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Arctic Loon (2)Gavia arctica


Laysan Albatross (2)Phoebastria immutabilis


Gyrfalcon (2)Falco rusticolus


Sooty Grouse (2)Dendragapus fuliginosus


Sharp-tailed Grouse (2)Tympanuchus phasianellus


Whooping Crane (2)Grus americana


Iceland Gull (2)Larus glaucoides


Red-crowned Parrot (2)Amazona viridigenalis


Snowy Owl (2)Nyctea scandiaca


Northern Pygmy-Owl (2)Glaucidium gnoma


Short-eared Owl (2)Asio flammeus


White Wagtail (2)Motacilla alba


White-winged Crossbill (2)Loxia leucoptera


Arctic Loon (2)Gavia arctica




    Subject: re: Priest Rapids Dam (was Eurasian Green-winged Teal)
    Date: 16 Jan
    From: downess AT charter.net 
    Tweets,
    Kevin Lucas™s post was mostly accurate regarding access issues, but deserves some clarification on a couple of issues. The first is that I™m outing myself as the bad birder who apparently messed everything up. That™s not quite accurate, but it is accurate that I did stop on the dam. I had a nice chat with the security guard about 4 years ago and he politely asked me to move on because there isn™t any stopping on dams, we all know this, it isn™t particular to Priest Rapids. So, why did I do it if we all know it?? Some background, I had been given some advice that is was ok to travel across Priest Rapids Dam and park in the parking area on the west end of the dam and view the birds in the western forebay there. That particular winter there was a discussion going around of a loon that I first observed in Kittitas County and later in the winter moved down to Priest Rapids Dam that potentially could have been an Arctic Loon. So upon the knowledge from my fellow locals, that it was ok to stop in the west end parking area and scope, I did that to try and obtain photos of this loon for ID discussion. When I was scoping, I saw the loon was actually very close to the dam at mid-channel and drove to the loon, stopped for a few minutes and took notes and pictures (that determined it wasn™t a ARLO by the way). The guard came out, we talked and he reminded me that it wasn™t ok to stop on the dam and I™ll need to move along. He also reminded me that the birders he had seen parked on the western parking lot were also within the dam no stopping area and that is not allowed. So, the further clarification to Kevin™s post is there is no public access (unless you take a boat on the water) for any part of the dam, including the western parking area. As Kevin mentioned, there is some limited viewing below the dam from Jackson™s fish camp and of course on calm days you can kayak or canoe from Desert Aire marina in Grant Co. Given that when the guard and I left we were saying pleasantries and wished each other a good day, I™d be hard pressed to believe that encounter alone messed up long efforts. Facts are always better that veiled assumptions.

    Great find of an unusual bird.

    Scott Downes
    [email protected]
    Yakima WA

    Laysan Albatross (2)Phoebastria immutabilis




      Subject: Westport Pelagic Trip, Saturday Feb. 3, 2018, 2 LAYSAN ALBATROSS, BROWN BOOBY
      Date: 04 Feb
      From: blabar AT harbornet.com 
      Westport Seabirds™ first pelagic trip of the year, was a great success! Fifteen seabird enthusiasts got a window between rough sea conditions during the previous days and with some to follow. Light rain and some bumpy conditions in the morning were not a deterrent for us to get 30-35 miles out to deep water. The trip back was smooth and with no rain, made viewing great.

      Leaving at 0700, we started counting at daybreak, around 0730. For the next 3 hours traveling roughly 30 miles, we encountered a limited amount of bird activity because of the time of year and the sea conditions.

      Highlights included: 1 Long-tailed Duck at least 3 miles off shore, 6 Black-footed Albatross and 22 Northern Fulmars as we neared Grays Canyon, lots of Common Murres numbering over 300 ( many that looked well fed, good news for the up-coming breeding season), 38 Cassin™s Auklet, 34 Black-legged Kittiwakes and 2 Ancient Murrelets (that were seen by a few).
      As we neared our normal chum spot in Grays Canyon, Phil Anderson had been following the F/V Maverick (a long-liner fish vessel operated by the Quinault Indian Nation) by radar. Long-liners usually attract hundreds of seabirds and indeed that was the scene.

      Highlights were: 2 LAYSAN ALBATROSS, 40 Black-footed Albatross, 310 Northern Fulmars, 30 Black-legged Kittiwakes and an assortment of gulls, mostly Herring.

      Our journey back to inshore had the similar regular species with the highlight being 2 POMARINE JAEGERS on the water together, then taking flight for all to see.
      Coming into the harbor, close to the Westport jetty, we immediately noted a large brown and white bird with several cormorants around it. It was a BROWN BOOBY, sleeping. Then it lifted its head several times for all to see and photograph. This was our first sighting of this species during the winter with maybe 6-7 other records for Westport Seabirds trips. This bird was also number 550 life birds for Sierra Downs, one of our youngest pelagic regulars! Oh, by the way, number 449 was the Laysan Albatross!

      Other highlights coming into the boat basin included 6 Black Turnstones and 1 Surfbird on the jetty and a CLARK™S GREBE in the basin.
      Mammal sightings were, 1 Gray Whale, 4 Northern Fur Seals, Harbor Porpoise, Harbor Seals, California Sea Lions and Steller™s Sea Lions.

      Spotters for this trip were Bill Tweit, Gene Revelas, Cara Borre and myself. Boat personnel and spotters were Phil and Chris Anderson.

      Our next scheduled trip is on March 17, with spaces still available. For reservations and all information for these trips, please visit our website at www.westportseabirds.com
      Thanks to all for making this first trip of the year such a great success!
      On behalf of Westport Seabirds,
      Bruce LaBar
      Tacoma, WA



      Subject: Westport Seabirds, Pelagic Schedule and up coming trip
      Date: 16 Jan
      From: blabar AT harbornet.com 
      Seafarers!
      Just a reminder that our 2018 schedule is posted on our website at www.westportseabirds.com
      Our first trip of the year is just weeks away on February 3, with spaces still available. Even though this winter trip can be iffy because of weather conditions, we™ve had some amazing sightings.
      Here are some of the rarities I found looking through past records:
      Parakeet Auklet, Laysan Albatross, Short-tailed Shearwater, Thick-billed Murre, Manx Shearwater, White-capped Albatross, Short-tailed Albatross and Mottled Petrel!!!
      Of course none of the above are guaranteed, but you never know what might fly in!
      If the weather isn™t looking favorable, we usually cancel the trip, but sometimes re-schedule the next day or week.
      So, if your looking for seabird rarities or just getting out and seeing our more common pelagic birds, please visit our website to make reservations.
      Hope to see you on this upcoming trip or others during the year!
      On behalf of Westport Seabirds,
      Bruce LaBar
      Tacoma, WA.

      Gyrfalcon (2)Falco rusticolus




        Subject: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley?
        Date: 19 Feb
        From: 1northraven AT gmail.com 
        Another way to find the Samish East 90s is to take Bayview Edison Rd west
        out of Edison (the turn west just at the south end of town) & drive west
        (maybe a mile) to where the road takes a sharp left turn to the south --
        from that turn to the next sharp turn (right-hand turn back to the west)
        the marsh to your left is essentially the core of the Samish east 90s, tho
        the area from that second turn where Bayview Edison Rd heads west again to
        the intersection with Samish Island Rd is also included. to make sense of
        this, open Google Maps & search on Edison WA, then just follow the only
        road that goes west out of town.

        this for those of sufficiently old-fashioned that we need visual maps.

        Chris Kessler
        Seattle

        On Mon, Feb 19, 2018 at 12:52 PM, Jane Hadley wrote:

        > Emily Birchman, in search of a Gyrfalcon, asked how to find the East 90 in
        > the Samish Flats.
        >
        > Paste in these coordinates at Google Maps to see the location of the East
        > 90:
        >
        > 48.548735, -122.466579
        >
        > Here is another relevant point on the map, just to the north of the
        > previous point:
        >
        > 48.553934, -122.466095
        >
        > The area between these two points along the Bayview-Edison Road is called
        > "The East 90s."
        >
        > You can read about birding the West 90, East 90s and other parts of the
        > Samish Flats in A Birder's Guide to Washington, 2nd Edition, which you can
        > buy as a paperback book or read online. The relevant section is here:
        > http://wabirdguide.org/samish-flats/
        >
        > Jane Hadley
        >
        > Seattle, WA
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _______________________________________________
        > Tweeters mailing list
        > [email protected]
        > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
        >
        >


        --
        "moderation in everything, including moderation"
        Rustin Thompson



        Subject: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley?
        Date: 19 Feb
        From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com 
        Emily Birchman, in search of a Gyrfalcon, asked how to find the East 90
        in the Samish Flats.

        Paste in these coordinates at Google Maps to see the location of the
        East 90:

        48.548735, -122.466579

        Here is another relevant point on the map, just to the north of the
        previous point:

        48.553934, -122.466095

        The area between these two points along the Bayview-Edison Road is
        called "The East 90s."

        You can read about birding the West 90, East 90s and other parts of the
        Samish Flats in A Birder's Guide to Washington, 2nd Edition, which you
        can buy as a paperback book or read online. The relevant section is
        here: http://wabirdguide.org/samish-flats/

        Jane Hadley

        Seattle, WA



        Subject: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley?
        Date: 19 Feb
        From: stollea AT gmail.com 
        I saw the report from Saturday of a gyrfalcon by the "East 90" in Skagit
        Valley and I am headed up there today with my family and wondered if anyone
        saw it yesterday? Can someone tell me how to find the East 90? Birdweb.org
        has a description of where the "west 90" is, but it doesn't mention the
        East 90.

        Thanks!
        Emily Birchman
        Kenmore, WA



        Subject: Gyrfalcon on Fir Island
        Date: 27 Jan
        From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com 
        Around 11:00 this morning I was watching a mixed flock of Dunlin and Black Bellied Plovers at the corner of Maupin and Fir Island Roads when all hell broke loose as a Gyrfalcon strafed the group and picked off a Dunlin. Flew off to the Northeast. The shorebirds returned 5 minutes later. Very cool!

        Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



        Subject: Gyrfalcon X 2
        Date: 23 Jan
        From: andjake19 AT gmail.com 
        Just north of the junction of McLean Rd on Farm to Market (west side of road) in Skagit flats, Tony Catanzaro, Dan McDougall-Treacy and myself were treated to a confrontation between two gyrfalcons today at ~1300.   

        Andy Jacobson
        Seattle_______________________________________________
        Tweeters mailing list
        [email protected]
        http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



        Subject: Gyrfalcon & Saw-whet owls
        Date: 22 Jan
        From: littlebirder AT pacifier.com 
        Okanogan area.My husband and I found 2 Saw-whet Owls at Bridgeport State Park, WA.
        Then we found an immature Gyrfalcon along Cameron Lake Road. I believe it was at:48,135855, -119.563572
        It was just before the 1st house after going up the hill and on a sharp corner that turned left.
        We also saw a very large flock of Snow Buntings at the cattle feed lot.


        Sherry HagenVancouver, [email protected]
        Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone



        Subject: Gyrfalcon - Skagit
        Date: 17 Jan
        From: terimartine AT me.com 
        Mark's post (below) prompted some in our birding group to rethink the bird we saw yesterday in the same location (late morning). It appears to be the same bird. Thanks Mark : - )
        Teri Martine
        Seattle

        Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/?

        Mark's post and photo:
        On January 16, at 4:40 pm, Janeanne Houston and I saw a juvenile Gyrfalcon on Best Rd, just south of Route 20. It flew up from the ground to a tree right next to the road. A crazy location, with traffic roaring at high speed in both directions as night fell. The spot does not look to me like a regular perch, being way too close to humans and heavy traffic. Keep an eye out as you travel through the area - this bird may be anywhere. And please be careful out there.

        Photo: https://flic.kr/p/JAodPx

        Mark Ahlness
        [email protected]
        West Seattle, WA



        Subject: Skagit Gyrfalcon - yes, again
        Date: 16 Jan
        From: mahlness AT gmail.com 
        On January 16, at 4:40 pm, Janeanne Houston and I saw a juvenile Gyrfalcon
        on Best Rd, just south of Route 20. It flew up from the ground to a tree
        right next to the road. A crazy location, with traffic roaring at high
        speed in both directions as night fell.

        The spot does not look to me like a regular perch, being way too close to
        humans and heavy traffic. Keep an eye out as you travel through the area -
        this bird may be anywhere. And please be careful out there.

        Photo: https://flic.kr/p/JAodPx

        Mark Ahlness
        [email protected]
        West Seattle, WA



        Subject: Regarding the Skagit gyrfalcon
        Date: 16 Jan
        From: viper.bob AT frontier.com 
        I was dismayed to see that the exact location of the Skagit gyrfalcon was posted here. I did not anticipate that. But now that it is out I would like to have everyone who decides to try for it - please use some common sense.
        You do not need to get out of your vehicle to see it. When it is there It is on an open perch close to the road -people getting out, slamming car doors, setting up tripods for scopes or cameras, talking loudly, etc. are sure to cause it to fly
        You do not need a spotting scope to view it well - bins work fine -I took several photos from within my vehicle without bothering itYou will be lucky to see it. I saw it only one time (when I got the pictures) and have not seen it since. I live not far from the location and check for it almost daily.I will be there from time to time to monitor the bird and the behavior of those who come to see it. I hope everyone will be respectful of this majestic raptor.
        Thank you,

        Bob KothenbeutelCamano Island, WA
        Website:www.rlkimages.photoshelter.com


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        Wildlife photographer based in Washington state | Bob Kothenbeutel
        Bob Kothenbeutel is a Washington state-based wildlife photographer specializing in images of birds in flight and... | |

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        Sooty Grouse (2)Dendragapus fuliginosus




          Subject: Diversion for whom?
          Date: 02 Feb
          From: baro AT pdx.edu 
          Of course, this is just one, non-ornithologist's personal Tweet
          (I mean opinion).

          Bob OBrien Portland

          On Fri, Feb 2, 2018 at 9:47 AM, Robert O'Brien wrote:

          > Well, since Mitch posed his post as a question, I'll answer it, although
          > it took me a few
          > days to realize it _may_ have been directed to my post about Thayer's Gull
          > vs. the AOU
          > (American Ornithologists Union). It was a snide remark, but it wasn't
          > directed towards
          > or about the president. It was directed against the AOU. Now whether one
          > admires
          > the president or the opposite, I think most would agree that his Tweets
          > (remember,
          > this is 'Twitter') use colorful language, which is very much personal to
          > him and very
          > effective in getting his opinions across. Being a sarcastic s.o.b myself,
          > I am often
          > in awe of his vocabulary and manner of speaking. So, in this case I did
          > borrow
          > (plagiarize) from his frequent Tweets. But, it was in admiration for his
          > style
          > and was directed solely at the AOU, whom I have long believed to make
          > inconsistent (capricious? well, maybe not quite) judgement on speciation
          > of 'our'
          > North American Birds. I strongly disagree with the current lumped status
          > of
          > Iceland/Thayer's Gull and Audubon/Myrtle Warblers, not based upon a desire
          > to tic
          > two more species, (I still 'count' the 4 individually) but because it is
          > inconsistent
          > with other splits, for instance Pacific Slope vs. Cordilleran Flycatcher
          > and
          > Dusky vs. Sooty Grouse both of which splits are justified (to my
          > interpretation)
          > currently (and even originally) based on insufficient evidence. Or, if
          > splits/lumps are to be made on the basis of one closely related pair then
          > they
          > should apply to the other pair.
          >
          > Bob OBrien Portland
          >
          >
          > On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 9:33 AM, Mitch wrote:
          >
          >> Could anyone explain how a birding forum has anything to do with personal
          >> views of politics? Tangential topics about new laws or proposals that
          >> impact birds and wildlife make sense, but how are unsolicited snide
          >> comments and backhanded remarks about the President of the United States of
          >> any value or relation to a site about bird sightings? And also I wonder how
          >> this is a diversion if you actively bring up what you are supposedly
          >> diverting from (many hours before the event would even take place mind
          >> you)? It certainly isn't a diversion for me to hear anyone's political
          >> views, once again, on a forum about birds.
          >>
          >>
          >> Mitchell
          >>
          >> _______________________________________________
          >> Tweeters mailing list
          >> [email protected]
          >> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
          >>
          >>
          >



          Subject: Diversion for whom?
          Date: 02 Feb
          From: baro AT pdx.edu 
          Well, since Mitch posed his post as a question, I'll answer it, although it
          took me a few
          days to realize it _may_ have been directed to my post about Thayer's Gull
          vs. the AOU
          (American Ornithologists Union). It was a snide remark, but it wasn't
          directed towards
          or about the president. It was directed against the AOU. Now whether one
          admires
          the president or the opposite, I think most would agree that his Tweets
          (remember,
          this is 'Twitter') use colorful language, which is very much personal to
          him and very
          effective in getting his opinions across. Being a sarcastic s.o.b myself,
          I am often
          in awe of his vocabulary and manner of speaking. So, in this case I did
          borrow
          (plagiarize) from his frequent Tweets. But, it was in admiration for his
          style
          and was directed solely at the AOU, whom I have long believed to make
          inconsistent (capricious? well, maybe not quite) judgement on speciation of
          'our'
          North American Birds. I strongly disagree with the current lumped status of
          Iceland/Thayer's Gull and Audubon/Myrtle Warblers, not based upon a desire
          to tic
          two more species, (I still 'count' the 4 individually) but because it is
          inconsistent
          with other splits, for instance Pacific Slope vs. Cordilleran Flycatcher
          and
          Dusky vs. Sooty Grouse both of which splits are justified (to my
          interpretation)
          currently (and even originally) based on insufficient evidence. Or, if
          splits/lumps are to be made on the basis of one closely related pair then
          they
          should apply to the other pair.

          Bob OBrien Portland


          On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 9:33 AM, Mitch wrote:

          > Could anyone explain how a birding forum has anything to do with personal
          > views of politics? Tangential topics about new laws or proposals that
          > impact birds and wildlife make sense, but how are unsolicited snide
          > comments and backhanded remarks about the President of the United States of
          > any value or relation to a site about bird sightings? And also I wonder how
          > this is a diversion if you actively bring up what you are supposedly
          > diverting from (many hours before the event would even take place mind
          > you)? It certainly isn't a diversion for me to hear anyone's political
          > views, once again, on a forum about birds.
          >
          >
          > Mitchell
          >
          > _______________________________________________
          > Tweeters mailing list
          > [email protected]
          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
          >
          >

          Sharp-tailed Grouse (2)Tympanuchus phasianellus




            Subject: More stuff from the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) meetings
            Date: 09 Feb
            From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com 
            Tweeters,

            I'll stop after this note.


            1. If you have a name to suggest as someone you think would make a good WDFW Director, please send that name to [email protected]
            2. Be on the lookout for a WDFW News Release (from WDFW Public Affairs) regarding this last FWC meeting. Included is approval to purchase 7,000+ acres for a total of over 20,000 acres in NE Douglas County. This is PRIME Sharp-tailed Grouse and other bird species habitat, and might well be worth your while to visit once it's open for recreation.

            Thanks, and may all your birds be identified,
            Denis DeSilvis

            [email protected]



            Subject: Update to Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse info plus other wildlife news
            Date: 24 Jan
            From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com 
            Tweeters,

            Thanks to all that responded to me personally on the info I provided about the Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse (CSTG) listing. Here's an update and some other news.

            The process to uplist the CSTG is lengthy, and has to do with the packed agendas for the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC), the required public comment periods for rule changes, and the duration needed to "open and shut" the required elements of the Washington Administrative Code.

            1. WDFW files forms in the Washington register that announce the potential rule change needed and opens a public comment period.
            2. There's an overlapping public comment period for SEPA.
            3. There'll be a briefing and public hearing on the potential reclassification to the FWC (likely June) with a briefing and public hearing.
            4. The decision will occur at the August FWC meeting.
            5. After the decision, the WDFW will file the paperwork to change the rule, which would go into effect 30 days later (September).


            Soon, the WDFW will issue Periodic Status Reviews for the pygmy rabbit and sea otter. Those of you that get WDFW news will see it first. Once that news is released, you'll have an opportunity to weigh in on whatever the listing for those species is.

            There has been much news lately relevant to Washington wildlife: Recent news examples, include: 1) The Trump Administration's Reinterpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act; 2) controversy over federal governments possible step toward delisting Canada lynx; and 3) the re-introduction in Congress of Recovering Americas Wildlife Act, HR 4647.

            Thats it for now, and may all your birds be identified,
            Denis DeSilvis
            [email protected]



            Subject: Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse Status in Washington
            Date: 21 Jan
            From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com 
            Tweeters,

            Some of you might have seen the results of the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) meeting that was held on Jan 18-20 -- and what was stated regarding the FWC's decision to uplist the status of the Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse (CSTG) from "threatened" to "endangered." (See the statement at the end of this message.)


            Although the FWC wanted to uplist the grouse, because the criteria for uplisting had been set at 450 birds, and the last count (2017) had 608 birds, their hands (as well as those of the WDFW) were shackled. Nonetheless, there is a process to reclassify the species, and the Commission voted to direct the WDFW to initiate that process.


            I don't want to take up your time with the process, but by about June (perhaps sooner), the process should be complete. Part of the process includes public input, and this is where you come in. If you're at all interested in the Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse, please send your comments in when it comes time. (I'll make Tweeter-dom aware of the timing, where to send letters and email, etc.)


            Because of letters from the Wildlife Diversity Advisory Council and Seattle Audubon Society, and testimony from representatives of Audubon Washington, the Wildlife Diversity Advisory Council, and Tahoma Audubon Society, the Commission members understood that the 608 CSTG's that were counted existed in 8 non-contiguous areas, and not one area contained the 200 birds considered to be a viable population.


            Unfortunately, from my perspective, it appears that birders in Washington aren't as enthralled with Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse as they are with Greater Sage Grouse, despite the fact that CSTG was once the most populous grouse in Eastern Washington. Without the work of the Wildlife Diversity Advisory Council underscoring the need for enhanced protection, and support from Audubon Washington, Seattle Audubon Society, and Tahoma Audubon Society, the Fish and Wildlife Commission would likely not have understood the perilous status of the grouse. Note: I am sorely perplexed by the lack of support for uplisting by Audubon societies and other wildlife groups from east of the Cascades.


            Here's the FWC's statement:
            ...the commission directed WDFW staff to initiate a public process to strengthen the conservation and protection of the Columbian sharp-tailed grouse, which has been classified as a threatened species under state law since 1998. Commission members said they favored elevating the level of protection to endangered, which could increase the likelihood of the species' survival and recovery.
            In the 1800s, the sharp-tailed grouse was the most abundant game bird in eastern Washington, with its highest densities in relatively moist grassland and sagebrush vegetation. But with much of its habitat converted to cropland, and in the wake of major fires in 2015, the population has declined to an estimated total of less than 600 birds.
            In the coming weeks, WDFW will seek public comments on the proposed change within a timetable that will enable the commission to make a final decision later this year.


            May all your birds be identified,

            Denis DeSilvis

            [email protected]

            Whooping Crane (2)Grus americana




              Subject: Arizona Report
              Date: 12 Feb
              From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com 
              I got back late Thursday from a concentrated 4.5 day trip to Arizona chasing some specific target birds. Specifically I was looking for four ABA Life Birds and five more ABA Life photos.
              The Life Birds were Sinaloa Wren, Streak Backed Oriole, Ruddy Ground Dove and Rosy Faced Lovebird. The ABA Photo birds were Louisiana Waterthrush, LeConte's Thrasher, Black Chinned and Baird's Sparrows and Gilded Flicker. I missed the Ruddy Ground Doves completely and had to try twice (and go a long way) for the Waterthrush, Streak Backed Oriole and Sinaloa Wren but eventually I was successful with all the others.
              I had helpful input from Bill Boyington, Todd Sahl and Melissa Hafting and had excellent guide help for a half day from Richard Fray (arizonabirder.com) who I met on the De Anza Trail the first time (unsuccessful) I looked for the Sinaloa Wren. Thank you to all of them. I will be happy to share information gained on this trip with anyone interested. I am not expecting to be back in Arizona for a while as I follow other "needs" but it sure is a fun place to bird. Next stop Texas in April - hoping finally to see a Whooping Crane.

              I have written up some of the details/stories from the trip and included lots of photos on three blog posts. The last (mostly about the Oriole and the Wren) can be found atblairbirding.wordpress.com/2018/02/13/second-efforts-streak-backed-oriole-and-sinaloa-wren/ Other posts are at blairbirding.wordpress.com
              Blair Bernson

              Iceland Gull (2)Larus glaucoides




                Subject: Iceland (Thayer's) Gull
                Date: 27 Jan
                From: byers345 AT comcast.net 
                Hello again,

                A number of people responded to my query about the gull and
                all agreed that it was the Thayer's version of Iceland Gull. New bird for
                me! Thanks to all of you who helped me out.

                Charlotte Byers, Edmonds



                Subject: gull I can't identify
                Date: 27 Jan
                From: baro AT pdx.edu 
                Hi Charlotte-
                Well up til this year it would have been a Thayer's Gull, a nice adult.
                But the &*()&%^&&*(&*()AmericanOrnithologistsUnion lumped it back in with
                Iceland Gull.
                So sad. So wrong.
                So, it's an Iceland (Thayer's) Gull
                Bob OBrien Portland

                On Sat, Jan 27, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Byers wrote:

                > Hello Tweeters,
                >
                > I was down at Edmonds marina today and took this photo of
                > a gull with pink legs, black wing tips, red mark on bill, medium gray
                > mantle. Is this a Glaucous-winged-Western hybrid?
                >
                > https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/26064130178/in/
                > dateposted-public/
                >
                > Thanks, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds
                >
                > _______________________________________________
                > Tweeters mailing list
                > [email protected]
                > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                >
                >

                Red-crowned Parrot (2)Amazona viridigenalis




                  Subject: Red-crowned Parrots
                  Date: 15 Jan
                  From: gm72125 AT bellsouth.net 
                  I doubt this bird is protected by law, since it's not naturally occurring, but I'd check. My own view would be this bird should be rescued. There are plenty of parrot adoption organizations, I think. Ultimately, it will be better for the bird, as it is doomed at your latitude. Red-crowned Parrot is very intelligent, and I kept one and can say they make wonderful pets, but need someone able to devote the necessary time, because they are highly intelligent and it would be cruel to place it in a home without proper care. -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama 

                  On Monday, January 15, 2018 4:32 PM, Hal Michael wrote:


                  Parrots are long-lived birds. Eventually, they will die. That is why determination of the establishment and sustainability of parrots takes so long. An escaped flock could live for decades but never reproduce.

                  Hal Michael
                  Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
                  Olympia WA
                  360-459-4005
                  360-791-7702 (C)
                  [email protected]


                  > On January 15, 2018 at 2:22 PM Dayna yalowicki wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > What is the history of these parrots at Seward Park? And why, if they have survived here for so many years, have they dwindled to only 1 individual? Climate? I know they are invasive, but one poor lonely bird calling seems so sad.
                  >
                  > Dayna Yalowicki
                  > Bothell, Wa
                  >
                  > Buy Free Range
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Tweeters mailing list
                  > [email protected]
                  > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                  _______________________________________________
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                  [email protected]
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                  Subject: Red-crowned Parrots
                  Date: 15 Jan
                  From: ucd880 AT comcast.net 
                  Parrots are long-lived birds.  Eventually, they will die.  That is why determination of the establishment and sustainability of parrots takes so long. An escaped flock could live for decades but never reproduce.

                  Hal Michael
                  Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
                  Olympia WA
                  360-459-4005
                  360-791-7702 (C)
                  [email protected]


                  > On January 15, 2018 at 2:22 PM Dayna yalowicki wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > What is the history of these parrots at Seward Park? And why, if they have survived here for so many years, have they dwindled to only 1 individual? Climate? I know they are invasive, but one poor lonely bird calling seems so sad.
                  >
                  > Dayna Yalowicki
                  > Bothell, Wa
                  >
                  > Buy Free Range
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Tweeters mailing list
                  > [email protected]
                  > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                  _______________________________________________
                  Tweeters mailing list
                  [email protected]
                  http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                  Subject: Red-crowned Parrots
                  Date: 15 Jan
                  From: dlwicki AT comcast.net 
                  What is the history of these parrots at Seward Park? And why, if they have survived here for so many years, have they dwindled to only 1 individual? Climate? I know they are invasive, but one poor lonely bird calling seems so sad.

                  Dayna Yalowicki
                  Bothell, Wa

                  Buy Free Range
                  _______________________________________________
                  Tweeters mailing list
                  [email protected]
                  http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                  Subject: Red-crowned parrot at Seward Park
                  Date: 15 Jan
                  From: cma AT squeakyfiddle.com 
                  The Seward Park parrot colony is down to a single individual now, probably the bird you spotted near the picnic area. 

                  > On Jan 15, 2018, at 8:59 AM, Jill Freidberg wrote:
                  >
                  > There has been a colony of (originally escaped) parrots in Seward Park for years. There are only 2 or 3 left now.
                  >
                  > Jill
                  >
                  >
                  >> On Jan 15, 2018, at 8:54 AM, [email protected] wrote:
                  >>
                  >> Hi, Tweets. There™s a red-crowned parrot calling from the treetops around the parking area near Shelter 3 at Seward Park. 9 am Monday morning. Anyone aware of an escaped bird?
                  >>
                  >> Cheers,
                  >> Whitney N-K_______________________________________________
                  >> Tweeters mailing list
                  >> [email protected]
                  >> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                  >
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Tweeters mailing list
                  > [email protected]
                  > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                  >

                  _______________________________________________
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                  Subject: Red-crowned parrot at Seward Park
                  Date: 15 Jan
                  From: jill.freidberg AT gmail.com 
                  There has been a colony of (originally escaped) parrots in Seward Park for years. There are only 2 or 3 left now. 

                  Jill


                  > On Jan 15, 2018, at 8:54 AM, [email protected] wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi, Tweets. There™s a red-crowned parrot calling from the treetops around the parking area near Shelter 3 at Seward Park. 9 am Monday morning. Anyone aware of an escaped bird?
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  > Whitney N-K_______________________________________________
                  > Tweeters mailing list
                  > [email protected]
                  > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

                  _______________________________________________
                  Tweeters mailing list
                  [email protected]
                  http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                  Subject: Red-crowned parrot at Seward Park
                  Date: 15 Jan
                  From: whitney.n.k AT gmail.com 
                  Hi, Tweets.  There™s a red-crowned parrot calling from the treetops around the parking area near Shelter 3 at Seward Park.  9 am Monday morning.  Anyone aware of an escaped bird?

                  Cheers,
                  Whitney N-K_______________________________________________
                  Tweeters mailing list
                  [email protected]
                  http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

                  Snowy Owl (2)Nyctea scandiaca




                    Subject: Snowy Owl Walla Walla County
                    Date: 18 Feb
                    From: leschwitters AT me.com 
                    > On Feb 17, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Mike & MerryLynn  wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello all,
                    >
                    > Because of so many photographers trespassing on private property the access to the Snowy Owl has been closed. Fish & Wildlife put up signs - no vehicles. So if you want to see a Snowy Owl - head up to Mansfield!
                    >
                    > There are still many Snow Geese at McNary NWR - usually at the east end of Humorist Road - they were trying to fly in the strong wind today - fun to watch.
                    >
                    > Later, M&ML
                    > --
                    > Mike & MerryLynn Denny
                    > Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
                    > "If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > [email protected]
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                    Subject: Snowy Owl Walla Walla County
                    Date: 17 Feb
                    From: m.denny AT charter.net 
                    Hello all,

                    Because of so many photographers trespassing on private property the
                    access to the Snowy Owl has been closed. Fish & Wildlife put up signs -
                    no vehicles. So if you want to see a Snowy Owl - head up to Mansfield!

                    There are still many Snow Geese at McNary NWR - usually at the east end
                    of Humorist Road - they were trying to fly in the strong wind today -
                    fun to watch.

                    Later, M&ML

                    --
                    Mike & MerryLynn Denny
                    Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
                    "If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"



                    Subject: 4 Snowy Owls; Douglas County
                    Date: 12 Feb
                    From: merdave AT homenetnw.net 
                    Winter brings some great birds, if you just wait long enough.  While I was
                    on vacation a friend found one Snowy Owl on H Rd. out of Mansfield.
                    Yesterday two of us found 2 Snowy Owls between 16th and 18th. Today we
                    found FOUR on the west side of H, between 17th and 18th. All could be
                    seen at the same time. One was quite close, but the other 3 were far out;
                    two on the ground; one on a rock. I know there is at least one field trip
                    headed this way, so sure hope they stay around. Lots of Snow Buntings
                    too. Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

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                    Subject: Snohomish Co. Pygmy-Owl
                    Date: 11 Feb
                    From: paul.bannick AT gmail.com 
                    Hi Marv,

                    Its a lucky day whenever we get to witness owls and their behavior. That
                    was a "concealing" behavior. All Owls try to break up the "typical owl
                    shape" when the perceive threat. For nearly all species this involves just
                    what you describe. I have seen this with Elf Owls, Saw-whets, Boreals,
                    Long-eared, Short-eared, Screech Owls, Snowy Owls, and both Northern and
                    Ferruginous Pygmy-Owls and even the Northern Hawk Owls. Owls with
                    "ear-tufts" also involve their tufts. Owls considered "earless/tuftless"
                    such as Pygmy-Owls and Snowy Owls sometimes even manage to show residual
                    tufts. I have seen this behavior in response to potential predators such
                    as Eagles, Hawks and larger owls.

                    Some examples:
                    Snowy Owl Concealment/Cryptic
                    https://paulbannick.photoshelter.com/image?&_bqG=279&_bqH=eJwzCHTTdczyja_MCwtKNq0syA12Co8wNDJ09PK0MjEyMbYyNDAAYSDpGe8S7GybkVierZ1fnqNq5KydXFRZUJKZrOYZHxrsGhTv6WIbClJZ4WvomeuX7pgS5akW7.gcYlucmliUnAEAp8EgWg--&GI_ID=

                    Northern Hawk Owl
                    https://paulbannick.photoshelter.com/image?&_bqG=275&_bqH=eJwzCHTTdczyja_MCwtKNq0syA12Co8wNDJ09PK0MjEyMbYyNDAAYSDpGe8S7GybkVierZ1fnqNq5KydXFRZUJKZrOYZHxrsGhTv6WIbClJZ4WvomeuX7pgS5akW7.gcYlucmliUnAEAp8EgWg--&GI_ID=

                    Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl
                    https://paulbannick.photoshelter.com/image?&_bqG=143&_bqH=eJxzcw4pDYtIKcyy9PfzLg5KS0rOTQ8I8gz39vS0MrUwsjI0MABhIOkZ7xLsbFtQmZ5bqWrkrJ1cVFlQkpms5hkfGuwaFO_pYhsKUlbha.iZ65fumBLlqRbv6BxiW5yaWJScAQB6UiAJ&GI_ID=

                    Short-eared Owl:
                    https://paulbannick.photoshelter.com/image?&_bqG=275&_bqH=eJwzCHTTdczyja_MCwtKNq0syA12Co8wNDJ09PK0MjEyMbYyNDAAYSDpGe8S7GybkVierZ1fnqNq5KydXFRZUJKZrOYZHxrsGhTv6WIbClJZ4WvomeuX7pgS5akW7.gcYlucmliUnAEAp8EgWg--&GI_ID=

                    Northern Pygmy-Owl
                    https://paulbannick.photoshelter.com/image?&_bqG=179&_bqH=eJxzcw4pDYtIKcyy9PfzLg5KS0rOTQ8I8gz39vS0MrUwsjI0MABhIOkZ7xLsbFtQmZ5bqWrkrJ1cVFlQkpms5hkfGuwaFO_pYhsKUlbha.iZ65fumBLlqRbv6BxiW5yaWJScAQB6UiAJ&GI_ID=



                    Paul

                    On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 2:09 PM, Marv Breece wrote:

                    > Yesterday (2.10.18) there was a NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL at the end of 220th St
                    > NE in Snohomish County. This is accessed off of 7th Ave NE off of
                    > Pioneer Hwy E, a short distance west of I5. (SE of Silvana)
                    >
                    >
                    > As I watched this bird it stood straight up and shrunk its body to *a
                    > diameter much smaller than its unshrunken head*. The size of the
                    > shrunken body was a fraction of normal. The bird looked very odd! The
                    > process took but a few seconds, after which the bird immediately returned
                    > to normal dimensions. The bird remained perched in the same place for
                    > several minutes after the shrinking. Unfortunately, I was not filming at
                    > the time. Whether this was concealing or revealing behavior, I cannot
                    > say. I was quite distant from the bird. There could easily have been
                    > another bird which posed a threat that I did not see.
                    >
                    >
                    > If anyone reading this has had a similar experience with a Pygmy-Owl I
                    > would appreciate hearing about it.
                    >
                    >
                    > Photos at: http://www.pbase.com/marvbreece/new_images
                    >
                    > Videos at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
                    >
                    >
                    > Marv Breece
                    > Tukwila, WA
                    > [email protected]
                    >
                    > Concepts shape our world.
                    > Concepts are not hard wired.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Tweeters mailing list
                    > [email protected]
                    > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                    >
                    >


                    --
                    Now Available:
                    Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls at:
                    http://paulbannick.com/shop/owl-a-year-in-the-lives-of-north-american-owls/


                    Paul Bannick Photography
                    www.paulbannick.com
                    206-940-7835



                    Subject: RFI - Sandy Pointe Snowy Owl and Birch Bay
                    Date: 07 Feb
                    From: mcpoodle2 AT comcast.net 
                    A group of us will be up in Birch Bay next weekend and I am wondering if anyone has seen the Snowy Owl that was hanging out at Sandy Point in December?   

                    Chris McNally
                    Lake Stevens, WA

                    Sent from my iPhone
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                    Subject: Snowy Owls?
                    Date: 19 Jan
                    From: vlmoffatt3 AT gmail.com 
                    Happy Friday Tweets

                    Has anyone been to Sandy point lately and know if the snowy is still there?

                    Or any up on the Delta over the border?

                    Thanks I have a friend in town and that was at the top of the list.

                    Victoria
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                    Subject: Dan Whoo?
                    Date: 17 Jan
                    From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net 
                    the Snowy Owl photos for which I just posted a link (with his permission), were taken by Dan Reiff   

                    Barb Deihl
                    [email protected]_______________________________________________
                    Tweeters mailing list
                    [email protected]
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                    Northern Pygmy-Owl (2)Glaucidium gnoma




                      Subject: Snohomish Co. Pygmy-Owl
                      Date: 11 Feb
                      From: marvbreece AT q.com 
                      Yesterday (2.10.18) there was a NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL at the end of 220 th St NE in Snohomish County. This is accessed off of 7 th Ave NE off of Pioneer Hwy E, a short distance west of I5. (SE of Silvana) 




                      As I watched this bird it stood straight up and shrunk its body to a diameter much smaller than its unshrunken head . The size of the shrunken body was a fraction of normal. The bird looked very odd! The process took but a few seconds, after which the bird immediately returned to normal dimensions. The bird remained perched in the same place for several minutes after the shrinking. Unfortunately, I was not filming at the time. Whether this was concealing or revealing behavior, I cannot say. I was quite distant from the bird. There could easily have been another bird which posed a threat that I did not see.




                      If anyone reading this has had a similar experience with a Pygmy-Owl I would appreciate hearing about it.




                      Photos at: http://www.pbase.com/marvbreece/new_images

                      Videos at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/


                      Marv Breece
                      Tukwila, WA
                      [email protected]

                      Concepts shape our world.
                      Concepts are not hard wired.

                      Short-eared Owl (2)Asio flammeus




                        Subject: Eide Road and SEOWs
                        Date: 29 Jan
                        From: pdickins AT gmail.com 
                        The work at Eide seems to have devastated the habitat for Short-eared Owls,
                        eliminating most of the grassy cover good for finding small rodents. There
                        are occasional reports of a single bird, and I had a distant view of one
                        prowling around the shrubs at the far west side. However, you have a better
                        chance of finding one this year up in Skagit in the Fir Island area or
                        north of Hwy. 20 on the Samish Flats between the East 90 and West 90.

                        Phil Dickinson

                        On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 12:15 PM, Glenn Nelson wrote:

                        > Hello Everyone,
                        >
                        > How has the reconfiguration of the Eide Road unit impacted short-eared owl
                        > presence and activity? If they no longer hunt that area, where else are
                        > people going to view them?
                        >
                        > Thanks,
                        > Glenn
                        >
                        > _______________________________________________
                        > Tweeters mailing list
                        > [email protected]
                        > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                        >
                        >



                        Subject: Volunteers needed for Short-eared Owl surveys
                        Date: 17 Jan
                        From: Joseph.Buchanan AT dfw.wa.gov 
                        Volunteer for Short-eared Owl Surveys



                        The Western Asio flammeus Landscape Study (WAfLS) seeks volunteers to help complete an eight-state citizen science project designed to gather information to better evaluate the population status of the Short-eared Owl. The Short-eared Owl has been listed in many western states as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need and recent information indicates a substantial population decline. These surveys are a critical starting point to fill information gaps for this species. Results will inform conservation actions by agencies and partners.



                        Volunteers will enjoy rural western landscapes at twilight while completing one road-based survey during each of two survey windows (1 - 21 March and 22 March - 15 April). The surveys consist of driving on secondary roads in eastern Washington, stopping at 8 to 11 points to complete a five-minute survey. At each point volunteers will record detections of Short-eared Owls as well as some brief habitat information. The entire survey is completed within 90 minutes. Training material will be provided. Participants will need to follow field and data entry protocols, have use of a vehicle, have a GPS (or a smartphone), and be able to identify a Short-eared Owl. Survey locations have been randomly selected by project planners, but actual routes within those locations will be identified by volunteers.



                        Help fill information gaps by signing-up for a survey in Washington (or any of the other participating states: CA, ID, MT, NV, OR, UT, WY)! Visit the project website for more details including the protocol, past year's reports and publications and how to sign-up. For any questions contact your state coordinator. The state coordinator for Washington is Joe Buchanan ([email protected]). We also need participants in Washington to register as volunteers with WDFW at (https://wdfw.wa.gov/about/volunteer/); at this link please click "Register to Volunteer" and you will be at the registration site. Questions about volunteering with WDFW should be directed to Christine Redmond ([email protected]).

                        White Wagtail (2)Motacilla alba




                          Subject: RFI White Wagtail
                          Date: 31 Jan
                          From: t.kleinlebbink AT comcast.net 
                          I looked for it late yesterday afternoon with no luck. 
                          Tina Klein
                          Bellevue, wa

                          > On Jan 30, 2018, at 16:58, Hans-Joachim Feddern wrote:
                          >
                          > Has anybody seen the Falls City White Wagtail today? Thought I may try for it tomorrow.
                          >
                          > Thanks,
                          >
                          > Hans
                          >
                          > --
                          > Hans Feddern
                          > Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
                          > [email protected]
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
                          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                          Subject: RFI White Wagtail
                          Date: 30 Jan
                          From: thefedderns AT gmail.com 
                          Has anybody seen the Falls City White Wagtail today? Thought I may try for
                          it tomorrow.

                          Thanks,

                          Hans

                          --
                          *Hans Feddern*
                          Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
                          [email protected]



                          Subject: Monday Snow Buntings-YES
                          Date: 29 Jan
                          From: alndonna AT wamail.net 
                          Seen about 1pm in the green grassy area west of the Eide Rd parking lot. About 8 birders in the driving rain. My picture of the distant birds is at:
                          http://www.pbase.com/alndonna/image/166934804

                          No trace of the Rusty BB or the White Wagtail on 19th Way near Fall City, between 9am and 10:30am, in the driving rain.

                          Did I mention that it was rainy?

                          Al in Tacoma



                          ---
                          This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
                          https://www.avast.com/antivirus



                          Subject: White Wagtail present at 1pm in the cottonwoods
                          Date: 28 Jan
                          From: louiserutter1000 AT gmail.com 
                          Showed again briefly on mud piles 1.50 then dropped behind.

                          Louise Rutter


                          Sent via the Samsung Galaxy SIII, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

                          -------- Original message --------
                          From: Nathaniel Peters
                          Date:01/28/2018 13:02 (GMT-08:00)
                          To: [email protected]
                          Subject: [Tweeters] White Wagtail present at 1pm in the cottonwoods

                          --
                          -
                          May theFluORescenCEbe with you!
                          -
                          Nathaniel Peters
                          W. M. Keck Microscopy Center Manager
                          University of Washington
                          Dept. of Physiology and BioPhysics / Dept. of Pharmacology
                          [email protected]
                          206-685-8784



                          Subject: White Wagtail present at 1pm in the cottonwoods
                          Date: 28 Jan
                          From: ncpeters AT uw.edu 
                          --
                          -
                          May the* F*lu*OR*escen*CE* be with you!
                          -
                          Nathaniel Peters
                          W. M. Keck Microscopy Center Manager
                          University of Washington
                          Dept. of Physiology and BioPhysics / Dept. of Pharmacology
                          [email protected]
                          206-685-8784



                          Subject: White Wagtail photos
                          Date: 28 Jan
                          From: hibpshman AT hotmail.com 
                          Seen around 1330 hrs on Saturday.


                          https://www.flickr.com/photos/crappywildlifephotography/


                          Rick Hibpshman

                          Issaquah












                          Sent from Outlook



                          Subject: White Wagtail Video
                          Date: 27 Jan
                          From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com 
                          > This video was taken at a great distance in less than ideal conditions and it shows.  However the White Wagtail steals the show.  Be sure to watch the whole video because there is a grand finale.
                          >
                          > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/39938539841/in/dateposted/
                          >
                          > The video was taken from SE 19th Way, Fall City.
                          >
                          > Hank & Karen Heiberg
                          > Lake Joy
                          > NE of Carnation, WA
                          >
                          >
                          > Sent from my iPad

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                          Subject: White Wagtail RFI
                          Date: 26 Jan
                          From: xjoshx AT gmail.com 
                          Gary,
                          The bird was seen several times in close proximity to 19th so that's where
                          I would plan on going. My view this afternoon was pretty poor, but the bird
                          was on the 19th St side of the river, so it would've still been much
                          preferred over the other side of the river.

                          Josh Adams
                          Cathcart, WA (A brief 30 miles downstream from the Wagtail)



                          Subject: White Wagtail RFI
                          Date: 26 Jan
                          From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com 
                          Dear Tweeters,
                          A friend and I are planning to brave the trip from Skagit County to King County tomorrow, to try for the White Wagtail. What would be a good route to take on a Saturday morning? Is there a consensus on 19th versus Neal, as far as a vantage point?
                          Yours truly,
                          Gary Bletsch



                          Subject: White Wagtail Fall City AM
                          Date: 26 Jan
                          From: jperry59 AT frontiernet.net 
                          My wife and I arrived at about 7:00 this morning at Neal Rd. After surveying the situation and early morning bird activity decided it would be best to go over to 19th Way by the dairy farm. Upon arrival at the entrance to the dairy farm (around 7:50 am), we spotted (with binoculars) the White Wagtail in the large deciduous tree in front of the power pole with the Rusty Blackbird. After about 2-3 minutes both birds flew back towards the dairy farm buildings. After a 2 hour wait, the White Wagtail flew back into the tall Deciduous tree by the power pole for only about 2 minutes. Even though it was brief, we were able to get good looks with a scope and Russ Morgan got great photos (see eBird).
                          Bill & Jane Perry



                          Subject: Wagtail photo
                          Date: 26 Jan
                          From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com 
                          > Here is a photo of the White Wagtail taken this morning at 9:45 a.m. from SE 19th Way.
                          >
                          > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/39883333232/in/dateposted/
                          >
                          > Here is a cropped version of the same photo
                          >
                          > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/39883333272/in/photostream/
                          >
                          > Hank Heiberg
                          > Lake Joy
                          > NE of Carnation, WA
                          >
                          > Sent from my iPad



                          Subject: White Wagtail, King Co SE19th way
                          Date: 26 Jan
                          From: bellasoc AT isomedia.com 
                          Hi Tweets



                          I arrived at the farm end of SE 19th Way at about 1:15 (having been told by
                          Anne Marie) that they had seen the White Wagtail there. About 2 minutes or
                          so later the wagtail flew in, by itself from the NW. It landed in one of the
                          tall bare deciduous trees to the right of the driveway. It perched on a
                          couple of limbs for a bit, moved to the right into another tree and to a
                          couple of limbs, and then further to the right to another tree. At this
                          final perch is was more in the open, but after about 10 seconds all the
                          other birds in the tree including the wagtail took off. They flew to the NW
                          across the open field and eventually landed in a large stand of trees and
                          disappeared.



                          The group of folks at the location were happy to have seen the bird, even if
                          only briefly.



                          Good Birding!



                          Brian H. Bell

                          Woodinville WA

                          Mail to bell a s o c a t iso med ia dot com



                          Subject: Wagtail-yes
                          Date: 26 Jan
                          From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com 
                          At 9:45 I photographed the White Wagtail from SE 19th Way which is a dead end road off W. Snoqualmie River Road SE which is west of the river & northwest of Fall City. I drove up and was deciding where to park when two birders from Tumwater spotted the bird in the cottonwood near the transformer. I didn™t have time to park, take my car keys or turn off the headlights. I hopped out of my truck, took the photo and the bird flew. Total elapsed time = 1 minute max. I™ll post the photo when I get home. 

                          Hank Heiberg
                          Lake Joy
                          NE of Carnation, WA

                          Sent from my iPhone
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                          Subject: Re: Wagtail id question
                          Date: 25 Jan
                          From: amk17 AT earthlink.net 
                          Nevermind.  G. Neavoll just explained that they are no longer separate species.  Thanks!


                          -----Original Message-----
                          >From: [email protected]
                          >Sent: Jan 25, 2018 7:12 PM
                          >To: "[email protected]"
                          >Subject: Wagtail id question
                          >
                          >I was fortunate to observe and listen to flight calls of the wagtail today. Thank you Logan Searl!!
                          >
                          >And I took a few really bad photos; however I am having a little trouble convincing myself that this is a white wagtail and not a black-backed. But this is my first wagtail sp and the pics and the descriptions just don't seem to match, fully, a white wagtail.
                          >
                          >It appears to be a first winter (or non-breeding if white wagtail) adult female. In my photos I do not see dark bases below the white median coverts but the bars appear thin. Of interest, Logan pointed out yellow at the base of the bill when viewed through the scope (just visible in some photos). The flight call was clearly a chiswick or a jijik.
                          >
                          >Just wondering if everyone is confident on the id. I'll try to post photos on flicker later and share the link but they are not great. Hopefully others have better photos and videos.
                          >
                          >AKopitov
                          >Seattle, WA
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                          Subject: Wagtail id question
                          Date: 25 Jan
                          From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com 
                          I believe current taxonomy tends to consider Black-backed Wagtail as a
                          subspecies of White Wagtail, so the species (barring arguments about that
                          taxonomic decision) is not in question.

                          As to the subspecies of White Wagtail, this bird has a clear black line from
                          the beak through the eye and back to the gray nape. As such, I think that
                          gives us a choice of Motacilla alba ocularis ("Swinhoe's Wagtail" or "East
                          Siberian Wagtail") or M. a. lugens ("Black-backed Wagtail")

                          The bird in Fall City has pretty clear and obvious wing bars, which tends to
                          point to ocularis. It is also appears completely gray on the back, nape,
                          and crown, which also would point to ocularis. The breast has quite an
                          extensive black bib, which may point more towards lugens.

                          I'd love to see some photos from closer up - scope views are way better than
                          no photos at all, but plumage details are not terribly easy to make out.

                          But I'm leaning towards M. a. ocularis.

                          We'll see what the WBRC decides. Anyone with photos should submit them to
                          the WBRC, or post them to eBird with notes and forward the checklist to the
                          WBRC.

                          Very nice bird!!!


                          == Michael Hobbs
                          == www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
                          == [email protected]



                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: [email protected]
                          Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 7:12 PM
                          To: [email protected]
                          Subject: [Tweeters] Wagtail id question

                          I was fortunate to observe and listen to flight calls of the wagtail today.
                          Thank you Logan Searl!!

                          And I took a few really bad photos; however I am having a little trouble
                          convincing myself that this is a white wagtail and not a black-backed. But
                          this is my first wagtail sp and the pics and the descriptions just don't
                          seem to match, fully, a white wagtail.

                          It appears to be a first winter (or non-breeding if white wagtail) adult
                          female. In my photos I do not see dark bases below the white median coverts
                          but the bars appear thin. Of interest, Logan pointed out yellow at the base
                          of the bill when viewed through the scope (just visible in some photos). The
                          flight call was clearly a chiswick or a jijik.

                          Just wondering if everyone is confident on the id. I'll try to post photos
                          on flicker later and share the link but they are not great. Hopefully
                          others have better photos and videos.

                          AKopitov
                          Seattle, WA
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                          Subject: Wagtail id question
                          Date: 25 Jan
                          From: amk17 AT earthlink.net 
                          I was fortunate to observe and listen to flight calls of the wagtail today.  Thank you Logan Searl!!

                          And I took a few really bad photos; however I am having a little trouble convincing myself that this is a white wagtail and not a black-backed. But this is my first wagtail sp and the pics and the descriptions just don't seem to match, fully, a white wagtail.

                          It appears to be a first winter (or non-breeding if white wagtail) adult female. In my photos I do not see dark bases below the white median coverts but the bars appear thin. Of interest, Logan pointed out yellow at the base of the bill when viewed through the scope (just visible in some photos). The flight call was clearly a chiswick or a jijik.

                          Just wondering if everyone is confident on the id. I'll try to post photos on flicker later and share the link but they are not great. Hopefully others have better photos and videos.

                          AKopitov
                          Seattle, WA
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                          [email protected]
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                          Subject: Wagtail - yes
                          Date: 25 Jan
                          From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com 
                          Just had the White Wagtail near Fall City, seen from near the end of Neal Rd., but the bird was closer to the end of 19th Way. It was pretty far up a deciduous tree, and appeared to be flycatching.
                          - Michael Hobbs


                          Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



                          Subject: White Wagtail Accessibility
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: amw.5737 AT gmail.com 
                          Carol:

                          Congratulations! Isn™t it great to be in the right place at exactly the
                          right time?

                          When I approached the dairy farm, also with the intention of getting
                          permission to enter, I encountered a man leaving in a pickup truck. When I
                          tried to make my request I discovered that he didn™t speak English.

                          Given the layout, the multiple no trespassing signs, no one else in sight,
                          and no obvious office, I turned around and left.

                          Hoping for another opportunity,
                          Ann Marie


                          On Wed, Jan 24, 2018 at 7:40 PM Carol Riddell wrote:

                          > I have added three very poor photos to this eBird checklist. The distance
                          > between the public viewing area on Neal Road, and the tree on the dairy
                          > farm across the Snoqualmie River really strained the limits of my 400 mm
                          > lens. Jordan Roderick™s photos should be much better since he has a longer
                          > lens.
                          >
                          > http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42209787
                          >
                          > I elected not to approach the farm house on the property where the wagtail
                          > was seen. I agree with Jeff Bryant that the bird is most likely on the
                          > ground or a low perch, where it cannot be seen from Neal Road on the east
                          > side of the river. My success with getting access to a bird on farm
                          > properties has been mixed but I have always been treated politely by the
                          > landowner, even when access was denied. That could change if many birders
                          > were to seek access as it could annoy the farm family. That said, perhaps
                          > someone from the BRC with a camera (RM!) might approach the landowners and
                          > try to see if better photos can be obtained for further documentation.
                          > There is a No Trespassing sign just before reaching the house. We were
                          > not sure whether the owners would mean that to apply to a birder seeking
                          > permission to look for the wagtail. For all we know, they might get a kick
                          > out of hosting a rare bird as long as access does not interfere with their
                          > operation.
                          >
                          > Carol Riddell
                          > Edmonds
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                          >



                          Subject: White Wagtail Accessibility
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: cariddellwa AT gmail.com 
                          I have added three very poor photos to this eBird checklist. The distance between the public viewing area on Neal Road, and the tree on the dairy farm across the Snoqualmie River really strained the limits of my 400 mm lens. Jordan Roderick™s photos should be much better since he has a longer lens.

                          http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S42209787

                          I elected not to approach the farm house on the property where the wagtail was seen. I agree with Jeff Bryant that the bird is most likely on the ground or a low perch, where it cannot be seen from Neal Road on the east side of the river. My success with getting access to a bird on farm properties has been mixed but I have always been treated politely by the landowner, even when access was denied. That could change if many birders were to seek access as it could annoy the farm family. That said, perhaps someone from the BRC with a camera (RM!) might approach the landowners and try to see if better photos can be obtained for further documentation. There is a No Trespassing sign just before reaching the house. We were not sure whether the owners would mean that to apply to a birder seeking permission to look for the wagtail. For all we know, they might get a kick out of hosting a rare bird as long as access does not interfere with their operation.

                          Carol Riddell
                          Edmonds



                          Subject: RFI White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: leschwitters AT me.com 
                          Neale Road runs along the Snoqualmie River parallel to Hwy 203. You can get on it just north of Fall City and it dead ends just before it reconnects with 203.  https://www.google.com/search?q=Neale+Road+fall+city&oq=neale+road&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j0j69i57j0l3.9102j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 

                          Larry Schwitters
                          Issaquah
                          > On Jan 24, 2018, at 2:57 PM, Hans-Joachim Feddern wrote:
                          >
                          > This may be a silly question, but where is Neale Road? Could somebody please post some directions? Just the town to go with it, so one could google it?
                          >
                          > Thanks!
                          >
                          > Hans
                          >
                          > On Wed, Jan 24, 2018 at 2:36 PM, Larry Schwitters > wrote:
                          > We gave it a half-hearted effort. It will probably not come easy. If you go, .5 mile after you first turn onto Neale Road check out the small dried up berry bush beside the road on the right to see if a White-throated Sparrow has returned.
                          >
                          > Larry Schwitters
                          >
                          > Issaquah
                          >> On Jan 24, 2018, at 1:18 PM, birdmarymoor > wrote:
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> Anyone having success or updates on the wagtail?
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
                          >>
                          >> -------- Original message --------
                          >> From: Jordan Roderick >
                          >> Date: 1/24/18 11:29 AM (GMT-08:00)
                          >> To: [email protected]
                          >> Subject: [Tweeters] White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          >>
                          >> While scanning for the rusty blackbird in IRS usual tree on Neale Road (it™s still here). A white wagtail flew in to the same tree! Observed at 10;30 in scope by four birders. Amazing!
                          >>
                          >> Sent from my iPhone
                          >> _______________________________________________
                          >> Tweeters mailing list
                          >> [email protected]
                          >> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                          >> _______________________________________________
                          >> Tweeters mailing list
                          >> [email protected]
                          >> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                          >
                          >
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
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                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --
                          > Hans Feddern
                          > Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
                          > [email protected]



                          Subject: RFI White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: thefedderns AT gmail.com 
                          This may be a silly question, but where is Neale Road? Could somebody
                          please post some directions? Just the town to go with it, so one could
                          google it?

                          Thanks!

                          Hans

                          On Wed, Jan 24, 2018 at 2:36 PM, Larry Schwitters
                          wrote:

                          > We gave it a half-hearted effort. It will probably not come easy. If you
                          > go, .5 mile after you first turn onto Neale Road check out the small dried
                          > up berry bush beside the road on the right to see if a White-throated
                          > Sparrow has returned.
                          >
                          > Larry Schwitters
                          >
                          > Issaquah
                          >
                          > On Jan 24, 2018, at 1:18 PM, birdmarymoor wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > Anyone having success or updates on the wagtail?
                          >
                          >
                          > Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
                          >
                          > -------- Original message --------
                          > From: Jordan Roderick
                          > Date: 1/24/18 11:29 AM (GMT-08:00)
                          > To: [email protected]
                          > Subject: [Tweeters] White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          >
                          > While scanning for the rusty blackbird in IRS usual tree on Neale Road
                          > (it™s still here). A white wagtail flew in to the same tree! Observed at
                          > 10;30 in scope by four birders. Amazing!
                          >
                          > Sent from my iPhone
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
                          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
                          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
                          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                          >
                          >


                          --
                          *Hans Feddern*
                          Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
                          [email protected]



                          Subject: RFI White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: leschwitters AT me.com 
                          We gave it a half-hearted effort. It will probably not come easy. If you go, .5 mile after you first turn onto Neale Road check out the small dried up berry bush beside the road on the right to see if a White-throated Sparrow has returned.

                          Larry Schwitters

                          Issaquah
                          > On Jan 24, 2018, at 1:18 PM, birdmarymoor wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > Anyone having success or updates on the wagtail?
                          >
                          >
                          > Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
                          >
                          > -------- Original message --------
                          > From: Jordan Roderick
                          > Date: 1/24/18 11:29 AM (GMT-08:00)
                          > To: [email protected]
                          > Subject: [Tweeters] White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          >
                          > While scanning for the rusty blackbird in IRS usual tree on Neale Road (it™s still here). A white wagtail flew in to the same tree! Observed at 10;30 in scope by four birders. Amazing!
                          >
                          > Sent from my iPhone
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
                          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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                          Subject: RFI White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: josh.n.glant AT gmail.com 
                          Rusty Blackbird in the cottonwood! Wagtail still absent

                          Joshua

                          Sent from my iPhone

                          > On Jan 24, 2018, at 1:22 PM, Joshua Glant wrote:
                          >
                          > Lack of. Even the blackbirds are a mile away
                          >
                          > Joshua Glant
                          >
                          > Sent from my iPhone
                          >
                          >> On Jan 24, 2018, at 1:18 PM, birdmarymoor wrote:
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> Anyone having success or updates on the wagtail?
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
                          >>
                          >> -------- Original message --------
                          >> From: Jordan Roderick
                          >> Date: 1/24/18 11:29 AM (GMT-08:00)
                          >> To: [email protected]
                          >> Subject: [Tweeters] White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          >>
                          >> While scanning for the rusty blackbird in IRS usual tree on Neale Road (it™s still here). A white wagtail flew in to the same tree! Observed at 10;30 in scope by four birders. Amazing!
                          >>
                          >> Sent from my iPhone
                          >> _______________________________________________
                          >> Tweeters mailing list
                          >> [email protected]
                          >> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                          >> _______________________________________________
                          >> Tweeters mailing list
                          >> [email protected]
                          >> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                          Subject: White Wagtail chase-ability
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: jbryant_68 AT yahoo.com 
                          Wagtail, like the stackbird flock, presumably spends most of its time on ground in the farm across the river from the dead end of Neal Rd.   It was sheer luck that I saw it fly up to the tall trees long enough to get scopes on it before it disappeared.  When I left, Carol Riddell was going into the farm at the dead end of 19th Place to see about access.  Maybe she™ll have good news.

                          Jeff Bryant
                          Seattle
                          Jbryant_68 AT Yahoo


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                          Subject: RFI White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: josh.n.glant AT gmail.com 
                          Lack of. Even the blackbirds are a mile away 

                          Joshua Glant

                          Sent from my iPhone

                          > On Jan 24, 2018, at 1:18 PM, birdmarymoor wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > Anyone having success or updates on the wagtail?
                          >
                          >
                          > Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
                          >
                          > -------- Original message --------
                          > From: Jordan Roderick
                          > Date: 1/24/18 11:29 AM (GMT-08:00)
                          > To: [email protected]
                          > Subject: [Tweeters] White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          >
                          > While scanning for the rusty blackbird in IRS usual tree on Neale Road (it™s still here). A white wagtail flew in to the same tree! Observed at 10;30 in scope by four birders. Amazing!
                          >
                          > Sent from my iPhone
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
                          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Tweeters mailing list
                          > [email protected]
                          > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters



                          Subject: RFI White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com 
                          Anyone having success or updates on the wagtail?

                          Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
                          -------- Original message --------From: Jordan Roderick Date: 1/24/18 11:29 AM (GMT-08:00) To: [email protected] Subject: [Tweeters] White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          While scanning for the rusty blackbird in IRS usual tree on Neale Road (it™s still here). A white wagtail flew in to the same tree! Observed at 10;30 in scope by four birders. Amazing!

                          Sent from my iPhone
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                          Subject: Fall city wagtail
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net 
                          HI Jeffrey et al.:
                          I have found this article of use for IDing White Wagtail subspecies:

                          https://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/archive/V29/29(3)%20p0180-p0198.pdf

                          sincerely
                          --

                          Ian Paulsen
                          Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
                          Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
                          https://birdbookerreport.blogspot.com/
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                          Subject: White wagtail on Neale Rd
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: jordan AT roderick.com 
                          While scanning for the rusty blackbird in IRS usual tree on Neale Road (it™s still here). A white wagtail flew in to the same tree!  Observed at 10;30 in scope by four birders.  Amazing!

                          Sent from my iPhone
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                          Subject: Fall city wagtail
                          Date: 24 Jan
                          From: jbryant_68 AT yahoo.com 
                          In tree with rusty blackbird.  So far presumed WHITE WAGTAIL

                          Sent from my iPhone
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                          White-winged Crossbill (2)Loxia leucoptera




                            Subject: White-winged crossbills update
                            Date: 15 Jan
                            From: pdickins AT gmail.com 
                            Just flew a bit further down the dike but still in area

                            Phil Dickinson

                            Sent from my iPhone
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                            Subject: White-winged Crossbills Snohomish
                            Date: 15 Jan
                            From: pdickins AT gmail.com 
                            4 White-winged Crossbills now at Fobes Rd. Dike near Snohomish. Alder along slough only a few yards south of entrance to dike

                            Phil Deickinson

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