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Updated on October 21, 2017, 10:05 am

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21 Oct: @ 09:57:31 
Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 20 (24th species of shorebird arrives...) [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Oct: @ 20:22:36 
Re: Bald Eagle vs. American Coot [RICK HOWIE r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Oct: @ 19:39:44 
Re: Solving the Juvenile Gull quiz... [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
20 Oct: @ 18:58:56 
Re: Bald Eagle vs. American Coot [Allan Dupilka adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Oct: @ 18:38:07 
Bald Eagle vs. American Coot [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Oct: @ 17:53:21 
Re: Solving the Juvenile Gull quiz... [Dcecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Oct: @ 15:42:56 
Solving the Juvenile Gull quiz... [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Oct: @ 14:50:35 
BCFO Bird Records Committee latest decision (October 2017) now published [gclulow@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
18 Oct: @ 22:20:39 
"juvenile gulls challenge" [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
18 Oct: @ 19:51:01 
Bald Eagle Count [adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
18 Oct: @ 12:38:26 
Bald Eagle Count on South Thompson River [adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
17 Oct: @ 17:24:44 
Re: juvenile gulls: ID challenge [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
17 Oct: @ 15:49:19 
Re: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues [leighton.douglas@yahoo.com [bcintbird]]
17 Oct: @ 10:03:37 
juvenile gulls: ID challenge [1 Attachment] [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
17 Oct: @ 00:50:58 
Re: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
16 Oct: @ 23:41:33 
RE: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues ['Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
16 Oct: @ 22:29:44 
RE: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues [leighton.douglas@yahoo.com [bcintbird]]
16 Oct: @ 21:43:09 
RE: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues ['Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
16 Oct: @ 09:44:23 
Re: juvenile gulls [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
15 Oct: @ 21:40:01 
juvenile gulls [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
15 Oct: @ 17:31:45 
Re: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
15 Oct: @ 11:48:45 
Re: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues [rklauke@mcsnet.ca [bcintbird]]
15 Oct: @ 10:48:03 
Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues [3 Attachments] [adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
14 Oct: @ 15:25:50 
Re: Snow bunting lake country [Michelle Lamberson mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
14 Oct: @ 15:16:30 
Snow bunting lake country [1 Attachment] [Michelle Lamberson mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
14 Oct: @ 15:14:34 
Re: Snow bunting lake country [Michelle Lamberson mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
14 Oct: @ 12:20:03 
Snow birds [Tammy Proctor birdsonly4me@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
13 Oct: @ 10:10:04 
@@@@#"#- [David Chapman chpmndavid@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
12 Oct: @ 23:17:24 
Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadee (was Re: Salmon Arm Bay for 12 Oct) [Dcecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
12 Oct: @ 21:18:11 
Re: Salmon Arm Bay for 12 Oct [leighton.douglas@yahoo.com [bcintbird]]
12 Oct: @ 18:22:01 
Salmon Arm Bay for 12 Oct [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
12 Oct: @ 13:53:14 
Black-and-white Warbler [Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
12 Oct: @ 12:18:28 
Black-and-white warbler continues [1 Attachment] [drdrdrx@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
11 Oct: @ 11:54:48 
Re: Long-billed Dowitcher's [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
11 Oct: @ 10:26:54 
Re: Long-billed Dowitcher's [RICK HOWIE r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
11 Oct: @ 09:50:52 
Re: Long-billed Dowitcher's [Allan Dupilka adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
11 Oct: @ 07:55:33 
Re: Long-billed Dowitcher's [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
10 Oct: @ 20:04:00 
Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 10 [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
10 Oct: @ 19:01:44 
Re: Long-billed Dowitcher's [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
10 Oct: @ 18:53:12 
Re: That gull [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
10 Oct: @ 07:50:15 
Re: Long-billed Dowitcher's [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
09 Oct: @ 20:41:00 
Long-billed Dowitcher's [1 Attachment] [adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
09 Oct: @ 18:12:40 
That gull [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
06 Oct: @ 23:03:01 
Re: That interesting gull [jim_deirdre@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
04 Oct: @ 21:31:18 
RE: Long-eared Owl in Kane Valley ['Dick Cannings' dickcannings@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
04 Oct: @ 17:11:19 
That interesting gull [3 Attachments] [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
04 Oct: @ 14:04:04 
Re: Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 2 (8 species of shorebird) [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
04 Oct: @ 14:00:44 
Re: Tern at Penticton [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
04 Oct: @ 12:25:45 
Re: Tern at Penticton [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
04 Oct: @ 10:32:24 
Re: Tern at Penticton [Michael Force pagodroma@yahoo.com [bcintbird]]





Subject: Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 20 (24th species of shorebird arrives...)
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 9:57 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Although the morning started out rather dismal it turned out to be a lovely
warm day, so much so that at least 2 western painted turtles dug themselves
out of the mud to surface.


Highlights:

Red-throated Loon 1 near mouth of Salmon River (too far off to age)
Pectoral Sandpiper 15 juvs
Long-billed Dowitcher 23 in pre-basic moult
Dunlin 1 basic (shorebird species #24 for this season)
Lapland Longspur 2


Cheers
Don Cecile



Subject: Bald Eagle vs. American Coot
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 20:22 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I have observed this predation technique on various occasions Don. Very intriguing to watch. I have seen eagles win quite often once they get a coot on his own from the main flock. Some eagles seem to give up before exhausting the coot. This may be Darwin in action. If you don't have the jam to continue the pursuit, perhaps you won't survive.Rick HowieKamloops


Sent from my Samsung device

-------- Original message --------
From: "Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]"
Date: 2017-10-20 4:38 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [bcintbird] Bald Eagle vs. American Coot

This morning as I was observing birds at the mouth of the Salmon River, I
noticed the Coots were in a tight flock on the water. This is their defence
against avian predators (usually Bald Eagles in fall/winter). Sure enough
as I looked around I found the suspect Eagle that had scoped out the group.
One Coot was separated from the flock and as I suspected, was the target the
Eagle had in mind. The Eagle must keep this Coot away from the main flock
if it is to be successful.
I watched as the Eagle made several mock attacks (presumably to tire the
Coot forcing it to dive repeatedly and perhaps shorten its breath). The
Eagle would attempt to hover as best an Eagle can, over the submerged Coot
and dive toward it every time it surfaced. Finally the Eagle came down
talons first and clutched the submerged Coot and then sat" on it in the
water until it drowned. I was curious to see what the Eagle would do next
It attempted a takeoff from the water with the Coot but was unsuccessful.
It rested for some time before trying again, and yet again it was not able
to achieve lift-off. At one point, the Eagle used its wings as paddles to
relocate and I thought it was going to make an attempt to reach the shore
but in the end it stopped and rested. It took 5 attempts before the Eagle
was able to achieve lift-off. Quite an effort for a meal!

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: Solving the Juvenile Gull quiz...
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 19:39 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Don,
Your quiz was invaluable. I have been thinking about the images for days now and this morning I checked out about 150 gulls at Kirkland Park at the mouth of Coldstream Creek, Kal Lake, where they were lounging and feeding on dead fish. I spotted a Thayer's very much like the top left bird and studied bill shapes on first-year Herrings and Cals. I got most of the answers wrong on the quiz but that doesn't mean I didn't learn anything. I feel like I've taken an important step in my gull knowledge. Many thanks for the posts.
Chris S.
On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:42 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:















Thanks to all those that participated. I received several private responses to the gull quiz and to date only one response matches my thoughts on these birds. Goes to show how difficult gull identification can be! I hope that the following comments are helpful as I share my thoughts on these birds (whether Im right or wrong is another matter.)Initially there were 4 birds in the grid then I added 2 more to help things along.

Soft parts will not be addressed as all of these birds have dark eyes and pink legs!
Starting top left:
Juvenile Thayers Gull: note the overall paleness of this bird due to more extensive pale edgings to coverts. Note also the overall size and shape (including bill dimensions) seems to match that of HEGU. This is a rather hefty THGU, many of them are daintier than this beast. Note the light brown primaries and tertials, in between the tones of HEGU and GWGU.Top right:
Juv. California Gull: note the two-toned bill, extensive pink base rather straight edges to upper and lower mandible (the bill looks pinched where it meets the head), a rather dark-chocolate bird with solid dark (almost black) primaires and tertials. This bird is a bit smaller (more slender) than HEGU. Long primary projection relative to other large gulls.Notice also the hint of a second bar" of dark at the base of the greater coverts.
Mid left:
Juv. Glaucous-winged Gull: note the massive all-dark bill longest bill of any of these birds. Head shape not so useful due to posture.Note overall light brown tones of the bird matching the primaries/tertials/tail and greater coverts.
Mid right:
Juv. Herring X Glaucous-winged Gull: note the smooth light wash of this bird and how it is so similar to the colouration of the GWGu.It is very much the size/shape of Herring Gull otherwise It has paler than usual primaries and especially pale tertials (my impression has been that whether light or dark, tertials and primaries of the large gulls always seem to match).
Bottom left:Juvenile Herring Gull: note the almost black primaries and tertials and how they match each other in shade unlike the bird mid right.

Bottom right:
1st basic Ring-billed Gull: not one of the large gulls but often causing confusion with other young gulls. Note here how small and dainty this bird (and bill) appear compared to the large gulls. Note also how pale this bird is, larger gulls can approach this paleness in their 2nd year but not their first year. Ring-billed gull acquires the gray covert feathers ahead of other larger gulls. Note the really long primary projection, blackish primaries with much lighter tertials (not what you would see in larger gulls)

I hope that more people will consider looking at gulls, and for those that do, I hope this has helped sort out some of the features to look for.
Cheers,Don CecileVernon, BC




















__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

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Also, consider joining these groups.

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Subject: Bald Eagle vs. American Coot
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 18:58 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Watched this process on Little Shuswap many times and have never seen an
Eagle (win). Always tired out first but may be factor of more open water
here than Salmon River mouth?

Allan Dupilka


On 2017-10-20 4:37 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
>
>
> This morning as I was observing birds at the mouth of the Salmon
> River, I noticed the Coots were in a tight flock on the water. This is
> their defence against avian predators (usually Bald Eagles in
> fall/winter). ?Sure enough as I looked around I found the suspect
> Eagle that had scoped out the group. ?One Coot was separated from the
> flock and as I suspected, was the target the Eagle had in mind. ?The
> Eagle must keep this Coot away from the main flock if it is to be
> successful?.
> ??I watched as the Eagle made several mock attacks (presumably to tire
> the Coot forcing it to dive repeatedly and perhaps shorten its
> breath). ?The Eagle would attempt to ?hover? as best an Eagle can,
> over the submerged Coot and dive toward it every time it surfaced.
> ?Finally the Eagle came down talons first and clutched the submerged
> Coot and ?then ?sat" on it in the water until it drowned. ?I was
> curious to see what th e Eagle would do next?
> It attempted a takeoff from the water with the Coot but was
> unsuccessful. ?It rested for some time before trying again, and yet
> again it was not able to achieve lift-off. ?At one point, the Eagle
> used its wings as paddles to relocate and I thought it was going to
> make an attempt to reach the shore but in the end it stopped and
> rested. ?It took 5 attempts before the Eagle was able to achieve
> lift-off. ?Quite an effort for a meal!
>
> Cheers,
> Don Cecile
> Vernon
>
>
>



Subject: Bald Eagle vs. American Coot
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 18:38 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
This morning as I was observing birds at the mouth of the Salmon River, I
noticed the Coots were in a tight flock on the water. This is their defence
against avian predators (usually Bald Eagles in fall/winter). Sure enough
as I looked around I found the suspect Eagle that had scoped out the group.
One Coot was separated from the flock and as I suspected, was the target the
Eagle had in mind. The Eagle must keep this Coot away from the main flock
if it is to be successful.
I watched as the Eagle made several mock attacks (presumably to tire the
Coot forcing it to dive repeatedly and perhaps shorten its breath). The
Eagle would attempt to hover as best an Eagle can, over the submerged Coot
and dive toward it every time it surfaced. Finally the Eagle came down
talons first and clutched the submerged Coot and then sat" on it in the
water until it drowned. I was curious to see what the Eagle would do next
It attempted a takeoff from the water with the Coot but was unsuccessful.
It rested for some time before trying again, and yet again it was not able
to achieve lift-off. At one point, the Eagle used its wings as paddles to
relocate and I thought it was going to make an attempt to reach the shore
but in the end it stopped and rested. It took 5 attempts before the Eagle
was able to achieve lift-off. Quite an effort for a meal!

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: Solving the Juvenile Gull quiz...
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 17:53 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Chris, thanks for your comments, I am glad you found the exercise helpful!
Cheers,Don CecileVernon

Sent from my iPhone
On Oct 20, 2017, at 2:51 PM, Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com> wrote:

Don,
Your quiz was invaluable. I have been thinking about the images for days now and this morning I checked out about 150 gulls at Kirkland Park at the mouth of Coldstream Creek, Kal Lake, where they were lounging and feeding on dead fish. I spotted a Thayer's very much like the top left bird and studied bill shapes on first-year Herrings and Cals. I got most of the answers wrong on the quiz but that doesn't mean I didn't learn anything. I feel like I've taken an important step in my gull knowledge. Many thanks for the posts.
Chris S.
On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:42 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:















Thanks to all those that participated. I received several private responses to the gull quiz and to date only one response matches my thoughts on these birds. Goes to show how difficult gull identification can be! I hope that the following comments are helpful as I share my thoughts on these birds (whether Im right or wrong is another matter.)Initially there were 4 birds in the grid then I added 2 more to help things along.

Soft parts will not be addressed as all of these birds have dark eyes and pink legs!
Starting top left:
Juvenile Thayers Gull: note the overall paleness of this bird due to more extensive pale edgings to coverts. Note also the overall size and shape (including bill dimensions) seems to match that of HEGU. This is a rather hefty THGU, many of them are daintier than this beast. Note the light brown primaries and tertials, in between the tones of HEGU and GWGU.Top right:
Juv. California Gull: note the two-toned bill, extensive pink base rather straight edges to upper and lower mandible (the bill looks pinched where it meets the head), a rather dark-chocolate bird with solid dark (almost black) primaires and tertials. This bird is a bit smaller (more slender) than HEGU. Long primary projection relative to other large gulls.Notice also the hint of a second bar" of dark at the base of the greater coverts.
Mid left:
Juv. Glaucous-winged Gull: note the massive all-dark bill longest bill of any of these birds. Head shape not so useful due to posture.Note overall light brown tones of the bird matching the primaries/tertials/tail and greater coverts.
Mid right:
Juv. Herring X Glaucous-winged Gull: note the smooth light wash of this bird and how it is so similar to the colouration of the GWGu.It is very much the size/shape of Herring Gull otherwise It has paler than usual primaries and especially pale tertials (my impression has been that whether light or dark, tertials and primaries of the large gulls always seem to match).
Bottom left:Juvenile Herring Gull: note the almost black primaries and tertials and how they match each other in shade unlike the bird mid right.

Bottom right:
1st basic Ring-billed Gull: not one of the large gulls but often causing confusion with other young gulls. Note here how small and dainty this bird (and bill) appear compared to the large gulls. Note also how pale this bird is, larger gulls can approach this paleness in their 2nd year but not their first year. Ring-billed gull acquires the gray covert feathers ahead of other larger gulls. Note the really long primary projection, blackish primaries with much lighter tertials (not what you would see in larger gulls)

I hope that more people will consider looking at gulls, and for those that do, I hope this has helped sort out some of the features to look for.
Cheers,Don CecileVernon, BC




















__._,_.___







Posted by: Dcecile <dcecile@shaw.ca>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group


New Photos
1






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Solving the Juvenile Gull quiz...
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 15:42 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks to all those that participated.  I received several private responses
to the gull quiz and to date only one response matches my thoughts on
these birds. Goes to show how difficult gull identification can be! I hope
that the following comments are helpful as I share my thoughts on these
birds (whether Im right or wrong is another matter.)
Initially there were 4 birds in the grid then I added 2 more to help things
along.


Soft parts will not be addressed as all of these birds have dark eyes and
pink legs!

Starting top left:

Juvenile Thayers Gull: note the overall paleness of this bird due to more
extensive pale edgings to coverts. Note also the overall size and shape
(including bill dimensions) seems to match that of HEGU. This is a rather
hefty THGU, many of them are daintier than this beast. Note the light brown
primaries and tertials, in between the tones of HEGU and GWGU.

Top right:

Juv. California Gull: note the two-toned bill, extensive pink base rather
straight edges to upper and lower mandible (the bill looks pinched where
it meets the head), a rather dark-chocolate bird with solid dark (almost
black) primaires and tertials. This bird is a bit smaller (more slender)
than HEGU. Long primary projection relative to other large gulls.
Notice also the hint of a second bar" of dark at the base of the greater
coverts.

Mid left:

Juv. Glaucous-winged Gull: note the massive all-dark bill longest bill of
any of these birds. Head shape not so useful due to posture.
Note overall light brown tones of the bird matching the
primaries/tertials/tail and greater coverts.

Mid right:

Juv. Herring X Glaucous-winged Gull: note the smooth light wash of this
bird and how it is so similar to the colouration of the GWGu.
It is very much the size/shape of Herring Gull otherwise It has paler than
usual primaries and especially pale tertials (my impression has been that
whether light or dark, tertials and primaries of the large gulls always seem
to match).

Bottom left:
Juvenile Herring Gull: note the almost black primaries and tertials and how
they match each other in shade unlike the bird mid right.


Bottom right:

1st basic Ring-billed Gull: not one of the large gulls but often causing
confusion with other young gulls. Note here how small and dainty this bird
(and bill) appear compared to the large gulls. Note also how pale this bird
is, larger gulls can approach this paleness in their 2nd year but not their
first year. Ring-billed gull acquires the gray covert feathers ahead of
other larger gulls. Note the really long primary projection, blackish
primaries with much lighter tertials (not what you would see in larger
gulls)


I hope that more people will consider looking at gulls, and for those that
do, I hope this has helped sort out some of the features to look for.

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon, BC



Subject: BCFO Bird Records Committee latest decision (October 2017) now published
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 14:50 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The latest sets of rare bird records accepted by the BCFO Bird Records Committee are now posted on the BCFO website http://wp.me/P1W1bo-1Wb.



Included in these decisions are four first records for British Columbia.



Should you see, or have past sightings of provincially rare birds, your submissions to the committee are encouraged and welcomed. In the BRC section of the website you will also find the BCFO Rare Bird Report Form, and the Provincial Review List to support your submissions .


George Clulow, Burnaby



Subject: "juvenile gulls challenge"
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 22:20 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi all, thanks to all who have responded to the challenge although that is
not the correct word, it is challenging to ID gulls but the image provided
with associated gulls is not intended to be a challenge but rather a
learning opportunity and hopefully one that might encourage further study of
gulls.

Of all of the private responses received thus far, only one is congruent
with my thoughts on these birds. Based on some of the comments received , I
thought it best to re-work the original image (whilst maintaining their
positions in the grid). Imagine, if you will, that while you were studying
these 4 birds, 2 more flew in this may help you re-calibrate your original
thoughts on these birds
So without giving anything away just yet have a 2nd look with these new
birds at the bottom of the grid.

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: Bald Eagle Count
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 19:51 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Update from yesterdays comment.


Today we took a short trip (from Chase to the end of Adams Lake/Niskonlith IRs on the north side of South Thompson River). Counted 137 Bald Eagles of which they were mostly sitting on sandbars or shore. This was a short 11 km which would be 13 per km and since we could only see approx. 1/2 of the shoreline from the road this could be 26 Bald Eagles per km.


Reba and Allan Dupilka
Little Shuswap Lake



Subject: Bald Eagle Count on South Thompson River
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 12:38 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
On the last trip from Chase to Dallas area (48 kms) we counted  68 Bald Eagles which breaks our previous record over the years of 44. Excellent Bald Eagle fall count all along this part of the River this year even in a year of very low salmon returns. Next year is the big year in Sockeye Salmon returns.

Allan Dupilka
Little Shuswap Lake



Subject: juvenile gulls: ID challenge
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 17:24 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Don,

I finally figured out that what is called 'picture grid' was what you
referred to as 'montage'( well you have to allow for me being and
English pedant:-)) and then was able to download that, and look at he
images more closely. Just about ready to? post my opinons to you offline.

I was at Penticton again this morning and took some similar images -
could become a fixture of bcintbirds.

Barry


On 17-Oct-17 8:03 AM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
> [Attachment(s) <#TopText> from Don Cecile included below]
> HI all, I shall attempt to imbed in this email, the mosaic of images I
> took the other morning of several juvenile gulls. ?It seems that
> posting the link does not take one directly to the image posted. ?I
> hope that this is a helpful learning experience. ?It is unusual to be
> able to provide photos of various species all taken in the same
> lighting conditions.
>
> Have fun,
>
> Cheers,
> Don Cecile
> Vernon
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada



---
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Subject: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 15:49 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks or posting those photos Chris. But unfortunately I can't see them! Yahoo email seems to be up to its old tricks again, or something.


I think the relatively high number of Red Fox Sparrows we get here probably come from the Peace River region. As Alexander Mackenzie discovered, it is relatively easy to cross the Rockies up there and once over they are in the Rocky Mountain Trench - a natural migration path south, passing here.


In any case, the red ones sure are - in my opinion - beautiful birds.


Better send this fast as the wind just started howling and the power may go off anytime.


Doug Leighton
Blaeberry



Subject:
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 10:03 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
HI all, I shall attempt to imbed in this email, the mosaic of images I took
the other morning of several juvenile gulls. It seems that posting the link
does not take one directly to the image posted. I hope that this is a
helpful learning experience. It is unusual to be able to provide photos of
various species all taken in the same lighting conditions.

Have fun,

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 0:50 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Here's an iliaca Eastern Red Fox Sparrow from Newfoundland. I took these
photos in Gros Morne National Park this past June. The Fox Sparrows of
Newfoundland reminded very much of the Red Fox Sparrows of the Fort St.
John and Dawson Creek areas of B.C., much more brightly coloured than the
Slate-coloured Fox Sparrows (altivagans) that we have atop Silver Star
Mountain, and none of them looking like the Song Sparrow that was
originally responsible for this thread.

The western populations of iliaca have also been called zaboria, just to
make things even more complicated.

Chris Siddle






On Mon, Oct 16, 2017 at 9:41 PM, 'Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <
bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
> Thanks for the photo of the "red" Fox Sparrow Doug. The red Fox Sparrow is
> considered to be part of the iliaca group that breeds across northern
> Canada from the east right up into Alaska and south to northern BC north of
> the peace River. The taxonomy is complex with morphological variation and a
> host of possible sub-species within all of the groups. The interior BC
> breeding cluster is considered to be the schistacea group with our local
> interior races being P.i. altivagans and P.i. olivacea with much variation
> and possible interbreeding with the iliaca and unalaschenis group where
> ranges come into contact.
>
> Those red birds that you get should generally migrate east of the Rockies
> but obviously a few stray west of their normal routes.
>
> The few winter birds here that I have seen photos of appear to belong to
> the unalaschensis group (6 possible races) which normally winter from
> southern coastal BC and southwards. The races breed from Alaska south into
> coastal and parts of western mainland BC.
>
> Once here, I saw an extremely gray, bright Fox Sparrow which probably
> belonged to one of the more southern megarhyncha group (breeds from
> southern Oregon to California but did not get a photo to study.
>
> Apparently, hybridization between the unalaschensis, iliaca and schistacea
> groups is complex wherever they meet in BC and morphology can be misleading
> when trying to distinguish some individuals into groups. ie morphology and
> mtDNA don't always agree.
>
> So a fun species to observe and track.
>
>
>
> Rick Howie
>
> Kamloops
>
>
>
> ph - 250-578-7542 <(250)%20578-7542>
>
> cell - 250-371-2551 <(250)%20371-2551>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues
Date: Mon Oct 16 2017 23:41 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks for the photo of the "red" Fox Sparrow Doug. The red Fox Sparrow is
considered to be part of the iliaca group that breeds across northern Canada
from the east right up into Alaska and south to northern BC north of the
peace River. The taxonomy is complex with morphological variation and a host
of possible sub-species within all of the groups. The interior BC breeding
cluster is considered to be the schistacea group with our local interior
races being P.i. altivagans and P.i. olivacea with much variation and
possible interbreeding with the iliaca and unalaschenis group where ranges
come into contact.

Those red birds that you get should generally migrate east of the Rockies
but obviously a few stray west of their normal routes.

The few winter birds here that I have seen photos of appear to belong to the
unalaschensis group (6 possible races) which normally winter from southern
coastal BC and southwards. The races breed from Alaska south into coastal
and parts of western mainland BC.

Once here, I saw an extremely gray, bright Fox Sparrow which probably
belonged to one of the more southern megarhyncha group (breeds from southern
Oregon to California but did not get a photo to study.

Apparently, hybridization between the unalaschensis, iliaca and schistacea
groups is complex wherever they meet in BC and morphology can be misleading
when trying to distinguish some individuals into groups. ie morphology and
mtDNA don't always agree.

So a fun species to observe and track.



Rick Howie

Kamloops



ph - 250-578-7542

cell - 250-371-2551



Subject: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues
Date: Mon Oct 16 2017 22:29 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Rick, I remember reading about that "genuine western Fox Sparrow" on this forum, as I recall.


Here in BC's Far East, Red Fox Sparrows show up as fall or spring migrants to the feeders quite regularly - at least 5 in the past decade. Like almost all sparrows they avoid winter here but I see on eBird that Roger Beardmore had one wintering in Salmon Arm (with stunning photos).


Attaching a photo of one that was here in late September this year. As far as beauty goes, I think the red ones win the pageant.


Doug Leighton
Blaeberry



Subject: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues
Date: Mon Oct 16 2017 21:43 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I have problems accessing the website where your photos are posted Allan,
but the responses indicate Song Sparrow. The red race of Fox Sparrow is an
eastern race as you likely know. But keep watching. Many years ago, I did
see a genuine western Fox Sparrow in winter at a feeder along the north side
of Little Shuswap Lake. Photos would be great because I suspect that many of
our wintering Fox Sparrows (as rare as they are), are not the local breeding
race. Rather, they are a coastal sub-species that move inland for whatever
reason.



Rick Howie

Kamloops



Subject: juvenile gulls
Date: Mon Oct 16 2017 9:44 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Don,

The URL opens up a large selection of photos of many species - not all
gulls. Some decidedly tricky:-)

Barry



On 15-Oct-17 7:39 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
> Hi all, ?large gulls can be quite a challenge to identify. I was
> inspired by the juvenile gull that Barry posted from Penticton as it
> created a nice learning opportunity. ?This morning I was able to
> photograph several juvenile gulls all in the same lighting conditions
> within seconds of each other so I decided to prepare a montage of
> these birds for you all to consider. ?You are welcome to play along
> privately or publicly as you wish. ?If you find the ID simple on these
> photos, please allow a bit of time for others to consider before
> sharing your thoughts. ?I do have the advantage of having seen these
> birds in the wild and I recognize how difficult it may be to ID birds
> from photo. I hope that these images will help generate interest in
> taking time to familiarize yourselves with gull ID and I hope it will
> be educational. ?I will post my comments on these birds a few days
> hence. Oh, I did photograph all of these birds this morning in Salmon Arm.
> The montage can be found here:
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
>
>
> Cheers,
> Don Cecile
> Vernon
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada



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Subject: juvenile gulls
Date: Sun Oct 15 2017 21:40 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi all,  large gulls can be quite a challenge to identify. I was inspired by
the juvenile gull that Barry posted from Penticton as it created a nice
learning opportunity. This morning I was able to photograph several
juvenile gulls all in the same lighting conditions within seconds of each
other so I decided to prepare a montage of these birds for you all to
consider. You are welcome to play along privately or publicly as you wish.
If you find the ID simple on these photos, please allow a bit of time for
others to consider before sharing your thoughts. I do have the advantage of
having seen these birds in the wild and I recognize how difficult it may be
to ID birds from photo. I hope that these images will help generate interest
in taking time to familiarize yourselves with gull ID and I hope it will be
educational. I will post my comments on these birds a few days hence. Oh, I
did photograph all of these birds this morning in Salmon Arm.
The montage can be found here:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...


Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues
Date: Sun Oct 15 2017 17:31 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Allan,

In my opinion it is one of the many Song Sparrow variants that may be
encountered this time of the year.

Barry


On 15-Oct-17 8:47 AM, adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
> [Attachment(s) <#TopText> from adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca
> [bcintbird] included below]
>
> We had this very sprightly individual come to the feeder the other
> day. Photos are a little blurry and no photos of back but the color is
> true as it was dull day and normal exposure.
>
>
> Initial research of guides and internet photos led us to possible Fox
> Sparrow (Red) but found a fair amount of variation in this species.
> As we have never seen this sub-species before we would appreciate any
> detailed thoughts on it's identification.
>
>
> Allan Dupilka
>
> Little Shuswap Lake
>
>
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



Subject: Possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but with issues
Date: Sun Oct 15 2017 11:48 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Allen
Looks like a ssp of Song Sparrow NOT Fox to me.

Richard Klauke Alberta

On 2017-10-15 09:47, adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
> [Attachment(s) from adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird] included
> below]
>
> We had this very sprightly individual come to the feeder the other
> day. Photos are a little blurry and no photos of back but the color is
> true as it was dull day and normal exposure.
>
> Initial research of guides and internet photos led us to possible Fox
> Sparrow (Red) but found a fair amount of variation in this species.
> As we have never seen this sub-species before we would appreciate any
> detailed thoughts on it's identification.
>
> Allan Dupilka
>
> Little Shuswap Lake
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [2]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [3]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [4]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [5]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [6]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [7]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [8]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [9] https://yho.com/1wwmgg
> [10]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
> [11]
> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo;_...
> [12] https://info.yahoo.com/privacy...
> [13] https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...


------------------------------------
Posted by: rklauke@mcsnet.ca
------------------------------------

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Subject:
Date: Sun Oct 15 2017 10:48 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
We had this very sprightly individual come to the feeder the other day. Photos are a little blurry and no photos of back but the color is true as it was dull day and normal exposure.


Initial research of guides and internet photos led us to possible Fox Sparrow (Red) but found a fair amount of variation in this species. As we have never seen this sub-species before we would appreciate any detailed thoughts on it's identification.


Allan Dupilka
Little Shuswap Lake



Subject: Snow bunting lake country
Date: Sat Oct 14 2017 15:25 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Folks,I apologize. My iPhone autocorrected some of my message. 
Location: Lake Country, Beasley park (according to map)On south shore of wood lake. Along wooded path just west of the eastern terminus of the path.
Sorry for the spam!


Michelle N. LambersonLake Country

Sent from my iPhone, my apologies for the brevity & autocorrect errors

On Oct 14, 2017, at 1:11 PM, Michelle Lamberson mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
























Not sure if its a rarity here but Im. Looking at what I believe to be a snow bunting on the south shore of Wood Lake Koty of the wooded area north of the soccer

fields ( along the path).


M













MICHELLE


Michelle N. Lamberson

Sent from my iPhone, my apologies for the brevity & autocorrect errors









__._,_.___







Posted by: Michelle Lamberson <mnlamberson@yahoo.ca>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

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Visit Your Group






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Subject:
Date: Sat Oct 14 2017 15:16 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
<*>[Attachment(s) from Michelle Lamberson included below]

Not sure if its a rarity here but Im. Looking at what I believe to be a snow bunting on the south shore of Wood Lake Koty of the wooded area north of the soccer
fields ( along the path).

M


<*>Attachment(s) from Michelle Lamberson:

<*> 1 of 1 Photo(s) https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
<*> IMG_5996.jpg

------------------------------------
Posted by: Michelle Lamberson
------------------------------------

To contact the moderator email
bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com
Also, consider joining these groups.
bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.
If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/
From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.

------------------------------------

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<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
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<*> Your email settings:
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Subject: Snow bunting lake country
Date: Sat Oct 14 2017 15:14 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Should have said Saturday, oct 14 at 1:10.

Michelle N. Lamberson
Sent from my iPhone, my apologies for the brevity & autocorrect errors

On Oct 14, 2017, at 1:11 PM, Michelle Lamberson mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
























Not sure if its a rarity here but Im. Looking at what I believe to be a snow bunting on the south shore of Wood Lake Koty of the wooded area north of the soccer

fields ( along the path).


M













MICHELLE


Michelle N. Lamberson

Sent from my iPhone, my apologies for the brevity & autocorrect errors









__._,_.___







Posted by: Michelle Lamberson <mnlamberson@yahoo.ca>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






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__,_._,___



Subject: Snow birds
Date: Sat Oct 14 2017 12:20 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Snowing here in Ashcroft. The Eurasian Collared Doves are having a tough time flying. They get too heavy from the snow on them. Just like planes, looks like these flyers are grounded.

Walked to the doctor's yesterday and there were at least 12 robins perched in trees. Some were calling.
Strange weather. We weren't expecting snow this morning.

Tammy HarrisonAshcroft



Subject: @@@@#"#-
Date: Fri Oct 13 2017 10:10 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadee (was Re: Salmon Arm Bay for 12 Oct)
Date: Thu Oct 12 2017 23:17 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Interesting! This could be fun to monitor. Any others with CBCH showing up outside their usual range?

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 12, 2017, at 7:18 PM, leighton.douglas@yahoo.com [bcintbird] wrote:
>
> Interesting about the Chestnut-backed Chickadee. Two weeks ago the first one since 2005 showed up here in the Blaeberry and then on October 7 I found them - a flock of 4 - for the first time at Moberly Marsh on the Columbia River (after hundreds of birding trips there). So I wonder if there is going to be a big dispersal of them in the southern interior this winter like there was in 2004-05?
>
> Doug Leighton
> Blaeberry
>



Subject: Re: Salmon Arm Bay for 12 Oct
Date: Thu Oct 12 2017 21:18 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Interesting about the Chestnut-backed Chickadee. Two weeks ago the first one since 2005 showed up here in the Blaeberry and then on October 7 I found them - a flock of 4 - for the first time at Moberly Marsh on the Columbia River (after hundreds of birding trips there). So I wonder if there is going to be a big dispersal of them in the southern interior this winter like there was in 2004-05?


Doug Leighton
Blaeberry



Subject: Salmon Arm Bay for 12 Oct
Date: Thu Oct 12 2017 18:22 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
HI all, a rather cool start to the day with a few late lingering birds and a
new fall arrival
Thanks to Jim Walton for joining me today! It was also nice to see Geoff
Styles briefly this morning before he had to head off.

Highlights:

Common Loon 23
Trumpeter Swan 13 (7 juv, 6 ads) first of fall
Wood Duck 1 juv
Northern Pintail 17
Blue-winged Teal 1 (fem/juv)
Osprey 1 (this is the latest record I have on file for the location)
Peregrine Falcon 1 ad
Pectoral Sandpiper 20 juvs
Long-billed Dowitcher 71 juvs
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1 (with local BCCH along Salmon River first
record for the bay!)
American Pipit 83


Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: Black-and-white Warbler
Date: Thu Oct 12 2017 13:53 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,


Yesterday in the afternoon I found a female type BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER in Rotary Trails Park which is across the street from the mouth of Powers Creek in West Kelowna. The bird was right where the main trail is flooded. It's still there today (Oct 12) and has been seen and photographed by others from the viewing platform in the park.


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC



Subject:
Date: Thu Oct 12 2017 12:18 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi all,

I relocated the black and white warbler at powers creek. I last saw it flying into the bushes to the left of the viewing platform.

Cheers,
Scott Thomson
Westbank



Subject: Long-billed Dowitcher's
Date: Wed Oct 11 2017 11:54 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks Allan for the photos of the Dowitchers.  I have not taken any photos
of them this time of year and your photo shows variation in each of the 3
birds present! I feel inspired now to take more photos of moulting birds
rather than just focussing on rarities , besides, as Barry states, rarely
does one find moulting birds illustrated in field guides

With regards to Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, indeed Sept/Oct is the time to find
them but Ive not seen one for several years now.

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon
From: on behalf of "Allan Dupilka
adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]"
Reply-To: , Dupilka

Date: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 7:53 AM
To: , Michael Lancaster

Subject: Re: [bcintbird] Long-billed Dowitcher's









Thanks Barry and Don. Good points


Don, I also was at Salmon Arm yesterday morning and all the Pectoral
Sandpipers were below the wharf with a fair group of Dowitchers. Obvious
good view from there and checked all very carefully for Sharp-tailed
Sandpipers in the flock but there was none. Often see one Sharp-tailed in
our area but nothing this year. We had a nice view and photo of a
Sabine(imm) on the South Thompson below Chase this week and interesting to
see how many there is showing up in the Interior this fall.


Allan Dupilka


Little Shuswap Lake



On 2017-10-11 5:55 AM, Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com
[bcintbird] wrote:


>
>
> Hi Don,
>
>
> Your remarks prompted me to look again at the images - thank you for that:-) I
> confess that as I could not see any rufous on the tertials , despite
> misgivings about 3 adults together, I assumed that is what they were. Second
> looks clearly show pointed upperpart feathers ( as opposed to rounded adult)
> the middle bird with clearly 'notched' edging the other two less so, and thus
> more heavily worn(off) . Also at large magnification I could see a hint of
> rufous in parts on the tertials of two of the birds. Sibley shows 'juvenile
> plumage' with the caption Aug/Nov - Hmm! However, very few artists show
> plumages with moulted feathers.
>
>
> I ought to make a trip or two to Salmon Arm specifically to see 'shorebirds'
> but it would take up a whole day and not a lot of time devoted to looking.
>
>
>
> Barry
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 10-Oct-17 5:01 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
>
>
>>
>>
>> HI Allan, nice photos, and it is unique to be able to photograph these birds
>> from above as can be done at the wharf.
>>
>> Your photo shows 3 juvenile Long-billed Dowitchers that are moulting into
>> first basic plumage. They are beginning to acquire the solid gray feathers
>> that they will wear through the winter.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Don Cecile
>>
>> Vernon
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: on behalf of "adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca
>> [bcintbird]"
>> Reply-To: , Dupilka
>>
>> Date: Monday, October 9, 2017 at 6:40 PM
>> To:
>> Subject: [bcintbird] Long-billed Dowitcher's [1 Attachment]
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Salmon Arm wharf always gives us some good photos. There was 50+ Long-billed
>> Dowitchers in the area and these three were below the wharf. The middle one
>> has some interesting features and not sure if this is just a variation
>> within the species during breeding to non-breeding plumages.. Any thoughts
>> would be appreciated.
>>
>> Allan Dupilka
>> Little Shuswap Lake, BC
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada
>
>
>
>
> ign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient> Virus-free. www.avg.com
> ign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: Long-billed Dowitcher's
Date: Wed Oct 11 2017 10:26 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Allan: you mentioned that you "often" see sharptailed sandpiper. How frequent would that be? I am less observant than you as I have only seen one at Kamloops in 38 years. But you have renewed my diligence.CheersRick Howie


Sent from my Samsung device

-------- Original message --------
From: "Allan Dupilka adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]" <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 2017-10-11 10:50 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com, Michael Lancaster <mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com>
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] Long-billed Dowitcher's























Thanks Barry and Don. Good points
Don, I also was at Salmon Arm yesterday morning and all the
Pectoral Sandpipers were below the wharf with a fair group of
Dowitchers. Obvious good view from there and checked all very
carefully for Sharp-tailed Sandpipers in the flock but there was
none. Often see one Sharp-tailed in our area but nothing this
year. We had a nice view and photo of a Sabine(imm) on the South
Thompson below Chase this week and interesting to see how many
there is showing up in the Interior this fall.
Allan Dupilka
Little Shuswap Lake


On 2017-10-11 5:55 AM, Michael
Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird] wrote:





Hi Don,
Your remarks prompted me to look again at the images - thank
you for that:-)
I confess that as I could not see any rufous on the tertials ,
despite misgivings about 3 adults together, I assumed that is
what they were. Second looks clearly show pointed upperpart
feathers ( as opposed to rounded adult) the middle bird with
clearly 'notched' edging the other two less so, and thus more
heavily worn(off) . Also at large magnification I could see a
hint of rufous in parts on the tertials of two of the birds.
Sibley shows 'juvenile plumage' with the caption Aug/Nov - Hmm!
However, very few artists show plumages with moulted feathers.
I ought to make a trip or two to Salmon Arm specifically to see
'shorebirds' but it would take up a whole day and not a lot of
time devoted to looking.

Barry




On 10-Oct-17 5:01 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:



HI Allan, nice photos, and it is unique to be able to
photograph these birds from above as can be done at the
wharf.
Your photo shows 3 juvenile Long-billed Dowitchers that
are moulting into first basic plumage. They are beginning
to acquire the solid gray feathers that they will wear
through the winter.


Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



From: <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
on behalf of "adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca
[bcintbird]" <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>,
Dupilka <adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca>
Date: Monday,
October 9, 2017 at 6:40 PM
To: <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
Subject:
[bcintbird] Long-billed Dowitcher's [1 Attachment]






Salmon Arm wharf always gives us some good photos.
There was 50+ Long-billed Dowitchers in the area and
these three were below the wharf. The middle one has
some interesting features and not sure if this is
just a variation within the species during breeding
to non-breeding plumages.. Any thoughts would be
appreciated.


Allan Dupilka

Little Shuswap Lake, BC








--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada


Virus-free. www.avg.com


















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Posted by: RICK HOWIE <r.howie@shaw.ca>









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Subject: Long-billed Dowitcher's
Date: Wed Oct 11 2017 9:50 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks Barry and Don.? Good points

Don, I also was at Salmon Arm yesterday morning and all the Pectoral
Sandpipers were below the wharf with a fair group of Dowitchers.?
Obvious good view from there and checked all very carefully for
Sharp-tailed Sandpipers in the flock but there was none.? Often see? one
Sharp-tailed in our area but nothing this year.? We had a nice view and
photo of a Sabine(imm) on the South Thompson below Chase this week and
interesting to see how many there is showing up in the Interior this fall.

Allan Dupilka

Little Shuswap Lake


On 2017-10-11 5:55 AM, Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com
[bcintbird] wrote:
>
>
> Hi Don,
>
> Your remarks prompted me to look again at the images - thank you for
> that:-) I confess that as I could not see any rufous on the tertials ,
> despite misgivings about 3 adults together, I assumed that is what
> they were. Second looks clearly show pointed upperpart feathers ( as
> opposed to rounded adult) the middle bird with clearly? 'notched'
> edging the other two less so, and thus more heavily worn(off) . Also
> at large magnification I could see a hint of rufous in parts on the
> tertials of two of the birds. Sibley shows 'juvenile plumage' with the
> caption Aug/Nov - Hmm! However, very few artists show plumages with
> moulted feathers.
>
> I ought to make a trip or two to Salmon Arm specifically to see
> 'shorebirds' but it would take up a whole day and not a lot of time
> devoted to looking.
>
> Barry
>
>
>
> On 10-Oct-17 5:01 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
>> HI Allan, nice photos, and it is unique to be able to photograph
>> these birds from above as can be done at the wharf.
>> Your photo shows 3 juvenile Long-billed Dowitchers that are moulting
>> into first basic plumage. ?They are beginning to acquire the solid
>> gray feathers that they will wear through the winter.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Don Cecile
>> Vernon
>>
>> From: >
>> on behalf of "adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca
>> [bcintbird]"
>> >
>> Reply-To: > >, Dupilka
>> >
>> Date: Monday, October 9, 2017 at 6:40 PM
>> To: >
>> Subject: [bcintbird] Long-billed Dowitcher's [1 Attachment]
>>
>> Salmon Arm wharf always gives us some good photos. There was 50+
>> Long-billed Dowitchers in the area and these three were below the
>> wharf. The middle one has some interesting features and not sure if?
>> this is just a variation within the species during breeding to
>> non-breeding plumages.. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>>
>> Allan Dupilka
>> Little Shuswap Lake, BC
>>
>>
>
> --
> M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada
>
>
> Virus-free. www.avg.com
>
>
>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
>
>



Subject: Long-billed Dowitcher's
Date: Wed Oct 11 2017 7:55 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Don,

Your remarks prompted me to look again at the images - thank you for
that:-) I confess that as I could not see any rufous on the tertials ,
despite misgivings about 3 adults together, I assumed that is what they
were. Second looks clearly show pointed upperpart feathers ( as opposed
to rounded adult) the middle bird with clearly 'notched' edging the
other two less so, and thus more heavily worn(off) . Also at large
magnification I could see a hint of rufous in parts on the tertials of
two of the birds. Sibley shows 'juvenile plumage' with the caption
Aug/Nov - Hmm! However, very few artists show plumages with moulted
feathers.

I ought to make a trip or two to Salmon Arm specifically to see
'shorebirds' but it would take up a whole day and not a lot of time
devoted to looking.

Barry



On 10-Oct-17 5:01 PM, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
> HI Allan, nice photos, and it is unique to be able to photograph these
> birds from above as can be done at the wharf.
> Your photo shows 3 juvenile Long-billed Dowitchers that are moulting
> into first basic plumage. ?They are beginning to acquire the solid
> gray feathers that they will wear through the winter.
>
> Cheers,
> Don Cecile
> Vernon
>
> From: >
> on behalf of "adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca
> [bcintbird]"
> >
> Reply-To: >, Dupilka
> >
> Date: Monday, October 9, 2017 at 6:40 PM
> To: >
> Subject: [bcintbird] Long-billed Dowitcher's [1 Attachment]
>
> Salmon Arm wharf always gives us some good photos. There was 50+
> Long-billed Dowitchers in the area and these three were below the
> wharf. The middle one has some interesting features and not sure if?
> this is just a variation within the species during breeding to
> non-breeding plumages.. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>
> Allan Dupilka
> Little Shuswap Lake, BC
>
>
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada



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Subject: Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 10
Date: Tue Oct 10 2017 20:04 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
HI all, a trip around the bay produced far fewer birds than a week ago!
There were however a few interesting birds around

Highlights:

Pacific Loon 1 juv (first of season)
Wood Duck 4 juv 1 ad fem
Northern Pintail adult female
Osprey 1
Black-bellied Plover 1 juv
Killdeer 19
Pectoral Sandpiper 27 juvs
Long-billed Dowitcher 38 juvs
Wilsons Snipe 4
Glaucous-winged Gull 1 juv (first of season)
Sabines Gull 1 juv (probably same bird that I saw on Oct 2)
American Pipit 191 (high count for the date)
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1 juv
Common Yellowthroat 5
American Tree Sparrow 2


Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: Long-billed Dowitcher's
Date: Tue Oct 10 2017 19:01 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
HI Allan, nice photos, and it is unique to be able to photograph these birds
from above as can be done at the wharf.
Your photo shows 3 juvenile Long-billed Dowitchers that are moulting into
first basic plumage. They are beginning to acquire the solid gray feathers
that they will wear through the winter.

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon

From: on behalf of
"adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]"
Reply-To: , Dupilka

Date: Monday, October 9, 2017 at 6:40 PM
To:
Subject: [bcintbird] Long-billed Dowitcher's [1 Attachment]





[Attachment(s) <#TopText> from adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]
included below]

Salmon Arm wharf always gives us some good photos. There was 50+ Long-billed
Dowitchers in the area and these three were below the wharf. The middle one
has some interesting features and not sure if this is just a variation
within the species during breeding to non-breeding plumages.. Any thoughts
would be appreciated.

Allan Dupilka
Little Shuswap Lake, BC



Subject: That gull
Date: Tue Oct 10 2017 18:53 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
My first impression of this bird was Glaucous-winged Gull although it
appeared a bit odd. I looked more closely and saw features that suggest
hybrid with the most likely candidate Herring Gull.

My reasoning:

The bird has the large dumpy appearance of Glaucous-winged Gull (GWGU)
however its primaries are too dark (for pure) but not dark enough for WEGU.
The bill seems smaller than typical GWGU, the facial profile is not quite
right for typical GWGU (seems smaller-looking) the overall colouration is on
the brown side, not the usual colour for a pure GWGU and the wing coverts
are more patterned than I would expect on pure GWGU all of which seems to
suggest there are HEGU genes present.

IF this bird is indeed a hybrid as I would suggest it is however lacking
the bold streaks that HEGU has and the tail is plain for HEGU thus it
appears to have more GWGU gene influence than HEGU.

So faced with the decision of slightly odd GWGU vs GWGUxHEGU, I went with
the latter.

Cheers,
Don
From: on behalf of "Michael Lancaster
mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]"
Reply-To: , Michael Lancaster

Date: Monday, October 9, 2017 at 3:11 PM
To:
Subject: [bcintbird] That gull







I have had a reply fromSibley:

"The bulging forehead and broad wings immediately strike me as
Glaucous-winged Gull, and the completely unbarred tail feathers also
point that way. I don't really see anything to suggest a hybrid so I
would go with a juvenile Glaucous-winged Gull, with a relatively small
bill and strongly patterned wing coverts, but all of that seems within
the range of variation. I'm open to other ideas if there's something
I've overlooked or misinterpreted".

I must say, that I have not seen a Juvenile Glaucous-winged Gull looking
like this one. The bulging wings I missed! As ever one cannot see all
the variation that is present in a species! Some of the features of
Glaucous-winged Gull are shared with Thayer's - like unmarked
broad-banded tail. Broad wings are not. Both Howell and Olsen say that
Glaucous-winged X American Herring Gull may resemble 'oversized' Thayers
and there are some birds to which one cannot attach a label.

So, any further comments from those that contributed to the discussion?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada

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Subject: Long-billed Dowitcher's
Date: Tue Oct 10 2017 7:50 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
To me, all of them show some remaining feathers from 'breeding plumage'
BUT, it is not a species I see very often.
Barry
On 09-Oct-17 6:40 PM, adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
> [Attachment(s) <#TopText> from adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca
> [bcintbird] included below]
>
> Salmon Arm wharf always gives us some good photos. There was 50+
> Long-billed Dowitchers in the area and these three were below the
> wharf. The middle one has some interesting features and not sure if
> this is just a variation within the species during breeding to
> non-breeding plumages.. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>
> Allan Dupilka
> Little Shuswap Lake, BC
>
>
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada



---
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Subject:
Date: Mon Oct 9 2017 20:41 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Salmon Arm wharf always gives us some good photos. There was 50+ Long-billed Dowitchers in the area and these three were below the wharf. The middle one has some interesting features and not sure if  this is just a variation within the species during breeding to non-breeding plumages.. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Allan Dupilka
Little Shuswap Lake, BC



Subject: That gull
Date: Mon Oct 9 2017 18:12 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I have had a reply fromSibley:

"The bulging forehead and broad wings immediately strike me as
Glaucous-winged Gull, and the completely unbarred tail feathers also
point that way. I don't really see anything to suggest a hybrid so I
would go with a juvenile Glaucous-winged Gull, with a relatively small
bill and strongly patterned wing coverts, but all of that seems within
the range of variation. I'm open to other ideas if there's something
I've overlooked or misinterpreted".

I must say, that I have not seen a Juvenile Glaucous-winged Gull looking
like this one. The bulging wings I missed! As ever one cannot see all
the variation that is present in a species! Some of the features of
Glaucous-winged Gull are shared with Thayer's - like unmarked
broad-banded tail. Broad wings are not. Both Howell and Olsen say that
Glaucous-winged X American Herring Gull may resemble 'oversized' Thayers
and there are some birds to which one cannot attach a label.

So, any further comments from those that contributed to the discussion?

Barry


--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada


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------------------------------------
Posted by: Michael Lancaster
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Subject: Re: That interesting gull
Date: Fri Oct 6 2017 23:03 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I have very little experience in identifying large gulls so I will not offer any opinion on the ID of Barry's gull.  However there appears to be some geography/timing issues that might be relevant.
If "that interesting gull" is indeed a textbook juvenile Thayer's gull, the nearest known breeding area (to Penticton) is on Banks Island in the Canadian Arctic. September 28 seems very early for this year's young to make it this far south. Indeed Howell and Dunn's "Gulls of the Americas" gives October 15 as the early arrival date for migrating Thayer's Gulls in the Pacific Northwest.
Some sort of hybrid coming from a BC breeding area seems more likely.


Hope this is helpful.
Jim Turnbull
Naramata



Subject: Long-eared Owl in Kane Valley
Date: Wed Oct 4 2017 21:31 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Alan et al.:
This looks like a regular male Long-eared Owl with its ear tufts held tight to the head. So not necessarily a young birdI think the only way to age it at this stage would be to look at the wing feathers to see if there was a pattern of different-aged feathers (i.e. fresh/old). Females are generally richer in colour with more orange in the face.
Dick Cannings
Ottawa
From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bcintbird@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: October 3, 2017 2:43 PM
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [bcintbird] Long-eared Owl in Kane Valley [3 Attachments]

[Attachment(s) from alaneburger@gmail.com [bcintbird] included below]
Last night while taking my dog for a walk in the dark along Kane Valley Rd a medium-sized owl flew over several times. I later located it in our front yard and it stayed long enough for me to run in and grab my camera - see photos. A good bird to get on my yard list!
I was puzzled about the species when I first saw it, because as you can see it is a short-eared version of the Long-eared Owl. It could be either a moulting adult or a juvenile.

Does anyone know if one can identify the juveniles of this species by plumage?

Alan Burger aburger@uvic.ca




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Posted by: "Dick Cannings" <dickcannings@shaw.ca>









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Subject:
Date: Wed Oct 4 2017 17:11 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
<*>[Attachment(s) from Michael Lancaster included below]

In response to my request for comments, I have had 4 replies( thanks to
all), 2 for Thayer's and two who believe it could be a Glaucous-winged X
American Herring Gull hybrid and one of those also considered
Glaucous-winged Gull juvenile. I do not believe that it was the latter
as I have seen plenty of these - admittedly probably with Western Gull
genes!

I did say that at times the bird showed attributes that could be
attributed to at least three of the other species present with the bird.
I did momentarily consider hybridisation, but as all the perceived
differences were brought about by lighting conditions, posture and
behaviour of the bird I did not follow up on the hybrid possibility.

The bird was considerably smaller than the Glaucous-winged Gull(adult)
present, somewhat smaller than the American Herring Gull's present and
about the same size as the Californian Gulls.

What struck me most about the bird was the 'neat and tidy markings',
particularly of the coverts which looked as neat as those of Glaucous or
Iceland Gull unlike the more 'coarse and untidy markings' of
Glaucous-winged juveniles and of American Herring Gull juveniles. The
bill depending on the angle of viewing varies quite appreciably as does
head shape. The leg colour changes hue according to the lighting.

I attach three more images all taken within seconds where the bird
clearly looks more bulky than in images 1-4 but it had just had a
'shower'.

I have looked at many images of PRESUMED ( and that is important) and I
can find images simlar to the bird in question. I have also looked at
many images of Thayer's Gull, and apart from the darkness of the
primaries on this bird being on the light side there is a 'cline' from
dark to light forms - as indeed there is with the presumed hybrid
postulated by the correspondents.

I remain unconvinced that what I saw is a hybrid but less confident than
I was.

So to the two gentlemen who think it is a hybrid, maybe they would like
to explain exactly which features they believe differs radically from a
Thayer's Gull? Or should I say are not present on Thayer's Gull?

There are of course others on this group that have Thayer's Gull on
their lists, and might have commented.

The following is a very useful reference:

https://www.pugetsound.edu/fil...

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada



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<*>Attachment(s) from Michael Lancaster:

<*> 3 of 3 Photo(s) https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/g...
<*> Image 5.jpg
<*> Image 6.jpg
<*> Imge 7.jpg

------------------------------------
Posted by: Michael Lancaster
------------------------------------

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Also, consider joining these groups.
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Subject: Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 2 (8 species of shorebird)
Date: Wed Oct 4 2017 14:04 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I have not been able to get close enough to capture any band information.

Don Cecile
Vernon, BC

From: on behalf of "Michelle Lamberson
mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]"
Reply-To: , Michelle Lamberson

Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 1:19 PM
To: "Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]"
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 2 (8 species of shorebird)
[1 Attachment]





[Attachment(s) <#TopText> from Michelle Lamberson included below]

Hi Don and anyone else that has seen the peregrines!



I'm curious.. The last time I was there, I noticed that one of the
Peregrines is banded. Any chance you've noted what the bands are? My photo
is too far away (see attached) and I always find it interesting to find out
where they are from! Curious if it's from the Puget Sound area...


Michelle N. Lamberson
Lake Country, BC





On Tuesday, October 3, 2017, 7:37:16 AM PDT, Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca
[bcintbird] wrote:










HI all, the passage of cold fronts has pushed shorebirds out of the bay,
whilst there were nearly 200 Killdeer 5 days ago, only 2 remain.

My apologies to Chris Charlesworth, I messaged him about a juv Rosss Goose
(I had found this bird way out past the Salmon River near Gadwall and it
appeared barely larger, when the Peregrines came by all waterfowl flushed,
it was later that I saw the bird again and it turned into a Snow Goose).
Oops!

here are the highlights from Salmon Arm Bay for Oct 2:


American White Pelican 7
Snow Goose 1 juv
Wood Duck 3 juvs
Northern Pintail 14 juv/fem
Osprey 1
Peregrine Falcon 3 (1 adult, 1 sub-adult, 1 juv)
Black-bellied Plover 1 juv
Semipalmated Plover 1 juv (3rd October record, second latest)
Killdeer 2
Least Sandpiper 1 juv (in moult, only 3rd October record, second latest)
Bairds Sandpiper 1 juv (3rd October record)
Pectoral Sandpiper 84 juvs
Long-billed Dowitcher 91 juvs
Wilsons Snipe 3
Sabines Gull 1 juv (2nd October record)
American Pipit 219
Lapland Longspur 6 (includes on moulting adult male)
Yellow-rumped Warbler 4
Common Yellowthroat 4
American Tree Sparrow 1 (record early)



Subject: Tern at Penticton
Date: Wed Oct 4 2017 14:00 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Looks good for Arctic.  Nice find!

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon, BC

From: on behalf of "Michael Lancaster
mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]"
Reply-To: , Michael Lancaster

Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 7:14 PM
To:
Subject: [bcintbird] Tern at Penticton [6 Attachments]





[Attachment(s) <#TopText> from Michael Lancaster included below]

This afternoon(15.00hr-16.00hrs), I had an hour to spare in Penticton
and went to look for the gull I saw the other day. No luck. However I
did see a tern. Terrible job trying to get pictures, strong wind off
shore. The bird kept to about 100m offshore and almost impossible to see
anything in the viewfinder because my eyes were watering so much!

Anyway, attached are several mediocre images which all show white
secondaries. This should therefore be a juvenile Arctic Tern.
'Triangular' shape of black mask and what appears to be white forehead(
rather than buffy) also indicates Arctic.

Anyone agree?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada

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Subject: Tern at Penticton
Date: Wed Oct 4 2017 12:25 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks Michael,

And thank you also for your comments on the 'interesting gull'. More of
which anon.

Barry


On 04-Oct-17 8:32 AM, Michael Force pagodroma@yahoo.com [bcintbird] wrote:
> Hi Birders,
>
> I agree with Barry. The photos are perfectly adequate to clinch the
> identification. The overall shape of the bird in addition to the
> plumage characters already mentioned are good for Arctic Tern. Lovely
> bird.
>
> Happy birding
> Michael Force
> currently aboard NOAA ship Reuben Lasker
> 111 nmi S of Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* "Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]"
>
> *To:* bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
> *Sent:* Tuesday, October 3, 2017 4:14 PM
> *Subject:* [bcintbird] Tern at Penticton [6 Attachments]
>
> [Attachment(s)
> from
> Michael Lancaster included below]
> This afternoon(15.00hr-16.00hrs), I had an hour to spare in Penticton
> and went to look for the gull I saw the other day. No luck. However I
> did see a tern. Terrible job trying to get pictures, strong wind off
> shore. The bird kept to about 100m offshore and almost impossible to see
> anything in the viewfinder because my eyes were watering so much!
>
> Anyway, attached are several mediocre images which all show white
> secondaries. This should therefore be a juvenile Arctic Tern.
> 'Triangular' shape of black mask and what appears to be white forehead(
> rather than buffy) also indicates Arctic.
>
> Anyone agree?
>
> Barry
>
> --
> M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> http://www.avg.com
>
>
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada



Subject: Tern at Penticton
Date: Wed Oct 4 2017 10:32 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Birders,
I agree with Barry. The photos are perfectly adequate to clinch the identification. The overall shape of the bird in addition to the plumage characters already mentioned are good for Arctic Tern. Lovely bird.
Happy birdingMichael Forcecurrently aboard NOAA ship Reuben Lasker111 nmi S of Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

From: "Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]"
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 4:14 PM
Subject: [bcintbird] Tern at Penticton [6 Attachments]

[Attachment(s) from Michael Lancaster included below] This afternoon(15.00hr-16.00hrs), I had an hour to spare in Penticton
and went to look for the gull I saw the other day. No luck. However I
did see a tern. Terrible job trying to get pictures, strong wind off
shore. The bird kept to about 100m offshore and almost impossible to see
anything in the viewfinder because my eyes were watering so much!

Anyway, attached are several mediocre images which all show white
secondaries. This should therefore be a juvenile Arctic Tern.
'Triangular' shape of black mask and what appears to be white forehead(
rather than buffy) also indicates Arctic.

Anyone agree?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada

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