Birding News
ABA's Birding News >> British Columbia - Interior

British Columbia - Interior bird news by date

Updated on December 11, 2017, 1:15 am

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


11 Dec: @ 01:11:06 
Re: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers [Scott Thomson drdrdrx@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
10 Dec: @ 11:51:10 
Re: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
10 Dec: @ 11:21:06 
Re: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
10 Dec: @ 10:33:49 
Re: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers [Gary Davidson gsd37@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
10 Dec: @ 02:11:52 
ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
09 Dec: @ 16:03:17 
Re: Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely [dicooper@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
09 Dec: @ 11:01:48 
Re: Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
09 Dec: @ 02:20:45 
RE: Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely ['Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
08 Dec: @ 15:54:11 
Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
08 Dec: @ 14:49:50 
RE: records on ebird ['Wayne Weber' contopus@telus.net [bcintbird]]
08 Dec: @ 13:14:05 
Re: records on ebird [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
08 Dec: @ 11:07:20 
records on ebird [Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
07 Dec: @ 07:45:53 
RE: Neonicotinoids and White-crowned Sparrows ['Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
07 Dec: @ 01:07:26 
Neonicotinoids and White-crowned Sparrows [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
01 Dec: @ 22:46:44 
loons [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
01 Dec: @ 20:33:55 
RBA WINTER WREN [Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 21:08:25 
Re: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Jack Bowling jbinpg@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 20:28:04 
Re: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Allan Dupilka adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 20:06:51 
RE: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees ['Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 19:33:19 
Re: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Allan Dupilka adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 15:18:25 
RE: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees ['Michael Shepard' mgshepard@pacificcoast.net [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 15:12:00 
Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Gary Davidson gsd37@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 15:09:34 
Re: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 14:56:54 
Re: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Dcecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 11:44:24 
Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Clive Keen clive_keen@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
29 Nov: @ 11:21:52 
Chestnut-backed Chickadees [Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
23 Nov: @ 11:08:24 
RE: White-winged Crossbill on Iceland ['Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
22 Nov: @ 14:16:43 
Snowy Owl Hunt - Part One [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
22 Nov: @ 13:26:02 
Re: Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake [Logan Lalonde logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
22 Nov: @ 13:20:31 
Re: Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake [Allan Dupilka adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca [bcintbird]]
22 Nov: @ 13:18:28 
White-winged Crossbill on Iceland [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
22 Nov: @ 10:40:06 
Re: Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake [Logan Lalonde logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
22 Nov: @ 10:21:42 
Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
21 Nov: @ 08:15:06 
What is in a name [Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]]
20 Nov: @ 18:59:15 
RE: immature swans ['Bob Handfield' bobnmaggie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Nov: @ 14:43:09 
Re: immature swans [Pam Laing pamlaing2309@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
20 Nov: @ 14:31:33 
Re: immature swans [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
20 Nov: @ 11:58:13 
immature swans ['Bob Handfield' bobnmaggie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
20 Nov: @ 00:03:02 
Penticton birds [Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
19 Nov: @ 23:57:02 
RE: Rough-legged Hawk, Pyman Road ['Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
19 Nov: @ 19:40:41 
Rough-legged Hawk, Pyman Road [Michelle Lamberson mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
19 Nov: @ 14:05:09 
Re: Little Gull continues [Scott Thomson drdrdrx@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
18 Nov: @ 23:07:03 
Re: Little Gull continues [jim_deirdre@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
18 Nov: @ 22:03:23 
Re: Little Gull continues [Michelle Lamberson mnlamberson@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]]
18 Nov: @ 18:35:02 
Re: Little Gull continues [Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
18 Nov: @ 17:27:14 
Re: Little Gull continues [Pam Laing pamlaing2309@gmail.com [bcintbird]]
18 Nov: @ 13:33:26 
Little Gull continues [Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
18 Nov: @ 09:40:58 
Little Gull photos [6 Attachments] [Don Cecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird]]
17 Nov: @ 21:52:53 
South Okanagan Birding [Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]]
17 Nov: @ 20:31:41 
Re: RBA: Little Gull in Penticton [Logan Lalonde logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com [bcintbird]]





Subject: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers
Date: Mon Dec 11 2017 1:11 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi All,


My take as ebird data submitter, for what it's worth. When out in the field, I am very unconcern with data gathering. I don't care what time it is or how long I've been there, and I don't often stick to a fixed route. So I go up to Goose Lake and wander at sometime during the daylight hours. Whilst wandering, I happen upon a White-breasted Mesite in the grass. I try to get a photo, but the dang thing sees the camera and leaves. Upon getting home I report my White-breasted Mesite to ebird, and wouldn't you know it, Ebird is worried. At this point I have a decision to make: do I put the bird in and get harassed my a reviewer or do I leave it off? I've done both. Not to say the reviews are harassing me but sometimes I do feel harassed. Now assuming I do enter my White-breasted Mesite sighting, there is a follow up email. I've found that replying to these emails can be a friendly affair or rather distasteful, based on which reviewer I have the pleasure or displeasure of speaking (emailing) to. I've had one reviewer forward an email to one of his buddies who in turn sent me a nasty email questioning why I was making such a claim. At the end of the day I use ebird to track of my personal sightings of a enjoyable hobby, and not to get in a pissing match with a reviewer. I'm now more inclined to enter my birds as I think I saw them (and I'm not suggesting I don't make mistakes) and ignore the follow up email; here's what I think I saw, believe it or don't, it makes no difference on this end. And just in case anyone wants to opine that I'm trying to point this at a specific reviewer, I'm not.



Scott Thomson

Westbank


________________________________
From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]
Sent: December 10, 2017 9:51 AM
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com; Chris Siddle
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers



Hi Chris,

I have searched hard for that statement, I did not make it - false news!

I 'work' pretty hard too. About 40 hrs a week banding birds ( mid April to mid Oct). That is at the high end of the working week in Canada and I did it in 3 days:-) in my 80th year. Now in my 81st year. At two sites I walk anything up to 12km just checking nets, at the other 4 sites I am less energetic, banding hummingbirds for 8 hrs a day.

The other 4 days I manage the garden, the house and the wife and average 10km a day.

Obviously, I do not have the time to volunteer for anything, although I did just that recently in connection with birds.

Tenerife is a cake walk. I even have time to email bcintbird and of course walk 10km a day.

Was that white peaches you were talking about?:-)

Barry

On 10/12/2017 17:21, Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird] wrote:

Thank you, Barry, for telling us all how hard we should work. You're a peach!

Chris Siddle

On Sun, Dec 10, 2017 at 8:33 AM, Gary Davidson gsd37@yahoo.ca [bcintbird] > wrote:


Hi Barry,

I am confused by your statement,

"Unfortunately, ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely occurring species."

How do you think eBird does this? At the end of every checklist submitted, observers are asked, "Are you submitting a list of all the birds you were able to identify?" If you answer NO, that checklist is handled differently by the computer analysis that follows. Furthermore, when eBirders check their personal statistics, they are given stats based on "number of complete checklists", in other words, those checklist in which they answered YES to the last question. It would seem to me that these two examples suggest that eBird does exactly the opposite of what you say, they in fact encourage birders to record ALL the birds they see and submit COMPLETE checklists.

Gary Davidson,
eBird reviewer, Central Kootenay
eBird reviewer, Kootenay-Boundary

________________________________
From: "Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]" >
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2017 12:11 AM
Subject: [bcintbird] ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers


Gentlemen - past and present reviewers for ebird, and contributors

I have read with interest the responses to my email. I do of course
appreciate that all are volunteers. Personally, I believe that
volunteers should devote as much time to doing the job as they would if
they were being paid for it. Even more perhaps, since presumably if one
volunteers, one is doing it because one enjoys doing it rather than just
because one is being paid. However, as with ebird itself, reviewers and
contributors to the database, none is entirely altruistic. Nonetheless,
I believe that ebird is of immense value to the world of birdwatching
especially to the cause of monitoring ALL species of birds worldwide.

Thus, all should do their utmost to ensure that the best information is
obtained and presented in the best manner.

I am delighted to note that lists are being compiled as to what species
requires more detailed information than others. This is after all
standard practice - at least with the societies with which I have been
involved.

I note that there is a proforma for use when a reviewer queries a
species for whatever reason, be it rare occurrence or numbers outside
set parameters - who sets the parameters incidentally? I find it
difficult to grasp that a similar proforma should not be available to
inform birdwatchers who have FREELY contributed their data to ebird
should not be entitled to the courtesy of being informed why ANY record
has been found unacceptable for public consumption.

Finally, it is EXTREMELY important that as much attention is paid to the
recording of common species as those that occur rarely. Unfortunately,
ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely
occurring species. Species such as House Sparrows, Eurasian Starlings(
now also Eurasian Collared Dove) and Grey Catbirds are in fact the
equivalent of the coal miners' Canary. Should the populations of those
species show sustained declines then we really are in trouble. And how
would we know if not recorded because they are viewed as 'dirt birds'?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com








--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias

[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/image... Virus-free. www.avg.com



Subject: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 11:51 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Chris,

I have searched hard for that statement, I did not make it - false news!

I 'work' pretty hard too. About 40 hrs a week banding birds ( mid April
to mid Oct). That is at the high end of the working week in Canada and
I did it in 3 days:-) in my 80th year. Now in my 81st year. At two sites
I walk anything up to 12km just checking nets, at the other 4 sites I am
less energetic, banding hummingbirds for 8 hrs a day.

The other 4 days I manage the garden, the house and the wife and average
10km a day.

Obviously, I do not have the time to volunteer for anything, although I
did just that recently in connection with birds.

Tenerife is a cake walk. I even have time to email bcintbird and of
course walk 10km a day.

Was that white peaches you were talking about?:-)

Barry


On 10/12/2017 17:21, Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird] wrote:
> Thank you, Barry, for telling us all how hard we should work. You're
> a peach!
>
> Chris Siddle
>
> On Sun, Dec 10, 2017 at 8:33 AM, Gary Davidson gsd37@yahoo.ca
> [bcintbird] > wrote:
>
>
>
> Hi Barry,
>
> I am confused by your statement,
>
> "Unfortunately, ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias
> towards rarely occurring species."
>
> How do you think eBird does this? At the end of every checklist
> submitted, observers are asked, "Are you submitting a list of all
> the birds you were able to identify?" If you answer NO, that
> checklist is handled differently by the computer analysis that
> follows. Furthermore, when eBirders check their personal
> statistics, they are given stats based on "number of complete
> checklists", in other words, those checklist in which they
> answered YES to the last question. It would seem to me that these
> two examples suggest that eBird does exactly the opposite of what
> you say, they in fact encourage birders to record ALL the birds
> they see and submit COMPLETE checklists.
>
> Gary Davidson,
> eBird reviewer, Central Kootenay
> eBird reviewer, Kootenay-Boundary
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* "Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com
> [bcintbird]"
> >
> *To:* bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
> *Sent:* Sunday, December 10, 2017 12:11 AM
> *Subject:* [bcintbird] ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers
>
> Gentlemen - past and present reviewers for ebird, and contributors
>
> I have read with interest the responses to my email. I do of course
> appreciate that all are volunteers. Personally, I believe that
> volunteers should devote as much time to doing the job as they
> would if
> they were being paid for it. Even more perhaps, since presumably
> if one
> volunteers, one is doing it because one enjoys doing it rather
> than just
> because one is being paid. However, as with ebird itself,
> reviewers and
> contributors to the database, none is entirely altruistic.
> Nonetheless,
> I believe that ebird is of immense value to the world of birdwatching
> especially to the cause of monitoring ALL species of birds worldwide.
>
> Thus, all should do their utmost to ensure that the best
> information is
> obtained and presented in the best manner.
>
> I am delighted to note that lists are being compiled as to what
> species
> requires more detailed information than others. This is after all
> standard practice - at least with the societies with which I have
> been
> involved.
>
> I note that there is a proforma for use when a reviewer queries a
> species for whatever reason, be it rare occurrence or numbers outside
> set parameters - who sets the parameters incidentally? I find it
> difficult to grasp that a similar proforma should not be available to
> inform birdwatchers who have FREELY contributed their data to ebird
> should not be entitled to the courtesy of being informed why ANY
> record
> has been found unacceptable for public consumption.
>
> Finally, it is EXTREMELY important that as much attention is paid
> to the
> recording of common species as those that occur rarely.
> Unfortunately,
> ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely
> occurring species. Species such as House Sparrows, Eurasian
> Starlings(
> now also Eurasian Collared Dove) and Grey Catbirds are in fact the
> equivalent of the coal miners' Canary. Should the populations of
> those
> species show sustained declines then we really are in trouble. And
> how
> would we know if not recorded because they are viewed as 'dirt birds'?
>
> Barry
>
> --
> M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> http://www.avg.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias



Subject: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 11:21 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thank you, Barry, for telling us all how hard we should work. You're a peach!
Chris Siddle
On Sun, Dec 10, 2017 at 8:33 AM, Gary Davidson gsd37@yahoo.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:















Hi Barry,
I am confused by your statement,
"Unfortunately, ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely occurring species."
How do you think eBird does this? At the end of every checklist submitted, observers are asked, "Are you submitting a list of all the birds you were able to identify?" If you answer NO, that checklist is handled differently by the computer analysis that follows. Furthermore, when eBirders check their personal statistics, they are given stats based on "number of complete checklists", in other words, those checklist in which they answered YES to the last question. It would seem to me that these two examples suggest that eBird does exactly the opposite of what you say, they in fact encourage birders to record ALL the birds they see and submit COMPLETE checklists.
Gary Davidson,eBird reviewer, Central KootenayeBird reviewer, Kootenay-Boundary

From: "Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]" <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2017 12:11 AM
Subject: [bcintbird] ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers












Gentlemen - past and present reviewers for ebird, and contributors
I have read with interest the responses to my email. I do of course
appreciate that all are volunteers. Personally, I believe that
volunteers should devote as much time to doing the job as they would if
they were being paid for it. Even more perhaps, since presumably if one
volunteers, one is doing it because one enjoys doing it rather than just
because one is being paid. However, as with ebird itself, reviewers and
contributors to the database, none is entirely altruistic. Nonetheless,
I believe that ebird is of immense value to the world of birdwatching
especially to the cause of monitoring ALL species of birds worldwide.
Thus, all should do their utmost to ensure that the best information is
obtained and presented in the best manner.
I am delighted to note that lists are being compiled as to what species
requires more detailed information than others. This is after all
standard practice - at least with the societies with which I have been
involved.
I note that there is a proforma for use when a reviewer queries a
species for whatever reason, be it rare occurrence or numbers outside
set parameters - who sets the parameters incidentally? I find it
difficult to grasp that a similar proforma should not be available to
inform birdwatchers who have FREELY contributed their data to ebird
should not be entitled to the courtesy of being informed why ANY record
has been found unacceptable for public consumption.
Finally, it is EXTREMELY important that as much attention is paid to the
recording of common species as those that occur rarely. Unfortunately,
ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely
occurring species. Species such as House Sparrows, Eurasian Starlings(
now also Eurasian Collared Dove) and Grey Catbirds are in fact the
equivalent of the coal miners' Canary. Should the populations of those
species show sustained declines then we really are in trouble. And how
would we know if not recorded because they are viewed as 'dirt birds'?
Barry
--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.http://www.avg.com





























__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 10:33 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Barry,
I am confused by your statement,
"Unfortunately, ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely occurring species."
How do you think eBird does this? At the end of every checklist submitted, observers are asked, "Are you submitting a list of all the birds you were able to identify?" If you answer NO, that checklist is handled differently by the computer analysis that follows. Furthermore, when eBirders check their personal statistics, they are given stats based on "number of complete checklists", in other words, those checklist in which they answered YES to the last question. It would seem to me that these two examples suggest that eBird does exactly the opposite of what you say, they in fact encourage birders to record ALL the birds they see and submit COMPLETE checklists.
Gary Davidson,eBird reviewer, Central KootenayeBird reviewer, Kootenay-Boundary

From: "Michael Lancaster mbl.tenbel@googlemail.com [bcintbird]"
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2017 12:11 AM
Subject: [bcintbird] ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers

Gentlemen - past and present reviewers for ebird, and contributors

I have read with interest the responses to my email. I do of course
appreciate that all are volunteers. Personally, I believe that
volunteers should devote as much time to doing the job as they would if
they were being paid for it. Even more perhaps, since presumably if one
volunteers, one is doing it because one enjoys doing it rather than just
because one is being paid. However, as with ebird itself, reviewers and
contributors to the database, none is entirely altruistic. Nonetheless,
I believe that ebird is of immense value to the world of birdwatching
especially to the cause of monitoring ALL species of birds worldwide.

Thus, all should do their utmost to ensure that the best information is
obtained and presented in the best manner.

I am delighted to note that lists are being compiled as to what species
requires more detailed information than others. This is after all
standard practice - at least with the societies with which I have been
involved.

I note that there is a proforma for use when a reviewer queries a
species for whatever reason, be it rare occurrence or numbers outside
set parameters - who sets the parameters incidentally? I find it
difficult to grasp that a similar proforma should not be available to
inform birdwatchers who have FREELY contributed their data to ebird
should not be entitled to the courtesy of being informed why ANY record
has been found unacceptable for public consumption.

Finally, it is EXTREMELY important that as much attention is paid to the
recording of common species as those that occur rarely. Unfortunately,
ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely
occurring species. Species such as House Sparrows, Eurasian Starlings(
now also Eurasian Collared Dove) and Grey Catbirds are in fact the
equivalent of the coal miners' Canary. Should the populations of those
species show sustained declines then we really are in trouble. And how
would we know if not recorded because they are viewed as 'dirt birds'?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com




Subject: ebird, reviewers, and data gatherers
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 2:11 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Gentlemen - past and present reviewers for ebird, and contributors

I have read with interest the responses to my email. I do of course
appreciate that all are volunteers. Personally, I believe that
volunteers should devote as much time to doing the job as they would if
they were being paid for it. Even more perhaps, since presumably if one
volunteers, one is doing it because one enjoys doing it rather than just
because one is being paid. However, as with ebird itself, reviewers and
contributors to the database, none is entirely altruistic. Nonetheless,
I believe that ebird is of immense value to the world of birdwatching
especially to the cause of monitoring ALL species of birds worldwide.

Thus, all should do their utmost to ensure that the best information is
obtained and presented in the best manner.

I am delighted to note that lists are being compiled as to what species
requires more detailed information than others. This is after all
standard practice - at least with the societies with which I have been
involved.

I note that there is a proforma for use when a reviewer queries a
species for whatever reason, be it rare occurrence or numbers outside
set parameters - who sets the parameters incidentally? I find it
difficult to grasp that a similar proforma should not be available to
inform birdwatchers who have FREELY contributed their data to ebird
should not be entitled to the courtesy of being informed why ANY record
has been found unacceptable for public consumption.

Finally, it is EXTREMELY important that as much attention is paid to the
recording of common species as those that occur rarely. Unfortunately,
ebird does encourage the cult of unjustified bias towards rarely
occurring species. Species such as House Sparrows, Eurasian Starlings(
now also Eurasian Collared Dove) and Grey Catbirds are in fact the
equivalent of the coal miners' Canary. Should the populations of those
species show sustained declines then we really are in trouble. And how
would we know if not recorded because they are viewed as 'dirt birds'?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



------------------------------------
Posted by: Michael Lancaster
------------------------------------

To contact the moderator email
bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com
Also, consider joining these groups.
bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.
If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/
From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
bcintbird-digest@yahoogroups.com
bcintbird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
bcintbird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: Re: Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 16:03 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Chris Well said. Thanks for the reminders.


Re putting a description in the comments: the way I word it is to put distinguishing field marks in the comments. If one does that, then everyone looking at the checklist knows you know of what you speak (assuming you have not hidden your comments from public view, which is an option in eBird settings). AND it helps others learn their birds. AND it saves time for me, for which I am thankful.


If you are not quite sure of your identification and donôt feel confident about putting something publicly in the comments, go ahead and feel free to use a spuh. Not all birds seen or heard can be identified.


It would be nice if eBird indicated WHY something is flagged, especially for beginner birders and eBirders - my wish list is long, especially for the webpages, but those are other topics.


Itôs amazing, really, how much good data we are getting, and giving. The most important thing is to just get out birding and have fun.


Dianne Cooper
eBird editor RD East Kootenay



Subject: Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 11:01 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Good points, Rick. Such a list is in the works.
Chris S.
On Sat, Dec 9, 2017 at 12:20 AM, 'Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:















Fair rants Chris and Chris. I would add that the decision point about just which species require details will likely be different for many people. Experienced observers who are confident about their identifications are unlikely to write up details about every species they see. Certainly not likely for robins, starlings mallards, pintails, pileated woodpeckers or a host of other species you could name. They may even be capable of distinguishing Semipalmated vs Western Sandpipers which might raise the eyebrows of reviewers if no details are provided.Perhaps than, it would be good to produce a list of species where details are recommended, even from experienced observers. That might include many or all peep species, yellowlegs and stilt sandpipers, dowitchers, accipiters, unusual buteos such as Harlan's Hawk, golden eagles vs sub-adult bald eagles, female plumaged blue and cinnamon teal, many gulls and the list could go on. Many of us have made and continue to see errors made over common species. Female Aythya ducks, female goldeneye, male scaup and so on. The list may be longer than desirable but if these are the species that cause heartburn in addition to rarities, observers should know this. By accepting the common species as gospel, the data on them may be even more skewed than mis-identified rarities where the consequences of error are much less significant from the perspective in terms of management decisions or understanding population shifts etc.Rick Howie Kamloops


















__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 2:20 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Fair rants Chris and Chris. I would add that the decision point about just
which species require details will likely be different for many people.
Experienced observers who are confident about their identifications are
unlikely to write up details about every species they see. Certainly not
likely for robins, starlings mallards, pintails, pileated woodpeckers or a
host of other species you could name. They may even be capable of
distinguishing Semipalmated vs Western Sandpipers which might raise the
eyebrows of reviewers if no details are provided.

Perhaps than, it would be good to produce a list of species where details
are recommended, even from experienced observers. That might include many or
all peep species, yellowlegs and stilt sandpipers, dowitchers, accipiters,
unusual buteos such as Harlan's Hawk, golden eagles vs sub-adult bald
eagles, female plumaged blue and cinnamon teal, many gulls and the list
could go on. Many of us have made and continue to see errors made over
common species. Female Aythya ducks, female goldeneye, male scaup and so on.
The list may be longer than desirable but if these are the species that
cause heartburn in addition to rarities, observers should know this. By
accepting the common species as gospel, the data on them may be even more
skewed than mis-identified rarities where the consequences of error are much
less significant from the perspective in terms of management decisions or
understanding population shifts etc.



Rick Howie

Kamloops



Subject: Siddle's mini-rant, but done nicely
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 15:54 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi birders,

Wayne Weber is correct that often reviewers, including me, do not have the time to correspond with an birder who has submitted an undocumented record of larger than normal numbers, a bird out of season, or an uncommon or rare bird. But sometimes I do have time, especially if the birder seems to me to show promise, not necessarily as a finder or rarities, but as a person who is seriously trying to add to our knowledge of local birds.
Let me introduce you to Birder X. He patrols his local area regularly and submits counts that seem to me to be attempts to accurately count or estimate the numbers of each species present. If he has habit of not submitting photos or good field descriptions of what he has seen, it may simply be that he is following the lead of almost everyone else in B.C. which is to say, sadly, that there is not a strong tradition of actually backing up an observation with notes taken on the spot. Most B.C. birders leave the Details section of an ebird form blank, as if they didn't know that birding as citizen science relies on the best proof available at the time. Ebird reviewers are trying hard to get birders to change their ways by reviewing all records, not just rare species, and by writing rants like this one. As well I like to think most reviewers also do some gentle encouraging. For example , if I sense that Birder X may respond positively I will begin correspondence and provide models of "Details" that I consider passible.
In a number of other situations I will also "reach out", as they say these days, for example to a beginning birder or to a regular contributor who has become an online friend. The happy thing is that given some encouragement most birders, as Chris Charlesworth writes,will "up their game".
Just one thing to add, and it's important to increasing the quality of ebird data: if you're going to submit your Christmas Count results to ebird, don't create one long list of species seen. Keep notes for each location, as much as possible. For instance I'll be helping with the Vernon count soon. I'll break my list into discrete locations like the Birnie Road landfill, Kalamalka Lakeview Road, Clerke Rd., Kekuli Bay Provincial Park, Rose's Pond, etc. I'll also keep track of how much time I spent at each location.
Happy Christmas counts!
Chris Siddle








__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: records on ebird
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 14:49 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Barry, Chris, and Interior Birders,



As a long-time eBird editor/reviewer myself (for Metro Vancouver), I can
answer your questions and add a few comments.



No, with some exceptions, we do not normally inform observers when a record
is not accepted. eBird reviewers are not expected to do so. If we did, it
would add enormously to the amount of correspondence we have to engage in.
If an observer really wants to see whether a particular record of an unusual
species has been accepted, he/she can look to see whether the sighting
appears on the map for that species. If the observer then wishes to ask why
the record was not accepted, he/she can then contact the eBird reviewer, who
will then try to explain in diplomatic terms why the record was not
accepted.



You are correct that the term "rejected" is not the best one to use, and on
reflection, I'm sure Chris would agree with me. Bird Records Committees in
most places have opted to use the terms "accepted" and "unaccepted" in their
reports. A sighting can be "unaccepted" for a number of reasons: it may have
been clearly shown (esp. if there is a photo) or strongly suspected to be a
different species, the documentation for a rare species may be suggestive
but not conclusive, the number reported may be extremely high but not well
documented, etc. For a rare species, I as a reviewer would have to be at
least 95% sure that it was correctly identified before I accepted it; 90% is
not quite good enough for a scientific database like eBird. I'm not sure if
Chris uses the same standards, but a 95% degree of certainty is one commonly
used by scientists to accept a hypothesis as being correct.



So the result is that sightings submitted to eBird get sorted into two
databases; a main database of accepted records, which are visible to the
public and appear on eBird maps, and a much smaller database of "unaccepted"
records, which are visible only to eBird reviewers and administrators (and
to the person who submitted the sighting). No sightings are ever deleted
completely unless they are removed by the observer himself or herself.



There are good reasons for retaining the "unaccepted" records. Many of them
are probably correct identifications, but the observer probably did not
provide good enough documentation to convince the reviewer. In some cases,
other observers may have obtained a good photo (or description) of the bird.
If this record is later submitted to eBird, then both the second sighting
and the original sighting can be moved into the main ("accepted") database.
This has happened many times.



As many of you know, eBird compiles listing statistics on the bird sightings
that you submit. It is important to note that the listing stats include all
unaccepted sightings that the observer has submitted, as well as the
accepted ones. There are many cases where an observer is quite certain that
he has seen Species X in Area Y, but has been unable to convince the eBird
reviewer that the ID is correct. However, the observer can keep his own
list, regardless of decisions made by a reviewer. I really like this feature
of eBird, which allows an observer to make his own decisions about what to
count on his personal list, but empowers the eBird reviewer to decide which
sightings go into the "accepted" database.



I'll leave it at that. Chris, you may have further comments to make.
Meanwhile, I hope everyone enjoys good birding in the next little while, and
good luck on your Christmas Bird Counts!



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus@telus.net

eBird editor/reviewer for Metro Vancouver







From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bcintbird@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, December 08, 2017 11:14 AM
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com; Chris Charlesworth
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] records on ebird





Hi Chris,

Do you inform the person whose record you are rejecting, why it has been
rejected? The reasons you give for rejection are entirely acceptable but no
one likes rejections.

Personally, I would use unacceptable rather than rejection since in fact the
record still 'remains on the table' and should another record of the same
species occur with an acceptable description then the previously unaccepted
one should be considered again - at least elevated to 'pending' - a system I
use with my own records.

Fortunately, with the advent of digital cameras, it has become easier to
accept so called rarities(rarely are they rarities, merely rarely
occurring). BUT it is not unknown for the addicted twitcher/lister to
'doctor' digital images.

There is unfortunately ( and I speak as someone who was on a records
committee for years) a bias against 'unknown birders' (and acceptance of
records from 'known birders')and disbelief because committee members have
not themselves seen the species. Both this sentence and th eone above are a
sad reflection on 'birding'.

And, again, unfortunately, the attention paid to such birds by birdwatchers
and record reviewers overrates their value. Yet, records of common species
seldom receive scrutiny and, as was recently revealed on BCIntbird, juvenile
'large gulls' are not easy even for experienced birdwatchers. Has any
record of Glaucous-winged Gull been found unacceptable in the Okanagan? How
many records of Eurasian Starling or House Sparrow are actually sent to
ebird?

For the record, very few of my queried records by ebird
reviewers(worldwide)have been found unacceptable after amicable
correspondence. Usually of species which I knew well, and did not take a
description, because I was unaware that they occurred rarely where I had
seen them; Eurasian Herring Gull in NW Spain, Carrion Crow in Southern Spain
for example where apparently they occur rarely. On a couple of occasions, I
have deleted the records from ebird(lists) myself even though I knew that
what I had seen was what I said it was. They remain on my lists, and I am
not ruled by society protocol what I should or should not count.

Reflections on your 'rant'.

Barry











On 08/12/2017 17:07, Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com
[bcintbird] wrote:



Birders,



I feel it's a good time to remind birders who use ebird about one or two
important points. Christmas Bird Counts are coming up soon and loads of
birders will be entering records into ebird. I, and other regional editors,
would really appreciate if many of the local ebirders 'upped' their game a
bit and provided more information on their sightings.



For example, if you find something that is flagged as rare, you need to
convince the regional editor that this is what you saw. So many times I get
rare bird reports that read something like this; 'bird hanging out with
juncos near feeder', or 'seen in flight over pond'. While this is
interesting, it does nothing to convince the regional editor that this is
what you saw! You need to obtain photographs, or sound recordings, and go
out of your way to prove that you have seen any rarities. If photos and
sound recordings are not obtained you need detailed field notes. Field notes
should be written before consulting a field guide. I, and probably a lot of
other regional editors, can pretty easily tell when a person's field notes
have come straight out of a field guide, so you really have to write these
yourself.



If records of rarities are submitted without photos, sound recordings or a
description, they will be rejected by your local ebird reviewer. If they are
rejected, the record still remains on your personal list, but won't appear
for others to see.



There's my rant for the morning.



Happy birding and ebirding!



Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC





--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias







Virus-free.
www.avg.com



Subject: records on ebird
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 13:14 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Chris,

Do you inform the person whose record you are rejecting, why it has been
rejected? The reasons you give for rejection are entirely acceptable but
no one likes rejections.

Personally, I would use unacceptable rather than rejection since in fact
the record still 'remains on the table' and should another record of the
same species occur with an acceptable description then the previously
unaccepted one should be considered again - at least elevated to
'pending' - a system I use with my own records.

Fortunately, with the advent of digital cameras, it has become easier to
accept so called rarities(rarely are they rarities, merely rarely
occurring). BUT it is not unknown for the addicted twitcher/lister to
'doctor' digital images.

There is unfortunately ( and I speak as someone who was on a records
committee for years) a bias against 'unknown birders' (and acceptance of
records from 'known birders')and disbelief because committee members
have not themselves seen the species. Both this sentence and th eone
above are a sad reflection on 'birding'.

And, again, unfortunately, the attention paid to such birds by
birdwatchers and record reviewers overrates their value. Yet, records of
common species seldom receive scrutiny and, as was recently revealed on
BCIntbird, juvenile 'large gulls' are not easy even for experienced
birdwatchers. Has any? record of Glaucous-winged Gull been found
unacceptable in the Okanagan? How many records of Eurasian Starling or
House Sparrow are actually sent to ebird?

For the record, very few of my queried records by ebird
reviewers(worldwide)have been found unacceptable after amicable
correspondence. Usually of species which I knew well, and did not take a
description, because I was unaware that they occurred rarely where I had
seen them; Eurasian Herring Gull in NW Spain, Carrion Crow in Southern
Spain for example where apparently they occur rarely.? On a couple of
occasions, I have deleted the records from ebird(lists) myself even
though I knew that what I had seen was what I said it was. They remain
on my lists, and I am not ruled by society protocol what I should or
should not count.

Reflections on your 'rant'.

Barry






On 08/12/2017 17:07, Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com
[bcintbird] wrote:
>
> Birders,
>
>
> I feel it's a good time to remind birders who use ebird about one or
> two important points. Christmas Bird Counts are coming up soon and
> loads of birders will be entering records into ebird. I, and other
> regional editors, would really appreciate if many of the local
> ebirders 'upped' their game a bit and provided more information on
> their sightings.
>
>
> For example, if you find something that is flagged as rare, you need
> to convince the regional editor that this is what you saw. So many
> times I get rare bird reports that read something like this; 'bird
> hanging out with juncos near feeder', or 'seen in flight over pond'.
> While this is interesting, it does nothing to convince the regional
> editor that this is what you saw! You need to obtain photographs, or
> sound recordings, and go out of your way to prove that you have seen
> any rarities. If photos and sound recordings are not obtained you need
> detailed field notes. Field notes should be written before consulting
> a field guide. I, and probably a lot of other regional editors, can
> pretty easily tell when a person's field notes have come straight out
> of a field guide, so you really have to write these yourself.
>
>
> If records of rarities are submitted without photos, sound recordings
> or a description, they will be rejected by your local ebird reviewer.
> If they are rejected, the record still remains on your personal list,
> but won't appear for others to see.
>
>
> There's my rant for the morning.
>
>
> Happy birding and ebirding!
>
>
> Chris Charlesworth
>
> Peachland, BC
>
>

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



Subject: records on ebird
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 11:07 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,


I feel it's a good time to remind birders who use ebird about one or two important points. Christmas Bird Counts are coming up soon and loads of birders will be entering records into ebird. I, and other regional editors, would really appreciate if many of the local ebirders 'upped' their game a bit and provided more information on their sightings.


For example, if you find something that is flagged as rare, you need to convince the regional editor that this is what you saw. So many times I get rare bird reports that read something like this; 'bird hanging out with juncos near feeder', or 'seen in flight over pond'. While this is interesting, it does nothing to convince the regional editor that this is what you saw! You need to obtain photographs, or sound recordings, and go out of your way to prove that you have seen any rarities. If photos and sound recordings are not obtained you need detailed field notes. Field notes should be written before consulting a field guide. I, and probably a lot of other regional editors, can pretty easily tell when a person's field notes have come straight out of a field guide, so you really have to write these yourself.


If records of rarities are submitted without photos, sound recordings or a description, they will be rejected by your local ebird reviewer. If they are rejected, the record still remains on your personal list, but won't appear for others to see.


There's my rant for the morning.


Happy birding and ebirding!


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC



Subject: Neonicotinoids and White-crowned Sparrows
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 7:45 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Interesting article Barry. Not surprising given that we are spraying or
coating foods with poisons and as usual, we learn more about their real
effects after doing the research after they are put into use. Advance
research and predicted effects are usually only a start in truly
understanding broader ecosystem impacts once we start putting programs into
practice. In this case, the program is pesticides, but we see the same
increase in our understanding after seeing other actions in practice for a
while. Unfortunately, many of them have negative impacts.



Rick Howie

Kamloops



Subject: Neonicotinoids and White-crowned Sparrows
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 1:07 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
https://www.birdguides.com/art...

Interesting about White-crowned Sparrows.

Neonicotinoids are banned, or there is a moratorium in the EU now if I
remember correctly.

USA has so far refused to do anything?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



------------------------------------
Posted by: Michael Lancaster
------------------------------------

To contact the moderator email
bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com
Also, consider joining these groups.
bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.
If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/
From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
bcintbird-digest@yahoogroups.com
bcintbird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
bcintbird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: loons
Date: Fri Dec 1 2017 22:46 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi birders,
The trio of Pacific Loons all wearing something like winter (basic) plumage continue to associate together out on Vernon Arm of Okanagan Lake at Okanagan Landing. Initially spotted back in early Nov. from the beach along Lakeshore Drive, the birds have moved closer the middle of the arm and today were visible from Paddlewheel Park off Eastside Rd (aka 25 Avenue) about a km from Lakeshore Road. Also visible from this spot were 4 Common Loons, one of which has a pale bill. Beware; this bird has the head and neck plumage of a Common Loon and should not be transformed into a Yellow-billed Loon. (Heaven knows, I tried very hard to make it a YBLO, but it just didn't work.)
Not much else for me report today.
Good birding,
Chris Siddle








__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group


New Members
2






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: RBA WINTER WREN
Date: Fri Dec 1 2017 20:33 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,

Early this afternoon I found a WINTER WREN at Scenic Canyon in Kelowna, along Mission Creek. This is the same location I found a Winter Wren in December of 2015 as well, interestingly and I wonder if it's the same bird. From the parking lot near Hollywood Road South, walk about 200 meters upstream along the trail. You'll go down a hill and find a spring babbling down the slope on the right. The Winter Wren, and several Pacific Wrens, were in the area of this spring, on both sides of the path and the Winter Wren was also along the edge of the signed 'Trout Pond' and the small concrete pump house. The Winter Wren and a Pacific Wren sat right next to each other at one point for excellent visual comparison and they were simultaneously calling as well. I couldn't ask for a better comparison of the two species. The Winter Wren has a more distinct white supercilium, as well as more distinct white spotting in the wings. The throat and upper breast are pale, in comparison to the warm buffy brown of Pacific Wren. The flanks are heavily barred as well. Overall the Pacific Wren is a much warmer brown bird than the Pacific. I first detected the bird by its call, a somewhat nasal 'chimp chimp', a bit different than the 'check check' of the Pacific Wren. The Winter Wren also gave a dry rattle several times, and once or twice even broke out into song. This is the third record for the Okanagan. Ryan Tomlinson found one on the east side of Osoyoos Lake in December several years ago, and now Scenic Canyon has had two records. I was in the presence of Jesse Hannebauer and his friend Dan. James Jansen showed up after we left and found the bird pretty easily and he was lucky to get some nice photographs. You can see the photos on the BC rare bird blog at: http://bcbirdalert.blogspot.ca...


In other news, we had a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW at Belgo Pond today. A first year male COMMON YELLOWTHROAT was a nice late record at Thompson Brook Marsh. Two hundred BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS at Hall Road were the first I've seen this winter / fall. A short trek up Hwy 33 produced 2 NORTHERN SHRIKES and several ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS at Pyman Road and CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEES and PINE GROSBEAKS on Philpott Road.


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 21:08 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Buteos swept through in September and October in low numbers here in the
PG area with none staying. I hear Roughleg numbers are good in the south
Peace. No doubt more a factor of food availability than snow cover.
Haven't seen a mouse or vole in the yard here in ages.

Jack Bowling
PG

On 2017-11-29 06:31 PM, Allan Dupilka adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca
[bcintbird] wrote:
>
> Hello Rick
>
> No. I would say hawk numbers in total? are down so far this year ( in
> fact quite light), probably because of better weather up north. We
> have not seen significant number of Harlan's Hawks but on the other
> hand we have not seen one dark phase and as of today we have seen
> "definite and probable" three light phase in the South Thompson.
>
> Allan Dupilka
>
> Little Shuswap Lk.
>
>
> On 2017-11-29 6:06 PM, 'Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
>>
>> Hi Allan: your last comment is of interest. Are you finding a
>> significant number of Harlan's Hawks?
>>
>> Rick Howie
>>
>> Kamloops
>>
>
>



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 20:28 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hello Rick

No. I would say hawk numbers in total? are down so far this year ( in
fact quite light), probably because of better weather up north. We have
not seen significant number of Harlan's Hawks but on the other hand we
have not seen one dark phase and as of today we have seen "definite and
probable" three light phase in the South Thompson.

Allan Dupilka

Little Shuswap Lk.


On 2017-11-29 6:06 PM, 'Rick Howie' r.howie@shaw.ca [bcintbird] wrote:
>
>
> Hi Allan: your last comment is of interest. Are you finding a
> significant number of Harlan's Hawks?
>
> Rick Howie
>
> Kamloops
>
>
>
>



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 20:06 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Allan: your last comment is of interest. Are you finding a significant
number of Harlan's Hawks?



Rick Howie

Kamloops



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 19:33 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Lots of Mountain Chickadee at our end of far east Columbia-Shuswap
which is normal and no Chestnut backed at our end of far west
Columbia-Shuswap or far east Thompson-Nicola which is also normal.
Exceptional number of Cascade ss Juncos (lot less Oregon ss) and it
appears to be that light phase juvenile Harlan's Red Tailed Hawks are
even more common than dark phase .

Allan Dupilka

Little Shuswap Lake, BC


On 2017-11-29 1:09 PM, Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]
wrote:
>
>
> At the same time I wonder if Mountain Chickadee numbers are down
> anywhere. My evidence is slight: for the first time ever I haven't had
> any at my bird feeders (Vernon) for months, whereas formally they were
> of daily occurrence.
>
> Chris Siddle
>
> On Wed, Nov 29, 2017 at 12:56 PM, Dcecile dcecile@shaw.ca
> [bcintbird] > wrote:
>
>
>
> Had an out-place CBCH back in October as did Doug Leighton and we
> thought they might be indicating possible irruption.
>
> Cheers,
> Don Cecile
> Vernon
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 29, 2017, at 9:44 AM, Clive Keen clive_keen@hotmail.com
> [bcintbird]
> > wrote:
>
>> Chris: also true of my part of northern BC -- Chestnut-backs have
>> been appearing in places they've not been seen before, including
>> just a few k north and east of Prince George.
>>
>>
>> Clive
>>
>> (Shel-glen area, east of Prince George)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Clive Keen
>> http://traybonbooks.com
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> *From:* bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
>> > > on behalf of Chris
>> Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com
>> [bcintbird]
>> >
>> *Sent:* November 29, 2017 10:21 AM
>> *To:* bc intbird
>> *Subject:* [bcintbird] Chestnut-backed Chickadees
>>
>> Birders,
>>
>>
>> Is anyone else out there in the southern Interior seeing numbers
>> of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in areas where they do not normally
>> occur? In West Kelowna we're experiencing an invasion of the
>> species this winter. I have had up to 5 at my feeders here in
>> Peachland. A Chestnut-backed Chickadee has visited a feeder on
>> Summerland's Trout Creek Point recently. I have heard them in
>> Glen Canyon Regional Park in West Kelowna, and Kalin Ocana has
>> reported up to 40 at Bear Creek Provincial Park in the
>> campground. Since 40 would be an unprecedented number of
>> Chestnut-backed Chickadees, I went to investigate yesterday.
>> While I didn't find 40, I did find 8 of them in the campground,
>> along with 20 Pine Grosbeaks.
>>
>>
>> Chris Charlesworth
>>
>> Peachland, BC
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 15:18 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Seem to be more Mountain Chickadees on the coast this fall, so maybe they have shifted a bit out of the southern interior.
I spent a couple of weeks working in the forests of the Cariboo (late September and October), and found both Mountain and Chestnut-backed Chickadees quite widespread, though certainly not abundant.
Michael G. Shepard
Victoria BC
From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bcintbird@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 29, 2017 1:10 PM
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com; Dcecile <dcecile@shaw.ca>
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees

At the same time I wonder if Mountain Chickadee numbers are down anywhere. My evidence is slight: for the first time ever I haven't had any at my bird feeders (Vernon) for months, whereas formally they were of daily occurrence.
Chris Siddle
On Wed, Nov 29, 2017 at 12:56 PM, Dcecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


Had an out-place CBCH back in October as did Doug Leighton and we thought they might be indicating possible irruption.
Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon
Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 29, 2017, at 9:44 AM, Clive Keen clive_keen@hotmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Chris: also true of my part of northern BC -- Chestnut-backs have been appearing in places they've not been seen before, including just a few k north and east of Prince George.
Clive
(Shel-glen area, east of Prince George)



Clive Keen
http://traybonbooks.com
From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: November 29, 2017 10:21 AM
To: bc intbird
Subject: [bcintbird] Chestnut-backed Chickadees


Birders,
Is anyone else out there in the southern Interior seeing numbers of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in areas where they do not normally occur? In West Kelowna we're experiencing an invasion of the species this winter. I have had up to 5 at my feeders here in Peachland. A Chestnut-backed Chickadee has visited a feeder on Summerland's Trout Creek Point recently. I have heard them in Glen Canyon Regional Park in West Kelowna, and Kalin Ocana has reported up to 40 at Bear Creek Provincial Park in the campground. Since 40 would be an unprecedented number of Chestnut-backed Chickadees, I went to investigate yesterday. While I didn't find 40, I did find 8 of them in the campground, along with 20 Pine Grosbeaks.
Chris Charlesworth
Peachland, BC









__._,_.___







Posted by: "Michael Shepard" <mgshepard@pacificcoast.net>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group


New Members
2






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 15:12 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Even though CBCH are quite regular in my area, Nakusp, there are far more around this winter than is usual. They significantly outnumber the BCCH around my yard at the moment.Gary

From: "Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]"
To: bc intbird
Sent: Wednesday, November 29, 2017 9:21 AM
Subject: [bcintbird] Chestnut-backed Chickadees

Birders,
Is anyone else out there in the southern Interior seeing numbers of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in areas where they do not normally occur? In West Kelowna we're experiencing an invasion of the species this winter. I have had up to 5 at my feeders here in Peachland. A Chestnut-backed Chickadee has visited a feeder on Summerland's Trout Creek Point recently. I have heard them in Glen Canyon Regional Park in West Kelowna, and Kalin Ocana has reported up to 40 at Bear Creek Provincial Park in the campground. Since 40 would be an unprecedented number of Chestnut-backed Chickadees, I went to investigate yesterday. While I didn't find 40, I did find 8 of them in the campground, along with 20 Pine Grosbeaks.

Chris CharlesworthPeachland, BC




Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 15:09 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
At the same time I wonder if Mountain Chickadee numbers are down anywhere. My evidence is slight: for the first time ever I haven't had any at my bird feeders (Vernon) for months, whereas formally they were of daily occurrence.
Chris Siddle
On Wed, Nov 29, 2017 at 12:56 PM, Dcecile dcecile@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




















Had an out-place CBCH back in October as did Doug Leighton and we thought they might be indicating possible irruption.
Cheers,Don CecileVernon

Sent from my iPhone
On Nov 29, 2017, at 9:44 AM, Clive Keen clive_keen@hotmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



























Chris: also true of my part of northern BC -- Chestnut-backs have been appearing in places they've not been seen before, including just a few k north and east of Prince George.


Clive
(Shel-glen area, east of Prince George)














Clive Keen
http://traybonbooks.com




From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: November 29, 2017 10:21 AM
To: bc intbird
Subject: [bcintbird] Chestnut-backed Chickadees









Birders,


Is anyone else out there in the southern Interior seeing numbers of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in areas where they do not normally occur? In West Kelowna we're experiencing an invasion of the species this winter. I have
had up to 5 at my feeders here in Peachland. A Chestnut-backed Chickadee has visited a feeder on Summerland's Trout Creek Point recently. I have heard them in Glen Canyon Regional Park in West Kelowna, and Kalin Ocana has reported up to 40 at Bear Creek Provincial
Park in the campground. Since 40 would be an unprecedented number of Chestnut-backed Chickadees, I went to investigate yesterday. While I didn't find 40, I did find 8 of them in the campground, along with 20 Pine Grosbeaks.




Chris Charlesworth
Peachland, BC














































__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group


New Members
2






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 14:56 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Had an out-place CBCH back in October as did Doug Leighton and we thought they might be indicating possible irruption.

Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 29, 2017, at 9:44 AM, Clive Keen clive_keen@hotmail.com [bcintbird] wrote:
>
> Chris: also true of my part of northern BC -- Chestnut-backs have been appearing in places they've not been seen before, including just a few k north and east of Prince George.
>
> Clive
> (Shel-glen area, east of Prince George)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Clive Keen
> http://traybonbooks.com
>
>
> From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]
> Sent: November 29, 2017 10:21 AM
> To: bc intbird
> Subject: [bcintbird] Chestnut-backed Chickadees
>
>
> Birders,
>
> Is anyone else out there in the southern Interior seeing numbers of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in areas where they do not normally occur? In West Kelowna we're experiencing an invasion of the species this winter. I have had up to 5 at my feeders here in Peachland. A Chestnut-backed Chickadee has visited a feeder on Summerland's Trout Creek Point recently. I have heard them in Glen Canyon Regional Park in West Kelowna, and Kalin Ocana has reported up to 40 at Bear Creek Provincial Park in the campground. Since 40 would be an unprecedented number of Chestnut-backed Chickadees, I went to investigate yesterday. While I didn't find 40, I did find 8 of them in the campground, along with 20 Pine Grosbeaks.
>
> Chris Charlesworth
> Peachland, BC
>
>



Subject: Re: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 11:44 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Chris: also true of my part of northern BC -- Chestnut-backs have been appearing in places they've not been seen before, including just a few k north and east of Prince George.


Clive

(Shel-glen area, east of Prince George)







Clive Keen
http://traybonbooks.com


________________________________
From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird]
Sent: November 29, 2017 10:21 AM
To: bc intbird
Subject: [bcintbird] Chestnut-backed Chickadees



Birders,


Is anyone else out there in the southern Interior seeing numbers of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in areas where they do not normally occur? In West Kelowna we're experiencing an invasion of the species this winter. I have had up to 5 at my feeders here in Peachland. A Chestnut-backed Chickadee has visited a feeder on Summerland's Trout Creek Point recently. I have heard them in Glen Canyon Regional Park in West Kelowna, and Kalin Ocana has reported up to 40 at Bear Creek Provincial Park in the campground. Since 40 would be an unprecedented number of Chestnut-backed Chickadees, I went to investigate yesterday. While I didn't find 40, I did find 8 of them in the campground, along with 20 Pine Grosbeaks.


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC



Subject: Chestnut-backed Chickadees
Date: Wed Nov 29 2017 11:21 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,


Is anyone else out there in the southern Interior seeing numbers of Chestnut-backed Chickadees in areas where they do not normally occur? In West Kelowna we're experiencing an invasion of the species this winter. I have had up to 5 at my feeders here in Peachland. A Chestnut-backed Chickadee has visited a feeder on Summerland's Trout Creek Point recently. I have heard them in Glen Canyon Regional Park in West Kelowna, and Kalin Ocana has reported up to 40 at Bear Creek Provincial Park in the campground. Since 40 would be an unprecedented number of Chestnut-backed Chickadees, I went to investigate yesterday. While I didn't find 40, I did find 8 of them in the campground, along with 20 Pine Grosbeaks.


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC



Subject: White-winged Crossbill on Iceland
Date: Thu Nov 23 2017 11:08 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Sharp-eyed observers Barry. Interesting analysis to verify identification.



Rick



Subject: Snowy Owl Hunt - Part One
Date: Wed Nov 22 2017 14:16 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I spent an hour and a half cruising around Swan Lake and Head of the Lake and found no Snowy but visibility was lousy. I did notice that the two Trumpeter Swan adults are back on Okeefe Pond dipping for food right next to the shore up against St. Anne Road. They are surprisingly easy to miss from the road and the highway for such huge white birds.
Chris S.








__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake
Date: Wed Nov 22 2017 13:26 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I'm sorry, Allan, I didn't realize we were talking about Gashawks, not owls!ė
Logan
On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 11:23 AM, Allan Dupilka <adupilka@airspeedwireless.ca> wrote:





Logan, you might want to recheck the mall. Those Snowies you
speak about are retired snowbirds from the prairies with nothing
to do and so they hang around the malls. !!!
Allan Dupilka
Little Shuswap Lk


On 2017-11-22 8:40 AM, Logan Lalonde
logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com [bcintbird] wrote:






Us Central and South Okanagan birders will keep an
eye out as it heads south! Birders, if you're out and about
wanting to have a slight chance at it, ( I won't; too much
school ), check the Kelowna Airport, the Bennett Bridge, and
generally flat areas with low grasses with other birds of prey,
especially Rough-legged Hawk Sometimes Snowies random hang out
at the mall in Penticton as well, so if you're passing through,
take a look. It's a moderately decent irruption winter for them,
and this is the best month for them, so keep an eye out. Thanks
for letting us know, Chris!


Logan


On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 8:21 AM, Chris
Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com
[bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:






Birders


This tip is a bit cold but you never know...
A sighting from yesterday's ebird: a possible
Snowy Owl at the north end of Swan Lake, n of
Vernon. Might be worth a drive around the area
even in the rain. Unfortunately, Snowies in the
N OK tend to move through the area quickly, not
hanging around for birders.


Chris S.



























__._,_.___







Posted by: Logan Lalonde <logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake
Date: Wed Nov 22 2017 13:20 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Logan, you might want to recheck the mall. Those Snowies you speak
about are retired snowbirds from the prairies with nothing to do and so
they hang around the malls. !!!

Allan Dupilka

Little Shuswap Lk


On 2017-11-22 8:40 AM, Logan Lalonde logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com
[bcintbird] wrote:
>
>
> Us Central and South Okanagan birders will keep an eye out as it heads
> south! Birders, if you're out and about wanting to have a slight
> chance at it, ( I won't; too much school ), check the Kelowna Airport,
> the Bennett Bridge, and generally flat areas with low grasses with
> other birds of prey, especially Rough-legged Hawk Sometimes Snowies
> random hang out at the mall in Penticton as well, so if you're passing
> through, take a look. It's a moderately decent irruption winter for
> them, and this is the best month for them, so keep an eye out. Thanks
> for letting us know, Chris!
>
> Logan
>
> On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 8:21 AM, Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com
> [bcintbird] > wrote:
>
> Birders
>
> This tip is a bit cold but you never know... A sighting from
> yesterday's ebird: a possible Snowy Owl at the north end of Swan
> Lake, n of Vernon. Might be worth a drive around the area even in
> the rain. Unfortunately, Snowies in the N OK tend to move through
> the area quickly, not hanging around for birders.
>
> Chris S.
>
>
>
>
>



Subject: White-winged Crossbill on Iceland
Date: Wed Nov 22 2017 13:18 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
https://www.birdguides.com/art...

A detailed differentiation of White-billed and Two-barred Crossbills.

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



------------------------------------
Posted by: Michael Lancaster
------------------------------------

To contact the moderator email
bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com
Also, consider joining these groups.
bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.
If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/
From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
bcintbird-digest@yahoogroups.com
bcintbird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
bcintbird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake
Date: Wed Nov 22 2017 10:40 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Us Central and South Okanagan birders will keep an eye out as it heads south! Birders, if you're out and about wanting to have a slight chance at it, ( I won't; too much school ), check the Kelowna Airport, the Bennett Bridge, and generally flat areas with low grasses with other birds of prey, especially Rough-legged Hawk Sometimes Snowies random hang out at the mall in Penticton as well, so if you're passing through, take a look. It's a moderately decent irruption winter for them, and this is the best month for them, so keep an eye out. Thanks for letting us know, Chris!
Logan
On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 8:21 AM, Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


























Birders
This tip is a bit cold but you never know... A sighting from yesterday's ebird: a possible Snowy Owl at the north end of Swan Lake, n of Vernon. Might be worth a drive around the area even in the rain. Unfortunately, Snowies in the N OK tend to move through the area quickly, not hanging around for birders.
Chris S.































__._,_.___







Posted by: Logan Lalonde <logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Possible Snowy Owl N end of Swan Lake
Date: Wed Nov 22 2017 10:21 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders
This tip is a bit cold but you never know... A sighting from yesterday's ebird: a possible Snowy Owl at the north end of Swan Lake, n of Vernon. Might be worth a drive around the area even in the rain. Unfortunately, Snowies in the N OK tend to move through the area quickly, not hanging around for birders.
Chris S.








__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: What is in a name
Date: Tue Nov 21 2017 8:15 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I confess that taxonomy has always been a favourite subject of mine.
Cornell eNews does a pretty good job of explaining the science involved
as regards birds.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/...

I forward this as possibly not all 'ebirders' (ugh!) get this regular
email.

However, the problem is not made any easier because virtually all
countiries have a national committe to deal with 'their' birds. The best
approach to taxonomy is in my opinion that of IOC and it will eventually
be used worldwide - many national committees already use it - notable
exception AOS. As well as scientific names, agreed English names are
used. Updates are made every few months incorporating the results of the
latest studies.

Unless we know the names of birds, how can we communicate to each other?

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Oliver BC Canada


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



------------------------------------
Posted by: Michael Lancaster
------------------------------------

To contact the moderator email
bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com
Also, consider joining these groups.
bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.
If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/
From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...

<*> Your email settings:
Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/...
(Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
bcintbird-digest@yahoogroups.com
bcintbird-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
bcintbird-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
https://info.yahoo.com/legal/u...



Subject: immature swans
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 18:59 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Pam,
Of course itôs called Godôs Mountain ď not sure what I was thinking. I have heard some pretty funny stories about stays there.
Cheers
bob
From: Pam Laing [mailto:pamlaing2309@gmail.com]
Sent: November 20, 2017 12:43 PM
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com; Chris Siddle
Cc: Bob Handfield
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] immature swans
Hi Chris, Bob,
I believe itôs actually called Godôs Mountain. Itôs a high end B&B offering an eccentric and quite wonderful array of rooms, one of which has no roof. Seriously, check it out! We stayed there once, (though we had a roof), for a special birthday one September. They offer wine-paired dinners that are superb. It is located on the east side of Skaha Lake roughly half way down the lake from Penticton, if i remember correctly. Bob, you will know better. I think they also maintain an organic vineyard.
Pam Laing
Sent from my iPad

On Nov 20, 2017, at 12:31 PM, Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi Bob,
Forgive my geographical ignorance of the S. OK but what's Go'd Little Acre , besides a once naughty novel by Erskine Caldwell?
Chris S.
On Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 9:58 AM, 'Bob Handfield' bobnmaggie@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
This morning looking across Skaha Lake I observed a group of 12 swans ď too far away for me to say whether Trumpeter or Tundra; however the good news is that of the 12, 4 were immatures. They are on the east side of the lake just a little south of where Godôs Little Acre is located.

Bob Handfield
Kaleden









__._,_.___







Posted by: "Bob Handfield" <bobnmaggie@shaw.ca>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: immature swans
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 14:43 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Chris, Bob,I believe itôs actually called Godôs Mountain. Itôs a high end B&B offering an eccentric and quite wonderful array of rooms, one of which has no roof. Seriously, check it out! We stayed there once, (though we had a roof), for a special birthday one September. They offer wine-paired dinners that are superb. It is located on the east side of Skaha Lake roughly half way down the lake from Penticton, if i remember correctly. Bob, you will know better. I think they also maintain an organic vineyard.
Pam Laing

Sent from my iPad
On Nov 20, 2017, at 12:31 PM, Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
























Hi Bob,
Forgive my geographical ignorance of the S. OK but what's Go'd Little Acre , besides a once naughty novel by Erskine Caldwell?
Chris S.
On Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 9:58 AM, 'Bob Handfield' bobnmaggie@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:















This morning looking across Skaha Lake I observed a group of 12 swans ď too far away for me to say whether Trumpeter or Tundra; however the good news is that of the 12, 4 were immatures. They are on the east side of the lake just a little south of where Godôs Little Acre is located.Bob HandfieldKaleden
































__._,_.___







Posted by: Pam Laing <pamlaing2309@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: immature swans
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 14:31 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Bob,
Forgive my geographical ignorance of the S. OK but what's Go'd Little Acre , besides a once naughty novel by Erskine Caldwell?
Chris S.
On Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 9:58 AM, 'Bob Handfield' bobnmaggie@shaw.ca [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:















This morning looking across Skaha Lake I observed a group of 12 swans ď too far away for me to say whether Trumpeter or Tundra; however the good news is that of the 12, 4 were immatures. They are on the east side of the lake just a little south of where Godôs Little Acre is located.Bob HandfieldKaleden


















__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: immature swans
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 11:58 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
This morning looking across Skaha Lake I observed a group of 12 swans - too
far away for me to say whether Trumpeter or Tundra; however the good news is
that of the 12, 4 were immatures. They are on the east side of the lake
just a little south of where God's Little Acre is located.



Bob Handfield

Kaleden



Subject: Penticton birds
Date: Mon Nov 20 2017 0:03 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I checked out the S. end of Okanagan Lake in Penticton this afternoon, along with James Jansen, and Brad and Kaden Vissia. We could not find the Little Gull, unfortunately. Loads of other gulls present, including a selection of first year and adult Iceland (Thayer's) Gulls.


At the Esplanade Trails we encountered about 4 Yellow-rumped Warblers, as well as a nice Swamp Sparrow. On the way back to Peachland, I stopped in at Trout Creek Point along Landry Crescent and found a late Lincoln's Sparrow.


Chestnut-backed Chickadees continue at the feeder on Trepanier Road in Peachland today as well.


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC



Subject: Rough-legged Hawk, Pyman Road
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 23:57 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Great shots. The rodent looks large. I am wondering if it is a Pocket
Gopher.



Rick Howie

Kamloops



Subject: Rough-legged Hawk, Pyman Road
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 19:40 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Good afternoon,
I took a trip out Highway 33 today, hoping to see a few hawks. Stopped in at Pyman Road. Not seeing any right away, I parked on the rise, outside the gate. After a few minutes I noticed some Rough-legged hawks hunting. I stayed in my car (the wind was whipping hard, so I I thought, I'll just watch).
As I sat there, one of them hunted in the grass just next to me several times. Seeing the birds battle the wind, keep focus and keep hunting from close by was wonderful. Over the course of an hour or so I saw 4 of them at least - and watched them chase off a few ravens. An impertinent American Kestrel also showed up - dive bombing the hawks on occasion. The rough-leggeds' biggest enmity, however, was reserved for a nervy red-tailed hawk that drifted in to their territory. Some chasing ensued...
One of the most intriguing things was when one of the birds caught a vole (I believe).
S/he rose out of the grass with the vole, dirt and grass clump...https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

flew a bit, then transferred the catch mid flight to..
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


its beak...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

It then flew a few wing beats, then transferred it back...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Not long later, s/he went to the grass for its meal. (I have a few of the in between pics as well). Pretty interesting, though. I was trying to figure out why it would do that -- remove the dirt and grass? Too much wiggling?
It was quite a pleasant afternoon - well for me - not the field rodents...
Cheers,Michelle



Michelle N. Lamberson
Lake Country, BC
http://www.flickr.com/photos/v...



Subject: Little Gull continues
Date: Sun Nov 19 2017 14:05 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hey All,


I did shoot down to Penticton today to try for the Little Gull. I did find and view the bird flying near the closed pier at around 8:30 am. From there it made it's way off to the NE. I hung around for another 3 hours, walking from the SS Sicamous to the Tennis Club, but did not see it again.


Scott Thomson

Westbank

________________________________
From: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com on behalf of jim_deirdre@yahoo.ca [bcintbird]
Sent: November 18, 2017 9:07 PM
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] Little Gull continues



The Little Gull was still around the pier in Penticton at 15:05 Saturday afternoon, Nov. 18 and being seen by many birders. The bird likes to range widely out over the lake, from about 2 km to the east of the pier, under the Penticton sign on Munson Mountain, to about 1 km to the W of the pier. Patience is required but will be rewarded[https://s.yimg.com/ok/u/assets...


Jim Turnbull

Naramata



Subject: Little Gull continues
Date: Sat Nov 18 2017 23:07 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The Little Gull was still around the pier in Penticton at 15:05 Saturday afternoon, Nov. 18 and being seen by many birders.  The bird likes to range widely out over the lake, from about 2 km to the east of the pier, under the Penticton sign on Munson Mountain, to about 1 km to the W of the pier.  Patience is required but will be rewarded.


Jim Turnbull
Naramata



Subject: Little Gull continues
Date: Sat Nov 18 2017 22:03 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi there,
My best views of the bird were on the eastern side of the pier late morning to afternoon.At the landward end of the pier was a good place to stand - you could see it fly across.
It's flight pattern - quick turns and dives - reminded me of a Forster's tern. Instead of diving in for fish, it picked things off the water.
I did not have the luck to have the bird fly right over... I'm jealous!
I did take a few pictures - not the greatest - the bird moved fast, stayed offshore quite a ways and the background kept snapping in focus (Sigh). I did manage to catch the "M" on its back, so that was pretty neat. One shot shoes the reddish legs as well.
I put the photos in an album in case anyone is interested.https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Bonus bird of the day at the pier was an American Dipper!Michelle N. Lamberson
Lake Country, BC
http://www.flickr.com/photos/v...

From: "Chris Siddle chris.siddle@gmail.com [bcintbird]"
To: bcintbird@yahoogroups.com; Pam Laing
Sent: Saturday, November 18, 2017 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: [bcintbird] Little Gull continues

Hi birders,
Chris C. has provided good details for re-finding the Little Gull. It's in first-winter plumage but retains a few juvenal marks, like a smudge on its side up past the flank, and a dark bar across its back joining with the dark bars across the wings to form a very prominent M. It likes to fly way out on the lake. Draw a line from the Sicamous (old paddlewheel) to the tip of the wooded pier and look for the bird along this line, more often towards the pier than the paddlewheeler, but of course it has appeared in other spots, most notably for Ann Gibson, Doug Kragh and me, right over our heads as we stood on the sidewalk along the beach.
Also I spotted a male and a female-type White-winged Scoter among the raft of Greater Scaups and Redheads along the same imaginary line.
If you have access to yahoo, Don Cecile has provided you with some good photos of the bird.
Good luck.
Chris S.


On Sat, Nov 18, 2017 at 3:27 PM, Pam Laing pamlaing2309@gmail.com [bcintbird] wrote:



Still there just before 2pm this afternoon.Pam Laing

Sent from my iPad
On Nov 18, 2017, at 11:33 AM, Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird] wrote:


Birders,
I haven't seen it posted here today, but the LITTLE GULL continues in Penticton today and is being seen by many birders. It seems to be hanging out off the end of the pier at what use to be called the Lakeside Resort and Casino. It's the only large pier on Okanagan Lk in Penticton. The pier itself is closed, unfortunately, but this just gives you a reference of where to look. It's been foraging quite actively offshore, and at times sitting on the water and resting, when it can be quite difficult to locate.

Chris CharlesworthAvocet Tours









Subject: Little Gull continues
Date: Sat Nov 18 2017 18:35 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi birders,
Chris C. has provided good details for re-finding the Little Gull. It's in first-winter plumage but retains a few juvenal marks, like a smudge on its side up past the flank, and a dark bar across its back joining with the dark bars across the wings to form a very prominent M. It likes to fly way out on the lake. Draw a line from the Sicamous (old paddlewheel) to the tip of the wooded pier and look for the bird along this line, more often towards the pier than the paddlewheeler, but of course it has appeared in other spots, most notably for Ann Gibson, Doug Kragh and me, right over our heads as we stood on the sidewalk along the beach.
Also I spotted a male and a female-type White-winged Scoter among the raft of Greater Scaups and Redheads along the same imaginary line.
If you have access to yahoo, Don Cecile has provided you with some good photos of the bird.
Good luck.
Chris S.


On Sat, Nov 18, 2017 at 3:27 PM, Pam Laing pamlaing2309@gmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




















Still there just before 2pm this afternoon.Pam Laing

Sent from my iPad
On Nov 18, 2017, at 11:33 AM, Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



























Birders,


I haven't seen it posted here today, but the LITTLE GULL continues in Penticton today and is being seen by many birders. It seems to be hanging out off the end of the pier at what use to be called the Lakeside Resort and Casino. It's the only large pier
on Okanagan Lk in Penticton. The pier itself is closed, unfortunately, but this just gives you a reference of where to look. It's been foraging quite actively offshore, and at times sitting on the water and resting, when it can be quite difficult to locate.



Chris Charlesworth
Avocet Tours








































__._,_.___







Posted by: Chris Siddle <chris.siddle@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Subject: Little Gull continues
Date: Sat Nov 18 2017 17:27 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Still there just before 2pm this afternoon.
Pam Laing

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 18, 2017, at 11:33 AM, Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird] wrote:
>
> Birders,
>
>
> I haven't seen it posted here today, but the LITTLE GULL continues in Penticton today and is being seen by many birders. It seems to be hanging out off the end of the pier at what use to be called the Lakeside Resort and Casino. It's the only large pier on Okanagan Lk in Penticton. The pier itself is closed, unfortunately, but this just gives you a reference of where to look. It's been foraging quite actively offshore, and at times sitting on the water and resting, when it can be quite difficult to locate.
>
> Chris Charlesworth
>
> Avocet Tours
>
>
>
>



Subject: Little Gull continues
Date: Sat Nov 18 2017 13:33 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,


I haven't seen it posted here today, but the LITTLE GULL continues in Penticton today and is being seen by many birders. It seems to be hanging out off the end of the pier at what use to be called the Lakeside Resort and Casino. It's the only large pier on Okanagan Lk in Penticton. The pier itself is closed, unfortunately, but this just gives you a reference of where to look. It's been foraging quite actively offshore, and at times sitting on the water and resting, when it can be quite difficult to locate.


Chris Charlesworth

Avocet Tours



Subject:
Date: Sat Nov 18 2017 9:40 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Congratulations to Chris Charlesworth for finding the Okanagans first
Little Gull and thanks to Chris for sharing the sighting. I was able to
scoot over to Penticton in the late afternoon and take a few low-light shots
of the bird in the distance. I hope they appear below.


Cheers,
Don Cecile
Vernon



Subject: South Okanagan Birding
Date: Fri Nov 17 2017 21:52 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,


Jesse Hannebauer and I spent the day exploring the south Okanagan. It was a sunny and warm day and a rare event in the south Okanagan, it wasn't windy. At my place in Peachland we began with a few species; White-breasted Nuthatch, Red-breasted Nuthatch and I had a Varied Thrush just before Jesse arrived. My better half Cindy said that the 5 Chestnut-backed Chickadees that have been frequenting my feeder were again here today.


Jesse and I headed to Penticton and began scanning through the gulls at the beach on Okanagan Lake. There were many gulls, and most of them were California Gulls. A few Herring, Ring-billed, Iceland and Glaucous-winged gulls were also mixed in. This is when I discovered the LITTLE GULL flying offshore beyond the other gulls at a distance of about 100-300 meters. Jesse and I couldn't believe our eyes and we began snapping photos of this first record for the Okanagan. The photos are not very good, but can be seen on the BC Rare Bird blog at www.bcbirdalert.blogspot.ca. In addition to gulls there was some waterfowl here, the best of which was a female Red-breasted Merganser.


We spent quite a bit of time watching the gull before we headed further south, and once we ripped ourselves away we headed towards Osoyoos via White Lake Road and River Road. Birding was slow along White Lake Road, with nothing interesting to report and similar along River Road, though we did hear a couple of Virginia Rails at Hack's Pond. At Inkaneep Provincial Park we had great views of a Bewick's Wren. Down at Road 22 good birds continued with a White-throated Sparrow in the bushes just east of the bridge, and a 'slate-co' Fox Sparrow along the S.E. dyke. Farther south along the S.E. dyke at the N. end of the large wetland we had a female COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, quite a late record for this species. Near the turnaround at the end of the road was a flock of 8 or so Common Redpolls and perhaps up to 10 American Tree Sparrows.


We took a walk at Haynes Lease Ecological Reserve and were rewarded with a flock of 15 Gray Partridge and half a dozen or so Chukar. An adult Golden Eagle soared over the cliffs and we had lovely views of both Canyon Wren and a late ROCK WREN. About 10 Western Bluebirds also were found here. We had a scope at the N. end of Osoyoos Lake and were quite surprised to find a first winter Bonaparte's Gull on the sandbar here. As we made our way north towards home, we scoped Vaseux Lake in the dingy dusk light and added a few more species to the day list which ended up at about 80 species.


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC

BC Rare Bird Alert
www.bcbirdalert.blogspot.ca
At 9:15 am on October 24th-2017, Michael Klotz found an adult male King Eider at the end of the steel piling at Berth # 5 at the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal.



Subject: RBA: Little Gull in Penticton
Date: Fri Nov 17 2017 20:31 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hello all; 
I headed to the waterfront right after school today ( around 4:00 p.m. )along with my friend Matyas Gerloczy, because nearly all Little Gulls in BC to this point have been one day wonders so I could not wait until tomorrow. Immediately, we had the bird zig-zagging in flight from the highway all the way to the Esplanade and back, feeding Bonaparte's-like constantly. The entire duration, the bird was over a kilometer out on the lake. The bird flew north towards Naramata around 4:30, long after the thousands of other gulls headed in that direction ( supposedly towards the landfill ). Beautiful tiny 1st year bird! Love the black strip across the mantle and wings.
Cheers!
Logan Lalonde
On Fri, Nov 17, 2017 at 9:16 AM, Chris Charlesworth c_charlesworth23@hotmail.com [bcintbird] <bcintbird@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

























Birders,


Jesse Hannebauer and I just found a first winter LITTLE GULL on the Okanagan Lake waterfront between the peach and the SS Sicamous at 9:00 am.


Chris Charlesworth


Sent from my iPhone





























__._,_.___







Posted by: Logan Lalonde <logan.a.w.lalonde@gmail.com>









To contact the moderator email

bcintbird-owner@yahoogroups.com

Also, consider joining these groups.

bcbirds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com an all BC group.

If you have pictures to share try this group.
http://groups.google.com/

From here you have to join the bcintbird-pics group before you can see the pictures.







Visit Your Group






Privacy Unsubscribe Terms of Use










__,_._,___



Contact us.

  • 93 Clinton Street Suite ABA
  • Delaware City, DE 19706
  • Toll Free: (800) 850-2473
  • Phone: (302) 838-3660
  • Fax: (302) 838-3651

How to join or post to a listserv >>