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Updated on February 20, 2018, 10:55 am

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20 Feb: @ 10:43:34 
Gambling with Ebird - correction [Chris Siddle [email protected] [bcintbird]]
20 Feb: @ 10:37:53 
"Gambling" with ebird [Chris Siddle [email protected] [bcintbird]]
15 Feb: @ 17:04:55 
Mexican birding [Chris Charlesworth [email protected] [bcintbird]]
15 Feb: @ 00:33:49 
RE: Legalised hunting in Tunisia ['Rick Howie' [email protected] [bcintbird]]
15 Feb: @ 00:29:12 
RE: Vagrant chasing ['Rick Howie' [email protected] [bcintbird]]
14 Feb: @ 23:23:57 
Legalised hunting in Tunisia [Michael Lancaster [email protected] [bcintbird]]
14 Feb: @ 23:20:16 
Review of the week - UK [Michael Lancaster [email protected] [bcintbird]]
14 Feb: @ 23:10:26 
Vagrant chasing [Michael Lancaster [email protected] [bcintbird]]
27 Jan: @ 12:15:28 
BC Bird of the Year 2017 - Proclaimed [[email protected] [bcintbird]]
24 Jan: @ 08:05:11 
Turkeys [Michael Lancaster [email protected] [bcintbird]]
23 Jan: @ 06:29:03 
Cranbrook and Kimberley CBCs [[email protected] [bcintbird]]
21 Jan: @ 01:49:15 
6 pack [Michael Lancaster [email protected] [bcintbird]]
19 Jan: @ 17:53:10 
birding blog repost please [JB [email protected] [bcintbird]]
17 Jan: @ 16:18:57 
Re: A request, a quest, and an ID exercise. [Don Cecile [email protected] [bcintbird]]
17 Jan: @ 10:15:10 
A request, a quest, and an ID exercise. [Michael Lancaster [email protected] [bcintbird]]





Subject: Gambling with Ebird - correction
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 10:43 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The first lines of my recent email "Gambling with Ebird" should read:
Please when you use ebird, DO NOT ENTER SIGHTINGS of SPECIES YOU ARE NOT ABSOLUTELY SURE OF HAVING SEEN OR HEARD.








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Subject: "Gambling" with ebird
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 10:37 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,
Please when you use ebird, DO NOT ENTER SIGHTINGS OF SPECIES YOU ARE NOT ABSOLUTELY SEEN OR HEARD.
I have noticed that some observers submit a sighting of a species that they aren't completely convinced they have seen in hopes that it will " squeeze through" unchallenged or if it is challenged, have its real identity verified by the ebird reviewer.
This approach to ebird I call GAMBLING and I feel it is an improper use of the reviewer's limited review time. Also if a sighting you're unsure about somehow passes through the ebird filters without the reviewer catching it, as happens far too often, the record becomes part of Cornell's database and is assumed by scientists to be a legitimate record.
A different approach would be to email me directly (not through ebird) with the details about or, preferably, images of the puzzling bird at [email protected] I can give you my opinion about its identity or link you to someone who would know. Once its identity is settled, then is the proper time to enter it as an ebird sighting..


Chris Siddle








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Subject: Mexican birding
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 17:04 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birders,


If you're interested in reading about some great birding in a warm destination, read my blog reports from a recent trip to West Mexico. www.avocettours.wordpress.com


To add a little local content to this message, there has been a NORTHERN PYGMY-OWL hanging out around my yard, and half a dozen CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEES continue as well. A male VARIED THRUSH has been making appearances for the past three days, as have WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH and BROWN CREEPER.


Chris Charlesworth

Peachland, BC



Subject: Legalised hunting in Tunisia
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 0:33 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The hunting of game birds in Canada by tourists follows a legal permitting
system. I have no issues with that. The slaughter of migratory or resident
passerines is a ridiculous anachronism that these countries need to grow out
of.



Rick Howie

Kamloops



Subject: Vagrant chasing
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 0:29 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
The simplified economics indicate how much this activity is worth. But as
noted in some of the comments, the economics do not account for the carbon
footprint and related environmental costs. These are treated as
externalities much as the regular economic analyses treat them when looking
at industry or other factors in an economic analysis. Quite simply, vagrant
chasing is not as green as people would like to think it is and there is
probably no measureable contribution to the conservation of the vagrant
species. I would venture that none of the economic expenditures make their
way to conservation programs except as allotted from general government
revenues, which to some degree are bolstered by the monies birders spend
through taxes. Birders live in glass houses as far as I am concerned about
this practice. I gave it up decades ago. Sorry to be a curmudgeon. I have my
own carbon foibles however.



Rick Howie

Kamloops



Subject: Legalised hunting in Tunisia
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 23:23 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
https://www.birdguides.com/new...

Barry

--
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Subject: Review of the week - UK
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 23:20 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
https://www.birdguides.com/art...

Note the number of Nearctic species. The Horned Lark is about 10 miles
from my old house and is a site I used to visit on a regular basis.

Comments on Thayer's Gull???? The 'adult' gulls in the background are
Lesser Black-backed Gulls.

Barry

--
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Subject: Vagrant chasing
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 23:10 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
https://www.birdguides.com/art...

There are two comments with this article that are very pertinent. The
other two are also pertinent. Such things are not mentioned in the article.

One other point carefully avoided(?) is that of how much it cost each
individual personally just to go and a see a bird. How did that effect
each person's economy??????

Barry

--
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Subject: BC Bird of the Year 2017 - Proclaimed
Date: Sat Jan 27 2018 12:15 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
After much thought, debate, and internal strife that some birders put themselves through with their deep and sometimes scientific examination of this year's candidates a clear winner has emerged. Others simply sent me two words:


Purple Sandpiper


In a relatively close second place was the Northern Cardinal. The Pink-footed Geese and the Curve-billed Thrasher both tied for third place.


The Summer Tanager received quite a few votes in the waning days of Dec, but couldn't quite place.


2017 was a spectacular year for interesting birds in BC. Here's hoping that 2018 is even better, and that most of them show up on the Island....




Kevin Neill

Victoria



Subject: Turkeys
Date: Wed Jan 24 2018 8:05 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Beyond damage to yards, local officials are concerned about the birds
?which can be up to four feet tall ?creating traffic hazards and
getting aggressive with residents.:-):-)


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...


Barry

--
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Subject: Cranbrook and Kimberley CBCs
Date: Tue Jan 23 2018 6:29 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
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bmtzIQ0KIERpYW5uZSBDb29wZXINCiBLaW1iZXJsZXksIEJDDQoNCg=



Subject: 6 pack
Date: Sun Jan 21 2018 1:49 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I a pleasantly surprised to see that the bird has learned to cope with
the plastic. It looks quite well and is eating - provided it stays close
to the fish stalls. It cannot peck so is disadvantaged but it certainly
can swallow.

But can it preen? It bathes regularly.

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias



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Subject: birding blog repost please
Date: Fri Jan 19 2018 17:53 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
I accidentally deleted the email about a birding blog - could the poster please email me or re-post here - thanks!


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Subject: A request, a quest, and an ID exercise.
Date: Wed Jan 17 2018 16:18 pm
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi Barry, if I saw that bird you have labelled as Plover, I would call it a
SPPL. I cant see anything about the bird to suggest otherwise.

Cheers,
Don

From: on behalf of "Michael Lancaster
[email protected] [bcintbird]"
Reply-To: , Michael Lancaster

Date: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 8:12 AM
To:
Subject: [bcintbird] A request, a quest, and an ID exercise.












Introduction.


On the 8th January I posted the first part of this email to 4 people
privately asking for opinions if they were so inclined and had the time. I
also indicated that I appreciated that at this time of the year they might
not be familiar with the plumage of Semipalmated Plover. As I received no
response, and the following day I was able to confirm the identity of the
bird in question, I thought it might be a useful exercise to post my
findings. Useful because both Semipalmated and Common Ringed Plover occur in
Canada and all 3 species mentioned in this email have been recorded in
Alaska.






There is the distinct possibility that Common Ringed Plover could occur in
BC. Human nature being what it is, how many people look closely at that
'ringed' plover that they see passing through on migration in the fall when
they are used to Semipalmated being the only species?


I would be interested in receiving opinions as to the identity of the bird
in the first photograph especially as you have the advantage of further
images and information.


Off-group if you wish. I will not reveal identity but if I get any
responses, I will post the results.


First part.


Yesterday (7th), I was asked to visit a site near me to look for a
Semipalmated Plover that had been reported.

When I arrived not long after sunrise, an acquaintance was already there
taking photographs of plovers and inspecting the images of the feet. A bird
immediately in front of us was a Little Ringed Plover -see image. I spotted
another bird a little distance away that looked like a Common Ringed Plover
and took a few quick shots when it flew off and landed further away ( no
disturbance on my part!). The bird had a clearly marked wing bar and I
mentally said Ringed Plover (Little Ringed Plover has no wing bar). I am in
the WP after all:-).

I then examined images of feet from another bird on his camera which
clearly was a Common Ringed Plover. Turning my attention back to birds
present, revealed that now there were two Common Ringed Plovers, and a
Little Ringed Plover. I assumed that the one that had flown away had
returned.

We were then joined by another person and all three of us waited for about
an hr before all of us had to depart - two to work and me to an appointment..
No bird was seen resembling the images on a 'phone belonging to the third
person. These were discussed, in particular the webbing on the feet of the
putative Semipalmated Plover. None of those images showed front-on spread
feet with clearly visible webbing. Rather, it appeared that only two toes
had webbing between them. The views were semi-side on and therefore outer
toe this is important.

About midday, I uploaded images from my camera of the last few days and was
surprised to see that the few images of the bird that flew away resembled
the images on the phone. Certainly as regards the presence of an eye ring
which was actually clearer on the phone images than on mine.

Now, Semipalmated Plover are supposed to have webbing between all toes.
However, Common Ringed Plover may have webbing or the appearance of webbing
between the middle and the outer toe - see CHHI 1. Semipalmated frequently?
have a white indentation in the lores at the gape - NOT reliable; see CHHI 1
and 2. Semipalmated Plovers are supposed to be more clearly marked on the
upper parts as juveniles than Common Ringed Plover. Semipalmated Plover is
supposed to have a thin clearly visible eye ring. However, juvenile/1st
winter Common Ringed Plover may exhibit a 'partial' eye ring - 'lower
crescent' - see CHHI 1 and 2. All remarks here incidentally appertain to
juvenile/1st winter birds, and it is the latter that I was dealing with. I
actually believe that Common Ringed Plover juveniles/1st winter depending on
circumstances, and lighting, may show a thin complete eye ring IF close up
views are obtained and the upper eyelids are not 'droopy.'

So, to the bird in question - labelled Plover. It appears to have a thin
eye ring, it might have some white indentation near the gape( submitted
photos did not show any ). The legs appear paler but it was in bright
sunlight on my image. The upper parts do appear streaked. Possibly the bird
is smaller than Common Ringed Plover; about the size of Little Ringed
Plover.



Three of us were there again in the afternoon for about 2hrs without any
sighting and I am going again tomorrow at dawn or thereabouts.


I subsequently learned that evening by reading, that adult Common Ringed
Plovers may have an eyering ( Mullarney et al Collins Bird Guide; 2nd ed
2009).

Semipalmated Plover has been recorded previously from the Canary Islands
and for that matter UK.


Second Part. 9th January.



I arrived a dawn at the same time as one of my acquaintances of the 8th.
The lagoon is only a short walk from the road and is contiguous with a
culvert at the north end and the shore at the south end.


I immediately spotted the bird in question and because of the low light
level, the darker upperback (contrasting with the lower part) as mentioned
by Sibley was obvious. We both attempted to get pictures, but the bird was
harassed by a Common Ringed Plover and it flew to the beach disappearing
round a corner of a low 'sand dune'. Leaving my companion to keep watch I
went to the beach and immediately I was spotted, the bird flew straight past
me and my friend into the culvert. From there it flew back to the place
where I had photographed the bird on the 8th. Although we both got photos
the feet were always in mud and good images were not obtainable. Both it and
a Little Ringed Plover were subsequently harassed and flew into the culvert
where there is trickling water and eventually the bird went up a bank and
after standing with the back towards us, turned and we got what we wanted
full-on frontal feet images see SEPL front. No doubt about it, both inner
and outer toes had webs to the middle toe Semipalmated Plover. My images
only showed 3 webs but it had 4. The webs seem to alter in aea depending on
stance of the bird and spread of the toes.


I also noted that the bird was smaller than Common Ringed Plover and about
the same size as Little Ringed Plover see image of both birds. Note that
the northern race of Common Ringed Plover( see image) is smaller and some
years ago when a small plover (compared to the 'normal' Common Ringed
Plovers beside me on the beach) landed a little distance from me I tried
hard to turn it into a Semipalmated. See also the Common Ringed Plover with
reflection it too appears smaller. A 'normal' sized bird appears more
plump and often darker around the eye. Note that the two smaller birds
clearly show what might be mistaken as an eyering. The most common feature
that I noticed of the Semipalmated was that the rear part of the eyering was
often visible at some distance and was yellow. Common Ringed Plovers 'lower
crescents' generally appear to be greyish/white.


Barry


--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias



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Subject: A request, a quest, and an ID exercise.
Date: Wed Jan 17 2018 10:15 am
From: bcintbird AT yahoogroups.com
 
*Introduction.*

On the 8^th January I posted the first part of this email to 4 people
privately asking for opinions if they were so inclined and had the time.
I also indicated that I appreciated that at this time of the year they
might not be familiar with the plumage of Semipalmated Plover. As I
received no response, and the following day I was able to confirm the
identity of the bird in question, I thought it might be a useful
exercise to post my findings. Useful because both Semipalmated and
Common Ringed Plover occur in Canada and all 3 species mentioned in this
email have been recorded in Alaska.


There is the distinct possibility that Common Ringed Plover could occur
in BC. Human nature being what it is, how many people look closely at
that 'ringed' plover that they see passing through on migration in the
fall when they are used to Semipalmated being the only species?

I would be interested in receiving opinions as to the identity of the
bird in the first photograph ? especially as you have the advantage of
further images and information.

Off-group if you wish. I will not reveal identity but if I get any
responses, I will post the results.

*First part.*

Yesterday (7th), I was asked to visit a site near me to look for a
Semipalmated Plover that had been reported.

When I arrived not long after sunrise, an acquaintance was already there
taking photographs of plovers and inspecting the images of the feet. A
bird immediately in front of us was a Little Ringed Plover -see image. I
spotted another bird a little distance away that looked like a Common
Ringed Plover and took a few quick shots when it flew off and landed
further away ( no disturbance on my part!). The bird had a clearly
marked wing bar and I mentally said Ringed Plover (Little Ringed Plover
has no wing bar). I am in the WP after all:-).

I then examined images of feet from another bird on his camera which
clearly was a Common Ringed Plover. Turning my attention back to birds
present, revealed that now there were two Common Ringed Plovers, and a
Little Ringed Plover. I assumed that the one that had flown away had
returned.

We were then joined by another person and all three of us waited for
about an hr before all of us had to depart - two to work and me to an
appointment. No bird was seen resembling the images on a 'phone
belonging to the third person. These were discussed, in particular the
webbing on the feet of the putative Semipalmated Plover. None of those
images showed front-on spread feet with clearly visible webbing. Rather,
it appeared that only two toes had webbing between them. The views were
semi-side on and therefore outer toe ? this is important.

About midday, I uploaded images from my camera of the last few days and
was surprised to see that the few images of the bird that flew away
resembled the images on the phone. Certainly as regards the presence of
an eye ring which was actually clearer on the phone images than on mine.

Now, Semipalmated Plover are supposed to have webbing between all toes.
However, Common Ringed Plover may have webbing or the appearance of
webbing between the middle and the outer toe - see CHHI 1. Semipalmated
frequently? have a white indentation in the lores at the gape - NOT
reliable; see CHHI 1 and 2. Semipalmated Plovers are supposed to be more
clearly marked on the upper parts as juveniles than Common Ringed
Plover. Semipalmated Plover is supposed to have a thin clearly visible
eye ring. However, juvenile/1st winter Common Ringed Plover may exhibit
a 'partial' eye ring - 'lower crescent' - see CHHI 1 and 2. All remarks
here incidentally appertain to juvenile/1st winter birds, and it is the
latter that I was dealing with. I actually believe that Common Ringed
Plover juveniles/1^st winter depending on circumstances, and lighting,
may show a thin complete eye ring IF close up views are obtained and the
upper eyelids are not 'droopy.'

So, to the bird in question - labelled Plover. It appears to have a thin
eye ring, it might have some white indentation near the gape( submitted
photos did not show any ). The legs appear paler but it was in bright
sunlight on my image. The upper parts do appear streaked. Possibly the
bird is smaller than Common Ringed Plover; about the size of Little
Ringed Plover.


Three of us were there again in the afternoon for about 2hrs without any
sighting and I am going again tomorrow at dawn or thereabouts.

I subsequently learned that evening by reading, that adult Common Ringed
Plovers may have an eyering ( Mullarney et al ? Collins Bird Guide; 2^nd
ed 2009).

Semipalmated Plover has been recorded previously from the Canary Islands
and for that matter UK.

*Second Part. 9^th January.*

**
I arrived a dawn at the same time as one of my acquaintances of the 8th.
The lagoon is only a short walk from the road and is contiguous with a
culvert at the north end and the shore at the south end.

I immediately spotted the bird in question and because of the low light
level, the darker upperback (contrasting with the lower part) as
mentioned by Sibley was obvious. We both attempted to get pictures, but
the bird was harassed by a Common Ringed Plover and it flew to the beach
disappearing round a corner of a low 'sand dune'. Leaving my companion
to keep watch I went to the beach and immediately I was spotted, the
bird flew straight past me and my friend into the culvert. From there it
flew back to the place where I had photographed the bird on the 8th.
Although we both got photos the feet were always in mud and good images
were not obtainable. Both it and a Little Ringed Plover were
subsequently harassed and flew into the culvert where there is trickling
water and eventually the bird went up a bank and after standing with the
back towards us, turned and we got what we wanted ? full-on frontal feet
images ? see SEPL front. No doubt about it, both inner and outer toes
had webs to the middle toe ? Semipalmated Plover. My images only showed
3 webs but it had 4. The webs seem to alter in aea depending on stance
of the bird and spread of the toes.

I also noted that the bird was smaller than Common Ringed Plover and
about the same size as Little Ringed Plover ? see image of both birds.
Note that the northern race of Common Ringed Plover( see image) is
smaller and some years ago when a small plover (compared to the 'normal'
Common Ringed Plovers beside me on the beach) landed a little distance
from me I tried hard to turn it into a Semipalmated. See also the Common
Ringed Plover with reflection ? it too appears smaller. A 'normal' sized
bird appears more plump and often darker around the eye. Note that the
two smaller birds clearly show what might be mistaken as an eyering. The
most common feature that I noticed of the Semipalmated was that the rear
part of the eyering was often visible at some distance and was yellow.
Common Ringed Plovers 'lower crescents' generally appear to be
greyish/white.

Barry

--
M B Lancaster. Currently, Tenerife, Las Canarias



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