock roof that forms and
        > upward pointing V shape.Any more directions would take the fun of the
        > search away and the thrill of victory when you see it. I can email a
        > photo with the location circled if necessary. Please remember, do not
        > cross money creek and get closer”the viewing angle gets worse and we cant
        > have disturbance that close to the nest. Thanks. Please let me know
        > what you see, I would like to keep track of the fledging date. I was there
        > 28 Aug 2018.”Eric Horvath, horvath@pioneer.net
        >
        > Larry Schwitters
        > Issaquah
        > _______________________________________________
        > Tweeters mailing list
        > Tweeters@u.washington.edu
        > http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
        >



        Subject: Now do you want to see a Black Swift?
        Date: 20 Jul
        From: leschwitters AT me.com 
        Tweeters,

        Eric and I got a very nice email from Bill Voss thanking us for posting the directions to a Black Swift nest. That was in late August of 2018. The nest is currently occupied. So if this is an adventure you would be interested in you will need to find that old post that gave the directions.

        Just kidding. Here it is again.

        I™m posting this for Oregon™s Eric Horvath who has now photographed 26 WA sites (all waterfalls) that show a bird on a nest.
        Here he gives you directions to an easy one.

        Hi Tweeters. As part of a search for Black Swifts nesting in Washington state, I have found a new site that is easily accessible and easily seen from a gravel road. There is only one Black Swift nest here at this waterfall, and the chick is getting near to fledging age; it will probably fledge about 10 September, guesstimate.
        If you visit here, please be on your best American Birding Association code of ethics and do not disturb the bird with sounds, or camera flash, or climbing around on the cliffs to get closer!

        Location: Lennox Ridge Falls, near to Skykomish, King County, WA. Directions: Turn off Hwy 2 onto the Old Cascades Hwy at signs pointing to Money Creek Campground, which is just under three miles west of Skykomish and about ten miles east of Index. After a mile turn right onto Miller River Road, then in another 300 feet turn right again onto Money Creek Road, and follow it for 4.6 miles to where the falls are visible to the left. A small pullout on the opposite side of the road provides room for 2 cars, and there is further parking 300 feet up the road. Money Creek Road is known for washouts, but current conditions are good for low clearance cars if you drive with care. When you are standing on the road looking across Money Creek at the waterfall, you may find a cairn. At this point you can see the falling water of Lennox Ridge Falls, and the black swift can be plainly seen with 10 x binoculars. That is, I can see the bird but I have a refined search image. You should bring your spotting scope and come in morning light on a sunny day if you want photos and digiscoping. Forget about your SLR camera for this site, it is just too far away. digiscoping is the only option. To find the nest, you will have to look carefully, as these birds are well hidden even if in the open. The chick is dark gray with white feather edgings, and the wingtips look like little white chevrons cause of the edging. So to the detailsyou™re there on the road with your tripod and scope, looking at the falling water. Look along the cliff left of the falling water, just a little bit above eye level from where you stand on the road. The nest is right below a maidenhair fern clump, under a rock roof that forms and upward pointing V shape.Any more directions would take the fun of the search away and the thrill of victory when you see it. I can email a photo with the location circled if necessary. Please remember, do not cross money creek and get closer”the viewing angle gets worse and we cant have disturbance that close to the nest. Thanks. Please let me know what you see, I would like to keep track of the fledging date. I was there 28 Aug 2018.”Eric Horvath, horvath@pioneer.net

        Larry Schwitters
        Issaquah



        Subject: Lots of swifts
        Date: 01 Jul
        From: leschwitters AT me.com 
        A thousand Vaux™s Swifts came out of the Monroe Wagner roost this morning. As most of you know it™s July.

        Any Black Swifts around?

        Larry Schwitters
        Issaquah
        _______________________________________________
        Tweeters mailing list
        Tweeters@u.washington.edu
        http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


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