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Updated on January 21, 2017, 9:20 am

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21 Jan: @ 09:18:37 
Re: Jackson Snow Geese [Sherry Mitchell-Bruker]
21 Jan: @ 09:00:40 
Re: Jackson Snow Geese [Marcia Walker]
20 Jan: @ 19:36:21 
Canvasback, Pine Creek Gamebird Habitat Area , Jan 20, 2017 [Dunning, John B]
20 Jan: @ 18:49:59 
Re: Spring migrants [bandtgorney]
20 Jan: @ 17:09:08 
RE: Recurring Townsend's Solitaire [Jeff Timmons]
20 Jan: @ 15:53:49 
Spring migrants [John Winebrenner]
19 Jan: @ 23:02:59 
Re: In memory of Jim Haw [Jeff McCoy]
19 Jan: @ 17:51:53 
Greene County Sites and Dugger Unit [gary langell]
19 Jan: @ 17:15:06 
Re: Jim Haw-- History Teacher, Birding Mentor, Birding Friend [SRS5816]
19 Jan: @ 15:52:16 
Jim Haw-- History Teacher, Birding Mentor, Birding Friend [Rodger Rang]
19 Jan: @ 09:27:00 
Jackson Snow Geese [David Crouch]
19 Jan: @ 09:23:17 
Re: Recurring Townsend's Solitaire [just junkemail]
19 Jan: @ 08:22:28 
Franklin swans [Kim Charles]
18 Jan: @ 19:32:25 
Re: In memory of Jim Haw [=?UTF-8?Q?=C3=AF=C2=BB=C2=BFMonte_&_Rita_Smith?=]
18 Jan: @ 17:30:20 
Recurring Townsend's Solitaire [terry ballenger]
18 Jan: @ 14:51:17 
Re: In memory of Jim Haw [Vicky Foltz]
18 Jan: @ 14:47:04 
Ewing Bottoms, 1,000s of Snow Geese [Del Striegel]
18 Jan: @ 11:21:32 
In memory of Jim Haw [Don Gorney]
17 Jan: @ 18:21:02 
Snow Geese and Sandhill Cranes [David Crouch]
17 Jan: @ 09:50:26 
Ewing bottoms Jackson County [dhkaiser]
17 Jan: @ 09:08:01 
Goose Pond FWA 1/16 [Wilkins, Vern W]
17 Jan: @ 08:27:09 
Fort Wayne, Franke Pk: Merlin [Casey Ryan]
16 Jan: @ 21:28:21 
Dearborn and Ripley County birds [Bob Decker]
16 Jan: @ 16:32:47 
Chinook mine birds (geese) [Peter Scott]
16 Jan: @ 14:48:33 
Remove From List [Kathleen Spicer]
16 Jan: @ 13:12:29 
Re: white fronted goose [Ed Hopkins]
16 Jan: @ 13:00:13 
white fronted goose [KEVIN B RYAN]
15 Jan: @ 19:35:58 
Townsend's Solitaire Update [Don Gorney]
15 Jan: @ 12:34:22 
Eagle Creek Park, Sunday January 15, 2017 [Don Williams]
15 Jan: @ 07:41:18 
Townsend's Solitaire [Larry McIntosh]
14 Jan: @ 17:53:11 
Ewing Bottoms Jackson Co. [Dan Kaiser]
14 Jan: @ 14:09:08 
Birder's List article reminder [Chuck Mills]
14 Jan: @ 12:33:02 
SW Allen Blackbirds-- Jan 14, 2017 AM [Rodger Rang]
14 Jan: @ 10:57:26 
RE: Townsend's Solitaire [Jeff Timmons]
13 Jan: @ 16:38:57 
RE: Townsend's Solitaire [Jeff Timmons]
13 Jan: @ 14:48:02 
Townsend's Solitaire [terry ballenger]
13 Jan: @ 08:29:55 
Townsend's Solitaire, 1/13 [Ed Hopkins]
12 Jan: @ 22:00:25 
ADMIN: Rules Reminder [phil]
12 Jan: @ 19:21:40 
Re: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE - Madison, County [Don Gorney]
12 Jan: @ 19:18:54 
Fw: eBird Report - Pine Creek Gamebird Habitat Area , Jan 12, 2017 [Dunning, John B]
12 Jan: @ 18:50:05 
West Union Covered Bridge Eagles, Parke Co [Amy Kearns]
12 Jan: @ 17:01:47 
TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE - Madison, County [Jeff Timmons]
12 Jan: @ 14:18:45 
Together for Birds Petition [Steve Holmer]
12 Jan: @ 14:03:20 
Fw: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE [terry ballenger]
12 Jan: @ 08:14:55 
Franklin swans [Kim Charles]
11 Jan: @ 21:35:51 
Re: Birders Lists. Deadline for submission January 31. [David Ayer]
11 Jan: @ 12:04:16 
Great Horned Owl, Allen County [zzedpowers]
11 Jan: @ 08:11:50 
Great Horned Owl, SW Monroe Co [Greene, Terri B]
10 Jan: @ 18:29:08 
A close encounter [Marlo Kauffman]
10 Jan: @ 16:44:17 
Fort Wayne Merlin [John Winebrenner]





Subject: Jackson Snow Geese
Date: Sat Jan 21 2017 9:18 am
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
Am I correct in thinking this is a triumph for the u.s. Fish and wildlife, restoring the eastern flyway?


Sherry

> On Jan 21, 2017, at 10:00 AM, Marcia Walker wrote:
>
> On Friday, Jan. 20, thousands of snow geese were a few miles west of Brownstown. They are on the west side of SR 135, north of U.S. 50. An incredible sight, there were two huge flocks that periodically lifted up into a sort of arial ballet, mingling together. Best viewing is along County Road 500 W, which is west of the intersection of 135 and U.S. 50. There were also sandhill cranes in the area and I’ve been told there are white fronted geese and ross’s geese as well. Did not have my scope, am headed back today this time with my scope.
>
> Marcia
>
>
>> On Jan 19, 2017, at 10:26 AM, David Crouch wrote:
>>
>> Currently prox 5,000 Sniw Geese on Slab Road south of road and east of 310W on Ewing Bottoms. Dave Crouch
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>




Subject: Jackson Snow Geese
Date: Sat Jan 21 2017 9:00 am
From: mwalker AT epowerc.net
 
On Friday, Jan. 20, thousands of snow geese were a few miles west of Brownstown. They are  on the west side of SR 135, north of U.S. 50. An incredible sight, there were two huge flocks that periodically lifted up into a sort of arial ballet, mingling together.  Best viewing is along County Road 500 W, which is west of the intersection of 135 and U.S. 50. There were also sandhill cranes in the area and I’ve been told there are white fronted geese and ross’s geese as well. Did not have my scope, am headed back today this time with my scope.

Marcia


> On Jan 19, 2017, at 10:26 AM, David Crouch wrote:
>
> Currently prox 5,000 Sniw Geese on Slab Road south of road and east of 310W on Ewing Bottoms. Dave Crouch
>
> Sent from my iPhone




Subject: Canvasback, Pine Creek Gamebird Habitat Area , Jan 20, 2017
Date: Fri Jan 20 2017 19:36 pm
From: jdunning AT purdue.edu
 
A Purdue student, Cody Widner, and I did the weekly waterfowl survey late this evening at Pine Creek Gamebird Habitat Area in Benton County. Not much around but we did have a male Canvasback. Nice bird and I don't think I had a Canvasback all year in 2016.

Barny
misner13@frontier.com

Pine Creek Gamebird Habitat Area , Benton, Indiana, US
Jan 20, 2017 5:30 PM - 6:00 PM

6 species

Canada Goose 14
Mallard 5
Canvasback 1
Ring-necked Duck 1
Northern Harrier 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 30

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Spring migrants
Date: Fri Jan 20 2017 18:49 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
WOW! Good for you. I will keep eyes pealed. I will put them on facebook. I had one of those weeks too. Needed to go birding today.

Randy and I got the Townsend solitaire today. There were 100 + greater white fronted geese at Limberlost. Snow geese too.


Terri
On Friday, January 20, 2017, John Winebrenner wrote:

Sorry for the late post - I haven't had much time on line this week - I saw my very first Turkey Vulture of the year along Goshen and Coliseum yesterday, and I just had a small flock of about a dozen Red-winged Blackbirds fly over as I was retrieving the mail about a half hour ago. Also, I had at least two Chipping Sparrows as I was walking into work, near Eagle Marsh, on Tuesday, 1/17.

John Winebrenner
Fort Wayne



Subject: Recurring Townsend's Solitaire
Date: Fri Jan 20 2017 17:09 pm
From: jeffreytimmons AT comcast.net
 
I wanted to pass along that the bird was not relocated this afternoon.  The bird seems to be hit or miss and can take some time to locate.



Jeff Timmons

Anderson, IN







From: Matthew Bowman [mailto:mlebowman1@embarqmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 20, 2017 9:38 AM
To: just junkemail
Cc: terry ballenger ; IN-BIRD-L
Subject: Re: [IN-BIRD-L] Recurring Townsend's Solitaire



9:30 am - the Solitaire is on the north side of the river feeding on berries on small shrubs east of the boat ramp parking area. Despite the rain, I got good views and the bird was not particularly bothered by my presence. Quite cooperative today. Thanks for all the postings on this bird.



Matt Bowman

Hendricks County

Sent from my iPhone


On Jan 19, 2017, at 10:22 AM, just junkemail wrote:

10am. Townsends Solitaire far west end of cemetery. In the cedar. Mockingbird joined soon after for nice comparison view.

Thanks to all who posted on this. Lifer for me.



Bill Sharkey.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Wednesday, January 18, 2017, 6:30 PM, terry ballenger wrote:

Okay birders, not to stir up controversy, but when visiting the Perkinsville Cemetery site today at approx. 4:15 I had two birds fly from the western-most cedar trees to the bare deciduous tree. I was aggressively pishing to coax them out of the cedars. The lighting was not good and all I could determine was the same silhouette-type GISS of both birds that matched TOSO. I could not see any definitive field marks. Both birds flew simultaneously from that tree west over the open fields towards SR13.



I immediately drove to Perkinsville on the other side of the river to the boat ramp parking lot. I again pished with no results.



I then quickly went back to the cemetery and within a few minutes found the one bird perched on a headstone at apprx. 5:15PM. I took several picture with my cell phone, walking to within 20 feet of the bird. My cell phone pics are not really quality shots, but at least I got confirmation.



So, bottom line, no conclusive evidence of two TOSO, but others may want to be aware should they venture a visit.



Good birding,

Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.




Subject: Spring migrants
Date: Fri Jan 20 2017 15:53 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
     Sorry for the late post - I haven't had much time on line this week - I saw my very first Turkey Vulture of the year along Goshen and Coliseum yesterday, and I just had a small flock of about a dozen Red-winged Blackbirds fly over as I was retrieving the mail about a half hour ago. Also, I had at least two Chipping Sparrows as I was walking into work, near Eagle Marsh, on Tuesday, 1/17.
John WinebrennerFort Wayne



Subject: In memory of Jim Haw
Date: Thu Jan 19 2017 23:02 pm
From: jeffmccoy AT embarqmail.com
 
Well said Don, and many fond memories invoked.

I vividly recall my first encounter with the great Jim Haw...

While wandering the trails of Fox Island (and still just a neophyte with a casual interest in birds) I spotted
someone with binoculars - my first
actual birdwatcher!

We discussed the birds we had been seeing and I excitedly began telling him about this book I just got called "Indiana Birds and Their Haunts" and
all the incredible rarities in it that I wished I could someday see.

I mentioned specifically the NE Indiana section where most of the rarities were credited to one person, a name I even
now held in great respect, and I asked this birder if he knew Jim Haw.

After patiently smiling and nodding through all of this he replied, "I am
Jim Haw".

He invited me to join the Stockbridge Audubon field trip at Fox Island the next weekend and I was hot on his heels wanting to know everything he knew
about birds. Before long I was leading trips myself. The rest is history.

He was the ultimate mentor and he kept everyone entertained with his endless clever puns and quips. I particularly appreciated his dry wit, the best kind of wit.

Oh dear...
I will dearly miss him.

----- Original Message -----
From: Don Gorney
To: IN-BIRDS
Sent: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 12:21:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] In memory of Jim Haw

It's with a heavy heart I share the news that Jim Haw passed away on January 9, 2017. Jim began birding in high school and was already an accomplished birder when he moved to Fort Wayne in the early 1970s. He birded the state with the likes of Ken Brock and other skilled birders - a relatively small group in the 1970's - and birded extensively in northeast Indiana. Ever since I met him in 1994, I've considered him the Dean of Northeast Indiana Birding/Birders. He knew his birds and where to find them. Importantly, he kept records. If you wanted to know about northeast Indiana bird records from the early 1970's onward Jim Haw was the source of the information. 
The best thing about Jim was that he graciously shared his time and knowledge. He was field trip leader for Stockbridge Audubon for many years, gave many bird programs, served on the Indiana Bird Records Committee, compiled the Ft. Wayne Christmas Count for decades, and patiently and willingly tutored new birders. Two of those new birders he mentored were Jeff McCoy and myself. Of course, there were scores more besides the two of us who learned a lot from Jim. In the days before email and the internet, it was always exciting for a new birder like me to call Jim to tell him about an uncommon/rare bird that I had found and for Jim to activate the rare bird alert phone tree. I vividly recall the printed phone tree diagram that was in two parts: one section for people who wanted to know about all "good" birds and another for those who just wanted to know about the real rarities only. Of course, Jim was the top of the tree and all good finds were reported to him first. 
Although I have participated in numerous Christmas Bird Counts over the years none have been like the Fort Wayne count. During the day I got to bird with Ted Heemstra, my other birding mentor who passed in May 2016, and Jeff McCoy. At the end of the day we assembled at Franke Park for a chili supper and to learn what species had been seen by the various teams. Jim made the compiling of the list suspenseful and fun. When I moved from Fort Wayne to Indy in 1998, I still participated in the Ft. Wayne Christmas Count a few more years because it was such fun and I greatly enjoyed Jim's performance at the end of the day. 
Jim was a quiet, soft-spoken man with a funny G-rated sense of humor. He was an excellent birder who unfortunately slowed down after his retirement due to health problems. In recent years his outings were of shorter duration and more by car but he was still finding King Rails and other good birds. I speak for many others when I say that Jim will be greatly missed as a birder and as a friend. 

His funeral service is Saturday, January 21 in Fort Wayne and he will be buried in his native Missouri. His obituary is at the link.
http://www.legacy.com/obituari...


 Don Gorney
Indianapolis, IN
317.501.4212
dongorney AT yahoo.com
--
Jeff McCoy
Columbia City, Indiana



Subject: Greene County Sites and Dugger Unit
Date: Thu Jan 19 2017 17:51 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
Today I birded some units at Goose Pond FWA, Jessup's fields, the deep pit in the southwest corner of Greene County and then the Dugger Unit in Sullivan County.
Below are my checklists:Highlights included a Ross's Goose in Field B, good numbers of Northern Pintail in Fields E and B, Canvasback and Tundra Swan at the southwest pit, and a Northern Shrike at the Dugger Unit.
Goose Pond FWA--Beehunter Marsh BH3, Greene, Indiana, US
Jan 19, 2017 9:30 AM - 10:03 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.1 mile(s)
Comments:    Waterfowl hunters In unit so waterfowl were nowhere to be seen in this unit.  Most species below were found along the east end of the unit.
14 species

Great Blue Heron (Blue form)  1
Northern Harrier  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  1
Carolina Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  2
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
American Tree Sparrow  3
White-throated Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  4



Jessup's Fields, Greene, Indiana, US
Jan 19, 2017 9:36 AM - 9:43 AM
Protocol: Stationary
5 species

Greater White-fronted Goose  220
Snow Goose  17
Sandhill Crane  273
American Crow  6
Horned Lark  8



Goose Pond FWA--Main Pool East, Greene, Indiana, US
Jan 19, 2017 10:39 AM - 11:04 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:    From north bridge
17 species

Greater White-fronted Goose  10
Snow Goose  15    Flyovers 
Canada Goose  20
Gadwall  149
Mallard  40
Northern Pintail  2
Redhead  3
Ring-necked Duck  45
Pied-billed Grebe  1
Northern Harrier  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Rough-legged Hawk  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
American Tree Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  3

Goose Pond FWA--Field E, Greene, Indiana, US
Jan 19, 2017 11:14 AM - 11:38 AM
Protocol: Stationary
8 species

Greater White-fronted Goose  38
Snow Goose  1100    Flyovers
Canada Goose  22
Mallard  51
Northern Shoveler  8
Northern Pintail  97
Bald Eagle  2    2 adult flyovers
Song Sparrow  1


Goose Pond FWA--Field B, Greene, Indiana, US
Jan 19, 2017 11:38 AM - 11:53 AM
Protocol: Stationary
8 species

Greater White-fronted Goose  270
Snow Goose  18
Ross's Goose  1
Gadwall  26
Mallard  75
Northern Shoveler  12
Northern Pintail  37
Sandhill Crane  8


Unnamed Lake "Deep Pit" (Between 575 S &725 S, Greene Co.), Greene, Indiana, US
Jan 19, 2017 12:01 PM - 12:19 PM
Protocol: Stationary
19 species (+1 other taxa)

Greater White-fronted Goose  33
Canada Goose  54
Tundra Swan  10
Gadwall  17
Mallard  10
Mallard (Domestic type)  1
Northern Shoveler  1
Northern Pintail  1
Canvasback  69    Individually counted
Ring-necked Duck  5
Common Goldeneye  1
Bald Eagle  1    1 adult
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  2
Carolina Chickadee  1
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern)  1


Greene Sullivan SF -- Dugger Unit, Sullivan, Indiana, US
Jan 19, 2017 12:56 PM - 1:58 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.6 mile(s)
Comments:    Did the loop around Bass Lake. 
26 species

Gadwall  14
American Wigeon  1
Mallard  23
Northern Pintail  2
Redhead  53
Ring-necked Duck  3
Bufflehead  5
Common Goldeneye  35
Hooded Merganser  12
Ruddy Duck  10
Northern Harrier  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
American Coot  161
Ring-billed Gull  3
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
Northern Shrike  1    Viewed from CR 350 E about 800 feet south of CR 100 S at approximately 39°04'08.8"N 87°20'33.4"W. See photo in checklist 
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  6
Carolina Wren  1
American Robin  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
American Tree Sparrow  26
Song Sparrow  5
Eastern Towhee  1
Northern Cardinal  3

View this checklist online at eBird Checklist – Greene Sullivan SF -- Dugger Unit, Indiana – Thu Jan 19, 2017 – 26 species


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Subject: Jim Haw-- History Teacher, Birding Mentor, Birding Friend
Date: Thu Jan 19 2017 17:15 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
If there is a Mt Rushmore or Hall of Fame for Birders, Jim Haw will surely
be there offering profound wisdom and perhaps some Far out puns. Thanks for
all your contributions. You will be missed! Sam Schwartz


In a message dated 1/19/2017 4:52:18 P.M. US Eastern Standard Time,
rrang@frontier.com writes:


I met Jim Haw for the first time in 1980, before I was a "birder"...or
even a "bird watcher". I was finishing up my B.S. in biology at IPFW and had
filled one of my last elective slots with a U.S. History course he was
teaching that semester. I sat next to a fellow biology major, a
self-proclaimed birder, and before class, Jim would often initiate conversation with her
about which, where, and when birds were being seen and by whom. Of
course, the bird names meant nothing to me at the time, nor did the observer
names he likely mentioned. (I can only imagine now that those names included
the likes of Ken Brock, Ed Hopkins, and, closer to home, Jeff Moore, Doug
Rood, Sandy Schacht, and Ted Heemstra.) But, despite my total ignorance of
the "hobby" and its enthusiasts, it was very obvious to me at the time that
Jim was very passionate about it. Not surprising now, that passion seemed
to grow as that spring semester-- and that spring migration--progressed
through April and May.


I worked for one of my ecology profs that following summer, and that same
fellow biology major would point out all the summering birds our group
would encounter as we sampled ponds scattered across NE Indiana. Perhaps it
was the killer looks at a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak that triggered my
interest, but I found myself attending the occasional Stockbridge Audubon field
trip not long afterward. It was on those where I experienced not only
again Jim Haw's passion for birding, but also his extensive knowledge, his
amazing talent, and his incredible patience and generosity in mentoring new
birders, myself and many others included. Even as our skills and confidence
grew, Jim was always available to provide some perspective and some
encouragement in helping us with our various birding conundrums. But, too, he was
often eager to know what others, beginner or not, thought about certain
topics, whether it be discussion of an ID, or what birding stop to try next,
or even whether it was time for lunch.


Through those field trips, as well as through other special birding
activities like CBCs, May Day Counts, and Breeding Bird Surveys, many of us grew
close enough over the years that we started going on extended birding trips
together. Jim was always the planner. Though he always invited input
from the group as to where and when we wanted to go and what birds or places
we wanted to see, Jim always planned the specifics, the gritty details that
make a rough idea become a pleasant memory. Because of him, I saw many
corners of the country, many incredible places, and so many amazing birds
that I would never have seen otherwise.


And what great times, so deeply ingrained in my mind. The skunk that we
couldn't get our vehicle around as it wobbled down the road ahead of us as
we descended a slope at Cave Creek Canyon. The Elf Owl one night in south
Texas that flew through our vehicle's barely opened window to end up on the
dash. The list of rarities that we got on another Texas trip, where we
went five-for-five on the potential group lifers (tough to do in a week when
most of your group has life lists in the mid-700s). The silly trip songs
that Jim would write (cute) and then attempt to sing (hilarious). Even at
the end of a day, when the group was tired, grimy, and hungry, laughter was
never more than tortured pun, of which Jim reigned supreme, away.


I'm sure many other members of the birding community have their own
stories of how Jim affected their lives, as well as their own special memories of
their experiences with him. But, as for me, let me just end simply with:


Jim, I will miss your expertise, your leadership, your dry wit, your
friendship. And maybe someday I will even miss your singing.


Rest in peace,


Rodger





Subject: Jim Haw-- History Teacher, Birding Mentor, Birding Friend
Date: Thu Jan 19 2017 15:52 pm
From: rrang AT frontier.com
 
 I met Jim Haw for the first time in 1980, before I was a "birder"...or even a "bird watcher".  I was finishing up my B.S. in biology at IPFW and had filled one of my last elective slots with a U.S. History course he was teaching that semester.  I sat next to a fellow biology major, a self-proclaimed birder, and before class, Jim would often initiate conversation with her about which, where, and when birds were being seen and by whom.  Of course, the bird names meant nothing to me at the time, nor did the observer names he likely mentioned.  (I can only imagine now that those names included the likes of Ken Brock, Ed Hopkins, and, closer to home, Jeff Moore, Doug Rood, Sandy Schacht, and Ted Heemstra.)  But, despite my total ignorance of the "hobby" and its enthusiasts, it was very obvious to me at the time that Jim was very passionate about it.  Not surprising now, that passion seemed to grow as that spring semester-- and that spring migration--progressed through April and May.
I worked for one of my ecology profs that following summer, and that same fellow biology major would point out all the summering birds our group would encounter as we sampled ponds scattered across NE Indiana.  Perhaps it was the killer looks at a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak that triggered my interest, but I found myself attending the occasional Stockbridge Audubon field trip not long afterward.  It was on those where I experienced not only again Jim Haw's passion for birding, but also his extensive knowledge, his amazing talent, and his incredible patience and generosity in mentoring new birders, myself and many others included.  Even as our skills and confidence grew, Jim was always available to provide some perspective and some encouragement in helping us with our various birding conundrums.  But, too, he was often eager to know what others, beginner or not, thought about certain topics, whether it be discussion of an ID, or what birding stop to try next, or even whether it was time for lunch.
Through those field trips, as well as through other special birding activities like CBCs, May Day Counts, and Breeding Bird Surveys, many of us grew close enough over the years that we started going on extended birding trips together.  Jim was always the planner.  Though he always invited input from the group as to where and when we wanted to go and what birds or places we wanted to see, Jim always planned the specifics, the gritty details that make a rough idea become a pleasant memory.  Because of him, I saw many corners of the country, many incredible places, and so many amazing birds that I would never have seen otherwise. 
And what great times, so deeply ingrained in my mind.  The skunk that we couldn't get our vehicle around as it wobbled down the road ahead of us as we descended a slope at Cave Creek Canyon.  The Elf Owl one night in south Texas that flew through our vehicle's barely opened window to end up on the dash.  The list of rarities that we got on another Texas trip, where we went five-for-five on the potential group lifers (tough to do in a week when most of your group has life lists in the mid-700s).  The silly trip songs that Jim would write (cute) and then attempt to sing (hilarious).  Even at the end of a day, when the group was tired, grimy, and hungry, laughter was never more than tortured pun, of which Jim reigned supreme, away.
I'm sure many other members of the birding community have their own stories of how Jim affected their lives, as well as their own special memories of their experiences with him.  But, as for me, let me just end simply with:
Jim, I will miss your expertise, your leadership, your dry wit, your friendship.  And maybe someday I will even miss your singing.
Rest in peace,
Rodger



Subject: Jackson Snow Geese
Date: Thu Jan 19 2017 9:27 am
From: nighthawk AT prograde.net
 
Currently prox 5,000 Sniw Geese on Slab Road south of road and east of 310W on Ewing Bottoms.   Dave Crouch

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Recurring Townsend's Solitaire
Date: Thu Jan 19 2017 9:23 am
From: sharkattack59 AT sbcglobal.net
 
 blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } 10am. Townsends Solitaire far west end of cemetery. In the cedar. Mockingbird joined soon after for nice comparison view. Thanks to all who posted on this. Lifer for me. 
Bill Sharkey. 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Wednesday, January 18, 2017, 6:30 PM, terry ballenger wrote:

Okay birders, not to stir up controversy, but when visiting the Perkinsville Cemetery site today at approx. 4:15 I had two birds fly from the western-most cedar trees to the bare deciduous tree.  I was aggressively pishing to coax them out of the cedars.  The lighting was not good and all I could determine was the same silhouette-type GISS of both birds that matched TOSO. I could not see any definitive field marks.   Both birds flew simultaneously from that tree west over the open fields towards SR13.
I immediately drove to Perkinsville on the other side of the river to the boat ramp parking lot.  I again pished with no results.
I then quickly went back to the cemetery and within a few minutes found the one bird perched on a headstone at apprx. 5:15PM.  I took several picture with my cell phone, walking to within 20 feet of the bird.  My cell phone pics are not really quality shots, but at least I got confirmation.
So, bottom line, no conclusive evidence of two TOSO, but others may want to be aware should they venture a visit. 
Good birding,Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.





Subject: Franklin swans
Date: Thu Jan 19 2017 8:22 am
From: kcharlesmsw AT hotmail.com
 
4 trumpeter swans continue at the retention pond behind the Lowes store in Franklin.  They often seem to fly out for the day at around 10 AM.

Kim Charles
Franklin, IN

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: In memory of Jim Haw
Date: Wed Jan 18 2017 19:32 pm
From: monterita AT frontier.com
 
I, too, am sad to hear of Jim's passing. Fred Wooley, Sam Plew, and I were just talking about him when we participated in the Pigeon River F&W Christmas Bird Countin early January. I met Jim when I first began working with Fred at Pokagon's Nature Center in 1985. He participated in all of our Christmas Bird Counts and I always enjoyed his visits to the nature center or when he called with important bird information. Many times when he stopped in to the nature center he always said he had a fair day of birding but then went on to list 15 species he and Sandy had seen. That would have been an excellent birding outing for me! He was soft-spoken and funny and such a wonderful person to learn more about birding. He will be missed! 
Thanks for sharing,
Rita Smith

On Wednesday, January 18, 2017 12:21 PM, Don Gorney wrote:


It's with a heavy heart I share the news that Jim Haw passed away on January 9, 2017. Jim began birding in high school and was already an accomplished birder when he moved to Fort Wayne in the early 1970s. He birded the state with the likes of Ken Brock and other skilled birders - a relatively small group in the 1970's - and birded extensively in northeast Indiana. Ever since I met him in 1994, I've considered him the Dean of Northeast Indiana Birding/Birders. He knew his birds and where to find them. Importantly, he kept records. If you wanted to know about northeast Indiana bird records from the early 1970's onward Jim Haw was the source of the information. 
The best thing about Jim was that he graciously shared his time and knowledge. He was field trip leader for Stockbridge Audubon for many years, gave many bird programs, served on the Indiana Bird Records Committee, compiled the Ft. Wayne Christmas Count for decades, and patiently and willingly tutored new birders. Two of those new birders he mentored were Jeff McCoy and myself. Of course, there were scores more besides the two of us who learned a lot from Jim. In the days before email and the internet, it was always exciting for a new birder like me to call Jim to tell him about an uncommon/rare bird that I had found and for Jim to activate the rare bird alert phone tree. I vividly recall the printed phone tree diagram that was in two parts: one section for people who wanted to know about all "good" birds and another for those who just wanted to know about the real rarities only. Of course, Jim was the top of the tree and all good finds were reported to him first. 
Although I have participated in numerous Christmas Bird Counts over the years none have been like the Fort Wayne count. During the day I got to bird with Ted Heemstra, my other birding mentor who passed in May 2016, and Jeff McCoy. At the end of the day we assembled at Franke Park for a chili supper and to learn what species had been seen by the various teams. Jim made the compiling of the list suspenseful and fun. When I moved from Fort Wayne to Indy in 1998, I still participated in the Ft. Wayne Christmas Count a few more years because it was such fun and I greatly enjoyed Jim's performance at the end of the day. 
Jim was a quiet, soft-spoken man with a funny G-rated sense of humor. He was an excellent birder who unfortunately slowed down after his retirement due to health problems. In recent years his outings were of shorter duration and more by car but he was still finding King Rails and other good birds. I speak for many others when I say that Jim will be greatly missed as a birder and as a friend. 

His funeral service is Saturday, January 21 in Fort Wayne and he will be buried in his native Missouri. His obituary is at the link.
http://www.legacy.com/obituari...


 Don Gorney
Indianapolis, IN
317.501.4212
dongorney AT yahoo.com




Subject: Recurring Townsend's Solitaire
Date: Wed Jan 18 2017 17:30 pm
From: t.ballenger AT sbcglobal.net
 
 Okay birders, not to stir up controversy, but when visiting the Perkinsville Cemetery site today at approx. 4:15 I had two birds fly from the western-most cedar trees to the bare deciduous tree.  I was aggressively pishing to coax them out of the cedars.  The lighting was not good and all I could determine was the same silhouette-type GISS of both birds that matched TOSO. I could not see any definitive field marks.   Both birds flew simultaneously from that tree west over the open fields towards SR13.
I immediately drove to Perkinsville on the other side of the river to the boat ramp parking lot.  I again pished with no results.
I then quickly went back to the cemetery and within a few minutes found the one bird perched on a headstone at apprx. 5:15PM.  I took several picture with my cell phone, walking to within 20 feet of the bird.  My cell phone pics are not really quality shots, but at least I got confirmation.
So, bottom line, no conclusive evidence of two TOSO, but others may want to be aware should they venture a visit. 
Good birding,Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.



Subject: In memory of Jim Haw
Date: Wed Jan 18 2017 14:51 pm
From: vfoltz655 AT gmail.com
 
I am so very sorry to hear this news.

Vicky Foltz

On Wed, Jan 18, 2017 at 12:21 PM, Don Gorney
wrote:

> It's with a heavy heart I share the news that Jim Haw passed away on
> January 9, 2017. Jim began birding in high school and was already an
> accomplished birder when he moved to Fort Wayne in the early 1970s. He
> birded the state with the likes of Ken Brock and other skilled birders - a
> relatively small group in the 1970's - and birded extensively in northeast
> Indiana. Ever since I met him in 1994, I've considered him the Dean of
> Northeast Indiana Birding/Birders. He knew his birds and where to find
> them. Importantly, he kept records. If you wanted to know about northeast
> Indiana bird records from the early 1970's onward Jim Haw was the source of
> the information.
>
> The best thing about Jim was that he graciously shared his time and
> knowledge. He was field trip leader for Stockbridge Audubon for many years,
> gave many bird programs, served on the Indiana Bird Records Committee,
> compiled the Ft. Wayne Christmas Count for decades, and patiently and
> willingly tutored new birders. Two of those new birders he mentored were
> Jeff McCoy and myself. Of course, there were scores more besides the two of
> us who learned a lot from Jim. In the days before email and the internet,
> it was always exciting for a new birder like me to call Jim to tell him
> about an uncommon/rare bird that I had found and for Jim to activate the
> rare bird alert phone tree. I vividly recall the printed phone tree diagram
> that was in two parts: one section for people who wanted to know about all
> "good" birds and another for those who just wanted to know about the real
> rarities only. Of course, Jim was the top of the tree and all good finds
> were reported to him first.
>
> Although I have participated in numerous Christmas Bird Counts over the
> years none have been like the Fort Wayne count. During the day I got to
> bird with Ted Heemstra, my other birding mentor who passed in May 2016, and
> Jeff McCoy. At the end of the day we assembled at Franke Park for a chili
> supper and to learn what species had been seen by the various teams. Jim
> made the compiling of the list suspenseful and fun. When I moved from Fort
> Wayne to Indy in 1998, I still participated in the Ft. Wayne Christmas
> Count a few more years because it was such fun and I greatly enjoyed Jim's
> performance at the end of the day.
>
> Jim was a quiet, soft-spoken man with a funny G-rated sense of humor. He
> was an excellent birder who unfortunately slowed down after his retirement
> due to health problems. In recent years his outings were of shorter
> duration and more by car but he was still finding King Rails and other good
> birds. I speak for many others when I say that Jim will be greatly missed
> as a birder and as a friend.
>
> His funeral service is Saturday, January 21 in Fort Wayne and he will be
> buried in his native Missouri. His obituary is at the link.
>
> http://www.legacy.com/obituari...
> aspx?n=james-alfred-haw-ph-d&pid3633581
>
>
>
> Don Gorney
> Indianapolis, IN
> 317.501.4212
> dongorney AT yahoo.com
>



Subject: Ewing Bottoms, 1,000s of Snow Geese
Date: Wed Jan 18 2017 14:47 pm
From: ddstriegel AT frontier.com
 
An exciting day birding in Jackson County.  Drove to Ewing Bottoms hoping to see Tundra/Trumpeter Swans that have been reported....did see a few.  However I was fortunate to view thousands of snow geese flying southwest then dropping into fields both north and south of Slab Rd (W County Rd 100N).  The largest group 4,000 landed along N County Rd 310 W the over group 1,500 landed north of Slab Rd.  Also to note was 205 Greater White-fronted Geese in Ewing Bottoms feeding in a corn stubble field.  Did get a couple of videos on cell phone of the snow geese.
>
> Ewing Bottoms, Jackson, Indiana, US
> Jan 18, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 5.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Large numbers of snow geese 5,500 plus.
> 12 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Greater White-fronted Goose 205 (south of Slab Rd in corn stubble field)
> Snow Goose 5500 (Approx 4,000 in one group and 1,500 in another group)
> Canada Goose 15
> Tundra Swan 6 (four adults two imm)
> Trumpeter/Tundra Swan 2 (too far out to ID)
> Mallard 28
> Northern Pintail 13
> Northern Harrier 1
> Bald Eagle 1 (standing on nest at quarry)
> Red-tailed Hawk 1
> Sandhill Crane 3000 (In various fields both south and north of Slab Rd)
> American Kestrel 2
> Horned Lark 12

Del Striegel
Georgetown, IN
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)




Subject: In memory of Jim Haw
Date: Wed Jan 18 2017 11:21 am
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
It's with a heavy heart I share the news that Jim Haw passed away on January 9, 2017. Jim began birding in high school and was already an accomplished birder when he moved to Fort Wayne in the early 1970s. He birded the state with the likes of Ken Brock and other skilled birders - a relatively small group in the 1970's - and birded extensively in northeast Indiana. Ever since I met him in 1994, I've considered him the Dean of Northeast Indiana Birding/Birders. He knew his birds and where to find them. Importantly, he kept records. If you wanted to know about northeast Indiana bird records from the early 1970's onward Jim Haw was the source of the information. 
The best thing about Jim was that he graciously shared his time and knowledge. He was field trip leader for Stockbridge Audubon for many years, gave many bird programs, served on the Indiana Bird Records Committee, compiled the Ft. Wayne Christmas Count for decades, and patiently and willingly tutored new birders. Two of those new birders he mentored were Jeff McCoy and myself. Of course, there were scores more besides the two of us who learned a lot from Jim. In the days before email and the internet, it was always exciting for a new birder like me to call Jim to tell him about an uncommon/rare bird that I had found and for Jim to activate the rare bird alert phone tree. I vividly recall the printed phone tree diagram that was in two parts: one section for people who wanted to know about all "good" birds and another for those who just wanted to know about the real rarities only. Of course, Jim was the top of the tree and all good finds were reported to him first. 
Although I have participated in numerous Christmas Bird Counts over the years none have been like the Fort Wayne count. During the day I got to bird with Ted Heemstra, my other birding mentor who passed in May 2016, and Jeff McCoy. At the end of the day we assembled at Franke Park for a chili supper and to learn what species had been seen by the various teams. Jim made the compiling of the list suspenseful and fun. When I moved from Fort Wayne to Indy in 1998, I still participated in the Ft. Wayne Christmas Count a few more years because it was such fun and I greatly enjoyed Jim's performance at the end of the day. 
Jim was a quiet, soft-spoken man with a funny G-rated sense of humor. He was an excellent birder who unfortunately slowed down after his retirement due to health problems. In recent years his outings were of shorter duration and more by car but he was still finding King Rails and other good birds. I speak for many others when I say that Jim will be greatly missed as a birder and as a friend. 

His funeral service is Saturday, January 21 in Fort Wayne and he will be buried in his native Missouri. His obituary is at the link.
http://www.legacy.com/obituari...


 Don Gorney
Indianapolis, IN
317.501.4212
dongorney AT yahoo.com



Subject: Snow Geese and Sandhill Cranes
Date: Tue Jan 17 2017 18:21 pm
From: Nighthawk AT prograde.net
 
We are getting a nice number of Snow Geese in Jackson County this season. Sally and I had 600 in the Ewing Bottoms today and others have been reporting similar numbers. Sandhill Cranes are now using the recently lightly flooded fields in good numbers as well.		Dave Crouch		Seymour

Ewing Bottoms, Jackson, Indiana, US
Jan 17, 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
8.0 mile(s)
Comments: Starting westbound from Honeytown Bottoms encountered a large flock of Snow Geese flying in from north. We followed the flock and found it landed in a field west of 225/150W and south of 300N. Then drove east on Slab Road to 310W and wound up at the Sand / gravel pit on US50.
12 species

Snow Goose 600 Two large flocks. Approximately 20% Blue morph. Had excellent scope views of first flock on ground with Swans and Sandhill Cranes. Second flock was in air and vocalizing just east of SR135 and south of Slab Road.
Canada Goose 14
Tundra Swan 17
Mallard 20
Northern Pintail 15
Green-winged Teal 2
Redhead 2
Sandhill Crane 5500 1,500 in same fields area as Snow Geese. At least 3,500 staged along both sides of Slab Road. Largest grouping I have seen in Ewing Bottoms this season, but it is an expected number.
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 11
Mourning Dove 6
American Kestrel 1
Horned Lark 4

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org )

Starve Hollow State Recreation Area, Jackson, Indiana, US
Jan 17, 2017 2:25 PM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Viewing the Lake / wetland area from the beach, campground at shallow end and the launch ramp.
6 species

Canada Goose 70
Great Blue Heron 1
Wilson's Snipe 7
Belted Kingfisher 1
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 15

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org )



Subject: Ewing bottoms Jackson County
Date: Tue Jan 17 2017 9:50 am
From: dhkaiser AT sprynet.com
 



This morning I had 5000+ SACR,  20 swan,  50 snow geese and 800+ gulls in and around the bottoms.   Both sides of 135 but mostly east and north of slab road. 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone



Subject: Goose Pond FWA 1/16
Date: Tue Jan 17 2017 9:08 am
From: vwilkins AT indiana.edu
 
There was quite a bit of activity at Goose Pond yesterday, and a sizable movement of ducks and geese from the north, despite south winds.  The rain held off until very late in the afternoon, but then it was steady and getting heavier up until I left around 4:15pm.


I walked back in GP10N, as there was no hunting in that unit or nearby ones, and the ducks have been hanging out back there the last few days. I think the units on the opposite side of the road were open for hunting, but there were no hunters in those units either. I figured I would scare a lot of the ducks up, but they could easily move into Thousand Island Woods or the other units. My plan was to get back there and then sit and wait for birds to come back. As I walked back, most of the ducks just moved to the north part of the unit, some flew into GP10S. Just as I sat down to wait, it seems like every goose at Goose Pond decided to come check out GP10N. Huge flocks got up from the south and came in, and smaller flocks were coming from the north. None of the snow geese would land in the unit, but hundreds of Greater White-fronted Geese landed. They were awfully wary. I was sitting on a small folding stool, and I could not move an inch without stirring up the birds...at least I assume it was my presence that had them agitated, even though they were somewhat far in the north end of the unit. I decided it was best to get out of there, rather than wait and see if more birds came in. As I was walking back thousands of geese were going back and forth, many new ones coming in from the north and the big flocks already there going back and forth from the fields to the south and southwest. There were hundreds of ducks coming and going too, but they were eclipsed by the number of geese. There are still quite a few Sandhill Cranes present too.


There are still at least two Merlins present. I assume these are the two that were present with the Prairie Merlin, as their behavior hasn't changed. They are roosting in Thousand Island Woods, and can be found most often in GP11N or GP10N, but they cover a big area along 1400. Yesterday was the first time I found them at the back of GP10N walking, but they were also seen in flight and perched, multiple times in units GP10S, GP10N, and GP11N. On previous visits I've seen them in all the units on the west side of the road also. At one point yesterday, while on the south levee at GP10N, I heard a Northern Flicker do an alarm call. I turned to see the bird being chased by a Merlin. It ducked safely into a small tree on the south ditch.


There were thousands of Snow Geese (I estimated 7000 in one flock, and there were many other flocks around the property), and at least a thousand Greater White-fronted. I tried taking many pictures of the largest flock, thinking I could create a panorama. So far I haven't been able to stitch it together. There's a lot of overlap in each picture, but it's 50 frames of Snow Geese! This is a picture of a tiny portion of the flock when some of the birds got off the ground, in the field I estimated this at around 500, but looking at the photo, I'm thinking it's closer to 1000. I'm sure this wasn't more than 10% of the flock that was on the ground. I'd be interested if anyone else has an estimate, or if anyone has the patience to try to count individual birds in this photo.

http://vw.homelinux.net/z/pict...


Below is a very distant picture of two Merlins together. It was raining fairly hard at this point, and the birds were fanning their tails, and ruffling their feathers in the rain. Some evenings they are still very active from 3-5pm or later, flying around and chasing everything in sight, but other evenings they sit for more than an hour or two at a time in the same spot. Earlier in the year I was seeing them fly into Thousand Island Woods between 5:30pm and 6pm. I haven't stayed that late the last few times I have been there, but generally it's very close to dark before they head to the roost.

http://vw.homelinux.net/z/pict...


A few other Merlin photos. The last two were at very long distances and all were taken in dark rainy conditions.

http://vw.homelinux.net/z/pict...

http://vw.homelinux.net/z/pict...

http://vw.homelinux.net/z/pict...


Vern






Subject: Fort Wayne, Franke Pk: Merlin
Date: Tue Jan 17 2017 8:27 am
From: borntobird500 AT gmail.com
 
Under normal circumstances I go to church to pray but yesterday it felt
appropriate to wander around in the woods instead, if only briefly. My
expectations were no expectations, just go. I needed to. Maybe, I
thought, I would run into a sagely owl who could tell me all I needed to
know, who knows? Early May had been the last time I was able to get into
the field and do any real birding. What's worse, I was unable to
participate in the annual Fort Wayne CBC this time around. That is a real
key indicator of how busy life is right now. I just don't have the time to
bird anymore with the expanding responsibilities of parenthood. Do I even
remember what a bird looks like? I drove to Franke Park anyways. My wife
told me to take my time, there was no rush to get back home. I proceeded
from my vehicle down the gravel road to the frog pond. I was thinking in
the back of my mind, I don't know what I'm doing here. In the words of one
friend, "there are no birds." I just needed to walk and let God do the
work. Maybe a mixed flock of Titmice and Chickadees would flutter my way.
Any sign of life would be great. I looked to the top of the bare trees
next to the pond and spied a small hawk. Nice, a Sharpie I thought. What
dismal weather. It matched the mood. The present fog and dim light made
it hard to identify the features of my Sharpie. Am I in Seattle? I gave
it a few more looks of contemplation and passed underneath it to continue
into the woods. That bird looks small as I eyed at it again from the
backside. I worked my way to the front of him again and stared. Working
the bird over and over with my bins, I thought with the fine streaking on
it's breast, thin white supercilium, I could sort of see a mustache and
it's small size, hey, I am looking at a Merlin here. Not exactly an owl
but close. There seems to be a real irruption of Merlins in Fort Wayne
this winter and I found one by myself! I usually don't get into the field
to report good birds. I count on the more skilled and more active birders
to locate the good ones and report back. I thought of how many good birds
will now go unreported and thus unseen by us time challenged birders.
Anyways, I left the bird to his perch and headed into the woods around the
pond. I circled around. I managed two Northern Cardinals and a Carolina
Wren. "There are no birds." Since it was quiet on the loop, I did get to
pray and think. Things in life happen that make us analyze our
priorities. A rocking chair came to mind. I need to have a rocking chair
perspective. I don't imagine I would look back at my life when I'm old and
wish I had spent more time at work, more time watching television, nor more
time on the computer. Life is completely short and I want to spend the
time I have with the people I love. I made last night count. I spent the
hours after my brief outing with my family: cooking, eating, playing and
reading stories before bedtime. I did not run into the owl yesterday that
I had hoped for but I did run into something better, perspective.

Casey Ryan



Subject: Dearborn and Ripley County birds
Date: Mon Jan 16 2017 21:28 pm
From: bdecker.bird AT gmail.com
 
Had a chance to get out.  Warm 40-47 degree day.

Oxbow (a.k.a. Old Channel Lake), Lawrenceburg, Dearborn, Indiana, US
Jan 16, 2017 8:52 AM - 10:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
27 species

Snow Goose 1
Canada Goose 1020
Gadwall 47
American Black Duck 2
Mallard 63
Northern Shoveler 8
Great Blue Heron 2
Bald Eagle 1
Ring-billed Gull 3
Mourning Dove 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 7
American Kestrel 1
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 11
Carolina Chickadee 4
Tufted Titmouse 2
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
Carolina Wren 2
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 5
White-crowned Sparrow 11
White-throated Sparrow 3
Song Sparrow 2
Northern Cardinal 9

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Aurora Landing (IN) (Most of the Ohio River is in KY), Dearborn, Indiana, US
Jan 16, 2017 10:54 AM - 10:59 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
3 species

Canada Goose 70
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 36
European Starling 35

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Versailles SP, Ripley, Indiana, US
Jan 16, 2017 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
20 species

Canada Goose 18
Great Blue Heron 1
Bald Eagle 3 One mature
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
Downy Woodpecker 5
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 2
American Crow 5
Carolina Chickadee 3
Tufted Titmouse 3
White-breasted Nuthatch 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Eastern Bluebird 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
American Tree Sparrow 2
Field Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 3
American Goldfinch 11

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

5 Mile Radius from home-US-IN-Sunman - 39.2007x-84.9998, Dearborn, Indiana, US
Jan 16, 2017 2:42 PM - 3:10 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
17 species

Red-tailed Hawk 1
Mourning Dove 3
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 2
American Kestrel 1
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 3
Carolina Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Carolina Wren 1
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 5
Dark-eyed Junco 3
White-crowned Sparrow 2
Northern Cardinal 1
American Goldfinch 2

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Bob Decker

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Chinook mine birds (geese)
Date: Mon Jan 16 2017 16:32 pm
From: Peter.Scott AT indstate.edu
 
I drove around Chinook mine in Vigo (first list) and Clay county today.  Highlight was the largest flock of Snow Geese I've seen in either county this winter ...

Chinook Mine North (Vigo Co.), Vigo, Indiana, US
Jan 16, 2017 11:00 AM - 12:10 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.0 mile(s)
Comments: Checked lakes and fields along Felling Ave and Swalls Drive. Weather misty, cloudy, calm, 45 deg F.
24 species

Greater White-fronted Goose 6
SNOW GOOSE 800 in one big somewhat nervous flock; spend most of time on ground (which is snow-free now) in green and muddy shortgrass fields about equidistant between Felling and Swalls Ave, 0.3 to 0.5 miles east of Tabortown Lake; i.e., keeping half a mile from roads. The flock took wing (usually all birds) periodically and flew around honking, circling or flying toward Clay county line eastward. Flock was a mix of white and dark morph adults, and juveniles; roughly 70% white morph. Counted by 100's several times, the 800 is an average estimate. Biggest flock I've seen here this winter.
Canada Goose 1000 in fields with Snows and elsewhere
Gadwall 20
American Wigeon 1 male, with Mallards and Gadwall on county line lake
Mallard 90
Ring-necked Duck 60
Common Goldeneye 4 only duck species on Tabortown lake (other four species were on County Line lake)
Bald Eagle 1 adult on nest south of Swalls Dr
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 3
Rough-legged Hawk 1
American Coot 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 1
Horned Lark 1 call heard
Carolina Chickadee 2
Eastern Bluebird 2
European Starling 20
Savannah Sparrow 1 in grass on roadside
Song Sparrow 4
Swamp Sparrow 2
Eastern Meadowlark 3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


Chinook Mine Northeast (Clay Co.), Clay, Indiana, US
Jan 16, 2017 12:10 PM - 1:10 PM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
Comments: Drove the rectangular circuit of roads: 500N, 650W, 600N, 550W. Walked around near intersection of 650W and 600N. Temp 45 F, misty, cloudy, calm, no snow cover, little ice.
21 species

Snow Goose 400 flock flew over 650W a few times, very likely part of larger flock seen in Vigo section of mine
Canada Goose 500
Gadwall 70
Mallard 10
Northern Shoveler 10
Northern Harrier 3
Red-shouldered Hawk 2 adults
Red-tailed Hawk 4
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
American Kestrel 1
Blue Jay 4
American Crow 10
Carolina Chickadee 4
Carolina Wren 1
American Robin 10
American Tree Sparrow 8
Fox Sparrow 1 smack calls heard, brushy area at north end of 650W
White-crowned Sparrow 6
White-throated Sparrow 2
Northern Cardinal 3

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Remove From List
Date: Mon Jan 16 2017 14:48 pm
From: kspicer AT sycamores.indstate.edu
 
Good Afternoon!


I would like to request that this email be removed from this listserv, please!


Thank you.


Katie Spicer






Subject: white fronted goose
Date: Mon Jan 16 2017 13:12 pm
From: birder4in AT gmail.com
 
  There is a fat-bellied, 'domestic ' Graylag Goose that looks similar to
white-fronted. It has been around for several weeks. It is able to fly.
-----
Ed Hopkins
W Lafayette

On Mon, Jan 16, 2017 at 2:00 PM KEVIN B RYAN
wrote:

>
>
>
>
>
>
> At Port of Indiana a Greater White-Fronted Goose was seen today late
> morning around 11:00am. I believe goose a juvenile. Goose spotted walking
> along road at lake front with canadian goose.
>
>
>



Subject: white fronted goose
Date: Mon Jan 16 2017 13:00 pm
From: kevamandaryan AT comcast.net
 
At Port of Indiana a Greater White-Fronted Goose was seen today late morning around 11:00am. I believe goose a juvenile. Goose spotted walking along road at lake front with canadian goose.



Subject: Townsend's Solitaire Update
Date: Sun Jan 15 2017 19:35 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
The Madison County Townsend's Solitaire was still present at 5pm on Sunday, Jan 15 at Perkinsville Cemetery. The bird was also seen on Sunday afternoon from the public boat launch on the north side of the river opposite the cemetery. 
Access the boat launch by crossing the White River on SR 13 and take an IMMEDIATE right onto W 280N. Go about .25 miles and you will see a brown sign with a boat indicating the public boat launch on the right. There is a short gravel drive to the boat launch. Right before the boat launch drive on W 280N there is a gravel parking lot. You want the actual drive/boat launch not the parking lot.  
The bird was viewed down low in the vegetation to the east of the gravel drive, perched in saplings, and perched high in a tree along the river. The bird was extremely difficult to see when it was low in the vegetation. The bird was never more than about 100 feet from the river when it was on the north side of the river. At 4:35pm the solitaire flew 40+ up a sycamore tree before flying across the river to the cemetery. At the cemetery the bird was very cooperative perching on the wire fence and posts on the southern side of the west end of the cemetery. 
It is likely that the bird is spending more time on the north side of the river than the south side in the cemetery. My hunch is that the bird is roosting in a cedar at the cemetery at night. My suggestion is to check the west end of the cemetery first and if you can't find the bird to try the boat launch on the north side. Be patient at the boat launch and keep your eye out for movement high or low. On Thursday Amy Hodson and I heard the bird calling from the same area on the north side of the river as where it was seen on Sunday afternoon. 
Don GorneyIndianapolis, IN
317.501.4212
dongorney AT yahoo.com



Subject: Eagle Creek Park, Sunday January 15, 2017
Date: Sun Jan 15 2017 12:34 pm
From: sailbird AT tds.net
 
Sunday morning bird walk tallied 44 species.  The list includes

Cackling Goose
Canada Goose
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Pintall
Redhead
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Great blue Heron
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
American Kestrel
Ring-billed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Barred Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
European Starling
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Bird walk begins at 9 AM each Sunday at the Ornithology Center, all are welcome.

Don Williams



Subject: Townsend's Solitaire
Date: Sun Jan 15 2017 7:41 am
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 

The Townsend's Solitaire was present this morning at 8:00 a.m.
Larry McIntosh 
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject: Ewing Bottoms Jackson Co.
Date: Sat Jan 14 2017 17:53 pm
From: dhkaiser AT sprynet.com
 
Barb and I visited the Ewing bottoms today looking for cranes.  Found
several thousand in the newly rain filled fields. Also had 51 swans, to
far away to ID which. And 5 eagles, two pair of adults and a juvenile.

Photos of an eagle in flight and some of the swan can be seen on my
FlickR site...

www.flicker.com/photos/dhkaiser

Dan Kaiser
Columbus



Subject: Birder's List article reminder
Date: Sat Jan 14 2017 14:09 pm
From: ccmills AT wowway.com
 




I am the editor for the Indiana Birder's List article that appears annually
in the Indiana Audubon Quarterly. I would hope that you would submit your
2016 lists to me. The deadline for doing this is January 31. Lists that may
be sent are World, North America, ABA, Indiana, Indiana county lists and
your property list. You may submit both life and year lists. The lists
should be what you saw up to and including December 31, 2016. There is no
charge for doing this. You may find a form on the IAS webpage under birds to
send your lists electronically. You may use the form included with this
email and send it to me either by email or snail mail. I will only need the
numbers seen and not the actual lists of species. You may also include
property lists. If you include property lists please give a brief
description of your property: urban yard, suburban yard, or country yard.
Also give an approximate size estimate. An urban or suburban yard might be
measured in feet such as 50 by 70 feet and a country yard in acres such as
25 acres. If you did this description last year you do not need to repeat
this information unless it has changed

You may include interesting information about your birding activities such
as places you birded and milestone birds that you saw.

The ABA list only includes Canada and the United States except that Hawaii
is not yet included but will be in 2017. The North America list covers
everything north of the Columbian-Panamanian border. It also includes the
West Indies, Mexico and Central America but not Hawaii.

While membership in the IAS is suggested for people who are involved in the
list report, it is not a requirement. People who are not members will still
have their lists included.

The list article will be published in the May Quarterly issue.



Chuck Mills

ccmills@wowway.com

8600 Framewood Drive

Newburgh, IN 47630






































Subject: SW Allen Blackbirds-- Jan 14, 2017 AM
Date: Sat Jan 14 2017 12:33 pm
From: rrang AT frontier.com
 
After stopping briefly at Fox Island County Park this morning to check the feeders (highlights were Sue Zwierko and common feeder fare), I drove some of the roads southwest of there.  I noted four GREEN-WINGED TEAL drakes in a mostly frozen puddle due east of Homestead at Branning and then found my first sizeable blackbird flock of the year along Amber Road just north of the rail road.  The flock of 300+ birds consisted of mostly male Common Grackles, but within the group I also found a couple dozen starlings, 10 cowbirds, and one RUSTY BLACKBIRD.
Rodger RangFort Wayne



Subject: Townsend's Solitaire
Date: Sat Jan 14 2017 10:57 am
From: jeffreytimmons AT comcast.net
 
The Townsend’s Solitaire made brief appearance at 10:30 and somewhat quickly disappeared.  Multiple people had been searching since daybreak.    It showed up again shortly after that at the far west end in the cedar tree.  It sat in the middle of the tree for 5 minutes or so motionless. If you did not know it was there it would have been impossible to see.  By shortly after 11am it seemed to just disappear.  It is likely the bird is in the area but it seems to be spending a lot of time away from the cemetery but comes back briefly to eat.  Definitely not as cooperative as the last couple of days.



Raining pretty good at noonish but roads are mostly ok with just a few slick spots in untreated areas.

Jeff Timmons

Anderson, IN







From: Jeff Timmons [mailto:jeffreytimmons@comcast.net]
Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 5:39 PM
To: in-bird-l@list.indiana.edu
Subject: RE: [IN-BIRD-L] Townsend's Solitaire



Bird showed up coming from the river. It came in pretty high in the air and dropped down into the cedar next to the west drive. It made a very brief appearance and then went back towards the river. It seemed a little more skittish tonight than it was last night. Hopefully it will be cooperative tomorrow as well. Best approach seems to bring you patient birding hat and scanning the cedar trees anywhere on the west end of the cemetery.



Good luck.

Jeff Timmons

Anderson, IN







From: terry ballenger [mailto:t.ballenger@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 3:48 PM
To: In-Bird List-serve ; IN-BIRD-L
Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] Townsend's Solitaire



Just to let everyone know that the bird is still present as of 2:50pm today at Perkinsville Cemetary. Brad Baumgardner and company along with a couple from Gas City and myself located it at the last cedar tree in the extreme west end of the cemetery property.



It eventually Tee-ed up at the very top of the tree giving excellent scope views. Several people got some good photos.



It may respond to VERY SOFT pishing, or a low volume playback of it's call note from a phone app.



Was mostly cooperative when found, not seeming to be skittish with at least eight birders around.



Good luck. Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.




Subject: Townsend's Solitaire
Date: Fri Jan 13 2017 16:38 pm
From: jeffreytimmons AT comcast.net
 
Bird showed up coming from the river.  It came in pretty high in the air and dropped down into the cedar next to the west drive.  It made a very brief appearance and then went back towards the river.  It seemed a little more skittish tonight than it was last night.  Hopefully it will be cooperative tomorrow as well.  Best approach seems to bring you patient birding hat and scanning the cedar trees anywhere on the west end of the cemetery.



Good luck.

Jeff Timmons

Anderson, IN







From: terry ballenger [mailto:t.ballenger@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 3:48 PM
To: In-Bird List-serve ; IN-BIRD-L
Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] Townsend's Solitaire



Just to let everyone know that the bird is still present as of 2:50pm today at Perkinsville Cemetary. Brad Baumgardner and company along with a couple from Gas City and myself located it at the last cedar tree in the extreme west end of the cemetery property.



It eventually Tee-ed up at the very top of the tree giving excellent scope views. Several people got some good photos.



It may respond to VERY SOFT pishing, or a low volume playback of it's call note from a phone app.



Was mostly cooperative when found, not seeming to be skittish with at least eight birders around.



Good luck. Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.




Subject: Townsend's Solitaire
Date: Fri Jan 13 2017 14:48 pm
From: t.ballenger AT sbcglobal.net
 
Just to let everyone know that the bird is still present as of 2:50pm today at Perkinsville Cemetary.  Brad Baumgardner and company along with a couple from Gas City and myself located it at the last cedar tree in the extreme west end of the cemetery property.
It eventually Tee-ed up at the very top of the tree giving excellent scope views.  Several people got some good photos.
It may respond to VERY SOFT pishing, or a low volume playback of it's call note from a phone app.
Was mostly cooperative when found,  not seeming to be skittish with at least eight birders around.
Good luck.   Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co. 



Subject: Townsend's Solitaire, 1/13
Date: Fri Jan 13 2017 8:29 am
From: birder4in AT gmail.com
 
 It is working the W end of Old Perkinsville Cemetery & 0915 EST.
---------
Ed Hopkins
W Lafayette



Subject: ADMIN: Rules Reminder
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 22:00 pm
From: phil AT pjkelly.net
 
Hello IN-BIRD-Lers,

It appears a rules reminder is in order.

Please review these rules before posting to the list.
1) Play nice. (That includes NO PERSONAL ATTACKS! If you have a
problem with something posted on the list, contact me at either: phil AT
pjkelly.net or in-bird-l-request AT listserv.indiana.edu).

2) Stay on topic--Indiana birds and birding in Indiana.

3) No commercial advertising or soliciting--this includes sales,
donations, and membership soliciting by non-profits and for-profit
businesses. An exception is granted for one-time, personal, for sale
ads of birding related items. (To clarify, if money is going to
exchange hands, then the item/event/activity should NOT be posted to the
IN-BIRD-L list. Our listserv sponsor specifically forbids commercial
activities on the listserv and I personally don't think it's a good idea
either!) If the event (or a portion) may be attended for FREE and it is
Indiana bird and birding related, then by all means post it. An
additional exception has been granted for the annual Christmas Bird
Counts, some of which collect a fee to defray the costs of tabulating
and publishing the count.

4) The following topics are not appropriate for this listserv:
politics, hunting, cats, use or non-use of bird banding codes in posts,
and other generally disruptive subjects.

5) Take disagreements & list management issues to PERSONAL EMAIL. Do
NOT use the list.

6) Obey the listowner regarding topics and behavior on the list :-) .

7) Include your real name, email address, and location in all posts.

8) If you have a question about a topic for the list--ask the
listowner before posting (send email to:
in-bird-l-request AT listserv.indiana.edu).
If you have a question or comment on these guidelines, send me an email
and I'll consider your request.

Thanks and Good Birding!

--
Phil Kelly
IN-BIRD-L Listowner
phil at pjkelly dot net
Kokomo, IN



Subject: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE - Madison, County
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 19:21 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
When I arrived at the cemetery at approx 3:30pm the Townsend's Solitaire, unbeknownst to me until later, was along the White River. After about 25 minutes I heard a short snippet of song coming from the far shore of the river. Several minutes later Amy Hodson arrived and we both heard the bird calling from the opposite shore. It called a number of times and sounded like it was at mid-story or lower. We were unable to get a visual.  
Finally, at 4:39pm the bird flew into the cemetery and provided great looks. Although there are several cedars in the cemetery the bird was obviously foraging along the White River.  Don Gorney
Indianapolis, IN
317.501.4212
dongorney AT yahoo.com


From: Jeff Timmons
To: in-bird-l@list.indiana.edu
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:01 PM
Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE - Madison, County

I arrived shortly after 4:30 to see if the Townsend’s Solitaire was present.  There were several others there.  I decided to drive over to the other side of the river to see if I could locate it.  As soon as I got a mile down the road Don let me know the bird showed up at 4:40.  I made it back and got great looks at the bird.  The bird moved from a headstone to the fence post and then at just before 5pm the bird flew into a Cedar Tree that is fairly close to the west lane of the cemetery.  The tree did not have a lot of berries on it but I am guessing that it will be roosting in that tree.  Everyone stayed a good distance from the bird so as to not flush it away.  I will say the tree is pretty thick and I could not see the bird when it was in the tree.  It could take some patience for it to come out.   https://www.google.com/maps/pl...  The above hopefully is a link to the Perkinsville Cemetery.  This is straight north of Lapel, IN.  Congratulations to Terry Ballenger and thank you for getting the word out.  Jeff TimmonsAnderson, IN      From: terry ballenger [mailto:t.ballenger@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 3:03 PM
To: IN-BIRD-L
Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] Fw: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE    
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: terry ballenger
To: "inbird@indiana.edu"
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 3:00 PM
Subject: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE  Hello all--  Just had a Townsend's Solitaire at Perkinsville Cemetery on 8th St. Rd. just east of SR 13, north of Noblesville.    Had at least four good looks at close range of classic field marks.  Bold white eye-ring; overall gray back and wings; and white outer tail feathers.  Take SR 37 N. to Strawtown.  Turn right on 8th St. Rd.   Go past SR 13 for about a 1/4 mi.  Cemetery on the left.  Enter main entrance and wind up the hill to a pull off area near a trash barrel.  The bird was seen within 200 feet or so of this area.  It perched on a fence post; drank standing water from the top of a tombstone; and also went into the surrounding cedar trees.  I watched it for more than 20 min.  It finally flew towards the White River where I eventually lost it.  Hope you are able to locate it.  Good birding, Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.  





Subject: Fw: eBird Report - Pine Creek Gamebird Habitat Area , Jan 12, 2017
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 19:18 pm
From: jdunning AT purdue.edu
 
A late afternoon visit to Pine Creek in eastern Benton County yielded two adult Bald Eagles - probably the nesting pair recently discovered a few miles to the east of the refuge.

Barny
misner13@frontier.com

Pine Creek Gamebird Habitat Area , Benton, Indiana, US
Jan 12, 2017 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM


Canada Goose 56
Ring-necked Pheasant 2
Bald Eagle 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 24
European Starling 30

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: West Union Covered Bridge Eagles, Parke Co
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 18:50 pm
From: greenpertplus AT hotmail.com
 
This morning, Allisyn Gillet, Gary Langell, and I counted eagles at the West Union Covered Bridge at Sugar Creek for the national Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey. We had far better than average results with 100 bald eagles and 1 golden eagle tallied. I recorded them as follows:


7:30-7:45 - 0

7:45-8 - 1 (1 adult)

8-8:15 - 43 (8 adults, 35 immatures)

8:15-8:30 - 37 (14 adults, 23 immatures)

8:30-9 - 19 (3 adults, 16 immatures)

9-9:10 - 0


The adult golden eagle flew over around 8:30.


West Union Covered Bridge, Sugar Creek, Parke, Indiana, US
Jan 12, 2017 7:23 AM - 9:14 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Midwinter eagle roost survey. Periods of heavy rain and wind gusting to 20 mph
22 species

Canada Goose 123
Common Goldeneye 1
Common Merganser 3
Golden Eagle 1 Adult, flew over at 8:30
Bald Eagle 100 26 adult, 74 immature
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Ring-billed Gull 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-headed Woodpecker 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1
Pileated Woodpecker 2
Blue Jay 5
American Crow 5
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) 2
Brown Creeper 1
Carolina Wren 1
European Starling 55
American Goldfinch 1
House Sparrow 25

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


Amy Kearns

Mitchell




Subject: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE - Madison, County
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 17:01 pm
From: jeffreytimmons AT comcast.net
 
I arrived shortly after 4:30 to see if the Townsend’s Solitaire was present.  There were several others there.  I decided to drive over to the other side of the river to see if I could locate it.  As soon as I got a mile down the road Don let me know the bird showed up at 4:40.  I made it back and got great looks at the bird.  The bird moved from a headstone to the fence post and then at just before 5pm the bird flew into a Cedar Tree that is fairly close to the west lane of the cemetery.  The tree did not have a lot of berries on it but I am guessing that it will be roosting in that tree.  Everyone stayed a good distance from the bird so as to not flush it away.  I will say the tree is pretty thick and I could not see the bird when it was in the tree.  It could take some patience for it to come out.



https://www.google.com/maps/pl...



The above hopefully is a link to the Perkinsville Cemetery. This is straight north of Lapel, IN.



Congratulations to Terry Ballenger and thank you for getting the word out.



Jeff Timmons

Anderson, IN







From: terry ballenger [mailto:t.ballenger@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 3:03 PM
To: IN-BIRD-L
Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] Fw: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE






----- Forwarded Message -----
From: terry ballenger
To: "inbird@indiana.edu "
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 3:00 PM
Subject: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE



Hello all--



Just had a Townsend's Solitaire at Perkinsville Cemetery on 8th St. Rd. just east of SR 13, north of Noblesville. Had at least four good looks at close range of classic field marks. Bold white eye-ring; overall gray back and wings; and white outer tail feathers.



Take SR 37 N. to Strawtown. Turn right on 8th St. Rd. Go past SR 13 for about a 1/4 mi. Cemetery on the left. Enter main entrance and wind up the hill to a pull off area near a trash barrel. The bird was seen within 200 feet or so of this area.



It perched on a fence post; drank standing water from the top of a tombstone; and also went into the surrounding cedar trees.



I watched it for more than 20 min. It finally flew towards the White River where I eventually lost it.



Hope you are able to locate it.



Good birding,

Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.






Subject: Together for Birds Petition
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 14:18 pm
From: sholmer AT abcbirds.org
 
[ABC-Together-for-Birds-petition-banner.jpg]

Together for Birds Petition

Bird conservation is a core American value, whether inspired by the powerful flight of a Bald Eagle or the charisma of a Golden-crowned Kinglet. This value is widely supported by citizens of all political persuasions. Now, we face a critical moment. The environment was not a major issue in the recent election, but decisions made by the incoming Administration and Congress could have far-reaching impacts for birds and their habitats.

That's why we need everyone who cares about birds to join together and sign this petition to protect cornerstone legislation and other top conservation priorities. This may be the single best opportunity ever for our community to stand together for birds. Please show your support for bird conservation and ensure that the progress we have made in recent decades is preserved.

We will present the petition and signatures to the new Administration and Congress on January 23, just after the Inauguration. Please sign to show your support for bird conservation today!

Sign the Petition

https://secure2.convio.net/abc...

Forward the Petition

Please use Facebook, Twitter (#togetherforbirds) and email to let family, friends and colleagues know about this effort to join together in support of birds.
Organizations Can Endorse the Petition

To sign on your organization, please fill in the name in the box provided

https://secure2.convio.net/abc...

Organizations, Please Circulate the Petition

Please forward this link to your lists https://secure2.convio.net/abc...

"TOGETHER FOR BIRDS" PETITION



Dear [Administration and Congress],



We, the undersigned organizations and individuals, represent a broad cross-section of the bird conservation community. We aim to build a dialogue with the new Administration and Congress to promote the conservation of birds and their habitats, which are of fundamental value to the American people.

More than 60 million Americans care deeply about birds, and bird-related recreation contributes more than $36 billion to our economy. Birds also act as the "canary in the coal mine" for our environment and provide valuable benefits to society, from pollination to pest control. But birds are in trouble, with many declining in population or facing extinction.

We endorse the following priorities to ensure that birds and their habitats continue to be effectively conserved for the benefit of all Americans. We ask that you please support:

1. THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: Protect the Act that has helped recover our national bird, the Bald Eagle, and other species in trouble.

2. THE MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT: Safeguard the only law that exists to protect most American birds, and support the federal Duck Stamp, one of the nation's most successful conservation programs.

3. FEDERAL FUNDING FOR BIRDS: Maintain and grow essential sources of federal support for migratory bird conservation.

4. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY: Ensure that the EPA can continue its vital work to protect people and birds from dangerous pesticides and other toxins.

5. LAND MANAGEMENT FOR BIRDS AND PEOPLE: Ensure that public lands remain public, are properly managed for wildlife, and that recreational access is maintained.

We also acknowledge that many other national and state initiatives are of critical importance to birds, and that citizens and private enterprise can play vital roles in these conservation efforts.

Let's work together for birds!


[ABC-Together-for-Birds-petition-banner.jpg]






Steve Holmer
Vice President of Policy
American Bird Conservancy &
Director, Bird Conservation Alliance
202-888-7490
sholmer@abcbirds.org

www.abcbirds.org, https://abcbirds.org/get-invol... ABC on Facebook, ABC Videos

[letterhead]





Subject: Fw: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 14:03 pm
From: t.ballenger AT sbcglobal.net
 



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: terry ballenger
To: "inbird@indiana.edu"
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 3:00 PM
Subject: TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE

Hello all--
Just had a Townsend's Solitaire at Perkinsville Cemetery on 8th St. Rd. just east of SR 13, north of Noblesville.    Had at least four good looks at close range of classic field marks.  Bold white eye-ring; overall gray back and wings; and white outer tail feathers.
Take SR 37 N. to Strawtown.  Turn right on 8th St. Rd.   Go past SR 13 for about a 1/4 mi.  Cemetery on the left.  Enter main entrance and wind up the hill to a pull off area near a trash barrel.  The bird was seen within 200 feet or so of this area.
It perched on a fence post; drank standing water from the top of a tombstone; and also went into the surrounding cedar trees.
I watched it for more than 20 min.  It finally flew towards the White River where I eventually lost it.
Hope you are able to locate it.
Good birding, Terry Ballenger, Ham. Co.




Subject: Franklin swans
Date: Thu Jan 12 2017 8:14 am
From: kcharlesmsw AT hotmail.com
 
4 trumpeter swans continue on the retention pond behind the Lowes store in Franklin.  They have been flying out from the pond later in the AM.

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Birders Lists. Deadline for submission January 31.
Date: Wed Jan 11 2017 21:35 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
Hello Chuck,Here is my list data.

                            David

On Thursday, January 5, 2017 9:16 AM, Chuck Mills wrote:


I am the editor for the Indiana Birder’s List article that appears annually in the Indiana Audubon Quarterly.  I would hope that you would submit your 2016 lists to me. The deadline for doing this is January 31. Lists that may be sent are World, North America, ABA, Indiana, Indiana county lists and your property list. You may submit both life and year lists. The lists should be what you saw up to and including December 31, 2016. There is no charge for doing this. You may find a form on the IAS webpage under birds to send your lists electronically. You may use the form included with this email and send it to me either by email or snail mail. I will only need the numbers seen and not the actual lists of species. You may also include property lists. If you include property lists please give a brief description of your property: urban yard, suburban yard, or country yard. Also give an approximate size estimate. An urban or suburban yard might be measured in feet such as 50 by 70 feet and a country yard in acres such as 25 acres. If you did this description last year you do not need to repeat this information unless it has changedYou may  include interesting information about your birding activities such as places you birded and milestone birds that you saw.The ABA list only includes Canada and the United States except that Hawaii is not yet included but will be in 2017. The North America list covers everything north of the Columbian-Panamanian border. It also includes the West Indies, Mexico and Central America but not Hawaii.While membership in the IAS is suggested for people who are involved in the list report, it is not a requirement. People who are not members will still have their lists included.The list article will be published in the May Quarterly issue.  Chuck Millsccmills@wowway.com8600 Framewood DriveNewburgh, IN 47630  




Subject: Great Horned Owl, Allen County
Date: Wed Jan 11 2017 12:04 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
I heard one at 8:30 this morning.  We usually hear one or two at our house about this time of year, but not in daytime.


Ed Powers



Subject: Great Horned Owl, SW Monroe Co
Date: Wed Jan 11 2017 8:11 am
From: tgreene AT indiana.edu
 
Drove by a Great Horned Owl sitting on a fence post along Lee Phillips Road (SW Monroe Co) this morning on my way to work.  This is the same area I’ve seen a GHOW on a few other occasions over the last month or so.  The area consists of open pastures with woods not far away.

Terri Greene
SW Monroe Co


Lee Phillips Rd, Monroe, Indiana, US
Jan 11, 2017 7:50 AM
Protocol: Incidental

Great Horned Owl 1 (sitting on fence post)

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: A close encounter
Date: Tue Jan 10 2017 18:29 pm
From: mkauff AT bnin.net
 
On my way home tonight (6:40), I was driving through a wooded area close to home when a large white bird flew in front of my car.  It was close enough that I was afraid I was going to hit the bird, so I only had a split second look.  Could it be a snowy owl is lurking about?  

The bird flew from the wooded area on the south side of CR 42 (about 1/2 mile east of CR 15 south of Goshen) to the north, where there are fields. I really don't know if this was an owl, but I'm not sure what else would be flying at night.

If you live in Goshen, keeps your eyes open.

Marlo J. Kauffman

Sent from my iPad



Subject: Fort Wayne Merlin
Date: Tue Jan 10 2017 16:44 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
     With as lousy as the weather was this afternoon, I didn't expect to see any birds at all on the drive home from work. I did see some Starlings and a couple Crows flying around.  Then, on Lima Road, somewhere just north of Cook Road, a fast flying bird shot across the northbound lanes up ahead of me. As it got above the southbound lanes, it banked to the south and flew right above my car. I was then able to identify it as a Merlin by the sharply pointed wings, which were nice and thick at the base, and the fast, choppy flight style that only Merlins have. It didn't seem to be affected by the wind and rain at all. I couldn't really get any color on the bird, but I'm thinking that it looked dark brown, which points to an immature bird.
John WinebrennerFort Wayne



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