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Georgia bird news by date

Updated on August 3, 2020, 9:00 pm

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03 Aug: @ 20:57:25 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 2 Aug 20 [robert emond]
02 Aug: @ 11:52:42 
Common Loon at Morgan Falls dam in distress possibly [Dan Vickers]
01 Aug: @ 14:05:38 
Re: Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!! [Jane Brunson]
31 Jul: @ 21:42:41 
Re: Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!! [robert emond]
31 Jul: @ 21:38:51 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 30 Jul 20 [robert emond]
31 Jul: @ 19:38:34 
Large Piedmont Mixed Kite Flock Continues - Oconee County 7/8-7/31/2020 [Mark McShane]
31 Jul: @ 19:26:29 
Re: Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!! [Clyde Holler]
31 Jul: @ 19:12:23 
Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!! [Mark McShane]
31 Jul: @ 05:20:53 
Hurricane alert [world oceans]
28 Jul: @ 22:23:55 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 26 Jul 20 [robert emond]
26 Jul: @ 12:35:43 
GOS Fall Meeting Cancelled [LAWRENCE CARLILE]
26 Jul: @ 10:40:32 
Kite News - Jackson (7/25) and Long (7/26) Counties! [Mark McShane]
25 Jul: @ 08:25:32 
Juvenile MIKI! [Marlene Koslowsky]
25 Jul: @ 07:33:04 
Tailless Swallow-tailed Kite Flight Video Post - Plus, The Saga Continues - 7/23-24/2020 [Mark McShane]
24 Jul: @ 09:29:33 
Oconee County KItes [Lee Stanley]
24 Jul: @ 08:21:45 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 23 Jul 20 [robert emond]
23 Jul: @ 19:32:39 
Skeens Farm 07/23/20 [Andrew Baxter]
23 Jul: @ 15:47:47 
Mixed Kite Flock Continues with a Tailless Swallow-tailed Kite - Hwy 129 Jackson County - 7/23/2020 [Mark McShane]
23 Jul: @ 15:10:28 
Atlanta Audubon webinar featuring David Sibley [A Betuel]
23 Jul: @ 14:47:00 
Juvenile White Ibis Hall Co [Wes Hatch]
22 Jul: @ 17:48:50 
Swallow-tailed & MS Kites [Brenda Stryszko]
22 Jul: @ 15:52:05 
Swallow-tailed Kite - Georgia DNR Account (Updated 8 November 2019) [Mark McShane]
22 Jul: @ 02:29:53 
AMERICAN FLAMINGO REPORTED - McIntosh County - 7/21/2020 [Mark McShane]
21 Jul: @ 19:39:45 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 20 Jul 20 [robert emond]
21 Jul: @ 14:53:34 
Re: Mixed Kite Flocks Continue - Oconee and Jackson Counties - 7/20/2020 [Daniel B Hall]
20 Jul: @ 23:18:27 
Mixed Kite Flocks Continue - Oconee and Jackson Counties - 7/20/2020 [Mark McShane]
19 Jul: @ 15:36:59 
Mixed Kite Flock - Jackson County - 7/19/2020 [Mark McShane]
19 Jul: @ 15:11:04 
AMERICAN FLAMINGO REPORTED - McIntosh County - 7/15/2020 [Mark McShane]
19 Jul: @ 13:43:54 
LONG COUNTY ANNUAL MIXED KITE FLOCKS (and Season and Sites Information) - 2020 EDITION! (read full post for latest information updated from last year) [Mark McShane]
18 Jul: @ 13:15:10 
Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks with Chicks - Burke County [Milton Hobbs]
18 Jul: @ 12:41:22 
Photographs needed from June-July 2018 [Malcolm Hodges]
17 Jul: @ 17:19:52 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 16 Jul 20 [robert emond]
17 Jul: @ 15:45:09 
Swallow-tails and MS Kites [Phyllis Bowen]
16 Jul: @ 19:56:43 
Mississippi kite behavior in Athens-Clarke County [Jennifer E Wolf]
16 Jul: @ 19:55:35 
Large Piedmont Mixed Kite Flock Continues - Oconee County 7/8-7/16/2020 [Mark McShane]
16 Jul: @ 06:47:52 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 15 Jul 20 [robert emond]
13 Jul: @ 15:00:23 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 12 Jul 20 [robert emond]
13 Jul: @ 09:40:18 
2018 photo needs met (for now) [Malcolm Hodges]
12 Jul: @ 20:33:01 
Goldfinch Male [Lynn Rivenbark]
10 Jul: @ 19:48:25 
Spring 2018 photos needed [Malcolm Hodges]
09 Jul: @ 22:51:30 
Atypical cardinal [Gary Lee Cottrell]
09 Jul: @ 10:20:55 
Second Clutch Phoebes [Sue Peters-Ferree]
09 Jul: @ 03:53:01 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 8 Jul 20 [robert emond]
08 Jul: @ 14:23:41 
Nesting Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher - [MARY MEYER]
06 Jul: @ 20:09:38 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 6 Jul 20 [robert emond]
06 Jul: @ 15:52:32 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 4 Jul 20 [robert emond]
05 Jul: @ 14:52:41 
HERONS-FLOYD CO [Ann Stewart]
05 Jul: @ 07:55:31 
Roseate Spoonbill continues at Roswell Riverwalk [Melanie mefurr]
03 Jul: @ 22:51:15 
Pigeon Mountain Birds and a Large Bear [Daniel Roper]
03 Jul: @ 07:56:21 
Fwd: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert 02 Jul 20 [robert emond]





Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 2 Aug 20
Date: Mon Aug 3 2020 20:57 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: August 3, 2020 at 3:29:28 AM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (1 Screven)
> Blue-winged Teal (1 Baldwin)
> Ring-necked Duck (3 Dooly, 1 Walton)
> Ruddy Duck (2 Dooly)
> Black-billed Cuckoo (1 Fulton)
> American Avocet (1 Dooly)
> Least Sandpiper (1 Fulton)
> Glaucous Gull (2 Glynn)
> Black Tern (2 Dooly)
> Forster's Tern (1 Decatur)
> Common Loon (2 Fulton)
> Anhinga (1 Fayette)
> Snowy Egret (4 Fulton)
> Tricolored Heron (1 Bulloch, 8 Fulton, 1 Greene, 1 Gwinnett)
> White Ibis (1 Fulton)
> Roseate Spoonbill (1 Dooly, 3 Dougherty, 8 Fulton)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (1 Clarke)
> Red-cockaded Woodpecker (1 Jones)
> Blue-headed Vireo (1 Butts)
> American Tree Sparrow (1 Fulton)
> Prothonotary Warbler (1 Fulton)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: Common Loon at Morgan Falls dam in distress possibly
Date: Sun Aug 2 2020 11:52 am
From: dvickers AT mindspring.com
 
Kris and I observed the breeding plumage COLO actively feeding up and down
the river. At one point it even called which is very nice to hear in
Atlanta in August.



Unfortunately the bird seems to have gotten itself hooked and is trailing
fishing line. Not sure what could be done for the bird as I am sure it
would be very difficult to capture. The bird disappeared a short time later
as the number of fishing boats and swimmers swelled in number.



I copy of the list with an embedded photo is below.



View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...



Kris Bisgard and Dan Vickers

Atlanta


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Subject: Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!!
Date: Sat Aug 1 2020 14:05 pm
From: jbrunson AT eufaula.rr.com
 
Congrats to Wes and James! What an accomplishment.

On 7/31/2020 7:10 PM, Mark McShane wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> Amazingly, it's only been about two months since we last held this ceremony for Jim Hanna!
>
> Super Congratulations go to Wes Hatch and James White who both worked very hard these past years (since catching the Georgia county birding bug) and just finished getting to at least 50 species experienced in Every Georgia County this past Sunday (Wes) and Monday (James)!!
>
> This is a very significant Georgia birding and county birding accomplishment and milestone (especially since Georgia has 159 counties, second only to Texas) and indicates a very unique and high level of birding dedication, as well as other special traits, in Wes and James!
>
> Well Done Guys!
>
> ---
>
> Reprint from two months ago:
>
> One certainly learns a lot about birding in Georgia, and in each Georgia county, and of Georgia itself, by even getting at least one birding checklist completed in each and every Georgia county (that's how it started for me), or by then going on to meeting a same minimum number of bird species experienced for each Georgia county! It's a lot of fun, excitement, and satisfying work, to research and plan how you're going to travel and try to see the most bird species you can in any given county, or set of given counties, in a day, a weekend, a week, or for any given time period, and then to execute that plan possibly contending with the weather, the birding times of day, the managing of the scheduling and your time, navigating and traveling the roads and trails, accessing chosen sites, habitats, and the current conditions. Your success accomplishing your county birding goals for a given trip is mostly up to how good your plan is for the day, and how you executed it, or adapted it on the fly (sometimes, for example, a new rare bird chase can interrupt your plan). It can be very challenging and rewarding on a personal level, and to accomplish and to share with others. Possibly quite different from a set trip to say a single known birding destination where you know what to expect. The more county birding you do the better you get at it, and thus hopefully the more data to gather, and the more feats and exploits to enjoy and remember. Georgia having 159 counties ensures that there will be enough county birding available to last a lifetime here in our state!
>
> County birders locate great birding spots in counties that are under-birded and often are able to get new hotspots added to eBird in counties with very few or no known hotspots, thus putting that county more on the birding map so to speak, and there are a lot of relatively under-birded counties and areas in Georgia. There is a lot of birding good to be had having county birders out constantly exploring and documenting their many, and sometimes surprising, finds around the state in such great, comprehensive, and publicly available detail as they capture in their many eBird checklists. Every county birder I know uses eBird!
>
> I guess I'm going to keep trying to resist the temptation to try for at least 50 (or beyond) in every Georgia county but the bug may bite again, thankfully 30 (achieved in 2017) is still somehow a very safe and satisfying, if small, number to be content with right now with many documented checklists and great Georgia birding memories. Well, if you've ever been bitten by the county birding bug, it's just that you keep birding around, and you keep birding around, and the numbers keep piling up, and then you realize maybe that, hey, I've got a lot of counties under 50, but that are over 40, and so you reason it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to try to push on to see a new higher minimum number of birds in every Georgia county, and 50 is such a nice round number, and it wouldn't be too hard to get there, and so it goes... to maybe, shall we say, what can be somewhat habit-forming county birding.
>
> Don't laugh and snicker! You could be next! County birding all 159 Georgia counties can start (even without your knowledge) very innocently enough and appear quite innocuous at first, but can prove to be either a fast as a whirlwind descent, or a slow and seductive process (or anywhere in between) on down the slippery slope into Full-Blown County Birding. By the time you know it, it's too late, you've already changed: You're a Georgia County Birder
>
> County birding can be very contagious as well, that's what happened to me, I caught it from others, even if it does seem to be in remission currently, does it ever really go away? Many county birders may not be very public about their, er, condition, so keep a very close eye on your birding friends or you could easily catch it too when you least expect it. A typical sure sign, for example, is if, say, you are birding with some folks and the second you cross any county line they start declaring cardinals, thrashers, and mockingbirds, and frantically asking each other if they have those for the county! Whaaat?!! They may be county birders, although single county birders on their own can sometimes be a little harder to detect. Now, all eBirders turn on your eBird Profiles so that logged in eBirders everywhere can see how you're doing in any given county, and maybe collaborate with you, or offer county birding advice, or...
>
> There I go again, well, I've done my best to try to explain this phenomenon a bit for the benefit of the uninitiated, but I don't think I'll say more, after all, Hi, my name is Mark, and I'm a county birder.
>
> Good Birding All, keep your wits about you, and be very safe out there!
>
> Mark
>
> Mark McShane
> Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
> www.neargareport.com
>
> You must be a subscriber to post to GABO-L.
> Instructions for subscribing (and the guidelines) are found here:
> http://www.gos.org/georgia-bir... Please read the guidelines before posting.
>
> Send regular postings to gabo-l@listserv.uga.edu
>
> To search GABO-L archives or manage your subscription, go to
> https://listserv.uga.edu/cgi-b...
>
> To contact a listowner, send message to GABO-L-request@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
You must be a subscriber to post to GABO-L.
Instructions for subscribing (and the guidelines) are found here:
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Subject: Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!!
Date: Fri Jul 31 2020 21:42 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Wow!! Congrats you guys  Thats an amazing accomplishment and
milestone.

Robert Emond
Lowndes

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 8:26 PM Clyde Holler wrote:

> Wonderful news. Wow!
>
>
> Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.
> Original Message
> From: Mark McShane
> Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 8:12 PM
> To: GABO-L AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
> Reply To: Mark McShane
> Subject: [GABO-L] Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!!
>
> Hi All,
>
> Amazingly, it's only been about two months since we last held this
> ceremony for Jim Hanna!
>
> Super Congratulations go to Wes Hatch and James White who both worked very
> hard these past years (since catching the Georgia county birding bug) and
> just finished getting to at least 50 species experienced in Every Georgia
> County this past Sunday (Wes) and Monday (James)!!
>
> This is a very significant Georgia birding and county birding
> accomplishment and milestone (especially since Georgia has 159 counties,
> second only to Texas) and indicates a very unique and high level of birding
> dedication, as well as other special traits, in Wes and James!
>
> Well Done Guys!
>
> ---
>
> Reprint from two months ago:
>
> One certainly learns a lot about birding in Georgia, and in each Georgia
> county, and of Georgia itself, by even getting at least one birding
> checklist completed in each and every Georgia county (that's how it started
> for me), or by then going on to meeting a same minimum number of bird
> species experienced for each Georgia county! It's a lot of fun, excitement,
> and satisfying work, to research and plan how you're going to travel and
> try to see the most bird species you can in any given county, or set of
> given counties, in a day, a weekend, a week, or for any given time period,
> and then to execute that plan possibly contending with the weather, the
> birding times of day, the managing of the scheduling and your time,
> navigating and traveling the roads and trails, accessing chosen sites,
> habitats, and the current conditions. Your success accomplishing your
> county birding goals for a given trip is mostly up to how good your plan is
> for the day, and how you executed it, or adapted it on the fly (sometimes,
> for example, a new rare bird chase can interrupt your plan). It can be very
> challenging and rewarding on a personal level, and to accomplish and to
> share with others. Possibly quite different from a set trip to say a single
> known birding destination where you know what to expect. The more county
> birding you do the better you get at it, and thus hopefully the more data
> to gather, and the more feats and exploits to enjoy and remember. Georgia
> having 159 counties ensures that there will be enough county birding
> available to last a lifetime here in our state!
>
> County birders locate great birding spots in counties that are
> under-birded and often are able to get new hotspots added to eBird in
> counties with very few or no known hotspots, thus putting that county more
> on the birding map so to speak, and there are a lot of relatively
> under-birded counties and areas in Georgia. There is a lot of birding good
> to be had having county birders out constantly exploring and documenting
> their many, and sometimes surprising, finds around the state in such great,
> comprehensive, and publicly available detail as they capture in their many
> eBird checklists. Every county birder I know uses eBird!
>
> I guess I'm going to keep trying to resist the temptation to try for at
> least 50 (or beyond) in every Georgia county but the bug may bite again,
> thankfully 30 (achieved in 2017) is still somehow a very safe and
> satisfying, if small, number to be content with right now with many
> documented checklists and great Georgia birding memories. Well, if you've
> ever been bitten by the county birding bug, it's just that you keep birding
> around, and you keep birding around, and the numbers keep piling up, and
> then you realize maybe that, hey, I've got a lot of counties under 50, but
> that are over 40, and so you reason it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to
> try to push on to see a new higher minimum number of birds in every Georgia
> county, and 50 is such a nice round number, and it wouldn't be too hard to
> get there, and so it goes... to maybe, shall we say, what can be somewhat
> habit-forming county birding.
>
> Don't laugh and snicker! You could be next! County birding all 159 Georgia
> counties can start (even without your knowledge) very innocently enough and
> appear quite innocuous at first, but can prove to be either a fast as a
> whirlwind descent, or a slow and seductive process (or anywhere in between)
> on down the slippery slope into Full-Blown County Birding. By the time you
> know it, it's too late, you've already changed: You're a Georgia County
> Birder
>
> County birding can be very contagious as well, that's what happened to me,
> I caught it from others, even if it does seem to be in remission currently,
> does it ever really go away? Many county birders may not be very public
> about their, er, condition, so keep a very close eye on your birding
> friends or you could easily catch it too when you least expect it. A
> typical sure sign, for example, is if, say, you are birding with some folks
> and the second you cross any county line they start declaring cardinals,
> thrashers, and mockingbirds, and frantically asking each other if they have
> those for the county! Whaaat?!! They may be county birders, although single
> county birders on their own can sometimes be a little harder to detect.
> Now, all eBirders turn on your eBird Profiles so that logged in eBirders
> everywhere can see how you're doing in any given county, and maybe
> collaborate with you, or offer county birding advice, or...
>
> There I go again, well, I've done my best to try to explain this
> phenomenon a bit for the benefit of the uninitiated, but I don't think I'll
> say more, after all, Hi, my name is Mark, and I'm a county birder.
>
> Good Birding All, keep your wits about you, and be very safe out there!
>
> Mark
>
> Mark McShane
> Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
> www.neargareport.com
>
> You must be a subscriber to post to GABO-L.
> Instructions for subscribing (and the guidelines) are found here:
> http://www.gos.org/georgia-bir... Please read the guidelines
> before posting.
>
> Send regular postings to gabo-l@listserv.uga.edu
>
> To search GABO-L archives or manage your subscription, go to
> https://listserv.uga.edu/cgi-b...
>
> To contact a listowner, send message to GABO-L-request@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
>
> You must be a subscriber to post to GABO-L.
> Instructions for subscribing (and the guidelines) are found here:
> http://www.gos.org/georgia-bir... Please read the guidelines
> before posting.
>
> Send regular postings to gabo-l@listserv.uga.edu
>
> To search GABO-L archives or manage your subscription, go to
> https://listserv.uga.edu/cgi-b...
>
> To contact a listowner, send message to GABO-L-request@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
>

You must be a subscriber to post to GABO-L.
Instructions for subscribing (and the guidelines) are found here:
http://www.gos.org/georgia-bir... Please read the guidelines before posting.

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To search GABO-L archives or manage your subscription, go to
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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 30 Jul 20
Date: Fri Jul 31 2020 21:38 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 31, 2020 at 2:42:39 AM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Greater White-fronted Goose (1 White)
> Gadwall (1 Fulton)
> Least Sandpiper (4 Fulton)
> Common Loon (1 Fulton)
> Snowy Egret (5 Fulton)
> Tricolored Heron (8 Fulton, 1 Gwinnett)
> White Ibis (1 Fulton)
> Roseate Spoonbill (1 Bulloch, 8 Fulton)
> Red-cockaded Woodpecker (1 Jones)
> Peregrine Falcon (1 Fulton)
> Blue-headed Vireo (1 Jones)
> Cliff Swallow (1 Glynn)
> Eastern Towhee (White-eyed) (1 Clarke)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
You must be a subscriber to post to GABO-L.
Instructions for subscribing (and the guidelines) are found here:
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Subject: Large Piedmont Mixed Kite Flock Continues - Oconee County 7/8-7/31/2020
Date: Fri Jul 31 2020 19:38 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

The good-sized Piedmont region (probably 20+ SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and a like number of MISSISSIPPI KITES) summer Georgia continuing mixed kite flock is still putting on an awesome and so far very reliable daily show in Oconee County, since I think at least around July 8th, over Colham Ferry Road and fields between Green Ferry Road and Rose Creek Drive and the immediate surrounding area!

If you wait around long enough the birds usually will eventually end up orbiting directly over your head! Recommend that maybe 11 or 12 until 2pm is probably best. Today at about 3:30 they all went up high and drifted away like they do, and hopefully they'll be back again tomorrow!

---

Today's checklist with video stills of the birds from only a handheld phone:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

---

General site coordinates:

Decimal Degrees (WGS84): 33.836972, -83.405361
-or-
GPS: N 33 50.218 W 83 24.322

---

Please be careful parking and observing from the roadsides in the area.

---

I haven't been to visit the nearby Jackson Food Mart (Exxon) flock since the 27th but expect they are probably continuing there as well. They always come low overhead at the south end of the parking lot there as well with enough patience.

The eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

---

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

You must be a subscriber to post to GABO-L.
Instructions for subscribing (and the guidelines) are found here:
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To search GABO-L archives or manage your subscription, go to
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Subject: Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!!
Date: Fri Jul 31 2020 19:26 pm
From: clydeholler AT gmail.com
 
Wonderful news. Wow!


SentfrommyBlackBerry10smartphone.
Original Message
From: Mark McShane
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 8:12 PM
To: GABO-L AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Reply To: Mark McShane
Subject: [GABO-L] Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!!

Hi All,

Amazingly, it's only been about two months since we last held this ceremony for Jim Hanna!

Super Congratulations go to Wes Hatch and James White who both worked very hard these past years (since catching the Georgia county birding bug) and just finished getting to at least 50 species experienced in Every Georgia County this past Sunday (Wes) and Monday (James)!!

This is a very significant Georgia birding and county birding accomplishment and milestone (especially since Georgia has 159 counties, second only to Texas) and indicates a very unique and high level of birding dedication, as well as other special traits, in Wes and James!

Well Done Guys!

---

Reprint from two months ago:

One certainly learns a lot about birding in Georgia, and in each Georgia county, and of Georgia itself, by even getting at least one birding checklist completed in each and every Georgia county (that's how it started for me), or by then going on to meeting a same minimum number of bird species experienced for each Georgia county! It's a lot of fun, excitement, and satisfying work, to research and plan how you're going to travel and try to see the most bird species you can in any given county, or set of given counties, in a day, a weekend, a week, or for any given time period, and then to execute that plan possibly contending with the weather, the birding times of day, the managing of the scheduling and your time, navigating and traveling the roads and trails, accessing chosen sites, habitats, and the current conditions. Your success accomplishing your county birding goals for a given trip is mostly up to how good your plan is for the day, and how you executed it, or adapted it on the fly (sometimes, for example, a new rare bird chase can interrupt your plan). It can be very challenging and rewarding on a personal level, and to accomplish and to share with others. Possibly quite different from a set trip to say a single known birding destination where you know what to expect. The more county birding you do the better you get at it, and thus hopefully the more data to gather, and the more feats and exploits to enjoy and remember. Georgia having 159 counties ensures that there will be enough county birding available to last a lifetime here in our state!

County birders locate great birding spots in counties that are under-birded and often are able to get new hotspots added to eBird in counties with very few or no known hotspots, thus putting that county more on the birding map so to speak, and there are a lot of relatively under-birded counties and areas in Georgia. There is a lot of birding good to be had having county birders out constantly exploring and documenting their many, and sometimes surprising, finds around the state in such great, comprehensive, and publicly available detail as they capture in their many eBird checklists. Every county birder I know uses eBird!

I guess I'm going to keep trying to resist the temptation to try for at least 50 (or beyond) in every Georgia county but the bug may bite again, thankfully 30 (achieved in 2017) is still somehow a very safe and satisfying, if small, number to be content with right now with many documented checklists and great Georgia birding memories. Well, if you've ever been bitten by the county birding bug, it's just that you keep birding around, and you keep birding around, and the numbers keep piling up, and then you realize maybe that, hey, I've got a lot of counties under 50, but that are over 40, and so you reason it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to try to push on to see a new higher minimum number of birds in every Georgia county, and 50 is such a nice round number, and it wouldn't be too hard to get there, and so it goes... to maybe, shall we say, what can be somewhat habit-forming county birding.

Don't laugh and snicker! You could be next! County birding all 159 Georgia counties can start (even without your knowledge) very innocently enough and appear quite innocuous at first, but can prove to be either a fast as a whirlwind descent, or a slow and seductive process (or anywhere in between) on down the slippery slope into Full-Blown County Birding. By the time you know it, it's too late, you've already changed: You're a Georgia County Birder

County birding can be very contagious as well, that's what happened to me, I caught it from others, even if it does seem to be in remission currently, does it ever really go away? Many county birders may not be very public about their, er, condition, so keep a very close eye on your birding friends or you could easily catch it too when you least expect it. A typical sure sign, for example, is if, say, you are birding with some folks and the second you cross any county line they start declaring cardinals, thrashers, and mockingbirds, and frantically asking each other if they have those for the county! Whaaat?!! They may be county birders, although single county birders on their own can sometimes be a little harder to detect. Now, all eBirders turn on your eBird Profiles so that logged in eBirders everywhere can see how you're doing in any given county, and maybe collaborate with you, or offer county birding advice, or...

There I go again, well, I've done my best to try to explain this phenomenon a bit for the benefit of the uninitiated, but I don't think I'll say more, after all, Hi, my name is Mark, and I'm a county birder.

Good Birding All, keep your wits about you, and be very safe out there!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Congratulations to Wes Hatch and James White!!!
Date: Fri Jul 31 2020 19:12 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

Amazingly, it's only been about two months since we last held this ceremony for Jim Hanna!

Super Congratulations go to Wes Hatch and James White who both worked very hard these past years (since catching the Georgia county birding bug) and just finished getting to at least 50 species experienced in Every Georgia County this past Sunday (Wes) and Monday (James)!!

This is a very significant Georgia birding and county birding accomplishment and milestone (especially since Georgia has 159 counties, second only to Texas) and indicates a very unique and high level of birding dedication, as well as other special traits, in Wes and James!

Well Done Guys!

---

Reprint from two months ago:

One certainly learns a lot about birding in Georgia, and in each Georgia county, and of Georgia itself, by even getting at least one birding checklist completed in each and every Georgia county (that's how it started for me), or by then going on to meeting a same minimum number of bird species experienced for each Georgia county! It's a lot of fun, excitement, and satisfying work, to research and plan how you're going to travel and try to see the most bird species you can in any given county, or set of given counties, in a day, a weekend, a week, or for any given time period, and then to execute that plan possibly contending with the weather, the birding times of day, the managing of the scheduling and your time, navigating and traveling the roads and trails, accessing chosen sites, habitats, and the current conditions. Your success accomplishing your county birding goals for a given trip is mostly up to how good your plan is for the day, and how you executed it, or adapted it on the fly (sometimes, for example, a new rare bird chase can interrupt your plan). It can be very challenging and rewarding on a personal level, and to accomplish and to share with others. Possibly quite different from a set trip to say a single known birding destination where you know what to expect. The more county birding you do the better you get at it, and thus hopefully the more data to gather, and the more feats and exploits to enjoy and remember. Georgia having 159 counties ensures that there will be enough county birding available to last a lifetime here in our state!

County birders locate great birding spots in counties that are under-birded and often are able to get new hotspots added to eBird in counties with very few or no known hotspots, thus putting that county more on the birding map so to speak, and there are a lot of relatively under-birded counties and areas in Georgia. There is a lot of birding good to be had having county birders out constantly exploring and documenting their many, and sometimes surprising, finds around the state in such great, comprehensive, and publicly available detail as they capture in their many eBird checklists. Every county birder I know uses eBird!

I guess I'm going to keep trying to resist the temptation to try for at least 50 (or beyond) in every Georgia county but the bug may bite again, thankfully 30 (achieved in 2017) is still somehow a very safe and satisfying, if small, number to be content with right now with many documented checklists and great Georgia birding memories. Well, if you've ever been bitten by the county birding bug, it's just that you keep birding around, and you keep birding around, and the numbers keep piling up, and then you realize maybe that, hey, I've got a lot of counties under 50, but that are over 40, and so you reason it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to try to push on to see a new higher minimum number of birds in every Georgia county, and 50 is such a nice round number, and it wouldn't be too hard to get there, and so it goes... to maybe, shall we say, what can be somewhat habit-forming county birding.

Don't laugh and snicker! You could be next! County birding all 159 Georgia counties can start (even without your knowledge) very innocently enough and appear quite innocuous at first, but can prove to be either a fast as a whirlwind descent, or a slow and seductive process (or anywhere in between) on down the slippery slope into Full-Blown County Birding. By the time you know it, it's too late, you've already changed: You're a Georgia County Birder

County birding can be very contagious as well, that's what happened to me, I caught it from others, even if it does seem to be in remission currently, does it ever really go away? Many county birders may not be very public about their, er, condition, so keep a very close eye on your birding friends or you could easily catch it too when you least expect it. A typical sure sign, for example, is if, say, you are birding with some folks and the second you cross any county line they start declaring cardinals, thrashers, and mockingbirds, and frantically asking each other if they have those for the county! Whaaat?!! They may be county birders, although single county birders on their own can sometimes be a little harder to detect. Now, all eBirders turn on your eBird Profiles so that logged in eBirders everywhere can see how you're doing in any given county, and maybe collaborate with you, or offer county birding advice, or...

There I go again, well, I've done my best to try to explain this phenomenon a bit for the benefit of the uninitiated, but I don't think I'll say more, after all, Hi, my name is Mark, and I'm a county birder.

Good Birding All, keep your wits about you, and be very safe out there!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Hurricane alert
Date: Fri Jul 31 2020 5:20 am
From: world.oceans7 AT gmail.com
 
Hi birders, You probably already know that a hurricane is headed for the
Florida Atlantic coast and the Carolinas.....please be careful (and
observant) if you are anywhere near the coast....and stay out of the water.

Hurricanes shuffle birds around considerably....if you see a large bird
flapping across the sky or water, don't assume it is "just another gull".
But please remember that no bird sighting on earth is worth losing your car
or your life.

James Gibson
Clayton County

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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 26 Jul 20
Date: Tue Jul 28 2020 22:23 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 27, 2020 at 1:39:20 AM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (1 Bulloch, 1 Screven)
> Ring-necked Duck (1 Dooly)
> Ruddy Duck (1 Dooly)
> Northern Bobwhite (2 Lamar, 1 Oglethorpe, 1 Towns)
> Common Ground Dove (1 Oglethorpe)
> Purple Gallinule (1 Screven)
> American Avocet (5 Glynn)
> Piping Plover (2 Burke)
> Stilt Sandpiper (1 Dooly, 3 Glynn)
> Semipalmated Sandpiper (2 Burke)
> Lesser Yellowlegs (1 Bartow, 3 Glynn)
> Glaucous Gull (2 Glynn)
> Common Loon (1 Fulton)
> Anhinga (1 Barrow)
> Double-crested Cormorant (1 Floyd)
> Snowy Egret (3 Fulton)
> Tricolored Heron (1 Candler, 9 Fulton, 2 Gwinnett, 1 Richmond)
> Glossy Ibis (1 Decatur, 2 Mitchell, 1 Screven)
> Roseate Spoonbill (1 Baker, 1 Dougherty, 8 Fulton)
> Bald Eagle (1 DeKalb)
> Red-cockaded Woodpecker (1 Charlton)
> Philadelphia Vireo (1 Fannin)
> Red-breasted Nuthatch (1 Rabun)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: GOS Fall Meeting Cancelled
Date: Sun Jul 26 2020 12:35 pm
From: l.carlile259 AT comcast.net
 
Dear GOS Members,

The GOS Executive Committee adjourned a virtual meeting just a few moments ago. The top item on our agenda was to decide whether we should go forward with a field trip-only fall meeting this October on Jekyll Island, or to cancel the meeting entirely. The EXCOM made a unanimous decision to cancel the meeting based on recent trends associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and our concern for the health and well-being of the GOS membership. We also agreed that we would reconvene in October to make a decision about whether we would host a winter meeting on Tybee Island in January 2021. We'll reassess conditions in October and let you know as soon as possible whether to plan for a winter meeting or not.

I hope all of your are well and staying safe!


Larry Carlile
President, GOS

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Subject: Kite News - Jackson (7/25) and Long (7/26) Counties!
Date: Sun Jul 26 2020 10:40 am
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

Jim Hanna messaged yesterday that he had seen the Non-swallow-tailed Swallow-tailed Kite from the Jackson Food Mart on Hwy 129 in Jackson County early Saturday afternoon, after Vince Howard had reported the tailless bird just over 3 miles away at the John Collier Rd. Kite Field eBird hotspot in Clarke County on Friday, and I missed the bird in Jackson on Friday after first finding it from the Food Mart on Thursday! Interesting that these kites are reliably moving back and forth around the area like that!

Jim's eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

---

Wes Hatch messaged while ago to report a huge mixed kite flock of 110 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and 65 MISSISSIPPI KITES at 10:13am in Long County in the immediate vicinity of the Little Rock Baptist Church site/area on Hwy 196 less than 2 miles from the Skeens Farm! It's doubtless that these are the majority of the birds to expect at the Skeens Farm!

The eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Wes then visited the Skeens Farm where at 10:27am he observed a mixed kite group of another 15 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and 7 MISSISSIPPI KITES at 10:13am

The eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

---

125 Swallow-tailed Kites could possibly represent about 20-25 percent of the entire Georgia population of the birds right now, more or less depending on the success of the kites in Georgia this year!

As noted in my recent LONG COUNTY ANNUAL MIXED KITE FLOCKS (and Season and Sites Information) - 2020 EDITION! post, the Little Rock Baptist Church site and area is one of the prime Long County kite watching sites, although the Skeens Farm usually garners all of the glory!

If you visit the Skeens Farm and don't see large numbers of kites don't forget to check other nearby Long County kite flocking areas:
https://app.box.com/s/vgt881jr...

---

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Juvenile MIKI!
Date: Sat Jul 25 2020 8:25 am
From: 000006d228557fef-dmarc-request AT listserv.uga.edu
 
All,
I've been anxiously and impatiently awaiting the arrival of any baby Mississippi Kites. Finally one has visited! This morning. It didn't stay long, but I expect it will return, and I will be seen on my front lawn often, eyes up, camera-ready.
I cannot predict when this cutie will show up, but if anyone wants to chance seeing it, let me know you want to come by. Mornings definitely best. Afternoons you might see the family out flying nearby. The tree faces east and usually so do the birds. Please note that this is not their nesting tree but a tree they seem to like.
Also I don't have a ton of these guys in the neighborhood but I have seen up to five but typically see two-three. If there are more young than this one, I will be letting you know soon as I see them.
ebird report here. With less than wonderful photo but not horrible. Better ones to come, I hope!

https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Marlene KoslowskyFayetteville, GA

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Subject: Tailless Swallow-tailed Kite Flight Video Post - Plus, The Saga Continues - 7/23-24/2020
Date: Sat Jul 25 2020 7:33 am
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

I stopped by the Jackson County kite field at the Jackson Food Mart (Exxon) on Hwy 129 yesterday afternoon to check on all things kite there. Brenda Stryszko had just arrived a few minutes before me. We didn't see any Mississippi Kites with the Swallow-tailed Kites there, plus we didn't see the Non-swallow-tailed Swallow-tailed Kite I had seen there on the 23rd.

The eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Yesterday during the late afternoon Vince Howard reported the tailless bird just over 3 miles away at the John Collier Rd. Kite Field eBird hotspot in Clarke County! (I didn't realize these two sites were so close together)!

Vince's eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

---

ALSO PLEASE BE AWARE, for those following eBird Georgia Rare Bird Alerts (RBAs) for Swallow-tailed Kites, and know that the rarity filters in eBird for the state and the counties can change for any species by date or at least by month sometimes, and all through any given year, and the filters can and do drop (and add) Swallow-tailed Kite, for example, as a rare bird as the season goes on, and thus the kites may no longer come out on the eBird Rare Bird Alerts, and that you may have to eBird Explore the county you are interested in to find very recent eBird Swallow-tailed Kite reports for that county!

I think the eBird Georgia Rare Bird Alert has dropped the species as rare in the eBird rarity filters at this time for Jackson County and Oconee County (no more alerts will come out during this kite season) but that Clarke County has not yet been dropped, as of yesterday at least. Also, I think if a species drops from the state level alert it may also drop from the county level alert. eBird staff please feel free to correct me or chime in on how this works!

So just know that just because the kites aren't showing up on an eBird RBA doesn't mean that the birds are no longer continuing at a site where they have been recently reported. They are not rare in Long County during the kite season and you have to eBird Explore the county or the county hotspots to find out about the recent reports there as always.

---

VIDEO:

I uploaded iPhone 7 handheld phone video clips of the tailless bird to my Box site.
The #1 video is the best one (big screen full-resolution is best), and one of them is shot just at full digital zoom (lower quality), but I put whatever footage I had up there.

Amazing, actually it looks as if the kite has almost completely adjusted to its condition in the videos, almost like a lizard losing its tail, but certainly not the same thing, I really feel for the bird!

You can find the footage at the:

072320 Tailless Swallow-tailed Kite Jackson County GA

folder directly on my Box site at:

https://app.box.com/s/2bi0kgvq...

-or-

find the folder from the root folder at:

https://app.box.com/shared/2yx...

If you need to you can sort the page by Name, or by (date) Updated, by clicking on the column headings Name or Updated at the top of the Box page.

Handheld phone or phonescoped video and still frames may be best viewed on a large screen and/or zoomed or at the biggest size possible.

Information concerning how to use Apple MOV movie files can be read in my MOV Video File How-To.txt available at:

http://www.box.com/s/ojj2lap6s...

Some of the video files on the site can be a bit large and may take some minutes to download if you don't have high-speed internet access, but it may be best to download them to your desktop or somewhere on your computer before running them in QuickTime (or your MOV player). That way they should run faster and you can keep them if you like them too. Being handheld and usually at a very high magnification they can sometimes get a little jittery, but they are still worth a look, especially since you can drag through frame by frame in QuickTime (or in your MOV player) and pause the video on the best parts, playing at half speed in QuickTime can also be a good idea.

---

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Oconee County KItes
Date: Fri Jul 24 2020 9:29 am
From: leestanley15 AT gmail.com
 
I visited the Oconee County location yesterday around 10 AM.  There were
around 20 Swallowtails and 4-5 Mississippi Kites. If you are a GA birder
please do yourself a favor and see these amazing birds. Awestruck is my
word to describe the experience!

Please see Mark McShane's earlier email for the coordinates. Just put it in
your map app and go!


Lee Stanley
From Douglas County GA

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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 23 Jul 20
Date: Fri Jul 24 2020 8:21 am
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 24, 2020 at 12:50:40 AM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (1 Bibb, 1 Crisp)
> Blue-winged Teal (1 Bartow)
> American Black Duck (1 Fulton)
> Ring-necked Duck (1 Dooly)
> Northern Bobwhite (1 Oglethorpe)
> Pied-billed Grebe (1 Bartow)
> Eurasian Collared-Dove (1 Cobb)
> American Avocet (1 Glynn)
> Marbled Godwit (4 Glynn, 2 McIntosh)
> Stilt Sandpiper (1 Dooly)
> Snowy Egret (1 Fulton)
> Tricolored Heron (1 Fulton)
> White Ibis (1 Fulton)
> Roseate Spoonbill (3 Fulton)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (1 Oconee)
> Mississippi Kite (1 Fulton)
> Louisiana Waterthrush (1 Chatham)
> Prothonotary Warbler (1 Bartow)
> Black-throated Green Warbler (1 Muscogee)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: Skeens Farm 07/23/20
Date: Thu Jul 23 2020 19:32 pm
From: a.d.baxter25 AT gmail.com
 
Good day all,

My wife and I visited Skeens farm today, and we observed about 35+ Swallow-tailed Kites hunting at various times over the fields surrounding the old poultry barns and the field adjacent to Grady Kennedy Rd. One juvenile was begging and being fed by an adult or two. We observed only 1“2 Mississippi Kites. We arrived at 9:20, and we could not see any birds. But by 9:40, the flock started to grow. We left around 10:30, and many kites were actively hunting as we left.

Good birding,

Andrew Baxter
Cobb County

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Subject: Mixed Kite Flock Continues with a Tailless Swallow-tailed Kite - Hwy 129 Jackson County - 7/23/2020
Date: Thu Jul 23 2020 15:47 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

I stopped by this afternoon to visit the mixed kite flock in Jackson County. I was parked there at the Jackson Food Mart (Exxon) and observed the kites for just over 30 minutes, very often directly overhead and well within 50-100 feet!

One bird was, and I mean completely, without a tail, which I hadn't seen in any of several previous sessions there, or even ever before in 13 years of kite watching! I was rather shocked to see the Non-Swallow-tailed Swallow-tailed Kite at first but it was behaving normally, catching plenty of prey and devouring it on the wing, diving, performing acrobatics, and seemed to be doing pretty much just fine, with no signs of pain or diminished activity, even without that big fork-tailed rudder. It was however often a bit unsteady.

Perhaps a Great Horned Owl took the tail off at a roost site in the middle of the night!

The eBird checklist with screen captures of the handheld phone video:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Also, The Secret Lives of Swallow-tailed Kites:
https://www.audubon.org/news/t...

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Atlanta Audubon webinar featuring David Sibley
Date: Thu Jul 23 2020 15:10 pm
From: ykcul88 AT gmail.com
 
Georgia Birders,
I hope you are all doing well and staying as safe as possible. We at
Atlanta Audubon are trying to provide as much digital content as we
can, helping people enjoy birds and learn about the world of birding from a
safe distance. I wanted to reach out about a special event coming up on
August 19 that you may be interested in attending - A conversation
with David Sibley. I will be moderating a chat with Mr. Sibley (beer in
hand) about his new book and all things bird. You can learn more an
register for the event at this link:
https://www.atlantaaudubon.org...
And while your there, please check out some of our past content and
upcoming events!

Good birding everyone. Make sure you let me know when you refind that
flamingo.

--
*Adam Betuel*
*Director of Conservation - Atlanta Audubon Society*
*President - Teal Birding*

*www.TealBirding.com *

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Subject: Juvenile White Ibis Hall Co
Date: Thu Jul 23 2020 14:47 pm
From: whatch11 AT gmail.com
 
Hey everyone!

I found a juvenile White Ibis at Chicopee lake today along with four little blue herons. Chicopee lake is a part of Elachee Nature science center and therefore you have to pay five dollars for parking. Good luck to any chasers.

Wes Hatch
Naturalist
Elachee Nature Science Center
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Subject: Swallow-tailed & MS Kites
Date: Wed Jul 22 2020 17:48 pm
From: stryszko AT comcast.net
 
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Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite - Georgia DNR Account (Updated 8 November 2019)
Date: Wed Jul 22 2020 15:52 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

Here's the link to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division's full profile account of SWALLOW-TAILED KITE, modified and edited recently by A. Day and T. Schneider on 8 November 2019:

https://georgiabiodiversity.a2...

Also, the Georgia Biodiversity Portal at:
https://www.georgiabiodiversit...
Contains rare bird pages at:
https://www.georgiabiodiversit...

With all of the July/August kite activity in Georgia every year timely reading for sure!

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: AMERICAN FLAMINGO REPORTED - McIntosh County - 7/21/2020
Date: Wed Jul 22 2020 2:29 am
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

Sorry the late post but just seeing this now. Please see Nancy™s email below concerning her Harris Neck NWR flamingo sighting on 7/21!

”-

I apologize for the late post on this but I just got to where I have cell service. I saw the American Flamingo today at 1:40P flying NE from the marsh across Harris Neck Road into the Harris Neck Refuge. It flew directly in front of me as I was driving so I was unable to get a photo. It was clear as a bell and amazing!

Nancy Hickey
Supervisory Biological Technician
Blackbeard Island NWR
Sea Turtle Conservation Project
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

”-

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 20 Jul 20
Date: Tue Jul 21 2020 19:39 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 21, 2020 at 12:06:43 AM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (1 Bartow)
> Northern Bobwhite (1 Oglethorpe)
> Common Ground Dove (1 Oglethorpe)
> Piping Plover (1 Glynn, 3 McIntosh)
> Long-billed Curlew (3 McIntosh)
> Marbled Godwit (1 Glynn, 3 McIntosh)
> Long-billed Dowitcher (3 McIntosh)
> Wilson's Phalarope (1 Glynn)
> Greater Yellowlegs (1 Glynn)
> Lesser Yellowlegs (3 McIntosh)
> Snowy Egret (1 Fulton)
> Cattle Egret (1 Bartow)
> White Ibis (1 Bartow)
> Roseate Spoonbill (2 Fulton)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (1 Jackson, 3 Oconee)
> Bald Eagle (1 Cobb)
> Red-cockaded Woodpecker (1 Charlton)
> Blue-headed Vireo (1 Taliaferro)
> Grasshopper Sparrow (1 White)
> Prothonotary Warbler (1 Fulton)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

> Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: Mixed Kite Flocks Continue - Oconee and Jackson Counties - 7/20/2020
Date: Tue Jul 21 2020 14:53 pm
From: danhall AT uga.edu
 
Saw another mixed flock this morning at about 10:15am over Macedonia Church Rd near where Moore Road intersects it. This is in Greene County, about 4.3 miles WSW of Maxeys, GA (lat/long coordinates: 33.732551, -83.231636). I didn't spend time to count individuals, but several birds of each kite species were present along with a few turkey vultures.

-Dan Hall


________________________________
From: Georgia Birders Online on behalf of Mark McShane
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:16 AM
To: GABO-L AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [GABO-L] Mixed Kite Flocks Continue - Oconee and Jackson Counties - 7/20/2020

[EXTERNAL SENDER - PROCEED CAUTIOUSLY]


Hi All,

It was very cool Monday to be able to visit two different Georgia Piedmont mixed kite flocks in the same hour! It looked like the now famous Oconee County birds were just getting started in earnest when I arrived at about 11:30am, and eventually there were at least 18 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and 9 MISSISSIPPI KITES there, seen from both Greene Ferry Road and Colham Ferry Road before I departed to visit the already well-documented Jackson County birds less than 15 miles away!

The Oconee County eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

34 minutes later at 12:18pm I was able to start a new checklist over in Jackson County where at least 8 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and 7 MISSISSIPPI KITES were putting on a really great show.

The Jackson County eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

The Jackson birds won as they came closer to me this time for handheld phone video than did the Oconee birds! Exact locations are in the checklists.

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Mixed Kite Flocks Continue - Oconee and Jackson Counties - 7/20/2020
Date: Mon Jul 20 2020 23:18 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

It was very cool Monday to be able to visit two different Georgia Piedmont mixed kite flocks in the same hour! It looked like the now famous Oconee County birds were just getting started in earnest when I arrived at about 11:30am, and eventually there were at least 18 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and 9 MISSISSIPPI KITES there, seen from both Greene Ferry Road and Colham Ferry Road before I departed to visit the already well-documented Jackson County birds less than 15 miles away!

The Oconee County eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

34 minutes later at 12:18pm I was able to start a new checklist over in Jackson County where at least 8 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and 7 MISSISSIPPI KITES were putting on a really great show.

The Jackson County eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

The Jackson birds won as they came closer to me this time for handheld phone video than did the Oconee birds! Exact locations are in the checklists.

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Mixed Kite Flock - Jackson County - 7/19/2020
Date: Sun Jul 19 2020 15:36 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

In addition to the great mixed kite flock action going on over in Oconee County at:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Jim Hanna called today to report a nice mixed kite flock of 8 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and 8 MISSISSIPPI KITES over in Jackson County, well seen in the fields just south of the Jackson Food Mart (Exxon) on the west side of Hwy 129 at about the following coordinates. Several others have reported these birds today.

Decimal Degrees (WGS84): 34.031771, -83.500038
GPS: N 34 01.906 W 83 30.002

Jim's eBird checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Well, you can never see too many Swallow-tailed Kites!

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: AMERICAN FLAMINGO REPORTED - McIntosh County - 7/15/2020
Date: Sun Jul 19 2020 15:11 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

A 7/15 report of a McIntosh County AMERICAN FLAMINGO flying from Harris Neck NWR southeast towards Blackbeard Island NWR was posted to eBird on 7/17!

The report is not substantiated by a photograph, but anyone who knows flamingos would probably be unlikely to mistake one for a spoonbill.

The eBird report is here:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

---

Interestingly (to me at least) it seems that the St. Marks NWR Wakulla County Florida bird which has reportedly continued from 11/2018 until 6/2020, which I saw on 11/3/2018, and which many Georgia birders have gone to visit, has been mysteriously missing from St. Marks since about 6/13/2020!

My eBird checklist for the Florida bird with embedded videos:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S4...

---

If there truly is a flamingo moving about in our central coastal marshes or on our coast it should be extremely difficult to relocate without mounting a proper expedition... or maybe it will find a spot to feed which can be easily seen from a public access vantage point! Hopefully the bird will be relocated and photographed, maybe it will even show up at Altamaha WMA!

---

Good Luck Coastal Birders, and Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: LONG COUNTY ANNUAL MIXED KITE FLOCKS (and Season and Sites Information) - 2020 EDITION! (read full post for latest information updated from last year)
Date: Sun Jul 19 2020 13:43 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

As most know, the entire U.S. SWALLOW-TAILED KITE population is a true specialty of the southeast. Although I have read that these birds used to breed in 21 eastern states long ago they now only breed in reliable good numbers, or maybe at all, in 7-8 coastal states in the south from maybe the southeastern tip of Texas (nearest Louisiana) through possibly North Carolina.

A sizable portion of the U.S. population of these kites, maybe 100-250 pairs, or a few more and hopefully not any less, happen to breed and/or distribute every year along our Georgia coastal river corridors, on or near our coast, maybe in other coastal plain areas, and maybe even a bit beyond further inland as well in Georgia (as a very few birds well documented well inland in the Georgia Piedmont in the spring have shown in many years)! Not sure right now what the latest hopefully still at least every 5-year aerial breeding surveys are revealing in the population trend for the birds in Georgia.

All of these kites migrate south leaving the U.S. in the fall (seeing a Swallow-tailed Kite overall in Georgia in September is quite rare). Prior to leaving though they flock up at their favorite foraging sites, usually over agricultural fields near their breeding grounds, for a good while to fatten up for the long journey ahead. Small numbers or groups of the kites also disperse, after breeding in southeastern Georgia, further north up into the Georgia Piedmont and/or maybe other areas of Georgia (they have been seen in late summer in the Georgia Mountain and Ridge and Valley regions as well), and finding suitable fields to forage over fatten up there on mostly their flying insect prey before starting the long trip south which is mostly begun in the second half of August.

In Georgia probably the most reliable and the most famous site and area to see the largest numbers of the birds over the years has been the Skeens farm and the surrounding area in Long County a few miles southeast of Glennville. Gene Wilkinson, of Glennville, has been putting out great reports on the status of the kite flocks there in July and August for many years and many, many birders have enjoyed seeing both Swallow-tailed Kites (STKI) and Mississippi Kites (MIKI), there in large mixed kite flocks, Very up close and Very personal based on the information that Gene provides and that we relay to Georgia Birders Online (GABO)!

---

7/17/2020 UPDATE:

Last year Gene reported that the elder Mr. Skeens, then 79, had recently been diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease, and was going to be having open heart surgery shortly, but Gene said seriously that he was in good health other than that, although he wasn't out meeting and greeting folks last season in the golf cart as usual. Great to hear that Gene reports that Mr. Skeens is still with us but that again he may not be out greeting folks as was his custom in the past.

Although it is a bit early in the kite viewing season there Friday Gene reported about 75 kites in the area of the farm, mostly Mississippi Kites, and another 75 kites, again mostly Mississippi Kites, in the area around the Little Rock Baptist Church over on Hwy 196.

Gene also advises that there have been some agricultural changes out on the farm for this season. If I have this right, the field(s) closest to the pond on the farm are currently planted in oats or millet, and another field there is hosting grazing cattle which have grazed down the field. In these fields we may not end up with any significant June Bug or Kite activity (but we don't know yet for sure) later in late July and the first half of August (peak). If so it may be that the approach road (Grady Kennedy Road) to the farm will be the primary area in the farm area itself which will hold the significant kite activity, we'll see.

I would request to folks that will be submitting eBird or GABO reports of their kite sightings in the area this season to provide as much detail as possible as to exactly where they are seeing the concentrations of the kites, so that others may benefit the most in their trip planning from the information provided.

Once the June Bugs start appearing in great numbers the Swallow-tailed Kite numbers should pick up as per usual. Last year I think the high count for Swallow-tailed Kites on the farm was about 120 at one time over several fields there at once!

Here is one of my trip reports from last year for more reference:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S5...

---

2020 SITE AND AREA INFORMATION:

Gene advised me in the spring of 2018 that the Skeens are now OUT OF THE POULTRY BUSINESS!!!

Gene advises that the Skeens farm grounds proper are open for birders to visit for kite-watching this season!

So the flocked up kites (two species) in Long County can be soon seen on the Skeens farm proper, later in July and through August (primarily the first half of the month), as in many years past!

(So, the RED STOP SIGN signage (which may still be present) at the entrance to the farm proper that went up in August 2015 because of the Claxton Poultry Farms disease prevention authorized personnel only regulations and precautions put in place then due to the ongoing and/or potential bird flu situation for poultry farms is no longer in effect!)

---

The kites will soon be able to be seen flocked up and foraging on and near the Skeens Farm, and in the surrounding areas as well, in their annual and probably daily and hopefully Large-sized foraging concentrations, potentially 30-100+ STKIs, with a good number of MIKIs as well, for their pre-migration and several weeks long daily feeding fests, before they leave on their southbound fall migration sometime mostly in mid to late August! Viewing is usually best from say possibly 21 July - 15 August, and maybe through the last half of August a bit as well.

The birds usually start arriving over the fields on the farm, and the surrounding areas, and on the north side of Grady Kennedy Road between 9:00-9:30am and then may start to disperse between 11:30-1:30pm. I would always start on the farm proper and/or Grady Kennedy Road at 9:00-9:30am, and then would check the other sites as needed afterwards.

You don't need any advance permission to enter and bird on the farm during kite season, but please engage the Skeens when you see them, show your gratitude, and ask about current parking, or if there are any special instructions for the day that you are there.

If you have never seen Swallow-tailed Kites before, or even if you have, you will always be totally elated by the bountifully beautiful, gorgeously graceful, stunningly amazing, and astoundingly acrobatic aerial displays put on by these kites, and by both species together! These displays can intensify a good bit in frequency, speed, and acrobatic prowess during a given session as the number of kites increases while they compete in larger numbers for the amount of flying insect June Bug and dragonfly prey over the fields in late July through mid-August or so! Jaw-dropping birdwatching action, and they sometimes float over your head within 20 feet or so, always an unparalleled opportunity for birders in Georgia!

---

I had previously put up 3, for folks not already familiar, essential viewing annotated aerial photography maps of the area and the sites at:

https://app.box.com/s/vgt881jr...

1. Long County - Kite Flocking Areas.jpg
Overview of the main areas to watch kites, the Skeens Farm is traditionally the best site. The farm proper is OPEN TO BIRDERS. This area is about 5 miles east of Glennville Georgia on Hwy 196.

2. Skeens Farm Area - Long County.jpg
The farm proper is OPEN TO BIRDERS. Shows the approach road to the farm, the farm, and the main kite watching areas there.

3. Skeens Farm - Detail with Parking.jpg
The farm proper is OPEN TO BIRDERS. Shows the farm entrance and possible best parking areas depending on conditions and farm operations. Shows where the kites may perch in the trees almost every morning and early afternoon on the farm proper.

Decimal Degrees (WGS84) coordinates and GPS coordinates are included on these JPG files, I would be familiar with them before you go. Input the coordinates into Google Maps exactly as they are, and you can view the pinpointed location on the screen, then you can do directions or zoom in and out to see how to get to the sites as needed. Turn the satellite imagery on as desired as well.

---

Although there can be no guarantee this is always a superb, and virtually certain chance, to see, during the peak timeframe, many, many SWALLOW-TAILED KITES, with some MISSISSIPPI KITES mixed in, Up Close, and usually Very Close (within 30-50 feet, or less, at times), and also to see them, maybe as many as 10-20 of them or more, perched, and usually very close then as well, and maybe for a few hours, and day after day!

Sunscreen, a good sun hat, or an umbrella, plenty of cold water, cold drinks, snacks, food, and a chair of some sort, are all highly recommended, and it will be hot.

Although the birds will be able to be seen very well even without any optics when they are close in, binoculars should be used. Cameras, video cameras, and spotting scopes are also all very, very highly recommended as well.

This is Georgia birding, or any birding, at its absolute best! We are indeed very fortunate to live and bird in a state that has good numbers of kites breeding and flocking, both the Swallow-tailed and the Mississippi, and that put on such amazingly spectacular annual shows for us in preparation for their fall migration!

One note of warning though, once you are smitten by these birds, viewing them very up close and personal, and for a good long while, you will probably have to start making the annual pilgrimage to see good numbers of them as many do, and as I've done for the past 13 summers in a row!

If anyone needs more information or any help with the directions please email or contact me.

---

SWALLOW-TAILED KITE at Cornell's All About Birds:

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/g...

---

Here are links to some really amazing STKI photo collections from a great day in Long County back in August 2008:

David Cree's 16 August 2008 Swallow-tailed Kites Flickr gallery
http://www.flickr.com/photos/2...

-and-

Joel McNeal's PBase 16 August 2008 Swallow-tailed Kites gallery
http://www.pbase.com/joelmcnea...

---

Thanks again to Gene, and to the Skeens, and hopefully we'll get some good flocking updates later this month!

Good Kiting All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks with Chicks - Burke County
Date: Sat Jul 18 2020 13:15 pm
From: thegahobbs6 AT gmail.com
 
Hello Georgia Birders.
This morning at the Southern Swiss Dairy pond there was a pair of
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks with 13 chicks. Cuties!
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...
Milton Hobbs
Burke County

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Subject: Photographs needed from June-July 2018
Date: Sat Jul 18 2020 12:41 pm
From: mhodges1957 AT gmail.com
 
Dear bird photographers,

I would like some bird photographs to spice up the "From the Field" article
for summer 2018. Requirements are that the photo was taken in June or July,
2018, and that it was taken in Georgia. Here are some ideas for submissions:
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (esp. with babies!)
Lovely shorebirds, such as avocets, stilts, or just about anything (I love
shorebirds)
Reddish Egret dancing at Gould's Inlet
Willow Flycatcher
Lark Sparrows at Fall Line Sandhills
A nice shot of a warbler that breeds in Ga.

Please submit photos by this Tuesday night at midnight, 21 July. Also, most
importantly, give me explicit permission in your email that we may use your
photo in an upcoming edition of *The Oriole*.

Thanks a million for your help! Last time I'll bug you for at least a
couple of months, honest.

Yours,
Mal Hodges
Riverdale, Ga.

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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 16 Jul 20
Date: Fri Jul 17 2020 17:19 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 16, 2020 at 11:06:00 PM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (1 Burke)
> Purple Gallinule (1 Brooks)
> Marbled Godwit (1 Morgan)
> Spotted Sandpiper (1 Fulton)
> Willet (Eastern) (1 Morgan)
> Ring-billed Gull (1 Morgan)
> Lesser Black-backed Gull (1 Chatham, 1 Glynn)
> Glaucous Gull (1 Glynn)
> Least Tern (1 Morgan)
> Common Loon (1 Fulton)
> Double-crested Cormorant (1 Chattooga)
> Brown Pelican (1 Morgan)
> Snowy Egret (2 Fulton)
> Tricolored Heron (4 Fulton)
> Roseate Spoonbill (5 Fulton, 1 Jackson)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (5 Oconee)
> Tree Swallow (1 Cobb, 1 Troup)
> Cedar Waxwing (1 Fulton)
> Dickcissel (1 Oconee)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: Swallow-tails and MS Kites
Date: Fri Jul 17 2020 15:45 pm
From: pjbowen.go AT gmail.com
 
Friday, July 17, 1:20pm. I am observing at least ten Swallow-tailed Kites and more Mississippi Kites right now feeding over an unmown field at the SE corner of Colham Ferry Rd. and Green Ferry Rd. just south of Watkinsville. There must be lots of dragon flies and other favorite insects in this field.

Phyllis Bowen
Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Mississippi kite behavior in Athens-Clarke County
Date: Thu Jul 16 2020 19:56 pm
From: jenwolf AT uga.edu
 
I’ve been observing Mississippi Kites in my Winterville neighborhood for about three of the last fourteen years I’ve lived here. It’s a small development on the edge of a lot of open farmland, with a creek and wetland close by, and I guess the kites find the setting hospitable because their numbers seem to be increasing. From what I’ve read and what I’ve observed from almost daily observation in season, I know they eat mostly insects they catch on the wing. But they’re also known to eat small vertebrates like birds, amphibians and small mammals, and sure enough, I saw it for myself for the first time, this morning. Not sure how the kite took the small bird, but it flew right over my head with the hapless creature still flapping in its claws. Birds are so beautiful I sometimes forget that for them, it’s life and death out there. This morning, the kite got to eat and may well have hatchlings to feed; the smaller bird also wanted to live, and may have been raising young as well, but that’s how it goes.

Jen Wolf
Winterville, Athens-Clarke County


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Subject: Large Piedmont Mixed Kite Flock Continues - Oconee County 7/8-7/16/2020
Date: Thu Jul 16 2020 19:55 pm
From: mcshanebirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

The now good-sized, for the Piedmont region (probably about 20 SWALLOW-TAILED KITES and a like number of MISSISSIPPI KITES), summer Georgia continuing mixed kite flock is putting on an awesome and very reliable (so far) daily show in Oconee County, since I think at least around July 8th, over Colham Ferry Road and fields between Green Ferry Road and Rose Creek Drive and the immediate surrounding area!

I believe the larger numbers were first reported and photographed on the 14th there by Richard Hall.

If you wait a while the kites will usually work their way directly overhead as the phone video stills from today's checklist show quite well!

Awesome close looks during these sessions at both species of kites, often within 30-50 feet (with patience), many times very close overhead, sometimes 30+ mixed kites performing their incredibly beautiful, buoyant, graceful, and aerially acrobatic flight and maneuvers, and high speed dives after their insect prey (amazingly as usual), within 100-200 yards or so sometimes, and in all directions, at many different heights, and all at once (whew)!

There's just nothing like being able to watch kites foraging at close range, especially Swallow-taileds, for basically as long as you like or can!

I don't see any reports on the eBird species map yet I don't think, but there are plenty of hourly eBird Georgia Rare Bird Alerts in my mailbox detailing the past, recent, and current sightings of this flock as folks are regularly visiting the kites there and reporting them via eBird.

A spectacle not to be missed if at all possible! These birds may continue at this site until mid-August, or even just a little longer, before they depart southward on their long migration to Central/South America, but of course there are no guarantees as to how long they will stay here this season. Probably safest and best to start to try to see them between 10am-1pm, however today they stayed until about 3:30pm before most moved off high and away although they can adjourn anytime in the afternoon depending I expect.

---

Today's checklist with video stills of the birds very close from only a handheld phone:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

---

General site coordinates:

Decimal Degrees (WGS84): 33.836972, -83.405361
-or-
GPS: N 33 50.218 W 83 24.322

---

Please be careful parking and observing from the roadsides in the area.

---

Good Birding All!

Mark

Mark McShane
Impetuous and Ebullient Birder
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia
www.neargareport.com

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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 15 Jul 20
Date: Thu Jul 16 2020 6:47 am
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 15, 2020 at 10:49:36 PM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Wilson's Phalarope (1 Glynn)
> Spotted Sandpiper (1 Coweta, 1 Oconee)
> Greater Yellowlegs (1 Chatham)
> Glaucous Gull (1 Glynn)
> Snowy Egret (1 Fulton)
> Tricolored Heron (2 Fulton)
> Roseate Spoonbill (2 Fulton, 1 Jackson)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (6 Oconee)
> American Kestrel (2 Rockdale)
> Tree Swallow (1 Fayette)
> Cliff Swallow (1 Chatham)
> Song Sparrow (1 Bibb)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 12 Jul 20
Date: Mon Jul 13 2020 15:00 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 12, 2020 at 10:04:29 PM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Ruddy Duck (5 Glynn)
> Purple Gallinule (1 Decatur, 1 Mitchell)
> Sandhill Crane (1 Charlton)
> American Avocet (5 Glynn)
> Ruff (1 Camden)
> Least Sandpiper (1 Decatur)
> White-rumped Sandpiper (4 Glynn)
> Pectoral Sandpiper (1 Camden)
> Western Sandpiper (1 Camden, 6 Glynn)
> Spotted Sandpiper (1 Clarke, 1 Fulton)
> Greater Yellowlegs (1 Camden, 5 Glynn)
> Lesser Yellowlegs (1 Camden, 1 Decatur, 5 Glynn)
> Glaucous Gull (1 Glynn)
> Common Loon (1 Fulton)
> Anhinga (1 Greene)
> Snowy Egret (1 Fulton)
> Little Blue Heron (2 Dawson)
> Black-crowned Night-Heron (1 Fulton)
> White Ibis (1 Clarke)
> Glossy Ibis (1 Mitchell)
> Roseate Spoonbill (1 Bartow, 2 Dougherty)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (1 Jackson, 2 Lamar)
> Broad-winged Hawk (1 Stewart)
> Red-cockaded Woodpecker (1 Charlton, 1 Decatur)
> Cedar Waxwing (1 Bartow)
> Louisiana Waterthrush (1 Glynn)
> Black-and-white Warbler (1 Camden, 2 Glynn)
> Prothonotary Warbler (1 Bartow)
> Scarlet Tanager (1 Chatham)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: 2018 photo needs met (for now)
Date: Mon Jul 13 2020 9:40 am
From: mhodges1957 AT gmail.com
 
Dear Georgia Bird Photographers,

I'm happy that there is such depth in this group, that some of my favorite
contributors can be playing on the coast all weekend, and I can still get
all I need to put "From the Field March-May 2018" to bed. Thanks to all who
sent me wonderful photos, and I'm only sorry I can't use them all! I'll be
bugging you again in a couple of weeks, as I get another one of these done.

Yours,
Mal Hodges
Riverdale, Ga.

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Subject: Goldfinch Male
Date: Sun Jul 12 2020 20:33 pm
From: sadiebub AT cox.net
 
Had a Male Goldfinch at my feeder today. NNE Macon Bibb Georgia

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Subject: Spring 2018 photos needed
Date: Fri Jul 10 2020 19:48 pm
From: mhodges1957 AT gmail.com
 
Dear Georgia bird photographers,

Please help me as I add photos to the "From the Field" compilation for
March-May 2018 for the GOS' journal, *The Oriole*. Here's what I'm looking
for:
The Savannah Black-legged Kittiwake, 14 Mar.-3 Apr.;
The Augusta Great Cormorant, 29 Mar.-17 Apr.;
The Bartow Co. Scissor-tailed Flycatchers;
The Augusta Mountain Bluebird, 13-18 Mar.;
The COP Lark Bunting, 5-31 Mar.

If you send me photos, please include a sentence explicitly granting
permission for us to use your photo in this article.

Thanks,
Mal Hodges

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Subject: Atypical cardinal
Date: Thu Jul 9 2020 22:51 pm
From: glcottrell AT charter.net
 
If interested in cardinals with atypical (leusistic?) coloring here™s a link to some photos of a cardinal seen in the Columbus, GA area recently.  My friend Marc shared the photos with me. If interested in trying to locate the bird try marc@aramian.com

https://share.icloud.com/photo...

Gary Cottrell
glcottrell@charter.net. Or 678-378-2532
Carrollton, GA
USA
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Subject: Second Clutch Phoebes
Date: Thu Jul 9 2020 10:20 am
From: soupysue AT windstream.net
 
Mama phoebe is feeding the second clutch of babies in the nest outside our
master bath window. I think there was a delay in egg laying but things are
good now.



Sue Peters-Ferree

Blairsville, Union Co.




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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 8 Jul 20
Date: Thu Jul 9 2020 3:53 am
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 8, 2020 at 9:03:02 PM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> King Rail (1 Greene)
> American Avocet (2 Glynn)
> Lesser Black-backed Gull (2 Glynn)
> Glaucous Gull (3 Glynn)
> Common Tern (1 Glynn)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (1 Madison, 1 Oconee)
> Broad-winged Hawk (1 Brooks)
> Barn Owl (1 Madison)
> American Kestrel (1 DeKalb)
> Willow Flycatcher (1 Greene)
> Tree Swallow (1 Forsyth)
> Song Sparrow (1 Bibb)
> Louisiana Waterthrush (1 Glynn)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: Nesting Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher -
Date: Wed Jul 8 2020 14:23 pm
From: cheshy AT prodigy.net
 
This is a first for us. We have a pair of Blue-Gray gnatcatchers taking coconut basket shreds and making a nest nearby. I'm amazed at how tiny they are compared to all the other birds around here.
Mary MeyerAcworth


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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 6 Jul 20
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 20:09 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 6, 2020 at 8:28:33 PM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Black-necked Stilt (1 Tattnall)
> Least Sandpiper (2 Glynn)
> Spotted Sandpiper (1 Richmond)
> Greater Yellowlegs (1 Tattnall)
> Glaucous Gull (1 Glynn)
> Common Loon (1 Fulton)
> Swallow-tailed Kite (1 Harris)
> Tree Swallow (1 Cobb, 1 Fulton)
> Red-breasted Nuthatch (2 Rabun)
> Bachman's Sparrow (1 Camden)
> Northern Waterthrush (1 Glynn)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 4 Jul 20
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 15:52 pm
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 4, 2020 at 7:58:26 PM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Common Gallinule (1 Rockdale)
> Purple Gallinule (1 Decatur)
> Least Sandpiper (1 Glynn)
> Greater Yellowlegs (2 Decatur, 1 Glynn)
> Lesser Yellowlegs (2 Decatur)
> Glaucous Gull (2 Glynn)
> Common Loon (1 Fannin)
> Anhinga (1 Rockdale)
> Double-crested Cormorant (2 Murray)
> Tricolored Heron (1 Decatur)
> White Ibis (1 Fulton)
> Glossy Ibis (2 Brooks, 1 Lowndes)
> Roseate Spoonbill (1 Decatur, 1 Dougherty, 1 Fulton)
> Mississippi Kite (1 Cobb)
> Willow Flycatcher (1 Fulton)
> Tree Swallow (1 Cobb, 1 Fayette, 1 Fulton)
> House Wren (Northern) (1 Richmond)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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Subject: HERONS-FLOYD CO
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 14:52 pm
From: annhstewart AT comcast.net
 
Yesterday and today I have had A Great Egret and  Blue Heron
Feeding on my very very low water level pond.
The Blue Heron is a normal visitor but the Great Egret only shows up a couple times a year!
Normally I would be happy with their visits but a couple months ago I spent a couple hundred dollars on restocking my pond and everytime I see the Birds come up with a fish all I see is DOLLAR SIGNS!$$$$$$$$$
going down their throats!
Haven™t seen my Little Green Heron in several weeks!
Maybe he got his belly full and is hibernating in the shade or maybe on a nest?

Ann Stewart
Rome,Georgia

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Subject: Roseate Spoonbill continues at Roswell Riverwalk
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 7:55 am
From: mefurr AT bellsouth.net
 
The Roseate Spoonbill reported yesterday at the Roswell Riverwalk continues this morning, feeding in the open very close to the entrance of the Chattahoochee Nature Center. 
Melanie Furr
Tucker, GA


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Subject: Pigeon Mountain Birds and a Large Bear
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 22:51 pm
From: 000003534f49532d-dmarc-request AT listserv.uga.edu
 
Ladies and Gents,
Friday, I walked a 9-mile loop on these trails: Estelle Mine; Branch, Brow, North Pocket. Conditions were taxing - hot, humid, lots of spider webs, many of the trails nearly overgrown.
Springtime birdsong is tapering off, but still a good day including: three vireos (yellow-throated, blue-headed, red-eyed, scarlet tanager (plentiful), blue-gray gnatcatcher, Acadian flycatcher, Eastern wood pewee, Kentucky warbler, broad-winged hawk, red-shouldered hawk, red-tailed hawk; white-breasted nuthatch, American crow, Carolina chickadee, tufted titmouse, northern cardinal, eastern towhee, American goldfinch, most woodpeckers (hairy, downy, red-bellied, pileated, northern flicker).
The surprise of the day was spooking a very large mail bear at, coming down the north pocket trail at roughly mile marker 2.25 or 2.50). It snorted and growled and lumbered quickly downslope, away from me. That's the first bear I've seen in 30 years hiking Pigeon Mountain (and only my second on a Georgia trail). The only other time I've seen a bear on a Georgia trail was on Tearbritches, in the Cohuttas, about eight years ago. It was a fairly small female that crashed down the mountainside. A few minutes later, I reached a lunch spot, laid down by the trail, and took a nap - meaning, that bear wasn't intimidating. The one today would've been had it come at me rather than spooking in the opposite direction.
That, combined with the 4 or 5 otters last week in the Cohutta Wilderness, made it quite a week.
Flowers blooming included Virginia spiderwort, Virginia bluebells, whorled coreopsis, a couple of early blooming ironweeds, white bears-foot.
Sincerely,
Dan Roper, Armuchee (Floyd County), GA

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Subject: Georgia Rare Bird Alert 02 Jul 20
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 7:56 am
From: robert.emond2015 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-alert@cornell.edu
> Date: July 2, 2020 at 7:28:29 PM EDT
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Georgia Rare Bird Alert
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Northern Bobwhite (2 Jones)
> Eastern Whip-poor-will (1 Bryan)
> Barn Owl (2 Lamar)
> Red-cockaded Woodpecker (1 Jones)
> Hairy Woodpecker (1 Glynn)
> Blue-headed Vireo (1 Dodge, 1 Jones)
> Tree Swallow (1 Cobb)
> Ovenbird (1 Dodge)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the Georgia Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Georgia. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summar...
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.
>
> eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-...

Robert Emond
Lowndes
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