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CA - San Diego Region Birding bird news by date

Updated on January 16, 2018, 1:45 pm

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16 Jan: @ 13:41:11 
a Nazca Booby not inside the bay [Justyn Stahl [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
15 Jan: @ 22:53:29 
Wilson's Snipe or other species "bobbing" [Roger Uzun [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
15 Jan: @ 20:41:29 
Listen for song development [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
15 Jan: @ 15:44:38 
Continuing Ramona Birds [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
15 Jan: @ 15:14:50 
Santee Lakes -- Jan 15, 2018 [Charlene Glacy [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
15 Jan: @ 15:01:00 
eBird -- Guajome Regional Park -- Jan 15, 2018 [Paula Theobald [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
15 Jan: @ 14:03:59 
Reminder: SDFO presents "Birding Paraguay" with John Sterling - Jan 16, 2018 [Justyn Stahl [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
15 Jan: @ 13:18:54 
eBird -- Guajome Regional Park -- Jan 15, 2018 [Paula Theobald [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
14 Jan: @ 22:12:05 
2 Brown Creepers at Lindo Lake [Lisa Ruby [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
14 Jan: @ 19:30:58 
Nelson's Sparrow at Tijuana River NWR, another location [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
14 Jan: @ 18:07:48 
Inca Doves at the Roadrunner club [Mark Stratton [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
14 Jan: @ 16:53:24 
Long-tailed Duck at salt works, Jan. 14 [sarabirding [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
14 Jan: @ 16:52:06 
Birding 1-14-18 [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
14 Jan: @ 13:03:28 
Nestor park is very productive now. 01/14, 9:17 am [terry hurst [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 22:49:12 
Zone-tailed Hawk, Lake Jennings [Justyn Stahl [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 21:45:49 
Re: Desert and mountains: Sagebrush Sparrow & Lewis's Woodpecker [Barbara Carlson [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 20:40:16 
Desert and mountains: Sagebrush Sparrow & Lewis's Woodpecker [Barbara Carlson [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 20:38:54 
Long-eared Owls in Anza Borrego Desert [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 20:35:54 
Long-eared owls in Anza Borrego desert [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 20:18:36 
Goose, Plover, and Owl; but no Sapsuckers [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 16:24:53 
Continuing rarities and other wintering birds in San Diego [Mark Stratton [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 16:21:08 
Scott's oriole, etc in Nestor 1-13-18 [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 15:36:02 
Saturday AM birding [Catherine Zinsky [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 15:24:34 
Local spots 1-13-18 [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 13:00:15 
miscellaneous recent "other" rarities [Paul Lehman [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 11:09:42 
Re: Are Regional/County Listservs Still Relevant? [a bit long] [Bruce Barrett [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 11:08:28 
Nelson’ Sparrows [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
13 Jan: @ 00:32:17 
Re: San Diego County Big Day Record? [Brennan Mulrooney [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 23:31:13 
San Diego County Big Day Record? [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 23:29:18 
Birding SDSU Article and Misc. Birds [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 21:43:50 
RE: Are Regional/County Listservs Still Relevant? ['Donald Adams' [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 19:22:04 
Ramona on 1/7/18 [Lisa Ruby [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 19:12:40 
Hooded Warbler continues in Del Mar, CA, jan 11, 2018 [Susan Smith [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 19:08:53 
Re: Are Regional/County Listservs Still Relevant? [a bit long] [Mark Stratton [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 16:21:35 
Are Regional/County Listservs Still Relevant? [a bit long] [Paul Lehman [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 13:34:53 
Red-throated Pipit continuing at Berry park [Mel Senac [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 11:51:44 
Pewee and dusky-capped [Nancy Christensen [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 11:46:15 
Nazca Booby boat cost-sharing? Mon/Tue 15-16 Jan [Justyn Stahl [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
12 Jan: @ 11:04:08 
eBird report - Saturn Blvd., American Pipit "japonicus", Jan 10, 2018 [Gary Nunn [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
11 Jan: @ 18:13:53 
So..San Diego Bay, Tri-colored Heron, Black Scoters, and Nazca Booby ['David Povey' [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
11 Jan: @ 16:14:30 
San Diego's Next 10 additions? [Justyn Stahl [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
11 Jan: @ 15:42:31 
Sage Thrasher yes, Mtn Plover no ['Nancy Christensen' [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
11 Jan: @ 14:59:00 
Berry Park [Paula Theobald [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
10 Jan: @ 18:04:30 
Misc birds [Nancy Christensen [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
10 Jan: @ 12:13:39 
La Jolla misc 1-10-18 [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
09 Jan: @ 18:43:09 
Re: 2018 pelagic birding schedule [Mark Stratton [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
09 Jan: @ 18:27:21 
Re: 2018 pelagic birding schedule [John P Valentik [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
09 Jan: @ 16:59:45 
2018 pelagic birding schedule [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
08 Jan: @ 23:32:55 
results of today's San Elijo monthly bird count 1-8-18 [[email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]
08 Jan: @ 14:46:32 
SDFO presents "Birding Paraguay" with John Sterling - Jan 16, 2018 [Justyn Stahl [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding]]





Subject: a Nazca Booby not inside the bay
Date: Tue Jan 16 2018 13:41 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Visiting birder Ben Griffith messaged me to say he photographed an adult
NAZCA BOOBY approximately 2.1 miles west of the Ocean Beach pier at about
1040am this morning, 16 January, while on a whale watch trip out of Mission
Bay. His photos will be submitted to eBird and the CBRC in the near future.

Justyn Stahl



Subject: Wilson's Snipe or other species "bobbing"
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 22:53 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Has anyone seen any Wilson's snipe or other species exhibiting "bobbing" behavior, where they sort of rock their bodies in place or while stepping slowly?
Is there anywhere with any species locally where I can observe this sort of behavior? Is there even a reliable spot anywhere in the county to see Wilson's snipe at all?
-Roger UzunPoway, [email protected]







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Subject: Listen for song development
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 20:41 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
For those interested in bird song, this is a good time of year to listen for song development while you're out birding. Males that hatched last year often begin to finalize their songs in the first few months of the year. Yesterday at the Tijuana River Estuary I found a Marsh Wren singing plastic (partially developed) song near the bridge on North McCoy trail. You can listen to it here:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


You can tell it's plastic song because the notes are jumbled, there is no stereotyped repetition, and the volume is variable, but you can still recognize it as a Marsh Wren (subsong might not even be recognizable as a Marsh Wren).


Bruce Rideout
La Mesa



Subject: Continuing Ramona Birds
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 15:44 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I did a quick run through Ramona this morning and had several of the continuing birds. The Harris's Hawk was at the end of Waynes Way. At Dos Picos County Park, the White-throated Sparrow was moving around under the oaks/chaparral north of the pond. There was also a Fox Sparrow around but I couldn't find any Golden-crowned that have been reported. A quick walk down the Ramona Grasslands Preserve Wildflower Loop produced Prairie Falcon, Western Screech-Owl in its usual roosting spot, and a nice Canyon Wren. On the way back home, I stopped in the San Pasqual Valley at Old Milky Way where I had the continuing Ross's Goose and three Snow Geese in the large Canada Goose flock.


--Ryan Andrews
Valley Center



Subject: Santee Lakes -- Jan 15, 2018
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 15:14 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Spent about 4 hours birding Santee Lakes with Sara and Keith Mayers. Notable birds were the Snow Goose and 4 Greater White-fronted Geese. 


Santee Lakes
Jan 15, 2018
7:31 AM
Traveling
3.13 miles
248 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.2 Build 28

1 Snow Goose -- On the grass with Coots and on water at East side of Lake 5. 1st winter bird showing gray from top of head down back of neck. Wing feathers Gray with white edging Stubby light pink bill with grinning patch.
4 Greater White-fronted Goose -- West side of Lake 1 left of concrete ramp. Grayish Brown overall, pinkish bill with white front.
2 Canada Goose
20 Wood Duck
9 Cinnamon Teal
350 Northern Shoveler
2 Gadwall
4 American Wigeon
60 Mallard
49 Ring-necked Duck
3 Lesser Scaup
4 Bufflehead
318 Ruddy Duck
8 Pied-billed Grebe
1 Clark's Grebe
34 Double-crested Cormorant
16 American White Pelican
5 Great Blue Heron
5 Great Egret
21 Snowy Egret
3 Green Heron
6 Black-crowned Night-Heron
1 Red-tailed Hawk
2 Common Gallinule
811 American Coot
12 Ring-billed Gull
2 Western Gull
3 Eurasian Collared-Dove
3 Anna's Hummingbird
1 Belted Kingfisher
1 Acorn Woodpecker
1 Nuttall's Woodpecker
2 Black Phoebe
2 Cassin's Kingbird
1 California Scrub-Jay
6 American Crow
1 Common Raven
18 Bushtit
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Western Bluebird
2 Northern Mockingbird
9 European Starling
1 Phainopepla
42 Yellow-rumped Warbler
3 White-crowned Sparrow
1 Song Sparrow
35 Red-winged Blackbird
6 Great-tailed Grackle
10 Lesser Goldfinch
5 House Sparrow
2 Scaly-breasted Munia

Number of Taxa: 51

Char GlacySan Diego







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Subject: eBird -- Guajome Regional Park -- Jan 15, 2018
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 15:01 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Guajome Regional Park

Jan 15, 2018

7:25 AM

Traveling

2.40 miles

160 Minutes

All birds reported? Yes

Comments: Snow geese and greater white-fronted goose have gotten pretty tame. They hang with the domestic thugs. I went to upper pond too. The cattails are almost completely surrounding it. From what I could see there were only coots on the water. There was a nice variety of bird life today but not that birdy really. I couldn™t even find an orange crowned warbler for goodness sakes! There seems to be a lot of construction.

Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.1 Build 25


3 Snow Goose -- Continuing

1 Greater White-fronted Goose -- Continuing

7 Domestic goose sp. (Domestic type)

3 Cinnamon Teal

75 Northern Shoveler

3 Gadwall

2 American Wigeon

24 Mallard

3 Ruddy Duck

1 Pied-billed Grebe

1 Eared Grebe

1 Clark's Grebe

2 Double-crested Cormorant

1 Great Blue Heron -- Flyover

1 Black-crowned Night-Heron

1 Cooper's Hawk

1 Red-tailed Hawk

3 Sora

80 American Coot

2 California Gull

12 Mourning Dove

2 Anna's Hummingbird

1 Allen's Hummingbird

3 Acorn Woodpecker

3 Nuttall's Woodpecker

1 Northern Flicker

1 American Kestrel

2 Black Phoebe

4 Cassin's Kingbird

1 California Scrub-Jay

12 American Crow

30 Bushtit

2 House Wren

6 Marsh Wren

1 California Gnatcatcher

4 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

6 Wrentit

1 Hermit Thrush

10 European Starling

3 Cedar Waxwing

2 Phainopepla

6 Common Yellowthroat

35 Yellow-rumped Warbler

6 White-crowned Sparrow

12 Song Sparrow

4 California Towhee

12 Red-winged Blackbird

10 Great-tailed Grackle

20 House Finch

2 Lesser Goldfinch


Number of Taxa: 50







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Subject: Reminder: SDFO presents "Birding Paraguay" with John Sterling - Jan 16, 2018
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 14:03 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
SDFO Event “ January 16,
2018 at 6:00 pmis the next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.




Program “ Birding in Paraguay presented by John Sterling. John will talk
about his adventures on two trips through Paraguay. From the dry Chaco in the
west to the Atlantic rainforests of the east, this country will soon be on the
map for international birders. John was the team leader that developed a
curriculum for training birding guides in Paraguay for National Audubon Society
and the Inter-American Development Bank. He was able to bird with several of
the graduates of the Advanced Training Course. John will talk about the new
opportunities for birding ecotourism and will illustrate his talk with his
photos.

John Sterling is a wildlife biologist and consultant whose clients include
The Nature Conservancy, National Audubon Society, the Center for Natural Lands
Management, CA Department of Water Resources, The Kern Water Bank and the
Smithsonian Institution. He was a former staff avian ecologist at the
Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, and for several universities and US Forest
Service research labs in additional to working for two environmental consulting
firms in California. John is a diehard birder since 1971 and loves teaching his
identification workshops and leading his international tours (spots open in
2018: Morocco and Paraguay).



Click here forMeeting Details and Map.

If you were a member
of SDFO in 2017 “ time to renew. 2018 renewals are being accepted. Click here
forSDFO membership
instructions. Please make sure to
include your current email address.



Justyn Stahl





















San Diego Field Ornithologists

Program Chair












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Subject: eBird -- Guajome Regional Park -- Jan 15, 2018
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 13:18 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Guajome Regional Park

Jan 15, 2018

7:25 AM

Traveling

2.40 miles

160 Minutes

All birds reported? Yes

Comments: Snow geese and greater white-fronted goose have gotten pretty tame. They hang with the domestic thugs. I went to upper pond too. The cattails are almost completely surrounding it. From what I could see there were only coots on the water. There was a nice variety of bird life today but not that birdy really. I couldn™t even find an orange crowned warbler for goodness sakes! There seems to be a lot of construction.

Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.1 Build 25


3 Snow Goose -- Continuing

1 Greater White-fronted Goose -- Continuing

7 Domestic goose sp. (Domestic type)

3 Cinnamon Teal

75 Northern Shoveler

3 Gadwall

2 American Wigeon

24 Mallard

3 Ruddy Duck

1 Pied-billed Grebe

1 Eared Grebe

1 Clark's Grebe

2 Double-crested Cormorant

1 Great Blue Heron -- Flyover

1 Black-crowned Night-Heron

1 Cooper's Hawk

1 Red-tailed Hawk

3 Sora

80 American Coot

2 California Gull

12 Mourning Dove

2 Anna's Hummingbird

1 Allen's Hummingbird

3 Acorn Woodpecker

3 Nuttall's Woodpecker

1 Northern Flicker

1 American Kestrel

2 Black Phoebe

4 Cassin's Kingbird

1 California Scrub-Jay

12 American Crow

30 Bushtit

2 House Wren

6 Marsh Wren

1 California Gnatcatcher

4 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

6 Wrentit

1 Hermit Thrush

10 European Starling

3 Cedar Waxwing

2 Phainopepla

6 Common Yellowthroat

35 Yellow-rumped Warbler

6 White-crowned Sparrow

12 Song Sparrow

4 California Towhee

12 Red-winged Blackbird

10 Great-tailed Grackle

20 House Finch

2 Lesser Goldfinch


Number of Taxa: 50







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San Diego Field Ornithologists (SDFO) hold regular meetings at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of every month in the Hoffman Room of The San Diego Foundation, 2508 Historic Decatur Rd., San Diego, CA 92106. You are invited! Please join us as a guest for a meeting or two, meet other members, and listen to guest speakers. We encourage you to join SDFO for only $25 a year.










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Subject: 2 Brown Creepers at Lindo Lake
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 22:12 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi,

I spent 4.5 to 5 hours wandering around Lindo Lake(s) today. A little
after noon I finally located the previously reported Brown Creeper and
then discovered there were two. I saw them both at the same time on two
different limbs of the same tree. They were quite vocal for a while.

My first view of one of the Creepers was in a pepper tree that was by
the "Horses Prohibited" sign at the northeast side of the land bridge
that runs between the two lakes. During the time I watched them, the two
birds proceeded to make their way through 4 or 5 more pepper trees
heading around to the right. Much of the time they moved in typical
Creeper fashion, flying down close to the base of a tree and quickly
working their way up the trunk and onto limbs. Sometimes they just flew
from one tree to another at about the same level.

Also saw a Red-breasted Sapsucker (appears to have been a female), and
not where I would have expected it. It was in a lone pepper tree near
the northwest portion of the recently filled second lake. When it left
that tree it moved into the bare trees by the lake edge. I just went
through other eBird lists from Lindo Lake for January and found one from
David and Paula Lawrence with photos of what looks like a male
Red-breasted Sapsucker. So looks like there could be two there.

There are Redheads, three Canvasback (2 female and a male) and lots of
the other expected ducks in the second lake.

eBird list with some photos:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs



Subject: Nelson's Sparrow at Tijuana River NWR, another location
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 19:30 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
First thing Sunday morning I birded the Tijuana River NWR, starting at 5th/Iris and heading towards the river mouth.  At the very end of the river mouth loop trail, where there is a bench at the water's edge, there was a Nelson's Sparrow and at least 2 Long-billed Savannah Sparrows.  Based on previous postings and ebird, it seems that the Nelson's Sparrow I saw is close to a mile south of the birds being seen near the Visitor Center.  So either one of the birds has moved a significant distance or it is another individual.


Jeremiah Stock
Santee, CA
[email protected]



Subject: Inca Doves at the Roadrunner club
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 18:07 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Just a quicky. There were 3 Inca Doves at the Roadrunner Club in Borrego springs today. When you go into the main entrance and through the gates, you come up to the back of the first homes on the left. There is grass there and a dirt like lot next to it. I saw 3 small doves fly into a tree, (not a pine), and went to check them out. They were Inca Doves. They we inside the tree a bit but I could still see one of them pretty good and the other two, I got ok views of them.
Mark StrattonNorth Park






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San Diego Field Ornithologists (SDFO) hold regular meetings at 6 p.m. on the third Tuesday of every month in the Hoffman Room of The San Diego Foundation, 2508 Historic Decatur Rd., San Diego, CA 92106. You are invited! Please join us as a guest for a meeting or two, meet other members, and listen to guest speakers. We encourage you to join SDFO for only $25 a year.










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Subject: Long-tailed Duck at salt works, Jan. 14
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 16:53 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
The female Long-tailed Duck that has been in south San Diego Bay but
not reported for more than two weeks, was in the salt works this
morning, Jan. 14, 2018. (This is a restricted area. We were on the
monthly walk arranged by San Diego Audubon.) I believe a few people
have photos.

================Sara Baase Mayers
Point Loma
================



Subject: Birding 1-14-18
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 16:52 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I started out at Murray Ridge Park in Serra Mesa. The facility is well landscaped with a large grassy area.  The park looks like it has good sparrow habitat on the perimiter, and lots of pines and eucs. Unfortunately, the eucs are not red-gums or white-gums.  In any event, no one was home save some lesser goldfinches, house finches, Allen's and Anna's hummers, yellow-rumps etc.  But, like the library on Aero Drive, this place may produce some good birds.  Too bad there is no water feature.


Next was the school yard next to Berry Park where there were a few pipits, but nothing special. I did not linger, and its likely that the red-necked pipet and orioles etc. showed up later.


Tesoro Grove has been well reported. The only thing that I can add was that the Baltimore, Orchard and Summer Tanager were also seen in the eastern part of the drainage (at the north end of the park adjacent to the apartment parking). The large red-gum next to the freeway seemed to be the fav of the Baltimore and Tanager, while the Orchard seemed to prefer the willows along the north side of the drainage. Besides the birds reported by Terry, there were two Wilson's Warblers flitting about.


Eric Kallen
San Diego



Subject: Nestor park is very productive now. 01/14, 9:17 am
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 13:03 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Both western and summer Tanagers. Bullock, Baltimore and Orchard orioles. Black and white Warbler, black throated gray. All spotted this morning and in same area near the mustard colored apts. .The black and white Warbler is just across the street from the apes in the other wooded area with water. soccer game going on across the street so I did not check up on the vermillion Flycatcher . Very birdie now.
Terry HurstSantee


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Subject: Zone-tailed Hawk, Lake Jennings
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 22:49 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
One was photographed and reported to a Facebook bird photography group this morning (13 Jan). Wasn™t one intermittently seen in El Cajon in previous winters?
Justyn Stahl







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Subject: Desert and mountains: Sagebrush Sparrow & Lewis's Woodpecker
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 21:45 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I forgot to mention we also saw the Gray Flycatcher at the WTP Settling Ponds.

Barbara Carlson
San Diego

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 13, 2018, at 6:39 PM, Barbara Carlson [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding] wrote:
>
> Mel Senac, Nancy Christensen and I headed to Borrego Springs this morning, 13 Jan. Our most productive stop was the Borrego Springs WTP Settling Ponds. There we spied two (2) Sagebrush/Bell's Sparrow dashing on the ground with their tails cocked up. The one we were able to photograph was the Sagebrush Sparrow.
>
> We continued into the Laguna Mountains to Agua Dulce Creek where it was cooler and breezy. We were pleased to re-find multiple Cassin's Finch and two (2) Golden-crowned Kinglet. However, we missed Williamson's Sapsucker. The road across from Pioneer Mail Trailhead yielded four (4) Lewis's Woodpecker fly-catching from the tall snags in the area.
>
> Our last stop of the day was the Ramona Pond which was quite birdy. Best were seven (7) Greater White-fronted Goose.
>
> Alas, we dipped on Bushtit and every towhee!
>
> Barbara Carlson
> San Diego
>



Subject: Desert and mountains: Sagebrush Sparrow & Lewis's Woodpecker
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 20:40 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Mel Senac, Nancy Christensen and I headed to Borrego Springs this morning, 13 Jan. Our most productive stop was the Borrego Springs WTP Settling Ponds. There we spied two (2) Sagebrush/Bell's Sparrow dashing on the ground with their tails cocked up. The one we were able to photograph was the Sagebrush Sparrow.
We continued into the Laguna Mountains to Agua Dulce Creek where it was cooler and breezy. We were pleased to re-find multiple Cassin's Finch and two (2) Golden-crowned Kinglet. However, we missed Williamson's Sapsucker. The road across from Pioneer Mail Trailhead yielded four (4) Lewis's Woodpecker fly-catching from the tall snags in the area.
Our last stop of the day was the Ramona Pond which was quite birdy. Best were seven (7) Greater White-fronted Goose.
Alas, we dipped on Bushtit and every towhee!
Barbara CarlsonSan Diego



Subject: Long-eared Owls in Anza Borrego Desert
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 20:38 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Tina and I visited Anza Borrego Desert today, stopping at Yaqui Wells. We found three of the previously reported Long-eared Owls continuing in the Ironwood trees to the west of the trail:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
When we stopped by Tamarisk Grove campground, we spotted two more Long-eared Owls in the Tamarisk trees lining the campground's south side:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


Andy and Tina Rathbone
San Diego, CA



Subject: Long-eared owls in Anza Borrego desert
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 20:35 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Tina and I visited Anza Borrego Desert today, stopping at Yaqui Wells. We found three of the previously reported Long-eared Owls continuing in the Ironwood trees to the west of the trail:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
When we stopped by Tamarisk Grove campground, we spotted two more Long-eared Owls in the Tamarisk trees lining the campground's south side:


http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...



Subject: Goose, Plover, and Owl; but no Sapsuckers
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 20:18 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Late Saturday afternoon I spent a few minutes unsuccessfully looking for sapsuckers at Western Hills Park in San Diego.  After that I saw the following continuing birds: Cackling Goose at DeAnza Cove (southeast shore of the cove), Mountain Plover in the barren northern part of the Fiesta Island dog run, and Short-Eared Owl in the interior of Fiesta Island, where it was followed by many large camera lenses as it flew around in the last of the sunlight.


I would also like to identify myself as the mystery birder at Berry Park this morning and thank R. Patton and Elizabeth Copper for pointing out the male Scott's Oriole (and others).


Jeremiah Stock
Santee, CA
[email protected]



Subject: Continuing rarities and other wintering birds in San Diego
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 16:24 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Good morning,
Camille and I started out between 7:30 and 8 in Balboa Park:Greater Pewee, Summer and Western Tanagers
After that, Berry Park where we had a couple of Bullock's Orioles.
Then, a very product stop at Nester Park and the Apts. across the street.
At the park, we had the Black & White Warbler and the Black-throated Gray.Across the street, we had a great time. In the Northwest corner of the Grassy area by the creek at the entrance of the Apts., we had a bunch of good birds in the Red-flowering Eucs.
Orchard Oriole, Baltimore Oriole, 2 more Bullock's Oriole, Summer and Western Tanagers, Black-throated and Wilson's Warblers.
At Crown Pt. we have the Painted Redstart at the previously report spot in the south parking lot, in the Carrotwood Trees.
Last stop was Robb field where we had the Tri-colored Heron.
Mark and Camille StrattonNorth Park






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Subject: Scott's oriole, etc in Nestor 1-13-18
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 16:21 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Around 9 am this morning, Elizabeth Copper, another birder (I am so sorry I missed your name!!), and I observed a male Scott's oriole, a female Bullock's oriole, and a female hooded oriole perched in the upper bare branches of a eucalyptus tree along the gated private driveway on the south side of Leon St in Nestor across from Berry Park.  All three flew out of view to the east and we were unable to refind them.
Around 11:20, a Wilson's warbler was first heard then seen in a scrubby willow patch at the SW corner of Tocayo & Hollister, then flew north into a dense ficus. At least 6 black-throated magpie-jays were seen in the private stables NW of the west end of Tocayo.


Ignore the rest of this if you don't want to hear about sightings of continuing birds.
On returning to Berry Park later in the morning with Guy, Dave, & other birders, the continuing yellow warbler was heard then seen just west of the driveway gate on the south side of Leon, phainopeplas were moving through, and the red-throated pipit was seen initially around 11 am along the south edge of the school yard then shifted to the fenceline between Berry Park & the schoolyard (it was not seen on our earlier visit). Yet again, the dusky-capped flycatcher was not seen or heard.
Tesoro Grove continued to prove its hot status, although note that the rarities appear to shift in & out of the immediate vicinity and there were relatively long periods with few to none of the rare species in view. While several were seen/heard along the willow corridor, waiting & watching near the flowering eucalyptus in the NW corner was the most productive, with Guy reporting western tanager earlier, and several of us being treated to summer tanager (dull yellow female-type), at least 2 male black-throated gray warblers, Townsend's warblers, a Wilson's warbler, the male Baltimore oriole, female orchard oriole, and 2 Bullock's orioles (a dull female and brighter possibly young male). Across the street to south, several of us at Nestor Park had at least 3 red-breasted nuthatches, female vermilion flycatcher along SW fence, up to 2 more black-throated grays, and the black-and-white warbler was in the NE corner.
R. Patton
San Diego, CA



Subject: Saturday AM birding
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 15:36 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Started at Balboa Park near dog park where the Greater Pewee played hide and seek, but was definitely observed by a number of birders.
Next ventured down to the Dairy Mart 'Stick' Pond. Saw:
Lincoln's SparrowGreen HeronRed-shouldered HawkRed-tailed Hawkdid not see the Green-tailed Towee
Nestor Park and the adjoining Tesoro area were teeming with birds. Seen were:Red-breasted NuthatchTownsend's WarblerWilson's WarblerOrange-crowned WarblerAllen's HummingbirdOrchard OrioleSummer TanagerBullock's OrioleBlack & White Warbler (thanks Camille Stratton!)male Ruby-crowned KingletCassin's Kingbird

--
Waggin' tails,

Catherine

Author of "Attitude + Attention =Teamwork! Seven Steps to Success"Available thru www.gettoready.net
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Ch Borderfame Soul TrainUDX, OM('Kellan the Felon' a.k.a. 'Sir Barkalot')
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX9, OGM ("Dax", as in "Dax of the Long Tongue" aka 'Sir Lickalot'))GCH OTCH Sporting Field's Quantum LeapUDX3, OM7 ('Devon'as in'Devon the Usurper' aka "Monkey")
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM (2002 - 2015)Shorewind Spellbound's Dragon Rider ("Echo")









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Subject: Local spots 1-13-18
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 15:24 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Trent Stanley & I birded several spots this morning.


We started at avout 7:20 am. at Santee Lakes. There was some sort of children's fishing derby going on, so the place was packed with hopefull young anglers. Birding was unproductive.


We next tried the lakes just upstream of Old Mission Dam. Nothing worthwhile seen.


Next stop was the Kearny Mesa/Serra Mesa library on Aero Drive across from Montgomery Field. We did not see much. But the habitit is good and there are very good observation points on the back side of the library. Evidence of coyotes in the brush area also, so cats would likely stay away. The canyon behind the library is lined with eucs, and runs down to a sports field. Birds present included: ( including birds I saw last week, as noted). There is a protected fenced-off habitat there also, probably on-site mitigation related to the construction of the library. Could possibly have protected gnatcatchers. Habitate appears to be sage scrub. This site should be visited from time-to-time.
Phainopepla
Munia (last Wednesday)
Spotted towhee
California Towhee (last Wednesday)
WC Sparrow
Bushtit
Audubon's warbler


Last stop was Hickman Field where we quickly found the gray fly.
Photos in my ebird report
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


Eric Kallen
San Diego



Subject: miscellaneous recent "other" rarities
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 13:00 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
In addition to other, well-publicized rarities present in San Diego 

County during the New Year, the following might be of interest:


CACKLING GOOSE: the continuing bird seen by many at De Anza Cove at

northeast Mission Bay has the real potential of being a minima, which

are very rare to casual in the county--extra small overall, with small

head and bill, black throat stripe, and rather dark breast. Grazes on

the lawns there with coots and wigeon.


REDDISH EGRET: the only regular bird in the county presently is an

adult at the Tijuana River mouth; it is there much, but not all, of the

time--avoid high tide.


YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON: up to 6 adults continue at the usual roost

site in the pines on the northeast side of the apartments immediately

east of the Tijuana Estuary Refuge Visitor Center.


BELL'S VIREO: casual in winter, a dull, pusillus-type was recently

along the south side of the San Diego River immediately west of Mimi's

Cafe at Mission Center Road.


PURPLE FINCH: 1 in Tierrasanta was of note, as this species is very

rare in the coastal lowlands.


SUMMER TANAGER: in addition to the well-watched birds at Nestor Park

and along the west side Balboa Park, there are also continuing birds at

the upper end of Sunnyslope Park in Nestor (1), at Kimball Park in

National City (1), and at Old Trolley Barn Park and surrounding

neighborhood in University Heights (2)--among others!


BALTIMORE ORIOLE: another spiffy adult male is present in town, this

one (with a young male Bullock's) in the De Anza Cove area at northeast

Mission Bay.


BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER: just a comment here on sexing birds in the fall

and winter--ALL Black-and-whites at these seasons have whitish (or

mostly whitish) throats, so that does not make them necessarily females.

For example, the returning bird along 28th at the southeast corner of

Balboa Park, where also the Palm Warbler and very sporadic Plumbeous

Vireo reside, is a male (blackish auriculars, heavy black streaking to

sides, flanks, and undertail coverts). Several reports of "female" birds

in the county and elsewhere at this time of year over the past few years

were apparently based solely on the birds having white throats.


NASHVILLE WARBLER: 1 continues at Montgomery Waller Park in Otay Mesa

and 2 more were on the north side of Mission Bay.


Small numbers of Barn Swallows, Western Tanagers, Bullock's Orioles, and

Black-throated Gray, Yellow, and Wilson's Warblers at many scattered

localities.


Of just very local interest, a Short-billed Dowitcher is wintering at

San Dieguito Lagoon in Del Mar, which is actually very rare away from

the larger tidal mudflat areas such as south San Diego Bay and Mission

Bay/San Diego River mouth.


--Paul Lehman, San Diego







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Subject:
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 11:09 am
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi
My two-pennyworth.
Thanks for venting Paul. You bring up some excellent points.
I would like to add one more dimension - namely granularity.
Interest in a "rare" bird varies greatly depending on whether it is be rare in a city, county, state, or country.
Without the sialia digest (thank you Dave) it would be very tough to learn of state-wide or country-wide rarities that are only reported to a local email group.
eBird will send a daily list of "target" birds reported in a county, state, or country. Of course, this only works if the sighting is actually reported to eBird. (It would be nice to get an email immediately rather than wait until the end of the day, but I'm not sure how many of us are ready to chase at a moments notice.)
My "dream" system would be something that has one front-end, where anyone can enter anything to do with birds, sightings, comments, etc. The system then broadcasts that information according to each recipient user's profile - immediately, daily, weekly - all birds or only those yet unseen in that county - general discussion or only sightings - and probably other filters that I have not thought of. Until this becomes a country-wide system (I did say "dream"), then there should also be an automatic feed to Narba.
Is that eBird? Maybe it depends of what Cornell see as eBird's ongoing purpose. Which leads me to....
....Is it time to put pressure on eBird and the ABA to cooperate.
Looking at the current ABA totals and the "last-updated" dates, it is very clear that many birders have abandoned ABA and probably now rely on eBird to keep their list totals.
However, eBird is not really set up to be a list-keeping tool, the main reason being the lack of a "count/don't count" filter.. Ironically, I have some friends who use the ABA list to control what they report to eBird. For example,if they see a mccaw in Florida they do not report it as it is not on the ABA list, as they don't want to "artificially" inflate their totals. They rely on the ABA to keep a level playing field for the listing game, while denying eBird the scientific goal of capturing everything they see.
Again dreaming, and assuming that eBird does become that sole front-end I spoke of earlier, I'd like to see eBird and ABA get together such that eBird is the scientific data gathering tool, and ABA as the list total keeper, with eBird automatically feeding sightings to ABA.
Thanks again Paul
Bruce BarrettSan Jose, CA

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 2:19 PM, Paul Lehman [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <[email protected]> wrote:




























It is pretty obvious that over the past few
years that many of the local/county/regional/state listservs have
become less and less relevant to a large number of birders, as
many of these people have voted with their feet.er,
fingertips.and moved over to other sites such as eBird. Not only
that, but bird information dissemination appears to have become
MORE fragmented as time goes on, rather than less fragmented. We
now have the local listservs, eBird, WhatsApp/GroupMe text
messaging groups, Facebook individual and group sites, personal
Flickr sites, personal and private-group text messaging, and even
a handful of old-school folks who actually still call their
friends on the phone! Some of these services are SUPPPOSED to
complement each other, e..g., a text-message group that is supposed
to be used for immediate dissemination of high-end rarity
information only, and folks are supposed to post to it AND to the
local listserv in a timely manner, but instead the former is used
almost exclusively and often for more standard bird fare, so the
general listserv gets only some scraps, if anything.
Using my home-county listserv here in San Diego
as an example, the number of local birders who now rarely if ever
post to SanDiegoRegionBirding has grown steadily. Most of these
folks still happily get information from such sources, but rarely,
if ever, post to it. But a good number of these people do submit
eBird reports on a regular basis instead. Why only to one? Is it the
ease of eBird submissions? Is it the instantaneous reporting from
the field? (But that is also easy to do to a local listserv with
any smartphone.) Is it that they can easily attach their photos to
their eBird reports? Is there a widespread belief that posting
rarity news only to eBird is enough? Or for some, are they timid
to post publicly, or just lazy, or simply don™t care to give back
to a listserv from which they got information allowing them to see
a rare bird? Whatever the reason, recent checks on many days since
mid-December of the number of posts to the San Diego listserv
versus the number of county rarity alerts coming through eBird
is something on the magnitude of 1 to 20 or 30 (albeit somewhat
skewed by the numbers of out-of-town Nazca Booby viewers and
local-birder 2018 big year kickoffs, and by the potential for
multiple rarities mentioned per a single listserv post but only
one species per eBird alert). A little of this dichotomy can be
explained by the fact that some birds such as a semi-tame,
multi-year-staying Greater White-fronted Goose at a local lake
still appears daily on the eBird rare-bird alert”given that it is
a flagged species”but that virtually nobody would dream of posting
its continued existence on a regular basis on the county listserv.
Or, over the past few weeks, the continued presence of Nazca
Boobies, a wintering Red-throated Pipit, and many other regional
and state-level rarities locally, has drawn an especially large
number of California birders from out of town as well as many
out-of-state birders”few of whom have posting privileges to the
San Diego listserv, but almost all of them can post to eBird.
In most areas, eBird has become the best way to
keep track, on an almost daily basis, of the continued presence of
existing rarities. (With the caveat that some such reports are
erroneous, as they are through any source, and folks should be
careful following up on some such reports, especially when made
many days after anyone else has reported seeing the bird. Even
when some folks are chasing known birds at known locations, they
can mess it up. Posted photos of misidentified stakeouts are not
overly rare, and the number of such erroneous reports without
photos are likely even greater. Just recently, for example, a
friend of mine from out-of-state, after seeing Nazca Booby here,
drove up to Santa Maria to see the tame Garganey. He was greeted
there by a birding couple, also from out of state and chasing the
same birds, who proudly pointed out the bird to him: a female
Northern Pintail. He quickly showed them the real Garganey. But,
the bottom line is, don™t underestimate the ability of some
observers to misidentify even known stakeouts. But I digress)
Are eBird reports also good at giving the
needed background information on how to FIND these stakeout
rarities? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. A dropped pin at a hotspot
may or may not signify a specific spot or may just denote the
location of a large park or marsh where the bird is. Some
observers add in exact lat/long information, but many do not.
Also, because many human beings (including many birders) are
geographically challenged, many locations they give in their eBird
submissions are MIS-STATED or MIS-PLOTTED, which is one
potentially serious problem with using eBird data in a number of
ways in general. But even if the general location is indeed
correct, the included comments (if any) may say little about the
specific tree(s) a bird is frequenting, or the best time of day it
might be seen there, origin questionable issues, or information
about possible legal access issues, etc. These specifics, which
can be very important, are often best imparted through posts to
the local listservs. Just in the past couple weeks, such was the
case here in San Diego County with a couple good posts to the
listserv dealing with private property issues and homeowner and
birder behavior involving the Ramona Harris™s Hawk.
Does one need to post an update on every
continuing rarity every single day on a local listserv? No,
although regular updates on high-end and just-recently-found
rarities are very helpful, and then periodic (weekly?) updates
that such-and-such long-staying or returning rarity is still
present is also helpful to other birders. But few local birders
supply that information. Recently here in San Diego, there have
been MULTIPLE DAILY eBird updates on Nazca Booby, Red-throated
Pipit, Greater Pewee, Thick-billed Kingbird and Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher, Harris™s Hawk, Tricolored Herons, Nestor Park birds,
etc. etc. etc., and almost nothing on these birds for well over a
week or more on SanDiegoRegionBirding. Nothing. The question then
becomes: Does it matter?
Looking at the broad birding community, some
birders spend almost their entire birding lives chasing stakeouts
found by other people. If that™s what they like doing, then great.
Some (but far fewer) birders hate chasing other people™s birds,
very rarely do it, but spend almost all their time doing their
own birding. That™s great, too! And
most of us birders are at some point in the continuum between
these two extremes. But the bottom line is, a relatively small
number of birders find a relatively large percentage of the rare
birds. And many birders do spend much of their birding time
chasing previously found birds. So, what can this large group of
chasers contribute? Perhaps rarity-status update information (BOTH
positive and negative) if they see that such updates have not been
made in a reasonable time period, or perhaps any news on changes
in a bird™s preferred exact site or timing of appearance during
the day.
Maybe include a bit more information
than the standard "continuing bird"?Include maybe where and
when the continuing bird was seen if possibly different from
usual. And if the report substantially extends the
date-span, then ideally including some comment about how it
was identified, or a photo. Some eBird reviewers avoid
confirming late reports of continuing rarities without at
least some documentation, given that some birds are reported
long after they actually departed.
If folks use only eBird for their rare-bird
chasing bird info, and then submit only to eBird, then fine. If
they do likewise only via some texting or Facebook group, fine!
But if they routinely use a local listserv to get their chase
information, see the bird, and then rarely or never return the
favor to birders following behind them”be it for reasons of
laziness, cluelessness, or simply self-centeredness”then this does
seem just a wee bit galling to those birders who are finding and
sharing.
Perhaps most birders are perfectly happy with
the quality and speed (i.e., efficiency) of the rare-bird
information they receive and think that my concerns are unfounded
and mostly merely tilting at windmills. Others may sympathize
fully. In any case, at least I got to vent!
--Paul Lehman,
San Diego































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Subject: Nelson’ Sparrows
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 11:08 am
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Just saw two Nelson™ Sparrows on the McCoy Trail past the bridge and the first small turn out, west side in a large leafless shrub about 50 feet off the trail





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Subject: San Diego County Big Day Record?
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 0:32 am
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
This website hasn™t been updated in several years, but I can™t imagine the big day record has changed.

https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/...

Brennan Mulrooney
Santee, CA

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 12, 2018, at 9:31 PM, [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding] > wrote:



I was curious if anyone knew what the San Diego county big day record was, or if anyone has seriously tried one? I couldn't find any info while searching online and haven't really heard of anyone doing one. I don't plan on doing a serious big day but I've often wondered what a well-planned, serious effort could get in the county. Surely over 150 species? I feel like with a lot of luck and good planning, 175 species could be within reason.


--Ryan Andrews

Valley Center



Subject: San Diego County Big Day Record?
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 23:31 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I was curious if anyone knew what the San Diego county big day record was, or if anyone has seriously tried one? I couldn't find any info while searching online and haven't really heard of anyone doing one. I don't plan on doing a serious big day but I've often wondered what a well-planned, serious effort could get in the county. Surely over 150 species? I feel like with a lot of luck and good planning, 175 species could be within reason.


--Ryan Andrews
Valley Center



Subject: Birding SDSU Article and Misc. Birds
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 23:29 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Greetings,


Dr. Kevin Burns and I recently wrote a short article about birds and birding SDSU. Thought some of you might like it. The article is on page 10. On this topic, the Rose-ringed Parakeets which have become quite a rare sighting were around campus all day on 5 January. Here is a link to the article: http://retire.sdsu.edu/newslet... http://retire.sdsu.edu/newslet...


Last Wednesday Courtny Achenbach and I birded Santee Lakes all day and had 91 species: a Least Bittern was in the reed island in pond 1, four Greater White-fronted Geese also on pond 1; a Yellow Warbler between ponds 1 and 2; a Sora in the SW corner of pond 3 (I think), the Sage Thrasher was near the north end of pond 4 (I think, sorry) first seen on the fence east of the access road then flew to an island, the juvenile Snow Goose was also on pond 4; we walked all the way to the north end of the park and saw American Robin and Chipping Sparrows in the Willow Loop Campground, and Lincoln's Sparrows and a Fox Sparrows along the dirt road near the entrance to West Sycamore Canyon.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...



Today visiting birders Jay Carlisle and Heidi Ware and I birded south county, finding the Nazca Boobies from Attu and Red-throated Pipet at Berry Park. About 30 mins after high tide, two Nelson's Sparrows and multiple individuals of at least three species of Savannah Sparrows were easily seen from McCoy Trail S of the bridge @ Tijuana Slough NWR. Nestor Park and Tesoro Grove continue to be amazing, with Black-and-White, Black-throated Gray, Townsend, and Wilson's Warblers, the adult male Baltimore, juvenile Orchard, and at least two Bullock's Orioles, and a Summer Piranga; we also saw American Goldfinch and a Red-breasted Nuthatch here. The flowering eucalyptus at the north end of the Tesoro Way lawn was where we saw all of the orioles. Here is the eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


Happy birding,
Casey Richart
San Diego State University



Subject: Are Regional/County Listservs Still Relevant?
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 21:43 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I do not bird as much as I once did.  I do not post to the list server from
my iPhone.



When I chase a rarity, I check the list server. If the rarity has been
posted to the list server that day with good finding information, I do not
post. If the bird has not been posted that day or better location
information is needed, I make a post.



Don Adams

San Diego, CA

[email protected]



Subject: Ramona on 1/7/18
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 19:22 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hi,


After reading Paul's post, and discussing with him, I decided to post

this. It's a little old now, but should still be somewhat useful.


DOS PICOS COUNTY PARK

Got there around 8:50 am and stayed until around 12:30 with most of my

time spent near the pond area.


I birded up in Ramona for most of Sunday Jan 7. Dean Budd, Ter Hurst and

I saw the WHITE-THROATED SPARROW multiple times mid to late morning at

Dos Picos County Park in the same spot it's been seen before, by the

largest oak near the bathrooms by the pond. It hangs out with two

Golden-crowned Sparrows. At least one of the Golden-crowneds is a first

year bird, and they both may be. On Sunday they foraged on the outside

edge of the tree, rather than under the canopy. They flush very easily,

so best to find a good viewing spot and stay put for a while. If you see

the Golden-crowneds, you'll likely find the White-throated. A very

difficult bird to photograph. Never stopped moving.


The FOX SPARROWS also continue at Dos Picos. They can be found going to

the pond edge for water by where the short wall is across the pond from

the bathrooms. Lots of other birds went for water there too. If there

are people fishing there, they don't seem to come out much. It's

possible this may have changed with the amount of rain we got this week,

depending on how much the pond level went up.


Found the previously reported SLATE-COLORED JUNCO and two female PURPLE

FINCHES in the picnic table area. The Finches were eating berries in a

bush along the edge of what I think is a creek bed, and the Junco was

also in the picnic table area, but away from the creek bed.


eBird list with photos:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


RANGELAND ROAD

I got there around 1:00 and stayed for a little over an hour.


There were at least 5 YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS in with a huge mixed

flock of TRI-COLORED BLACKBIRDS and Brown-headed Cowbirds along

Rangeland Road early afternoon. Some of the cows were hanging out near

the fence on the south side of the road and the birds were actively

foraging around the cows. Very difficult to pick out what was there with

them packed together, their tails in the air, and heads in the dirt.

Estimating there were around 1000 birds.


Saw both dark morph and normal FERRUGINOUS HAWKS, one of each, both were

in the air. The dark morph was a ways off to the north, and required a

scope to ID. Small number of MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRDS on the north side of

Rangeland Road close to where Highland Valley goes south towards the

Grasslands Preserve. No Bald Eagles. Not a single goose either, although

Nancy Christensen thought she heard some. So dry out there. There was no

water in the pond that is near the west end of the road. Might be a

little water out there in places now after the rain.


eBird list with some bad photos:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...


Lisa Ruby

Sabre Springs







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Subject: Hooded Warbler continues in Del Mar, CA, jan 11, 2018
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 19:12 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hello fellow SD birders,  Just reporting in that the HOODED WARBLER  at the Ruette le Parc condo complex in Del Mar, continues. Yesterday afternoon, at about 3:45 pm, after getting out of my car, I heard a loud HOWA chip and saw him in back of my condo at 13716 Ruette le Parc,  industriously feeding around the low trees and on the ground.  As you know, this condo complex is now sadly off limits to birders.  But I was elated to see that  this beautiful bird,  after about a week of disruption --two teams of arborists doing very intensive pruning of all our trees, and mulching of Torrey pine and cedar branches here, was still around!  The pruning seemed focused  especially around my building, but maybe this is just paranoia talking!   Anyway, glad to report this beautiful bird seems to have survived it all (cats and tree cutters).   Also, the signs warning birders to stay away have been taken down, but I think that was because either the HOA realized birders had responded to my and Paul L.'s posts so signs were no longer needed, or more likely they wanted to take them down before they were destroyed by the  rains.  Nonetheless, please be aware that Ruette le Parc in Del Mar no longer allows birding by non residents in the complex.  I really appreciate your compliance of this,  now and in the past.  sue


Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological Consulting
Del Mar, CA



Subject:
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 19:08 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I do have to say that although, I have really reduced my posts a lot over the last couple of years, I constantly see on our own local list serv that we should not continuously post about a bird that everyone already knows about so naturally, I have been spooked away from posting about something that has already been posted about 3, 4, 5, ....10 times, even if it is rare. Especially for some of us that aren't amongst the better birders, we just never quite know where to draw the line. Do we keep posting or don't we not??? It has to be one or the other or we just really don't know what to do. Especially some of the newer birders, I use to have so many people thanking me for my posts but others that said I posted too much. This is conflicting and difficult to interpret to the newer birders. So, in closing, we can't be told that we should keep posting, but then told, if it's already been posted about 3,4,5 or more times, we don't need to keep posting because we just honestly, don't know what we are supposed to do.

Mark StrattonNorth Park
On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 2:19 PM, Paul Lehman [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <[email protected]> wrote:




























It is pretty obvious that over the past few
years that many of the local/county/regional/state listservs have
become less and less relevant to a large number of birders, as
many of these people have voted with their feet.er,
fingertips.and moved over to other sites such as eBird. Not only
that, but bird information dissemination appears to have become
MORE fragmented as time goes on, rather than less fragmented. We
now have the local listservs, eBird, WhatsApp/GroupMe text
messaging groups, Facebook individual and group sites, personal
Flickr sites, personal and private-group text messaging, and even
a handful of old-school folks who actually still call their
friends on the phone! Some of these services are SUPPPOSED to
complement each other, e.g., a text-message group that is supposed
to be used for immediate dissemination of high-end rarity
information only, and folks are supposed to post to it AND to the
local listserv in a timely manner, but instead the former is used
almost exclusively and often for more standard bird fare, so the
general listserv gets only some scraps, if anything.
Using my home-county listserv here in San Diego
as an example, the number of local birders who now rarely if ever
post to SanDiegoRegionBirding has grown steadily. Most of these
folks still happily get information from such sources, but rarely,
if ever, post to it. But a good number of these people do submit
eBird reports on a regular basis instead. Why only to one? Is it the
ease of eBird submissions? Is it the instantaneous reporting from
the field? (But that is also easy to do to a local listserv with
any smartphone.) Is it that they can easily attach their photos to
their eBird reports? Is there a widespread belief that posting
rarity news only to eBird is enough? Or for some, are they timid
to post publicly, or just lazy, or simply don™t care to give back
to a listserv from which they got information allowing them to see
a rare bird? Whatever the reason, recent checks on many days since
mid-December of the number of posts to the San Diego listserv
versus the number of county rarity alerts coming through eBird
is something on the magnitude of 1 to 20 or 30 (albeit somewhat
skewed by the numbers of out-of-town Nazca Booby viewers and
local-birder 2018 big year kickoffs, and by the potential for
multiple rarities mentioned per a single listserv post but only
one species per eBird alert). A little of this dichotomy can be
explained by the fact that some birds such as a semi-tame,
multi-year-staying Greater White-fronted Goose at a local lake
still appears daily on the eBird rare-bird alert”given that it is
a flagged species”but that virtually nobody would dream of posting
its continued existence on a regular basis on the county listserv.
Or, over the past few weeks, the continued presence of Nazca
Boobies, a wintering Red-throated Pipit, and many other regional
and state-level rarities locally, has drawn an especially large
number of California birders from out of town as well as many
out-of-state birders”few of whom have posting privileges to the
San Diego listserv, but almost all of them can post to eBird.
In most areas, eBird has become the best way to
keep track, on an almost daily basis, of the continued presence of
existing rarities. (With the caveat that some such reports are
erroneous, as they are through any source, and folks should be
careful following up on some such reports, especially when made
many days after anyone else has reported seeing the bird. Even
when some folks are chasing known birds at known locations, they
can mess it up. Posted photos of misidentified stakeouts are not
overly rare, and the number of such erroneous reports without
photos are likely even greater. Just recently, for example, a
friend of mine from out-of-state, after seeing Nazca Booby here,
drove up to Santa Maria to see the tame Garganey. He was greeted
there by a birding couple, also from out of state and chasing the
same birds, who proudly pointed out the bird to him: a female
Northern Pintail.. He quickly showed them the real Garganey. But,
the bottom line is, don™t underestimate the ability of some
observers to misidentify even known stakeouts. But I digress)
Are eBird reports also good at giving the
needed background information on how to FIND these stakeout
rarities? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. A dropped pin at a hotspot
may or may not signify a specific spot or may just denote the
location of a large park or marsh where the bird is. Some
observers add in exact lat/long information, but many do not.
Also, because many human beings (including many birders) are
geographically challenged, many locations they give in their eBird
submissions are MIS-STATED or MIS-PLOTTED, which is one
potentially serious problem with using eBird data in a number of
ways in general. But even if the general location is indeed
correct, the included comments (if any) may say little about the
specific tree(s) a bird is frequenting, or the best time of day it
might be seen there, origin questionable issues, or information
about possible legal access issues, etc. These specifics, which
can be very important, are often best imparted through posts to
the local listservs. Just in the past couple weeks, such was the
case here in San Diego County with a couple good posts to the
listserv dealing with private property issues and homeowner and
birder behavior involving the Ramona Harris™s Hawk.
Does one need to post an update on every
continuing rarity every single day on a local listserv? No,
although regular updates on high-end and just-recently-found
rarities are very helpful, and then periodic (weekly?) updates
that such-and-such long-staying or returning rarity is still
present is also helpful to other birders. But few local birders
supply that information. Recently here in San Diego, there have
been MULTIPLE DAILY eBird updates on Nazca Booby, Red-throated
Pipit, Greater Pewee, Thick-billed Kingbird and Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher, Harris™s Hawk, Tricolored Herons, Nestor Park birds,
etc. etc. etc., and almost nothing on these birds for well over a
week or more on SanDiegoRegionBirding. Nothing. The question then
becomes: Does it matter?
Looking at the broad birding community, some
birders spend almost their entire birding lives chasing stakeouts
found by other people. If that™s what they like doing, then great.
Some (but far fewer) birders hate chasing other people™s birds,
very rarely do it, but spend almost all their time doing their
own birding. That™s great, too! And
most of us birders are at some point in the continuum between
these two extremes. But the bottom line is, a relatively small
number of birders find a relatively large percentage of the rare
birds. And many birders do spend much of their birding time
chasing previously found birds. So, what can this large group of
chasers contribute? Perhaps rarity-status update information (BOTH
positive and negative) if they see that such updates have not been
made in a reasonable time period, or perhaps any news on changes
in a bird™s preferred exact site or timing of appearance during
the day.
Maybe include a bit more information
than the standard "continuing bird"?Include maybe where and
when the continuing bird was seen if possibly different from
usual. And if the report substantially extends the
date-span, then ideally including some comment about how it
was identified, or a photo. Some eBird reviewers avoid
confirming late reports of continuing rarities without at
least some documentation, given that some birds are reported
long after they actually departed.
If folks use only eBird for their rare-bird
chasing bird info, and then submit only to eBird, then fine. If
they do likewise only via some texting or Facebook group, fine!
But if they routinely use a local listserv to get their chase
information, see the bird, and then rarely or never return the
favor to birders following behind them”be it for reasons of
laziness, cluelessness, or simply self-centeredness”then this does
seem just a wee bit galling to those birders who are finding and
sharing.
Perhaps most birders are perfectly happy with
the quality and speed (i.e., efficiency) of the rare-bird
information they receive and think that my concerns are unfounded
and mostly merely tilting at windmills. Others may sympathize
fully. In any case, at least I got to vent!
--Paul Lehman,
San Diego































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Subject:
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 16:21 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
It is pretty obvious that over the past few years that many of the
local/county/regional/state listservs have become less and less relevant
to a large number of birders, as many of these people have voted with
their feet?.er, fingertips?.and moved over to other sites such as eBird.
Not only that, but bird information dissemination appears to have become
MORE fragmented as time goes on, rather than less fragmented. We now
have the local listservs, eBird, WhatsApp/GroupMe text messaging groups,
Facebook individual and group sites, personal Flickr sites, personal and
private-group text messaging, and even a handful of old-school folks who
actually still call their friends on the phone! Some of these services
are SUPPPOSED to complement each other, e.g., a text-message group that
is supposed to be used for immediate dissemination of high-end rarity
information only, and folks are supposed to post to it AND to the local
listserv in a timely manner, but instead the former is used almost
exclusively and often for more standard bird fare, so the general
listserv gets only some scraps, if anything.

Using my home-county listserv here in San Diego as an example, the
number of local birders who now rarely if ever post to
SanDiegoRegionBirding has grown steadily. Most of these folks still
happily get information from such sources, but rarely, if ever, post to
it. But a good number of these people do submit eBird reports on a
regular basis instead.Why only to one? Is it the ease of eBird
submissions? Is it the instantaneous reporting from the field? (But that
is also easy to do to a local listserv with any smartphone.) Is it that
they can easily attach their photos to their eBird reports? Is there a
widespread belief that posting rarity news only to eBird is ?enough??Or
for some, are they timid to post publicly, or just lazy, or simply don?t
care to give back to a listserv from which they got information allowing
them to see a rare bird? Whatever the reason, recent checks on many days
since mid-December of the number of posts to the San Diego listserv
versus the number of county ?rarity? alerts coming through eBird is
something on the magnitude of 1 to 20 or 30 (albeit somewhat skewed by
the numbers of out-of-town Nazca Booby viewers and local-birder 2018
?big year? kickoffs, and by the potential for multiple rarities
mentioned per a single listserv post but only one species per eBird
alert). A little of this dichotomy can be explained by the fact that
some birds such as a semi-tame, multi-year-staying Greater White-fronted
Goose at a local lake still appears daily on the eBird rare-bird
alert?given that it is a flagged species?but that virtually nobody would
dream of posting its continued existence on a regular basis on the
county listserv. Or, over the past few weeks, the continued presence of
Nazca Boobies, a wintering Red-throated Pipit, and many other regional
and state-level rarities locally, has drawn an especially large number
of California birders from out of town as well as many out-of-state
birders?few of whom have posting privileges to the San Diego listserv,
but almost all of them can post to eBird.

In most areas, eBird has become the best way to keep track, on an almost
daily basis, of the continued presence of existing rarities. (With the
caveat that some such reports are erroneous, as they are through any
source, and folks should be careful following up on some such reports,
especially when made many days after anyone else has reported seeing the
bird. Even when some folks are chasing known birds at known locations,
they can mess it up. Posted photos of misidentified stakeouts are not
overly rare, and the number of such erroneous reports without photos are
likely even greater. Just recently, for example, a friend of mine from
out-of-state, after seeing Nazca Booby here, drove up to Santa Maria to
see the tame Garganey. He was greeted there by a birding couple, also
from out of state and chasing the same birds, who proudly pointed out
the bird to him: a female Northern Pintail. He quickly showed them the
real Garganey. But, the bottom line is, don?t underestimate the ability
of some observers to misidentify even known stakeouts.But I digress?)

Are eBird reports also good at giving the needed background information
on how to FIND these stakeout rarities? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. A
dropped pin at a hotspot may or may not signify a specific spot or may
just denote the location of a large park or marsh where the bird is.
Some observers add in exact lat/long information, but many do not. Also,
because many human beings (including many birders) are geographically
challenged, many locations they give in their eBird submissions are
MIS-STATED or MIS-PLOTTED, which is one potentially serious problem with
using eBird data in a number of ways in general. But even if the general
location is indeed correct, the included comments (if any) may say
little about the specific tree(s) a bird is frequenting, or the best
time of day it might be seen there, origin questionable issues, or
information about possible legal access issues, etc. These specifics,
which can be very important, are often best imparted through posts to
the local listservs. Just in the past couple weeks, such was the case
here in San Diego County with a couple good posts to the listserv
dealing with private property issues and homeowner and birder behavior
involving the Ramona Harris?s Hawk.

Does one need to post an update on every continuing rarity every single
day on a local listserv? No, although regular updates on high-end and
just-recently-found rarities are very helpful, and then periodic
(weekly?) updates that such-and-such long-staying or returning rarity is
still present is also helpful to other birders. But few local birders
supply that information. Recently here in San Diego, there have been
MULTIPLE DAILY eBird updates on Nazca Booby, Red-throated Pipit, Greater
Pewee, Thick-billed Kingbird and Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Harris?s
Hawk, Tricolored Herons, Nestor Park birds, etc. etc. etc., and almost
nothing on these birds for well over a week or more on
SanDiegoRegionBirding. Nothing. The question then becomes: ?Does it matter??

Looking at the broad birding community, some birders spend almost their
entire birding lives chasing stakeouts found by other people. If that?s
what they like doing, then great. Some (but far fewer) birders hate
chasing ?other people?s birds,? very rarely do it, but spend almost all
their time doing ?their own? birding. That?s great, too!And most of us
birders are at some point in the continuum between these two extremes.
But the bottom line is, a relatively small number of birders find a
relatively large percentage of the rare birds. And many birders do spend
much of their birding time chasing previously found birds. So, what can
this large group of chasers contribute? Perhaps rarity-status update
information (BOTH positive and negative) if they see that such updates
have not been made in ?a reasonable time period,? or perhaps any news on
changes in a bird?s preferred exact site or timing of appearance during
the day. Maybe include a bit more information than the standard
"continuing bird"?Include maybe where and when the continuing bird was
seen if possibly different from ?usual.? And if the report substantially
extends the date-span, then ideally including some comment about how it
was identified, or a photo. Some eBird reviewers avoid confirming late
reports of continuing rarities without at least some documentation,
given that some birds are reported long after they actually departed.

If folks use only eBird for their rare-bird chasing bird info, and then
submit only to eBird, then fine. If they do likewise only via some
texting or Facebook group, fine! But if they routinely use a local
listserv to get their ?chase? information, see the bird, and then rarely
or never return the favor to birders following behind them?be it for
reasons of laziness, cluelessness, or simply self-centeredness?then this
does seem just a wee bit galling to those birders who are finding and
sharing.

Perhaps most birders are perfectly happy with the quality and speed
(i.e., efficiency) of the rare-bird information they receive and think
that my concerns are unfounded and mostly merely tilting at windmills.
Others may sympathize fully. In any case, at least I got to vent!

--Paul Lehman,San Diego



Subject: Red-throated Pipit continuing at Berry park
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 13:34 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Refound continuing red throated pipit at Berry Park at 10:15 AM on Friday Jan 12. 
The bird was not present at 8 AM nor were any of the other Pipits. The Pipits are now back in the park and the Red-throated still being seen at 10:38 AM when Nancy and I left.

Mel Senac


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Pewee and dusky-capped
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 11:51 am
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Friday morning Mel and I saw the Greater Pewee about 7:15 in Balboa Park. It sang its dawn song which helped us find it in a eucalyptus near the bunyabunya trees. 
The Dusky-capped Flycatcher put in an appearance at the Berry Park location at about 8:15. No pipits in park at that time.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb



Subject: Nazca Booby boat cost-sharing? Mon/Tue 15-16 Jan
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 11:46 am
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I had an out-of-towner express interest in renting a boat anytime Monday or
Tuesday or morning. Anyone interested in doing it then to share costs with
him?

Please reply off-line.

Thanks,
Justyn



Subject: eBird report - Saturn Blvd., American Pipit "japonicus", Jan 10, 2018
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 11:04 am
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
A checklist came in to eBird from Jan 10, 2018 reporting an apparent American Pipit form "japonicus" along Saturn Boulevard in the Tijuana River Valley. The location is described as just north of the river crossing in the dirt field on east side of the road. Also pipit flock moved to "field just north of band of trees" in that area.

Features described by the observers are blackish flaring malar patch, white wingbars, pale underparts, bright pink legs. Photos were not obtained.
eBird checklist with more notes here http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This is a rare form of pipit to encounter in San Diego County, it would be great to see photos posted if the bird can be relocated by other observers.
--
Gary Nunn
you can find me on twitter, @garybnunn








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Subject: So..San Diego Bay, Tri-colored Heron, Black Scoters, and Nazca Booby
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 18:13 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
I did a bit of hop scotching around south bay this morning. The following
birds were seen, and I missed on the Long-tailed Duck again.

The Tri-colored Heron was in the Biological study area. The bird was not
visible from the parking lot, only seen when I walk out on the dike and
turned back towards the car. The bird in the salt mash vegetation a very
short distance north of the dike.

Two male Black Scoters were seen from Grand Caribe. Those separate from
nearby Surf Scoters. They were about 200 -250 yards out and roughly on a
line with the Chula Vista Nature Center across the bay, ( sorry the name has
changed , and I don't recall the new name).

The Nazca Booby was on one of its usual 5 mph buoys, seen from Loew's
Coronado Resort. A quick scan turned up no other boobies.



As Paula Theobald mentioned we did see the Red-throated Pipit at Berry Park
about 10:30 a.m. it seemed to be more closely associated with Savannah
Sparrows along the fence than the few American Pipits out in the lawn area.



Dave Povey

Dulzura



Subject: San Diego's Next 10 additions?
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 16:14 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
A few weeks ago, I asked for your thoughts, guesses, and/or dreams, as to what the Next 10 additions to the San Diego County list would be. Thanks to 16 participants in this educated guesswork, 58 species were suggested as contenders for the Next 10 list for San Diego, with 31 unique species receiving only one vote.


Due to several ties, the consensus Next 10 actually consists of 12 species this time. The list is below, with rank, followed by species, and then number of votes received.


1. Yellow-billed Loon (14)
2. Glossy Ibis (11)
3. Field Sparrow (9)
4. Smith™s Longspur (8)
5. Hudsonian Godwit (7)
5. Eastern Yellow Wagtail (7)
5. White-rumped Sandpiper (7)
8. Arctic Loon (6)
8. Ruby-throated Hummingbird (6)
10. Garganey (5)
10. Slaty-backed Gull (5)
10. Couch™s Kingbird (5)


Other species considered by more than one person were, in taxonomic order:


Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
Trumpeter Swan
Streaked Shearwater
Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel
Rock Sandpiper
Marsh Sandpiper
Black-headed Gull
Kelp Gull
Berylline Hummingbird
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Nutting™s Flycatcher
Northern Shrike
Cave Swallow
Sedge Wren
Veery
Abert™s Towhee




And finally, the 31 long shots (As Phil Unitt said, The next addition will be one NOT on the Next 10 list!), those garnering only one vote, in taxonomic order:


Emperor Goose
Common Pochard
Murphy™s Petrel
Mottled Petrel
Hawaiian Petrel
Bulwer™s Petrel
Tristram™s Storm-Petrel
White-tailed Tropicbird
Gray Hawk
Short-tailed Hawk
Purple Sandpiper
Common Greenshank
Gray-tailed Tattler
Swallow-tailed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Plain-capped Starthroat
White-eared Hummingbird
Eurasian Hobby
Fork-tailed Flycatcher
Woodhouse™s Scrub-Jay
Arctic Warbler
Siberian Stonechat
Gray Thrasher, damn it (verbatem from one participant)
Gray Silky-Flycatcher
Olive-backed Pipit
Fan-tailed Warbler
Slate-throated Redstart
Rustic Bunting
Eastern Meadowlark
White-winged Crossbill
Northern Red Bishop (exotic that would require establishment)


Note there were no votes for Tropical Parula!


May at least a few of these be found in San Diego in 2018!


Justyn Stahl






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Subject: Sage Thrasher yes, Mtn Plover no
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 15:42 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Birded the dog park at Fiesta Island this morning. I failed again to find
the Mtn Plover - I'm not sure it has been reported since the new year began.
While searching for the plover, I encountered a Sage Thrasher (which has
been reported this winter) along the trail south of the large eucalyptus
trees in the center of the run. I was also checking for the Lapland Longspur
which may be hanging around this winter, but did not find it either.



Nancy Christensen

Ramona



Subject: Berry Park
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 14:59 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Jan Nordenberg and I arrived at 7:15 and searched for the Red-throated Pipit and Dusky-capped Flycatcher for over an hour. There were no pipits anywhere at the park. We found a couple of American Pipits behind church at corner of Leon and Hollister. After looking by for Long-tailed Duck unsuccessfully at 8th  St pond in IB with Dave Povey, I went back to Berry Park with Dave. We spotted the Red-throated Pipit in a few minutes at about 10 am. It stayed near the fence line with school loosely associated with Am. pipits and Savannah Sparrows.

Paula Theobald
Oceanside



Subject: Misc birds
Date: Wed Jan 10 2018 18:04 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hello all, having read The Skimmer last night, I decided to track down a few birds reported on the San Diego CBC.
The Gray Flycatcher continued at Montclair Park (reported by Ryan Andrews). It was hawking insects from a tree at the end of the lawn closest to the highway.
The Clay-colored Sparrow at Hollywood Park (also found by Ryan Andrews) was found foraging with a small flock of Chipping Sparrows right at the entrance to the park. That entrance is at the end of Juniper Street. The neighborhood being a bit sketchy, as were a couple of guys hanging out, I did not explore the entire park. Luckily, the sparrows could be seen and photographed from the car!
I also visited the 28th Street Park (part of Balboa Park) where I saw both the Palm Warbler and the Black and White Warbler reported there. Both were just north of the bathroom, which provided welcome shelter during morning showers.

Sent from my iPad



Subject: La Jolla misc 1-10-18
Date: Wed Jan 10 2018 12:13 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Went by La Jolla Cove expecting gaggle of birders to be sea-watching post-storm but guess anyone else had already come & gone.  Surprisingly low numbers of birds given the wind & continuing squall line to the NW, with only a few loons seen & all Pacific, handful of Bonaparte's gulls & black-vented shearwaters way out toward horizon, a few royal & Forster's terns heading toward large tern feeding flock well to north near Black's. Nice reward of one Cassin's auklet blitzing by over the surf relatively close to shore (or as much as flying butterballs can blitz...).
The Brandt's cormorants are well along in nest building on the cliffs. I was surprised to see eggs in at least one and likely two nests - the SD Co Bird Atlas and Birds of North America both list nest-building as early as December, but no confirmed egg dates until February. I'll forward photos to SDNHM & Pt Blue.
South of Children's Pool & SW of the S intersection of Coast Blvd & S Coast Blvd, 3 black oystercatchers were very obligingly foraging on the rocks at 8:40 am.
R. Patton
San Diego, CA



Subject: 2018 pelagic birding schedule
Date: Tue Jan 9 2018 18:43 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
The link worked for me.
Mark StrattonNorth Park

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Tue, Jan 9, 2018 at 3:59 PM, John P Valentik [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <[email protected]> wrote:

























Hey Bruce, how about a link?

J Pat Valentik
Huntsville AR 72740
479 981 0901































For anyone interested in pelagic birding trips this year, please note our new web address: sandiegopelagics.com. Our old website,
SoCalBirding.com, will no longer be active.. We have a great schedule of pelagic
trips this year, starting off with a 12-hour trip on Sunday, May 20, so check
out the new website for all the details. We hope to see you out on the water
with us.Bruce RideoutLa Mesa





































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Subject: 2018 pelagic birding schedule
Date: Tue Jan 9 2018 18:27 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Hey Bruce, how about a link?

J Pat ValentikHuntsville AR 72740479 981 0901

On Tue, Jan 9, 2018 at 4:59 PM, [email protected] [SanDiegoRegionBirding] wrote:




For anyone interested in pelagic birding trips this year, please note our new web address: sandiegopelagics.com. Our old website,SoCalBirding.com, will no longer be active. We have a great schedule of pelagictrips this year, starting off with a 12-hour trip on Sunday, May 20, so checkout the new website for all the details. We hope to see you out on the waterwith us...




Bruce Rideout

La Mesa



Subject: 2018 pelagic birding schedule
Date: Tue Jan 9 2018 16:59 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
For anyone interested in pelagic birding trips this year, please note our new web address: sandiegopelagics.com. Our old website, SoCalBirding.com, will no longer be active. We have a great schedule of pelagic trips this year, starting off with a 12-hour trip on Sunday, May 20, so check out the new website for all the details. We hope to see you out on the water with us.


Bruce Rideout
La Mesa



Subject: results of today's San Elijo monthly bird count 1-8-18
Date: Mon Jan 8 2018 23:32 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
Thanks to 15 participants for conducting the 8 January 2018 San Elijo Lagoon monthly bird count: Lea Squires (beach/offshore); Bradley Nussbaum, Elizabeth Venrick, Emma Havstad (Pole Rd);  Kathy Aldern, Marayanne Bache, Gretchen Nell, Don Johnson, Dave Carey (CBS= Rios to freeway); Patti Koger, Jeff Clingan, Julie Jones (EBS = La Orilla to Sta Inez);  Steve Perry, Gail DeLalla (EBE = Stonebridge Mesa); Robert Patton (EBNW = dike; EBNE = Escondido Cr; Cardiff Cove, beach/offshore, West Basin, Nature Center).



104 species were recorded: Pacific loon, pied-billed grebe, western grebe, brown pelican, double-crested cormorant, great blue heron, great egret, snowy egret, black-crowned night-heron, green-winged teal, mallard, northern pintail, northern shoveler, gadwall, American wigeon, lesser scaup, surf scoter, bufflehead, red-breasted merganser, ruddy duck, osprey, white-tailed kite, northern harrier, sharp-shinned hawk, Cooper™s hawk, red-shouldered hawk, red-tailed hawk, American kestrel, peregrine falcon, Ridgway™s rail, Virginia rail, sora, American coot, black-bellied plover, snowy plover, semipalmated plover, killdeer, black-necked stilt, greater yellowlegs, willet, spotted sandpiper, whimbrel, long-billed curlew, ruddy turnstone, black turnstone, sanderling, western sandpiper, least sandpiper, long-billed dowitcher, dowitcher sp., Heermann™s gull, ring-billed gull, California gull, herring gull, western gull, royal tern, Forster™s tern, rock pigeon, Eurasian collared-dove, mourning dove, white-throated swift, Anna™s hummingbird, Allen™s hummingbird, Allen™s/rufous hummingbird sp., belted kingfisher, Nuttall™s woodpecker, downy woodpecker, black phoebe, Say™s phoebe, Cassin™s kingbird, tree swallow, barn swallow (3 along beach & 3 over E mesa), California scrub jay, American crow, common raven, bushtit, Bewick™s wren, house wren, marsh wren, ruby-crowned kinglet, blue-gray gnatcatcher, California gnatcatcher, western bluebird, hermit thrush, wrentit, northern mockingbird, California thrasher, cedar waxwing, European starling, Hutton™s vireo, orange-crowned warbler, yellow-rumped warbler, Townsend™s warbler, common yellowthroat, spotted towhee, California towhee, Belding™s savannah sparrow, savannah sparrow (western migrant), song sparrow, Lincoln™s sparrow, golden-crowned sparrow, white-crowned sparrow, red-winged blackbird, great-tailed grackle, house finch, lesser goldfinch, house sparrow, scaly-breasted munia.



The next San Elijo monthly bird count will be Monday 12 February.


R. Patton
San Diego, CA



Subject: SDFO presents "Birding Paraguay" with John Sterling - Jan 16, 2018
Date: Mon Jan 8 2018 14:46 pm
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
SDFO Event “ January 16,
2018 at 6:00 pmis the next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.



Program “ Birding in Paraguay presented by John Sterling. John will talk
about his adventures on two trips through Paraguay. From the dry Chaco in the
west to the Atlantic rainforests of the east, this country will soon be on the
map for international birders. John was the team leader that developed a
curriculum for training birding guides in Paraguay for National Audubon Society
and the Inter-American Development Bank. He was able to bird with several of
the graduates of the Advanced Training Course. John will talk about the new
opportunities for birding ecotourism and will illustrate his talk with his
photos.

John Sterling is a wildlife biologist and consultant whose clients include
The Nature Conservancy, National Audubon Society, the Center for Natural Lands
Management, CA Department of Water Resources, The Kern Water Bank and the
Smithsonian Institution. He was a former staff avian ecologist at the
Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, and for several universities and US Forest
Service research labs in additional to working for two environmental consulting
firms in California. John is a diehard birder since 1971 and loves teaching his
identification workshops and leading his international tours (spots open in
2018: Morocco and Paraguay).



Click here forMeeting Details and Map.

If you were a member
of SDFO in 2017 “ time to renew. 2018 renewals are being accepted. Click here
forSDFO membership
instructions. Please make sure to
include your current email address.



Justyn Stahl





















San Diego Field Ornithologists

Program Chair










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