Birding News
ABA's Birding News >> Alberta

Alberta bird news by date

Updated on July 21, 2017, 11:15 am

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


21 Jul: @ 11:13:34 
Re: Off topic - Bobcat [Jill Bhar jill.bhar@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
21 Jul: @ 09:53:18 
RE: Off topic - Bobcat ['Ann' richardann@nucleus.com [Albertabird]]
21 Jul: @ 00:16:36 
Re: Off topic - Bobcat ['Joy and Cam' joyandcamfinlay@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
20 Jul: @ 22:37:58 
Off topic - Bobcat [2 Attachments] [BARB COOTE brc2004@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
17 Jul: @ 20:45:43 
Re: Peeps [ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
17 Jul: @ 20:12:44 
Re: Peeps [Gerald Romanchuk geraldjr@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
17 Jul: @ 20:06:17 
RE: Peeps ['Miles Tindal' mtindal@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
17 Jul: @ 19:54:11 
Re: Peeps [Caroline Lambert caroline144@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
17 Jul: @ 17:03:31 
RE: Peeps ['Miles Tindal' mtindal@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
16 Jul: @ 18:16:31 
Peeps [ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
16 Jul: @ 16:41:35 
Re: Re: Cattle Egret? ['Mike Mulligan' potoo@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
16 Jul: @ 15:15:01 
To Waterton Lakes NP and back (2017 June 14 / June 28) [M A dudra.m@sasktel.net [Albertabird]]
16 Jul: @ 15:12:51 
Waterton - Pincher Creek - Waterton (2017 June 20) [M A dudra.m@sasktel.net [Albertabird]]
16 Jul: @ 15:12:46 
Waterton Lakes National Park (2017 June 14-28) [M A dudra.m@sasktel.net [Albertabird]]
16 Jul: @ 14:38:29 
Re: Cattle Egret? [mtsveen@yahoo.com [Albertabird]]
15 Jul: @ 23:11:30 
Cattle Egret? ['Gus - CCNA' gyaki@calcna.ab.ca [Albertabird]]
11 Jul: @ 13:40:36 
Great - Crested Flycatcher ['Robert Storms' storms@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
11 Jul: @ 09:45:58 
Nature Calgary Waterton weekend (July 7-9 2017) [2 Attachments] [Andrew Hart andrewhart@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 17:14:06 
Re: Sparrow ID [RAINER EBEL graejay@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 17:11:35 
Arctic Tern [2 Attachments] [ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 17:11:35 
Re: Sparrow ID ['ronakube@telusplanet.net' ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 16:52:02 
Re: Sparrow ID [Caroline Lambert caroline144@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 13:56:44 
Sparrow ID [2 Attachments] [ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 13:11:47 
Re: Shorebird ID ['ronakube@telusplanet.net' ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 08:47:11 
Re: Shorebird ID [Caroline Lambert caroline144@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
10 Jul: @ 01:17:43 
Shorebird ID [2 Attachments] [ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
08 Jul: @ 17:38:31 
Nature Calgary Birding North Glenmore Park, SW Calgary. 0900-1130 am. Sat. July 8/17 [Janet Gill gillannjanet@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
07 Jul: @ 12:25:24 
2017 AOS Supplement [David Scott drscott1908@yahoo.com [Albertabird]]
07 Jul: @ 10:13:54 
NEW Bird Identification Workshop! [Derek@birdvancouver.com [Albertabird]]
04 Jul: @ 10:05:32 
Band-tailed Pigeon continues [1 Attachment] [James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
03 Jul: @ 22:39:34 
Re: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary [wbird7@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
03 Jul: @ 11:53:38 
Re: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary [1 Attachment] [mtsveen@yahoo.com [Albertabird]]
03 Jul: @ 08:31:27 
Re: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary [mtsveen@yahoo.com [Albertabird]]
02 Jul: @ 21:27:28 
Re: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary ['Mike Mulligan' potoo@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
02 Jul: @ 13:04:20 
Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary [russumd@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]]
01 Jul: @ 15:16:33 
Loon at Carburn Park [Andrew Hart andrewhart@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
27 Jun: @ 13:03:11 
An unusual concentration of Swainson's Hawks [9 Attachments] [dolman@uleth.ca [Albertabird]]
25 Jun: @ 21:12:14 
FFCPPSoc. Fish Creek PP-Burnsmead, Calgary. Jun 25, 2017 ['David Mitchell' davidamitchell@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
25 Jun: @ 19:53:53 
FFCPPSoc Birding Burnsmead, FCPP, Calgary. 1:15-4:PM Sunday, June 25/17 [Janet Gill gillannjanet@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
24 Jun: @ 21:24:51 
Nature Calgary field trip to Brown-Lowery PP. 24 June, 2017 [Andrew Hart andrewhart@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
24 Jun: @ 14:31:31 
FFCPPSOC Fish Creek PP--Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA Jun 24, 2017 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM ['David Mitchell' davidamitchell@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
24 Jun: @ 12:54:41 
Fw: [New post] Happening NOW: Dickcissels on the Move ['Mike Mulligan' potoo@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
23 Jun: @ 17:45:46 
Re: Finch ID question [Sandra Savage savagebirder@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
23 Jun: @ 17:36:13 
Finch ID question [2 Attachments] [Andrew Hart andrewhart@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
23 Jun: @ 15:37:28 
Cameras, lenses and spotting scope for sale [rklauke@mcsnet.ca [Albertabird]]
22 Jun: @ 14:25:52 
FFCPPSOC Fish Creek PP--Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA Jun 22, 2017 ['David Mitchell' davidamitchell@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
22 Jun: @ 08:20:11 
Nature Calgary - Lafarge Meadows - FCPP - Tuesday June 20 [melaniesene@gmail.com [Albertabird]]
21 Jun: @ 16:37:18 
FFCPP Society Fish Creek PP--The Ranch and Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA 21-Jun-2017 ['David Mitchell' davidamitchell@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
21 Jun: @ 16:18:44 
white(mostly) empidonax flycatcher ['Robert Storms' storms@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]
21 Jun: @ 12:24:00 
Richard Fyfe [Nora and Ian Halladay nihalladay@shaw.ca [Albertabird]]





Subject: Re: Off topic - Bobcat
Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 11:13 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Great story and photos, Barb. In answer to your question, I would think this is a matter for Fish and Wildlife.

Jill Bhar
High .River
Sent from my iPad

------------------------------------
Posted by: Jill Bhar
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: Off topic - Bobcat
Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 9:53 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Barb,  I agree wonderful shots but if this animal injures anyone it will be killed,   she is only doing what she needs to do to keep her young safe but she is in the wrong place,   my suggestion would be to phone the Animal protection unit and let them try and move these animals to a safer place for both them and surrounding people.    You would never forgive yourself if a child got injured or worse and all the animals we put down.     Ann Clarke



From: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Albertabird@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 11:16 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Albertabird] Off topic - Bobcat





Barb

Wonderful shots of such a very uncommon sight, particularly in Calgary. Hope they survive!

Cam Finlay, now of Victoria but formerly from Alberta (mainly Edmonton, but often in Calgary and parts in between).



From: BARB COOTE brc2004@shaw.ca [Albertabird]

Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 8:37 PM

To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com

Subject: [Albertabird] Off topic - Bobcat [2 Attachments]





I'm not sure who to approach about a family of Bobcats near my house. I finally found them today and the mother is quite scary. She would have attacked me I'm sure if I'd gotten any closer to her young. They were out and about about half an hour before these photos. Her young are under the patio next door to where I was tonight. I've been searching for her since early May.

I am worried since there are apparently 5 young. I'm going back earlier tomorrow night to see the young. Also, if I had approached her any closer tonight I am absolutely certain she would have attacked me. Should this family of Bobcats be allowed to stay in Calgary. This is a condo development near Market Mall. I'm hoping someone can advise. Thanks.

Barb Coote.

Varsity Village

Calgary.



Subject: Off topic - Bobcat
Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 0:16 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Barb
Wonderful shots of such a very uncommon sight, particularly in Calgary. Hope they survive!
Cam Finlay, now of Victoria but formerly from Alberta (mainly Edmonton, but often in Calgary and parts in between).

From: BARB COOTE brc2004@shaw.ca [Albertabird]
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 8:37 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Albertabird] Off topic - Bobcat [2 Attachments]



I'm not sure who to approach about a family of Bobcats near my house. I finally found them today and the mother is quite scary. She would have attacked me I'm sure if I'd gotten any closer to her young. They were out and about about half an hour before these photos. Her young are under the patio next door to where I was tonight. I've been searching for her since early May.
I am worried since there are apparently 5 young. I'm going back earlier tomorrow night to see the young. Also, if I had approached her any closer tonight I am absolutely certain she would have attacked me. Should this family of Bobcats be allowed to stay in Calgary. This is a condo development near Market Mall. I'm hoping someone can advise. Thanks.
Barb Coote.
Varsity Village
Calgary.



Subject:
Date: Thu Jul 20 2017 22:37 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I'm not sure who to approach about a family of Bobcats near my house.  I finally found them today and the mother is quite scary.  She would have attacked me I'm sure if I'd gotten any closer to her young.  They were out and about about half an hour before these photos. Her young are under the patio next door to where I was tonight.  I've been searching for her since early May.
I am worried since there are apparently 5 young. I'm going back earlier tomorrow night to see the young. Also, if I had approached her any closer tonight I am absolutely certain she would have attacked me. Should this family of Bobcats be allowed to stay in Calgary. This is a condo development near Market Mall. I'm hoping someone can advise. Thanks.
Barb Coote.
Varsity Village
Calgary.

>



Subject: Peeps
Date: Mon Jul 17 2017 20:45 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks everyone, Baird's is a first sighting for the year.
Ron Kube
Calgary



Subject: Peeps
Date: Mon Jul 17 2017 20:12 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I'd go with Baird's too. Like you've mentioned the long primary projection and bill shape look good for that species.
Both birds look like actively molting adults. You can see the contrast of worn, faded feathers with the darker, fresher ones coming in.

Gerald RomanchukEdmonton
On Jul 17, 2017, at 7:06 PM, 'Miles Tindal' mtindal@shaw.ca [Albertabird] <Albertabird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
























Caroline, looking more closely, I think you™re right with the Baird™s “ the wingtips seem to project beyond the tail, which would be consistent with Baird™s.Miles TindalFrom: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Albertabird@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 6:54 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Albertabird] Peeps The yellow legged one is a Least Sandpiper, but I am puzzled by the dark legged one. To me it seems the bill is a little too pointed, a little too long, and not quite straight enough for Semipalmated. Also, the wings look very long, and there's not much contrast in the face. Those features would point to a Baird's, but, despite no size reference, the bird seems too small for Baird's. I also think of a Baird's as being more bulky - more barrel-chested. I don't know what to make of the frayed and worn plumage.Any other thoughts on this?Caroline Lambert
CanmoreOn 7/17/17 4:01 PM, 'Miles Tindal' mtindal@shaw.ca [Albertabird] wrote: Hi Ron,I believe your dark legged bird is a juvenile semipalmated sandpiper, and your yellow legged bird is an adult least sandpiper.Miles TindalCanmore.From: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Albertabird@yahoogroup s.com]
Sent: Sunday, July 16, 2017 4:55 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Albertabird] Peeps Hi everyone, here's a couple of small shorebirds seen south of Lomond, AB on July 15. One with dark legs and one with greenish/yellow legs. Any help to ID them would be appreciated. Thanks
Ron Kube
Calgary





















__._,_.___







Posted by: Gerald Romanchuk <geraldjr@telusplanet.net>









_____________________________________________________________


* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com

* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...






Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Peeps
Date: Mon Jul 17 2017 20:06 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Caroline, looking more closely, I think you™re right with the Baird™s “ the wingtips seem to project beyond the tail, which would be consistent with Baird™s.
Miles Tindal
From: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Albertabird@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 6:54 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Albertabird] Peeps

The yellow legged one is a Least Sandpiper, but I am puzzled by the dark legged one. To me it seems the bill is a little too pointed, a little too long, and not quite straight enough for Semipalmated. Also, the wings look very long, and there's not much contrast in the face. Those features would point to a Baird's, but, despite no size reference, the bird seems too small for Baird's. I also think of a Baird's as being more bulky - more barrel-chested. I don't know what to make of the frayed and worn plumage.
Any other thoughts on this?
Caroline Lambert
Canmore
On 7/17/17 4:01 PM, 'Miles Tindal' mtindal@shaw.ca [Albertabird] wrote:

Hi Ron,

I believe your dark legged bird is a juvenile semipalmated sandpiper, and your yellow legged bird is an adult least sandpiper.

Miles Tindal
Canmore.

From: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Albertabird@yahoogroup s.com]
Sent: Sunday, July 16, 2017 4:55 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Albertabird] Peeps


Hi everyone, here's a couple of small shorebirds seen south of Lomond, AB on July 15. One with dark legs and one with greenish/yellow legs. Any help to ID them would be appreciated. Thanks
Ron Kube
Calgary










__._,_.___







Posted by: "Miles Tindal" <mtindal@shaw.ca>









_____________________________________________________________


* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com

* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...






Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Peeps
Date: Mon Jul 17 2017 19:54 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The yellow legged one is a Least Sandpiper, but I am puzzled by the dark
legged one. To me it seems the bill is a little too pointed, a little
too long, and not quite straight enough for Semipalmated. Also, the
wings look very long, and there's not much contrast in the face. Those
features would point to a Baird's, but, despite no size reference, the
bird seems too small for Baird's. I also think of a Baird's as being
more bulky - more barrel-chested. I don't know what to make of the
frayed and worn plumage.

Any other thoughts on this?

Caroline Lambert
Canmore

On 7/17/17 4:01 PM, 'Miles Tindal' mtindal@shaw.ca [Albertabird] wrote:
>
> Hi Ron,
>
> I believe your dark legged bird is a juvenile semipalmated sandpiper,
> and your yellow legged bird is an adult least sandpiper.
>
> Miles Tindal
>
> Canmore.
>
> *From:*Albertabird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Albertabird@yahoogroup s.com]
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 16, 2017 4:55 PM
> *To:* Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
> *Subject:* [Albertabird] Peeps
>
> Hi everyone, here's a couple of small shorebirds seen south of Lomond,
> AB on July 15. One with dark legs and one with greenish/yellow legs.
> Any help to ID them would be appreciated. Thanks
> Ron Kube
> Calgary
>
>



Subject: Peeps
Date: Mon Jul 17 2017 17:03 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Ron,
I believe your dark legged bird is a juvenile semipalmated sandpiper, and your yellow legged bird is an adult least sandpiper.
Miles Tindal
Canmore.
From: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Albertabird@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, July 16, 2017 4:55 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Albertabird] Peeps

Hi everyone, here's a couple of small shorebirds seen south of Lomond, AB on July 15. One with dark legs and one with greenish/yellow legs. Any help to ID them would be appreciated. Thanks
Ron Kube
Calgary










__._,_.___







Posted by: "Miles Tindal" <mtindal@shaw.ca>









_____________________________________________________________


* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com

* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...






Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Peeps
Date: Sun Jul 16 2017 18:16 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi everyone, here's a couple of small shorebirds seen south of Lomond, AB on July 15. One with dark legs and one with greenish/yellow legs. Any help to ID them would be appreciated. Thanks
Ron Kube
Calgary



Subject: Re: Cattle Egret?
Date: Sun Jul 16 2017 16:41 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thank you for checking out this report so promptly, Michael.

Mike Mulligan
Calgary



From: mtsveen@yahoo.com [Albertabird]
Sent: Sunday, July 16, 2017 1:38 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Albertabird] Re: Cattle Egret?



Marcie Plishka and I investigated the potential cattle egret this morning (July 16). We were unable to find any egrets.


We started at Ralph Klein Park at 8:45 am. Scoping from the top of the interpretative center did not turn up any egrets, only two great blue herons among other things. Strangely, a banded homing pigeon was perched on the center.


The directions might have implied the egret was outside the park on a nearby waterbody. We investigated a wetland to the northeast of Ralph Klein Park that intersects 114 ave SE without any luck.


Finally, we tried the waterbody to the west of the park at the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway. No luck on egrets, but there was a HARLEQUIN DUCK sitting on the orange boom. There were also a number of shorebird species. That ebird checklist is here:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...



Based on the previous description, it is difficult to say where the egret was spotted. Hopefully someone is able to track it down.


Good birding,
Michael Sveen
Calgary



Subject: To Waterton Lakes NP and back (2017 June 14 / June 28)
Date: Sun Jul 16 2017 15:15 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
On 2017 June 14, we left Swift Current at 8:30AM, heading west to
Waterton Lakes National Park. It was a nice morning for a drive.

The TransCanada Highway, from the Saskatchewan/ Alberta border (10:15AM)
to Dunmore, we saw: 4 Swainson's Hawks, white gulls, 4 Western
Kingbirds, 2 Eastern Kingbirds, 5 American Crows, Red-winged Blackbirds,
Western Meadowlarks, Brewer's Blackbirds, & Brown-headed Cowbirds.

We took the short cut at Dunmore, west to Hwy #3, along the Township
Road #120 and saw: a few puddle ducks, a few Ring-billed Gulls, 2
Mourning Doves, 1 Northern "Yellow-shafted" Flicker, 1 Black-billed
Magpie, 2American Crows, American Robins, Red-winged Blackbirds,
Western Meadowlarks,& Common Grackles.

From the junction of Township Road #120 & Hwy #3 to Lethbridge, we saw:
**a few Ducks, a flock of 3 American White Pelicans, 2 Double-crested
Cormorants, 2 Northern Harriers, 3 Swainson's Hawks, Franklin's Gulls,
white gulls, Rock Pigeons,**1 Mourning Dove,**4 American Crows, Barn
Swallows, American Robins, Vesper Sparrows, Red-winged Blackbirds,
Western Meadowlarks, Yellow-headed Blackbirds, Common Grackles,
Brown-headed Cowbirds, House Sparrows, & several Richardson's Ground
Squirrels*.*

Within Lethbridge (as we drove along the east edge of Lethbridge: 43rd
St S to 24th Ave S to Mayor Magrath Dr S and south out to Hwy #5) we
saw: a few puddle ducks, 1 Swainson's Hawk, Rock Pigeons, Red-winged
Blackbirds, and Common Grackles.

As we drove along Hwy #5 from Lethbridge (1:00PM) to Cardston, we saw:
**puddle ducks (including Mallards, Northern Shovelers), 1 Northern
Harrier, 4 Swainson's Hawks, 1 Killdeer, 1 Marbled Godwit, Franklin's
Gulls, white gulls, Rock Pigeons, 3 Black-billed Magpies, 1 American
Crow,American Robins, European Starlings, Red-winged Blackbirds,
Brown-headed Cowbirds, 3 Pronghorn, and a few Richardson's Ground Squirrels.

Within Cardston, we saw: Rock Pigeons, 2 Black-billed Magpies, and 1
American Crow.

Hwy #5 from Cardston to Waterton, we saw:**ducks (including Mallards),
American Coots, a few white gulls, Eastern Kingbirds, Cliff Swallows,
Red-winged Blackbirds, Western Meadowlarks, Yellow-headed Blackbirds,
LBJ's (little brown jobbies), and several Richardson's Ground
Squirrels. We arrived at the Waterton Park Entrance at 2:30PM.

------- ------- -------

After spending 14 nights in Waterton, we returned home on June 28. We
left Waterton Lakes National Park at 8:36AM.

From Waterton to Cardston along Hwy #5, we saw: Ducks (including
Mallards), 1 Northern Harrier, 4 Swainson's Hawks, 2 Red-tailed Hawks,
white Gulls, 6 Black-billed Magpies, 1 American Crow, Cliff Swallows, 1
American Robin, Red-winged Blackbirds, Brown-headed Cowbirds, LBJ's, and
several Richardson's Ground Squirrels.

Within Cardston, we saw: 1 Swainson's Hawk, Rock Pigeons, 2
Black-billed Magpies, 1 American Crow, and 3 American Robins.

Hwy 5 from Cardston to the Hwy #52 junction, we saw: Mallards, 1 Great
Blue Heron in flight, 1 Swainson's Hawk, white gulls, 1 Black-billed
Magpie, 1 American Crow, Cliff Swallows, Red-winged Blackbirds,
Brown-headed Cowbirds, LBJ's, and 1 Coyote.

We decided to take a new route to Hwy #3 so turned off at Junction #52.
It is nice to take a different road sometimes. Heading east along Hwy
#52 to Raymond, we saw: 3 Mourning Doves, 2 Barn Swallows, Red-winged
Blackbirds, Brown-headed Cowbirds, and a few Richardson's Ground Squirrels.

At Raymond, we headed north along Hwy #845 to Coaldale. Along this route
we saw: puddle ducks, 1 Red-tailed Hawk, American Coots, 2 American
Crows, 1 American Robin, a flock of 23 European Starlings, Red-winged
Blackbirds, Western Meadowlarks, Brown-headed Cowbirds, and a few
Richardson's Ground Squirrels.

Along Hwy #3 from Coaldaleto the Township Road #120 Junction south of
Medicine Hat, we saw: Ducks, 1 Double-crested Cormorant, 2 Swainson's
Hawks, 1 Ferruginous Hawk, an unidentified hawk on a nest, 1 Killdeer,
Franklin's Gulls, white gulls, Rock Pigeons, 1 Mourning Dove, Western
Kingbirds, 1 Black-billed Magpie,**European Starlings, Red-winged
Blackbirds, Western Meadowlarks,**Brown-headed Cowbirds, House Sparrows,
& 1 White-tailed Deer.

Along Township Road #120 east to Dunmore, we saw: 1 Red-tailed Hawk, 2
Black-billed Magpies, Barn Swallows,6 American Robins, Red-winged
Blackbirds, Brown-headed Cowbirds, & Common Grackles.

TransCanada Hwy from Dunmore to the Saskatchewan/Alberta border
(12:50PM) we saw: a few ducks, 1 Willet, 1 Black-billed Magpie, 4
American Crows, Barn Swallows, Red-winged Blackbirds,**& Brown-headed
Cowbirds.

We clocked 2348 kilometres driving in the 15 days we were gone and 51
hours spent in the truck.

For those who may be interested to hear about what we saw in our travels
from Swift Current to the Saskatchewan/ Alberta border, I have posted
our Saskatchewan sightings for the trip on Sask Birds.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...

Happy Birding,

- Mary Ann and Larry, Swift Current, SK
50? 17' 00" N - 107? 48' 00" W



Subject: Waterton - Pincher Creek - Waterton (2017 June 20)
Date: Sun Jul 16 2017 15:12 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
We made a quick trip to Pincher Creek and back the afternoon of 2017
June 20. We left Waterton at 2:15PM and were back by 4:15PM.

Waterton to Pincher Creek along Hwy #6 we saw:

Ducks (including Mallards)
1 Red-tailed Hawk*
*American Coots
2 Western Kingbirds
**5 Black-billed Magpies, 2 American Crows, 1 Common Raven*
***Cliff Swallows*
***2 American Robins*
***Red-winged Blackbirds, Yellow-headed Blackbirds, Brown-headed Cowbirds

Within Pincher Creek the short time we were there, we saw: Rock Pigeons,
American Robins, European Starlings, and House Sparrows.

On the return trip from Pincher Creek to Waterton along Hwy #6, we saw:

Ducks (including Mallards)
2 Swainson's Hawks, 1 Red-tailed Hawk
American Coots
1 Eastern Kingbird
6 Black-billed Magpies, 2 American Crows, 1 Common Raven
Cliff Swallows
Red-winged Blackbirds, Brown-headed Cowbirds

4 Mule Deer (a single and a herd of 3)
1 Elk cow


- Mary Ann and Larry, Swift Current, SK
50? 17' 00" N - 107? 48' 00" W



Subject: Waterton Lakes National Park (2017 June 14-28)
Date: Sun Jul 16 2017 15:12 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
We arrived in Waterton Lakes National Park 2017 June 14 at 2:30PM ...
and were there for 14 nights. We left Waterton June 28 at 8:36AM and
headed for home. It is always great to return to our favourite place.
We had a mix of weather... some cool, some just nice, one day was hot, a
few days with showers, most days were windy (sometimes it didn't start
out that way but ended up with wind part way through the day), but
nothing unexpected. It was all good. We saw and/or heard and
identified a respectable number of bird (85), mammal (14) species as
well as some unidentified species (gulls, warblers, voles, mouse, frogs,
fish):

Canada Geese, Gadwalls, 6 Trumpeter Swans, Mallards, Ring-necked Ducks,
Lesser Scaups, Common Goldeneyes, Common Mergansers
at least 4 Common Loons
1 Double-crested Cormorant
at least 1 or 2 Osprey, 1 Bald Eagle adult, a few sightings of at least
2 Northern Harriers (males), 1 Sharp-shinned Hawk (at Belly River
campground), 1 Swainson's Hawk, 4 Red-tailed Hawks, 1 Merlin
Sora (heard only - at the Entrance Pond)
2 Sandhill Cranes (a pair of adults in the Maskinonge)
1 Killdeer (Bison Paddock)
1 Spotted Sandpiper
Wilson's Snipes (heard only)
Franklin's Gulls, Ring-billed Gulls, white gull species flying, Black Terns
Great Horned Owl (heard only from Townsite Campground one early morning
hour)
Calliope Hummingbirds (in a couple different locations)
at least 2 Belted Kingfishers (1 female at the Maskinonge area and 1
male at the Entrance Pond)
Red-naped Sapsuckers, Downy Woodpeckers, Northern Flickers, Pileated
Woodpecker (heard only)
Western Wood-Pewee (heard only), Willow Flycatchers (heard and
observed), Least Flycatchers (heard and observed), Eastern Kingbirds
Warbling Vireos
Gray Jays (Akamina Parkway & Cameron Lake), Stellar's Jays (Townsite,
Akamina Parkway & Cameron Lake), Black-billed Magpies, American Crows,
Common Ravens
Tree Swallows, Violet-Green Swallows, Cliff Swallows
Black-capped Chickadees
Red-breasted Nuthatches
House Wrens, Marsh Wrens
2 or 3 American Dippers (Cameron Falls and along Cameron Creek at
McNeally's picnic area)
Ruby-crowned Kinglets (seen a few, heard more - everywhere!)
Mountain Bluebirds, Veery (heard only), Swainson's Thrushes (saw one but
heard many more - everywhere), lots of American Robins, Varied Thrush
(heard only at Cameron Lake)
Gray Catbirds (heard only)
European Starlings
Cedar Waxwings (everywhere)
Yellow Warblers, Yellow-rumped "Audubon" Warblers, Townsend's Warblers
(Cameron Lake area), American Redstart (males), 1 Northern Waterthrush
(Cameron Lake), Common Yellowthroats, Wilson's Warblers, unidentified
warblers
Chipping Sparrows, Clay-colored Sparrows, Vesper Sparrows, Savannah
Sparrows, Song Sparrows, Lincoln's Sparrows, White-crowned Sparrows,
Dark-eyed Juncos
Black-headed Grosbeaks (heard more than we saw), a few Lazuli Buntings
(males - different locations along Red Rock Parkway)
Red-winged Blackbirds, Western Meadowlarks, Yellow-headed Blackbirds
(heard only), Brewer's Blackbirds, Brown-headed Cowbirds
Cassin's Finches (both male & female -- 4 in the Townsite and a flock of
at least 8 at Little Prairie picnic area), White-winged Crossbills
(Cameron Lake), Pine Siskins, American Goldfinches

50 Black Bears (varying colours - 5 or 6 of the 50 sightings were
'repeat' bears),**2 Red Foxes (1 adult at Belly River campground and 1
kit along Hwy 6), Golden Mantle Ground Squirrels, Richardson's Ground
Squirrels, Columbian Ground Squirrels, 1 Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel,
Least Chipmunks, Red Squirrels, vole species, mouse species, 1 Snowshoe
Hare, 1 Nuttall's Cottontail, 2 Elk cows (1 in the Maskinonge area and 1
along Red Rock Parkway), White-tailed Deer, Mule Deer, a few Rocky
Mountain Bighorn Sheep

frog species (heard only)
fish species
Dirt pile diggings from Northern Pocket Gophers

We did not see many ducks anywhere. We used to see a number of ducks at
the Maskinonge area and in the Entrance Pond, but the numbers were down
last year and again this year.

Try as we might, we could not locate a Rufous Hummingbird this year (not
even behind the cottages across from the Townsite campground area.) We
did see a few Calliope Hummingbirds so had to be content with that.

Again this year, we noticed a lot of European Starlings around. We saw
less Common Ravens than we usually do, and never did see the Pileated
Woodpecker - just heard him. We also did not see a Hairy Woodpecker
(again) this year.

We really miss not being able to go out to Marquis Hole. From the
inquiries I made, it sounds like it is only gong to be accessible by
foot, bike or horseback (none of these are an option for us so I guess
we just playback in our memory what we used to see there.)

We enjoyed our time spent in the beautiful Waterton Lakes National
Park. It was getting busy when we were there (especially the weekends),
but cannot even begin to imagine how busy it was going to get after we left.


- Mary Ann and Larry, Swift Current, SK
50? 17' 00" N - 107? 48' 00" W



Subject: Re: Cattle Egret?
Date: Sun Jul 16 2017 14:38 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Marcie Plishka and I investigated the potential cattle egret this morning (July 16). We were unable to find any egrets.

We started at Ralph Klein Park at 8:45 am. Scoping from the top of the interpretative center did not turn up any egrets, only two great blue herons among other things. Strangely, a banded homing pigeon was perched on the center.


The directions might have implied the egret was outside the park on a nearby waterbody. We investigated a wetland to the northeast of Ralph Klein Park that intersects 114 ave SE without any luck.


Finally, we tried the waterbody to the west of the park at the Rotary/Mattamy Greenway. No luck on egrets, but there was a HARLEQUIN DUCK sitting on the orange boom. There were also a number of shorebird species. That ebird checklist is here:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...



Based on the previous description, it is difficult to say where the egret was spotted. Hopefully someone is able to track it down.


Good birding,
Michael Sveen
Calgary



Subject: Cattle Egret?
Date: Sat Jul 15 2017 23:11 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Someone should check this out.

Gus Yaki-403-243-2248

----- Original Message -----
From: Chris
Durtnall
To: Gus -
Fastmail
Sent: Saturday, July 15, 2017 10:12 AM
Subject: Re: Fw: 2017 walk


Good morning Gus
I saw a large white Egret on the shores of the lake opposite Ralph
Klein park east of Calgary.possibly a cattle Egret
Chris






Virus-free.
www.avast.com







__._,_.___







Posted by: "Gus - CCNA" <gyaki@calcna.ab.ca>









_____________________________________________________________


* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com

* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...






Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Great - Crested Flycatcher
Date: Tue Jul 11 2017 13:40 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
One seen at Carburn Park this morning between 10-11am.



Robert Storms

Calgary,AB



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antiviru...



Subject:
Date: Tue Jul 11 2017 9:45 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
We had 21 participants for our annual weekend trip to Waterton on what
turned out to be three of the hottest days of the year.

Although not a birding trip per se we had a number of experienced
birders on the trip. And as usual the weekend included an evening
birding trip to try and see Sandhill Cranes at the Maskinonge and Common
Nighthawks at the Waterton Springs Campground. We were successful in
both of those quests, and were rewarded by spectacular sightings of the
full moon rising incredibly before our eyes and shining large and
magnificently just above the mountains.

We had MacGillvray's Warblers and Warbling Vireos in and around the
campground. Several Lazuli Buntings up and down the Red Rock Canyon
Road. Our main hike on Saturday was up to Bertha Falls and Lake. On
the way up we came eyeball to eyeball with a male Black-headed Grosbeak,
it flew down to join its mate, and they then both flew around below us
for a while. Beargrass was in magnificent bloom all over the park, but
particularly around Bertha Lake. Sitting at the edge of the lake a Fox
Sparrow dropped by to serenade us at lunch. Another group saw a Fox
sparrow at Cameron Lake, along with a Western Tanager.

On Sunday morning we were fortunate to have David Musto, one of the
Park's conservation officers join us to lead a bird walk in the
campground area before breakfast. David led us to several Lazuli
Buntings, and gave us some wonderful insights to the park's birds and
other wildlife.

Over the weekend various groups reported at least 75 species of birds as
follows :

Species Name

Canada Goose

Trumpeter Swan

American Wigeon

Mallard

Lesser Scaup

Common Goldeneye

Common Merganser

Common Loon

Pied-billed Grebe

Red-necked Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

American Bittern (seen at Police Outpost PP)

Great Blue Heron

Osprey

Northern Harrier

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Sandhill Crane

Wilson's Snipe

Spotted Sandpiper

Black Tern

Mourning Dove

Common Nighthawk

Rufous Hummingbird

Red-naped Sapsucker

Northern Flicker

Western Wood-Pewee

Least Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

Warbling Vireo

Black-billed Magpie

Steller's Jay

American Crow

Common Raven

Tree Swallow

Bank Swallow

Cliff Swallow

Red-breasted Nuthatch

House Wren

Pacific Wren

Marsh Wren

American Dipper

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Mountain Bluebird

Townsend's Solitaire

Veery

Swainson's Thrush

American Robin

Varied Thrush

Gray Catbird

Cedar Waxwing

MacGillivray's Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

American Redstart

Yellow Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Townsend's Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Clay-colored Sparrow

Fox Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

White-crowned Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Lincoln's Sparrow

Western Tanager

Black-headed Grosbeak

Lazuli Bunting

Red-winged Blackbird

Yellow-headed Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

Pine Siskin

American Goldfinch

There could have been a few more because we not trying to keep a
rigorous group tally.

Even though this is a bird site it is hard to talk about a Waterton trip
without mentioning bears.We had a couple of small black bears wander
through our campsite, and various participants saw one or more black
bears (of all colours) during the weekend.It is always worrying when a
bear gets close to campsite, so here is some good feedback from Parks on
one of the ones we saw (picture attached).

?That particular bear is one that got into some food in the townsite two
summers ago when it was very young. We conducted some aversive
conditioning and put the collar on the bear to track its movements.
Since then, it seems that the bear has been successful in staying out of
human food, and although it does hang around close to human-use areas
like the campground, it seems to be focusing on natural food and
avoiding direct contact with people. So far, it seems like we've had a
good outcome with this bear.?

Andrew Hart

Calgary



Subject: Sparrow ID
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 17:14 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Yes Colleen it is an HY SAVS Sparrow.   The short noticed tail, the lighter outer rects, the chestnut edging on the secondary coverts, and secondaries and the general overall look of the bird (or jizz) suggests SAVS. It has the appearance of a large sparrow. It may be confused with HY Song, Swamp,and/ or Lincoln's sparrow. In fact the SAVS may be the only  juv plumages sparrow displaying a notched tail

Rainer Ebel
Eagle Point
Edmonton, Alberta
+1-780-4444486

Marine Dr East
Sanctuary Cove Queensland
0413327381
Sent from my iPhone

> On 10 Jul 2017, at 15:48, Caroline Lambert caroline144@gmail.com [Albertabird] wrote:
>
> Confusing juveniles - it's part of what makes birding so fascinating. I believe this is a Savannah Sparrow. First, even though juveniles of plain-breasted species can be streaked, it's usually light streaking (Brewer's Sparrow is a good example). The amount and coarseness of the streaking on this bird suggests an adult that has a streaked breast (so not Baird's or Grasshopper, but the structure doesn't look quite right anyway). The short, notched tail is good for Savannah rather than Vesper. I pulled this juvenile Savannah Sparrow description, which matches quite well, from Birds of North America:
>
> "Crown stripe indistinct or absent, with flecking of dark brown, white, and chestnut feathers; crown sometimes quite pale, eyebrow stripe absent or indistinct, with little or no yellow; auriculars buffy chestnut flecked with dark brown; breast with dark streaking against a buffy or yellowish background, paler on belly; secondaries, greater wing coverts, and scapulars broadly margined with chestnut."
>
> Further, compare the photos with this one of mine:
> http://www.kittiwakenaturephot...
>
> Would love to hear if anyone thinks differently.
>
> Caroline Lambert
> Canmore
>
>
>> On 7/10/17 12:30 PM, ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird] wrote:
>>
>> Hi again everyone. Here's another bird from the 9th I'm having trouble with. I realize how tough sparrows can be and that this is very likely going to be a juvenile of something I've seen a million times, but I thought I would put it out there just in case it's something different. Seen in the Rolling Hills area. Thanks
>>
>> Ron Kube
>>
>> Calgary
>>
>
>



Subject:
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 17:11 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
After asking for ID's on two birds that turned out to be juveniles of common birds seen in Alberta, I did manage to find a bird not so common, an Arctic Tern. The short legs and red bill had me thinking it was different from what I usually see. I saw this bird near Bassano on the 9th. A new bird to add to my list.
Ron Kube
Calgary



Subject: Sparrow ID
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 17:11 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Yup, that's pretty much what I thought. I figured it would a juvenile. Your image is pretty darn close. Thanks Caroline.
Ron Kube
Calgary


From: "Caroline Lambert caroline144@gmail.com [Albertabird]"
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2017 3:48:46 PM
Subject: Re: [Albertabird] Sparrow ID





Confusing juveniles - it's part of what makes birding so fascinating. I believe this is a Savannah Sparrow. First, even though juveniles of plain-breasted species can be streaked, it's usually light streaking (Brewer's Sparrow is a good example). The amount and coarseness of the streaking on this bird suggests an adult that has a streaked breast (so not Baird's or Grasshopper, but the structure doesn't look quite right anyway). The short, notched tail is good for Savannah rather than Vesper. I pulled this juvenile Savannah Sparrow description, which matches quite well, from Birds of North America:

"Crown stripe indistinct or absent, with flecking of dark brown, white, and chestnut feathers; crown sometimes quite pale, eyebrow stripe absent or indistinct, with little or no yellow; auriculars buffy chestnut flecked with dark brown; breast with dark streaking against a buffy or yellowish background, paler on belly; secondaries, greater wing coverts, and scapulars broadly margined with chestnut."
Further, compare the photos with this one of mine:
http://www.kittiwakenaturephot...

Would love to hear if anyone thinks differently.

Caroline Lambert
Canmore


On 7/10/17 12:30 PM, ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird] wrote:





Hi again everyone. Here's another bird from the 9th I'm having trouble with. I realize how tough sparrows can be and that this is very likely going to be a juvenile of something I've seen a million times, but I thought I would put it out there just in case it's something different. Seen in the Rolling Hills area. Thanks

Ron Kube

Calgary



Subject: Sparrow ID
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 16:52 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Confusing juveniles - it's part of what makes birding so fascinating. I
believe this is a Savannah Sparrow. First, even though juveniles of
plain-breasted species can be streaked, it's usually light streaking
(Brewer's Sparrow is a good example). The amount and coarseness of the
streaking on this bird suggests an adult that has a streaked breast (so
not Baird's or Grasshopper, but the structure doesn't look quite right
anyway). The short, notched tail is good for Savannah rather than
Vesper. I pulled this juvenile Savannah Sparrow description, which
matches quite well, from Birds of North America:

"Crown stripe indistinct or absent, with flecking of dark brown, white,
and chestnut feathers; crown sometimes quite pale, eyebrow stripe absent
or indistinct, with little or no yellow; auriculars buffy chestnut
flecked with dark brown; breast with dark streaking against a buffy or
yellowish background, paler on belly; secondaries, greater wing coverts,
and scapulars broadly margined with chestnut."

Further, compare the photos with this one of mine:
http://www.kittiwakenaturephot...

Would love to hear if anyone thinks differently.

Caroline Lambert
Canmore


On 7/10/17 12:30 PM, ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird] wrote:
>
> Hi again everyone. Here's another bird from the 9th I'm having trouble
> with. I realize how tough sparrows can be and that this is very likely
> going to be a juvenile of something I've seen a million times, but I
> thought I would put it out there just in case it's something
> different. Seen in the Rolling Hills area. Thanks
>
> Ron Kube
>
> Calgary
>
>



Subject:
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 13:56 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi again everyone. Here's another bird from the 9th I'm having trouble with. I realize how tough sparrows can be and that this is very likely going to be a juvenile of something I've seen a million times, but I thought I would put it out there just in case it's something different. Seen in the Rolling Hills area. Thanks
Ron Kube
Calgary



Subject: Shorebird ID
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 13:11 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I've seem them out of the water plenty of times and they never looked as tall as this one did, but I did search through phalarope pics on Flickr and found a few that looked just like mine, so phalarope it is.
Ron Kube
Calgary




From: "Caroline Lambert caroline144@gmail.com [Albertabird]"
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2017 7:47:06 AM
Subject: Re: [Albertabird] Shorebird ID










Yes, that is a juvenile Wilson's Phalarope. Phalaropes are deceptive when they are out of the water, as we are so accustomed to seeing them swimming, with their necks not extended like this one. The beautiful scalloping of the back feathers is one indication of the age.
Caroline Lambert
Canmore


On 7/9/17 11:47 PM, ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird] wrote:










Hi everyone, I'd like to try and get an ID on this shorebird I saw south of Lomond on July 10. Someone has already suggested juvenile Wilson's Phalarope and I can see why with the buffy color down the side of the neck, but this bird seemed bigger than a phalarope, more yellowlegs size. Any help would be appreciated.
Ron Kube
Calgary



Subject: Shorebird ID
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 8:47 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Yes, that is a juvenile Wilson's Phalarope. Phalaropes are deceptive
when they are out of the water, as we are so accustomed to seeing them
swimming, with their necks not extended like this one. The beautiful
scalloping of the back feathers is one indication of the age.

Caroline Lambert
Canmore

On 7/9/17 11:47 PM, ronakube@telusplanet.net [Albertabird] wrote:
>
> Hi everyone, I'd like to try and get an ID on this shorebird I saw
> south of Lomond on July 10. Someone has already suggested juvenile
> Wilson's Phalarope and I can see why with the buffy color down the
> side of the neck, but this bird seemed bigger than a phalarope, more
> yellowlegs size. Any help would be appreciated.
> Ron Kube
> Calgary
>
>
>



Subject:
Date: Mon Jul 10 2017 1:17 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi everyone, I'd like to try and get an ID on this shorebird I saw south of Lomond on July 10. Someone has already suggested juvenile Wilson's Phalarope and I can see why with the buffy color down the side of the neck, but this bird seemed bigger than a phalarope, more yellowlegs size. Any help would be appreciated.
Ron Kube
Calgary



Subject: Nature Calgary Birding North Glenmore Park, SW Calgary. 0900-1130 am. Sat. July 8/17
Date: Sat Jul 8 2017 17:38 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Nature Calgary Birding North Glenmore Park, SW Calgary. 0830-1130 am. Sat. July 8/17. Sunny, brisk West wind, 22 to 28 Celsius. 

1. Double-crested Cormorant - 18
2. Canada Goose - 35
3. Mallard - 12
4. Lesser Scaup - 5
5. Common Goldeneye - 5
6. Sora - heard x3 in area of storm water ponds
7. Franklin's Gull - 800 resting on wharf mid-reservoir
8. White headed Gull sp. - 5 also resting on wharf but too distant to ID
9. Northern Flicker - 1
10. Black-billed Magpie - 7
11. American Crow - 17
12. Tree Swallow - 10
13. Black-capped Chickadee - 5
14. House Wren - 1
15. Cedar Waxwing - 3
16. Clay-coloured Sparrow - 2
17. Savannah Sparrow - 2
18. Song Sparrow - 1
19. Red-winged Blackbird - 6
20. American Goldfinch - heard

Leader: Penny Smith
Calgary










__._,_.___







Posted by: Janet Gill <gillannjanet@gmail.com>









_____________________________________________________________


* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com

* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...






Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: 2017 AOS Supplement
Date: Fri Jul 7 2017 12:25 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hello all,
This email is a follow-up to that I sent on April 4th of this year, copied below. The American Ornithological Society's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds has met to review this years' checklist proposals, some of which I outlined in my earlier email. Their decisions may be found in the Fifty-eighth supplement to the American Ornithological Society's Check-list of North American Birds at the following URL:http://www.americanornithology...
For a summary of those changes affecting those species regularly found in Canada and the continental United States, see this post by Michael Retter on the American Birding Association's blog:http://blog.aba.org/2017/07/20...

Most of the proposals pertaining to species that regularly occur in Alberta were not accepted by the committee. These include the following:
- Change the English name of the Ring-necked Duck to Ring-billed Duck.- Split the Yellow-rumped Warbler into three species.- Split the Nashville Warbler into two species.- Split the Willet into two species.- Split the Brown Creeper into two species.- Lump the Common Redpoll and the Hoary Redpoll into a single species.
There are, however, two changes that will affect us to a small extent in Alberta:
- The Thayer's Gull is now considered a subspecies of Iceland Gull.- The English name of the Le Conte's Sparrow has been changed to LeConte's Sparrow.
To be sure, a number of revisions have been made to taxonomic classifications and the taxonomic sequence of species, genera, and families. Some of these pertain to birds observed in Alberta. For more information, follow the links above.
Again, if this summary contains any errors or oversights, please correct me. I believe I have outlined the Committee's decisions accurately.
Good birding,
David ScottLethbridge, AB
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Here's the email of April 4th, 2017:

Hello all,
For those who are interested and have not already familiarized themselves with the bird taxonomy proposals submitted this year to the American Ornithological Society's Classification Committee, I thought I would highlight those proposed changes affecting species regularly observed in Alberta. Please note that these are only proposals and may not be accepted by the Committee. We will likely not see the Committee's decisions (widely considered authoritative) for a few months.
These proposals include species lumps and splits, the renaming of individual species, and taxonomic reorganizations. For what is expected to be the full list of proposals, see the following documents:http://checklist.aou.org/asset...
For a shorter and more accessible read, see these posts on the American Birding Association's blog:http://blog.aba.org/2017/01/20...
And here are the highlights for Alberta, as best I can determine:
- Change the English name of the Ring-necked Duck to Ring-billed Duck.

- Change the English name of the Le Conte's Sparrow to LeConte's Sparrow.

- Split Yellow-rumped Warbler into three species, including Audubon's Warbler and Myrtle Warbler. The proposed third species is essentially a resident of Mexico and Central America and would not be expected to occur in Alberta.

- Split Nashville Warbler into two species. The proposed western species, which would perhaps be known as Calaveras Warbler, breeds from British Columbia south to California. The proposed eastern species, which may be called the Rusty-capped Warbler, breeds from the Maritimes and northeastern United States west through Saskatchewan. Though Nashville Warblers are rather tough to come by in Alberta, we would see both species here. Those found in the mountains would very likely be Calaveras, while those that turn up at Cold Lake and nearby areas would, I expect, be Rusty-capped. Those seen in between would best be scrutinized closely.

- Split the Willet into two species: the Eastern Willet and the Western Willet. Barring a highly unusual vagrant from the east coast, all of our willets would be of the latter species.

- Split Brown Creeper into two species. As one of the proposed species is found from southeastern Arizona southward, the only change affecting us would be our Brown Creepers' new name: Nearctic Creeper.

- Lump Common Redpoll and Hoary Redpoll into a single species. (This proposal was submitted last year; this year's resubmission provides some additional research requested by the Committee. It appears that the evidence supporting the lump is quite robust.)

- Lump Thayer's Gull and Iceland Gull into a single species.

- Other species splits (Red Crossbill, Northern Harrier, Northern Shrike) and lumps (Dark-eyed Junco & Yellow-eyed Junco) have been proposed; however, these would not be expected to bring any significant changes to Alberta's avifauna due to our having only one of the species/subspecies involved, the others being extralimital (i.e., occurring outside of Alberta; e.g., Hen Harrier, Great Gray Shrike, Yellow-eyed Junco).

- Many additional proposals would revise taxonomic classifications and the taxonomic sequence of species, genera, and families. For the sake of brevity, I've excluded these from this list. For more information, follow the links above.

I believe I have presented the proposals accurately; if my summary includes any errors or oversights, please don't hesitate to correct me. Again, it is important to note that these are only proposals at this point and have yet to be reviewed by the AOS Committee.
Best regards, and good birding,
David ScottLethbridge, AB



Subject: NEW Bird Identification Workshop!
Date: Fri Jul 7 2017 10:13 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The Vancouver Avian Research Centre is excited to announce a NEW Bird Identification Workshop for fall 2017!



This new workshop will build on VARC™s present, highly popular workshop by adding four further field trips on the following four subsequent weekends. These field trips will be led by Yousif Attia and Jason Jones, two locally recognized bird ID experts who will help participants build on the skills they have learned during the initial weekend course.



The workshop is designed for beginner and intermediate birders who may wish to participate in citizen science programs like the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) or who just want to take their bird knowledge and identification skills to the next level. But with Yousif and Jason leading the ongoing field trips, identification of the more difficult groups such as shorebirds, raptors and gulls will also be tackled for more advanced birders!



The course will cover groups, topography, field marks, song, habitat, molt, ageing and more and includes a guided field session to the Colony Farm banding station. Although developed for beginner and intermediate birders the ornithological aspects of the course and ongoing field trips will benefit even the most experienced birders and the workshop is invaluable for birders traveling overseas.



Fall offers a great learning experience in the lower mainland with birds in tricky juvenal, formative and basic plumages so we hope that the fall course will be worth waiting for!



Full details of the workshop schedule, content and registration information can be found online at:



http://www.birdvancouver.com/w... http://www.birdvancouver.com/w...



Please forward on your social networks to anyone who may be interested - Thanks!


Derek



Derek Matthews
Vancouver Avian Research Centre
Vancouver, BC, Canada



Subject:
Date: Tue Jul 4 2017 10:05 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hello

Three birders (Vince Cottrell and a couple) saw it earlier this morning at 7:20 am.

Hank Vanderpol, my father & I saw it at 8:45 am. It's in the same area that Michael Sveen previously reported.

Good birding
James Fox
Edmonton



<*> View Attachments on Web https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
------------------------------------
Posted by: James Fox
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary
Date: Mon Jul 3 2017 22:39 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
A search of the IBS from 6 pm to about 8:45 pm Monday July 3 failed to turn up the pigeon. There were three of us in our group, and a few other birders were also looking while we were there.

Bob Lefebvre, Calgary



Subject:
Date: Mon Jul 3 2017 11:53 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
As of 9:00 am on July 3, the band-tailed pigeon was in the same location as I previously posted at Inglewood Bird Sanctuary. It is hanging out near the Saskatoon berry bushes. A number of birders have already been down to see it.

My ebird checklist with photos is posted here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...



Good birding,
Michael Sveen
Calgary



Subject: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary
Date: Mon Jul 3 2017 8:31 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The BAND-TAILED PIGEON is currently at Inglewood Bird Sanctuary as of 7:30 am. It is perched just east of the trail at:

Dropped pin
near Inglewood, Calgary, Alberta

https://goo.gl/maps/FbxN2fqXwk...

I have taken photos and will post them once I get home.

Good birding,
Michael Sveen
Calgary

------------------------------------
Posted by: mtsveen@yahoo.com
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary
Date: Sun Jul 2 2017 21:27 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
If anyone refinds the Band-tailed Pigeon reported below, I would appreciate your posting it on Albertabird with pertinent details (or phone me). I was unsuccessful trying to see it this afternoon.

thanks much
Mike Mulligan
Calgary
telephone 403-232-1013



From: russumd@telusplanet.net [Albertabird]
Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2017 12:04 PM
To: Albertabird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Albertabird] Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary





Susan and I had a definitive sighting of a Band-tailed Pigeon (wide light band on tail, yellow bill, white collar) at 10:30 this morning sitting on a snag just west of the river trail at Inglewood Bird sanctuary (~50 metres south of where the trail makes a sharp left). It flew before I could take a picture.

Dave Russum

Calgary



Subject: Band-tailed Pigeon, Inglewood Bird Sanctuary
Date: Sun Jul 2 2017 13:04 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Susan and I had a definitive sighting of a Band-tailed Pigeon (wide light band on tail, yellow bill, white collar) at 10:30 this morning sitting on a snag just west of the river trail at Inglewood Bird sanctuary (~50 metres south of where the trail makes a sharp left).  It flew before I could take a picture.
Dave Russum
Calgary



Subject: Loon at Carburn Park
Date: Sat Jul 1 2017 15:16 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
This afternoon there is a Common Loon swimming lazily around in the
larger lake at Carburn Park.

There are also a couple of large Canada Day picnic groups.

So it all makes an appropriate scene for Canada Day.

Andrew Hart

Calgary



------------------------------------
Posted by: Andrew Hart
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject:
Date: Tue Jun 27 2017 13:03 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
On Sunday, June 25, we came upon a rather interesting collection of Swainson's Hawks. At the McIntyre Ranch south of Magrath we counted at least 30 of these hawks in a three kilometre stretch of Highway 62. The hawks were on fence posts, power poles and on the ground. We believe this was a group of immature, non-breeding birds. According to Gus Yaki, most Swainson™s Hawks do not breed until their third year, after making three back and forth migrations between breeding and wintering grounds. (By the way, Gus Yaki™s excellent article on Swainson™s Hawks can be found at the birdscalgary.com web site. Just type in Swainson™s Hawks in the search box.) Therefore the hawks we saw were either one-year-old birds which will be molting this summer from juvenile plumage into Basic I plumage, or two-year-old birds which will be molting from Basic I plumage into adult plumage.



The attached photos are meant to show the extreme variability in the plumage of these birds. As immatures they all share the features, to lesser or greater degree, of whitish feathering on their heads and pale patches in the upper wing coverts and scapulars. Other markings on their body reflect whether they will molt into light-phase, intermediate-phase or dark-phase birds as adults.


We have seen concentrations of non-breeding Swainson™s Hawks only a few times before in Alberta. On June 12, 1988 while conducting the Ranier Breeding Bird Survey we counted 10 such hawks at one stop. On July 5, 1996, again on the McIntyre Ranch, we saw 60-70 Swainson™s Hawks in a high kettle. Perhaps other subscribers to this list-serve have also seen such groups and would care to comment “ are these aggregations of non-breeding birds a regular occurrence? In Sunday's sighting, the concentration might be the result of an abundant food source. I would estimate that there were, let™s say, a gazillion Richardson™s Ground Squirrels running around the pastures.


Cheers,
Teresa and Doug Dolman
Lethbridge



Subject: FFCPPSoc. Fish Creek PP-Burnsmead, Calgary. Jun 25, 2017
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 21:12 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
FFCPPSoc Birding Burnsmead, FCPP, Calgary. 1:15-4:PM Sunday, June 25/17.
Sunny with scattered thin cloud, South wind 22 to 33Km/hr, 25 to 28 Celsius.



1. Pie-billed Grebe - 1

2. American White Pelican - 32

3. Double-crested Cormorant - 6

4. Great Blue Heron - 1

5. Canada Goose - 6

6. Mallard - 16

7. Gadwall - 14

8. American Wigeon - 10

9. Blue-winged Teal - 4ad, 13 ducklings

10. Common Merganser - 1f, 8 ducklings

11. Osprey - 2

12. Ring-necked Pheasant - 2

13. American Coot - 3 ad, 4 cootlings

14. Franklin's Gull - 150

15. Ring-billed Gull - 2

16. Northern Flicker - 4

17. Least Flycatcher - 1

18. Black-billed Magpie - 1

19. Common Raven - 1

20. Tree Swallow - 40

21. Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 12

22. House Wren - 6

23. American Robin - 4

24. Gray Catbird - 1

25. Cedar Waxwing - 1

26. Yellow Warbler - 6

27. Clay-coloured Sparrow - 3

28. Savannah Sparrow - 10

29. Song Sparrow - 3

30. Red-winged Blackbird - 50

31. Yellow-headed Blackbird - 1

32. Common Grackle - 1

33. Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

34. House Finch - 6

35. American Goldfinch - 2



Eastern Gray Squirrel - 1 Black Morph

Muskrat - 1

White Admiral Butterfly - 1

Leaders; Stephen Spring, Bernie Diebolt, Janet Gill



_____

FFCPPSoc. Fish Creek PP-Burnsmead, Calgary. Jun 25, 2017 9:00 AM - 12:20 PM.
Mostly clear, moderate S wind, 18C to 23C.



1. Canada Goose - 8 (6 goslings)
2. Wood Duck - 3 (2 ducklings seen briefly)
3. Gadwall - 4
4. American Wigeon - 6
5. Mallard - 26 (18 ducklings)
6. Blue-winged Teal - 2
7. Northern Shoveler - 11 (pair and 9 ducklings)
8. Common Merganser - 11 (7 ducklings)
9. Ring-necked Pheasant - 3
10. Common Loon - 1 (flying east)
11. Double-crested Cormorant - 8
12. American White Pelican - 50
13. Great Blue Heron - 2
14. Osprey - 4
15. Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1
16. Swainson's Hawk - 2
17. Wilson's Snipe - 1
18. Spotted Sandpiper - 1
19. Franklin's Gull - 60
20. Ring-billed Gull - 2
21. California Gull - 2
22. Herring Gull - 1
23. Mourning Dove - 2
24. Belted Kingfisher - 1 (queen)
25. Downy Woodpecker - 2
26. Northern Flicker - 4
27. Western Wood-Pewee - 3
28. Least Flycatcher - 3
29. Eastern Kingbird - 1
30. Warbling Vireo - 1 (heard)
31. Black-billed Magpie - 4
32. American Crow - 4
33. Common Raven - 5
34. Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 10
35. Tree Swallow - 20
36. Bank Swallow - 30
37. Barn Swallow - 1
38. Cliff Swallow - 1
39. Black-capped Chickadee - 10
40 House Wren - 12
41. American Robin - 6
42. Cedar Waxwing - 4
43. Yellow Warbler - 4
44. Le Conte's Sparrow - 1
45. Clay-colored Sparrow - 10
46. Savannah Sparrow - 25
47. Song Sparrow 3
48. Red-winged Blackbird - 16
49. Common Grackle - 2
50. Brown-headed Cowbird - 6
51. House Finch - 4
52. American Goldfinch - 2
53. House Sparrow - 2



Red Squirrel - 1

Grey Squirrel - 1



Leader: Wlad Franco-Valias



_____

Friends of Fish Creek Fish Creek PP--The Ranch, Calgary, Alberta, CA.
25-Jun-2017 7:31 AM - 11:01 AM



1. Wood Duck - 1 - - Female
2. Gadwall - 2
3. American Wigeon - 4
4. Mallard - 12
5. Blue-winged Teal - 3
6. Common Goldeneye - 3
7. Common Merganser - 1
8. Ring-necked Pheasant - 2
9. Double-crested Cormorant - 2
10. American White Pelican - 30
11. Great Blue Heron - 1
12. Osprey - 2
13. Swainson's Hawk - 4 - - Watched one catch a small rodent
14. Wilson's Snipe - 1
15. Spotted Sandpiper - 2
16. Franklin's Gull - 30
17. Ring-billed Gull - 2
18. California Gull - 1
19. Belted Kingfisher - 1 - - Male
20. Downy Woodpecker - 1
21. Hairy Woodpecker - 1
22. Northern Flicker - 4
23. Western Wood-Pewee - 6 - - One on a nest
24. Least Flycatcher - 12
25. Eastern Kingbird - 2
26. Warbling Vireo - 1
27. Black-billed Magpie - 1
28. American Crow - 1
29. Common Raven - 3
30. Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 6
31. Tree Swallow - 15
32. Bank Swallow - 5
33. Barn Swallow - 2
34. Cliff Swallow - 4
35. Black-capped Chickadee - 7
36. White-breasted Nuthatch - 2
37. House Wren - 13
38. American Robin - 10
39. Gray Catbird - 2
40. European Starling - 6
41. Cedar Waxwing - 6
42. Yellow Warbler - 5
43. Le Conte's Sparrow - 2 - - Heard singing and seen clearly. Near
Annie's Cafe. - Photos taken.
44. Clay-colored Sparrow - 20
45. White-throated Sparrow - 2
46. Savannah Sparrow - 20
47. Song Sparrow - 3
48. Lincoln's Sparrow - 2
49. Red-winged Blackbird - 25
50. Brewer's Blackbird - 2
51. Common Grackle - 4
52. Brown-headed Cowbird - 8
53. Baltimore Oriole - 2
54. House Finch - 5
55. Pine Siskin - 1
56. American Goldfinch - 2
57. House Sparrow - 3



Porcupine - 1



Leader: Rose Painter



Subject: FFCPPSoc Birding Burnsmead, FCPP, Calgary. 1:15-4:PM Sunday, June 25/17
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 19:53 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
FFCPPSoc Birding Burnsmead, FCPP, Calgary. 1:15-4:PM Sunday, June 25/17.
Sunny with scattered thin cloud, South wind 22 to 33Km/hr, 25 to 28 Celsius.

1. Pie-billed Grebe - 1
2. American White Pelican - 32
3. Double-crested Cormorant - 6
4. Great Blue Heron - 1
5. Canada Goose - 6
6. Mallard - 16
7. Gadwall - 14
8. American Wigeon - 10
9. Blue-winged Teal - 4ad, 13 ducklilngs
10. Common Merganser - 1f, 8 ducklings
11. Osprey - 2
12. Ring-necked Pheasant - 2
13. American Coot - 3 ad, 4 cootlings
14. Franklin's Gull - 150
15. Ring-billed Gull - 2
16. Northern Flicker - 4
17. Least Flycatcher - 1
18. Black-billed Magpie - 1
19. Common Raven - 1
20. Tree Swallow - 40
21. Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 12
22. House Wren - 6
23. American Robin - 4
24. Gray Catbird - 1
25. Cedar Waxwing - 1
26. Yellow Warbler - 6
27. Clay-coloured Sparrow - 3
28. Savannah Sparrow - 10
29. Song Sparrow - 3
30. Red-winged Blackbird - 50
31. Yellow-headed Blackbird - 1
32. Common Grackle - 1
33. Brown-headed Cowbird - 2
34. House Finch - 6
35. American Goldfinch - 2

Eastern Gray Squirrel - 1 Black Morph
Muskrat - 1
White Admiral Butterfly - 1

Leaders; Stephen Spring, Bernie Diebolt, Janet Gill
Calgary



Subject: Nature Calgary field trip to Brown-Lowery PP. 24 June, 2017
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 21:24 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Five of us drove down to Brown-Lowery on a pleasant day with the
possibility (which never materialized) of thunderstorms later.

Brown-Lowery can be very variable. Some days alive with bird sounds,
other days not so much. This was a not so much day.

We started to hear Tennessee Warblers as soon as we entered the park.
For the second time in two weeks we failed to find Pacific Wren. I
think someone warns them when we are coming.

We saw our first Three-toed Woodpecker early on, and heard, then saw,
Hermit Thrush. We had a single male Ruffed Grouse skulking in the
undergrowth near the meadow. Up near the benches overlooking the
surrounding farms we saw five Red Crossbills, in the company of some
Pine Siskins, perhaps there are a few of these around this summer.

Our complete list of 28 species for five and a half hours of walking
around the park was
Ruffed Grouse 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Red-naped Sapsucker 1
American Three-toed Woodpecker 3
Western Wood-Pewee 1
Gray Jay 4
Common Raven 3
Black-capped Chickadee 10
Boreal Chickadee 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch 4
House Wren 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1
Swainson's Thrush 6
Hermit Thrush 2
American Robin 6
Varied Thrush 1
Tennessee Warbler 20
Cape May Warbler 1
Yellow Warbler 1
Chipping Sparrow 4
Clay-colored Sparrow 1
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 3
White-throated Sparrow 6
Western Tanager 1
Brown-headed Cowbird 5
Red Crossbill 5
Pine Siskin 10
Evening Grosbeak 2

Andrew Hart

Calgary



------------------------------------
Posted by: Andrew Hart
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: FFCPPSOC Fish Creek PP--Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA Jun 24, 2017 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 14:31 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
FFCPPSOC Fish Creek PP--Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA Jun 24, 2017 9:00 AM
- 12:30 PM



1. Canada Goose - 8
2. Gadwall - 4
3. American Wigeon - 8
4. Mallard - 9
5. Blue-winged Teal - 2
6. Northern Shoveler - 10 - 9 young
7. Common Goldeneye - 2
8. Common Merganser - 11 - 9 young
9. Ring-necked Pheasant - 3
10. Pied-billed Grebe - 2
11. Double-crested Cormorant - 12
12. American White Pelican - 60
13. Great Blue Heron - 3
14. Swainson's Hawk - 3
15. Sora - 1
16. American Coot - 7 - 3 young
17. Killdeer - 3
18. Spotted Sandpiper - 2
19. Franklin's Gull - 200
20. Ring-billed Gull - 1
21. Belted Kingfisher - 2
22. Downy Woodpecker - 3
23. Northern Flicker - 5
24. Western Wood-Pewee - 5
25. Least Flycatcher - 12
26. Eastern Kingbird - 1
27. Warbling Vireo - 5
28. Black-billed Magpie - 2
29. Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1
30. Tree Swallow - 40
31. Bank Swallow - 6
32. Barn Swallow - 1
33. Black-capped Chickadee - 6
34. Red-breasted Nuthatch - 1
35. White-breasted Nuthatch - 2
36. House Wren - 14
37. American Robin - 12
38. Gray Catbird - 2
39. Cedar Waxwing - 12
40. Orange-crowned Warbler - 1
41. Yellow Warbler - 10
42. Clay-colored Sparrow - 6
43. Savannah Sparrow - 30
44. Song Sparrow - 3
45. Red-winged Blackbird - 20
46. Yellow-headed Blackbird - 1
47. Brewer's Blackbird - 1
48. Brown-headed Cowbird - 8
49. Baltimore Oriole - 3
50. House Finch - 1
51. American Goldfinch - 2



1 unidentified parrot roller-blading



Leaders: David Mitchell, Trevor Churchill, Wayne Walker



Subject: Happening NOW: Dickcissels on the Move
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 12:54 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Today's blog from American Birding Association
discusses"Dickcissels on the Move". Although most reports are from
considerably east of Alberta, the eBird map indicates sightings just south of
the Montana border. See below.

Mike Mulligan
Calgary





From: ABA Blog
Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2017 6:30 AM
To: potoo@shaw.ca
Subject: [New post] Happening NOW: Dickcissels on the
Move


Tom Reed posted: "Dickcissel is
a summertime staple of America™s Heartland. However, it has also garnered
a reputation for being nomadic and unpredictable, and in some years will
wander in large numbers well beyond the prairie. It appears that 2017 is
shaping up to be a pr"




New
post on ABA Blog




Happening
NOW: Dickcissels on theMoveby Tom
Reed
Dickcissel
is a summertime staple of America™s Heartland.
However, it has also garnered a reputation for
being nomadic and unpredictable, and in some years
will wander in large numbers well beyond the
prairie. It appears that 2017 is shaping up to be
a prime example of such a movement. Here at the
NAB news desk we™ve spent much of June
monitoring a surge of Dickcissel reports from
regions outside its core summer range: the
Mid-Atlantic, northern portions of the Upper
Midwest, Ontario, and Manitoba, among others. This
summer has brought about the first Dickcissel
sightings to many locations since the last
substantial invasion, back in 2012.


2017
has seen many reports of Dickcissel throughout the
Upper Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and southern Canada.
Map from
eBird.
Naturally
we™ll touch on this event, possible causes, and
overall significance both in this space and in a
future issue of NAB, but for now we want to
encourage birders who might be in the path of
Dickcissels to get out and have a look at open
country habitats in their local patches. If you
live in an area that typically hosts breeding
Dickcissels, are you seeing them in expected
numbers? If you live elsewhere, what habitats are
they occupying? When did they start to arrive?


Birders
should be on the lookout for the dapper, and often
conspicuous, Dickcissel in areas outside of their
core range this summer. Photo: Charles
Shields/Macaulay Library
This
is an event that could easily spill over into
July, so even if you don™t find any right now, try
again soon! Be sure to get your Dickcissel reports
into eBird (especially if you are birding in a
state currently conducting a breeding bird atlas),
forward notes to your local report compiler, and
let us know what you™re seeing in the comments
below. We look forward to hearing from you, and
look forward to seeing how this event will unfold
during the next few weeks.

Tom
Reed | June 24, 2017 at 8:00 am |
Tags: breeding
bird atlas | Categories: Action,
Publications,
Science
| URL: http://wp.me/p4fXID-5yr


Comment
See
all
comments
Unsubscribe
to no longer receive posts from ABA Blog.
Change your
email settings at Manage
Subscriptions.
Trouble
clicking? Copy and paste this URL into your
browser:
http://blog.aba.org/2017/06/ha...



__._,_.___







Posted by: "Mike Mulligan" <potoo@shaw.ca>









_____________________________________________________________


* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com

* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...






Visit Your Group


New Photos
4






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Finch ID question
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 17:45 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Andrew

These look like Red Crossbills to me. I know that the season is off but
that's what I would have called them based on the female and the
descriptions and the larger flock.

Sandra Savage

Calgary


On 6/23/2017 4:33 PM, Andrew Hart andrewhart@shaw.ca [Albertabird] wrote:
>
> I was in Beaverdam Flats this morning and noticed the back end of a
> small flock of small birds vanishing in to the top of a deciduous tree.
>
> I put my binoculars on them and noticed they were very red, more than I
> would normally expect for a House Finch. Next I noticed that the
> females seemed to be yellowish with no obvious streaking. I was able to
> get one photograph and then they all flew off (turned out to be about 25
> of them) to a part of Beaverdam that is still off limits.
>
> I have attached the same photo twice, one version is deliberately
> overexposed to show up the shape of the birds a bit more.
>
> I think If I had seen these in a conifer in winter I would have settled
> on Red-winged Crossbill. But that seems unlikely here. None of the
> birds with a visible face was sideways on.
>
> Any suggestions appreciated.
>
> Andrew Hart
>
> Calgary
>
>



------------------------------------
Posted by: Sandra Savage
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject:
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 17:36 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I was in Beaverdam Flats this morning and noticed the back end of a
small flock of small birds vanishing in to the top of a deciduous tree.

I put my binoculars on them and noticed they were very red, more than I
would normally expect for a House Finch. Next I noticed that the
females seemed to be yellowish with no obvious streaking. I was able to
get one photograph and then they all flew off (turned out to be about 25
of them) to a part of Beaverdam that is still off limits.

I have attached the same photo twice, one version is deliberately
overexposed to show up the shape of the birds a bit more.

I think If I had seen these in a conifer in winter I would have settled
on Red-winged Crossbill. But that seems unlikely here. None of the
birds with a visible face was sideways on.

Any suggestions appreciated.

Andrew Hart

Calgary



<*> View Attachments on Web https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
------------------------------------
Posted by: Andrew Hart
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: Cameras, lenses and spotting scope for sale
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 15:37 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I have  a number of good quality cameras , lenses and a high quality spotting scope for sale.
For enquiries contact me offline.


Thanks you
Richard Klauke
Vilna, Alberta



Subject: FFCPPSOC Fish Creek PP--Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA Jun 22, 2017
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 14:25 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
FFCPPSOC Fish Creek PP--Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA Jun 22, 2017 9:00 AM
- 12:15 PM



1. Canada Goose - 8
2. Gadwall - 4
3. American Wigeon - 2
4. Mallard - 20 - 14 young
5. Blue-winged Teal - 1
6. Common Merganser - 20 - 16 young
7. Pied-billed Grebe - 2
8. Double-crested Cormorant - 3
9. American White Pelican - 35
10. Great Blue Heron - 1
11. Bald Eagle - 1
12. Swainson's Hawk - 1
13. American Coot - 3
14. Killdeer - 2
15. Spotted Sandpiper - 2
16. Franklin's Gull - 200
17. Belted Kingfisher - 2
18. Downy Woodpecker - 1
19. Hairy Woodpecker - 1
20. Northern Flicker - 4
21. Merlin - 1
22. Western Wood-Pewee - 1
23. Least Flycatcher - 4
24. Eastern Kingbird - 1
25. Warbling Vireo - 2
26. Black-billed Magpie - 7
27. American Crow - 1
28. Common Raven - 2
29. Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5
30. Tree Swallow - 7
31. Barn Swallow - 6+
32. House Wren - 7
33. American Robin - 4
34. Gray Catbird - 1
35. Cedar Waxwing - 6
36. Yellow Warbler - 5
37. Clay-colored Sparrow - 6
38. Savannah Sparrow - 31
39. Song Sparrow - 4
40. Red-winged Blackbird - 70
41. Yellow-headed Blackbird - 1
42. Brewer's Blackbird - 1
43. Common Grackle - 1
44. Brown-headed Cowbird - 10
45. Baltimore Oriole - 2 - On nest, feeding young!



White-tail Deer - 1



Leaders: Stephen Phelps, David Mitchell



Subject: Nature Calgary - Lafarge Meadows - FCPP - Tuesday June 20
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 8:20 am
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Posting on behalf of Nimali Seneviratne


Fish Creek PP--Lafarge Meadows, Calgary, Alberta, CA
20-Jun-2017 6:30 PM - 8:35 PM
3.0 kilometer(s)
11 participants walked from the Boat Launch parking lot in FCPP to Lafarge Meadows and back. Temp. around 25 degrees C with a slight breeze. At the end of the walk at around 8.30 PM wind gusts of up to 80km caused severe dust clouds.



Canada Goose 16
Gadwall 3
American Wigeon 4
Mallard 8
Blue-winged Teal 3
Common Goldeneye 2
Common Merganser 1
Ruddy Duck 2
Red-necked Grebe 2
Double-crested Cormorant 4
American White Pelican 71
Great Blue Heron 4
Black-crowned Night-Heron 5 One seen at storm water pond. Other 4 observed flying
Osprey 7
American Coot 1
Killdeer 1
Spotted Sandpiper 10
Greater Yellowlegs 1
gull sp. 1
Common Tern 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
Belted Kingfisher 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 4
Western Wood-Pewee 2
Least Flycatcher 2
Eastern Kingbird 6
Warbling Vireo 2
Black-billed Magpie 1
Common Raven 3
Tree Swallow 45
Bank Swallow 25
Cliff Swallow 15
Black-capped Chickadee 3
House Wren 6
American Robin 1
European Starling 6
Cedar Waxwing 5
Yellow Warbler 6
Clay-colored Sparrow 4
Savannah Sparrow 5
Song Sparrow 4
Red-winged Blackbird 42
Yellow-headed Blackbird 23
Brewer's Blackbird 3
Common Grackle 3
Baltimore Oriole 1 Seen and heard by leader
American Goldfinch 1



Melanie & Nimali Seneviratne
Calgary, AB



Subject: FFCPP Society Fish Creek PP--The Ranch and Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA 21-Jun-2017
Date: Wed Jun 21 2017 16:37 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
FFCPP Society Fish Creek PP--The Ranch and Burnsmead, Calgary, Alberta, CA
21-Jun-2017 9:10 AM - 12:33 PM



1. Canada Goose - 15 - - 6 adults 9 goslings
2. Gadwall - 4
3. American Wigeon - 6
4. Mallard - 25
5. Blue-winged Teal - 2
6. Lesser Scaup - 3
7. Common Goldeneye - 3
8. Common Merganser - 2
9. Ring-necked Pheasant - 2
10. Pied-billed Grebe - 2
11. Double-crested Cormorant - 4
12. American White Pelican - 15
13. Great Blue Heron - 3
14. Osprey - 2
15. Swainson's Hawk - 5
16. Sora - 1
17. Killdeer - 1
18. Wilson's Snipe - 1
19. Spotted Sandpiper - 4
20. Franklin's Gull - 75
21. Ring-billed Gull - 1
22. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) - 3
23. Great Horned Owl - 2 - both juveniles
24. Belted Kingfisher - 2
25. Downy Woodpecker - 4
26. Hairy Woodpecker - 1
27. Northern Flicker - 4
28. Western Wood-Pewee - 5
29. Least Flycatcher - 9
30. Eastern Kingbird - 1
31. Warbling Vireo - 2
32. Black-billed Magpie - 1
33. American Crow - 3
34. Common Raven - 3
35. Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5
36. Tree Swallow - 50
37. Barn Swallow - 2
38. Cliff Swallow - 10
39. Black-capped Chickadee - 8
40. White-breasted Nuthatch - 2
41. House Wren - 11
42. American Robin - 15
43. Gray Catbird - 1
44. European Starling - 6
45. Cedar Waxwing - 5
46. Yellow Warbler - 7
47. Clay-colored Sparrow - 15
48. Savannah Sparrow - 20
49. Song Sparrow - 3
50. Brewers blackbird - 1
51. Red-winged Blackbird - 50
52. Yellow-headed Blackbird - 10
53. Common Grackle - 10
54. Brown-headed Cowbird - 5
55. Baltimore Oriole - 3
56. House Finch - 4
57. American Goldfinch - 5
58. House Sparrow - 5



Leaders: Dan Edwards, Stephen Phelps, David Mitchell, Rose Painter



Subject: white(mostly) empidonax flycatcher
Date: Wed Jun 21 2017 16:18 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I had this same bird a few weeks ago at BHSPP just n. of the parking lot. It
was singing a Least Flycatcher's song. Everything else was consistent with
this species; size, shape, habitat, etc.



Robert Storms

Calgary,AB



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antiviru...



Subject: Richard Fyfe
Date: Wed Jun 21 2017 12:24 pm
From: Albertabird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The naturalist community will be saddened to hear of the passing of Dr. Richard Fyfe. He died in Edmonton on June 17.

As an Officer of the Canadian Wildlife Service Dr. Fyfe had many accomplishments but perhaps he is best known for spearheading the Peregrine Falcon recovery program which brought the falcon back from near extinction. He received the Order of Canada in 2000.

It was on a visit to Calgary in 1968 when he encouraged a group of us to take part in the newly organized Breeding Bird Survey. Some of us are still involved.

A full obituary can be found in the website of the Edmonton Journal.

Ian Halladay
Calgary





------------------------------------
Posted by: Nora and Ian Halladay
------------------------------------

_____________________________________________________________

* List owner: Albertabird-owner@yahoogroups.com
* Guidelines: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
Albertabird-digest@yahoogroups.com
Albertabird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Albertabird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Contact us.

  • 93 Clinton Street Suite ABA
  • Delaware City, DE 19706
  • Toll Free: (800) 850-2473
  • Phone: (302) 838-3660
  • Fax: (302) 838-3651

How to join or post to a listserv >>