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Updated on January 31, 2015, 7:40 pm

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31 Jan: @ 19:39:07 
Ferruginous Hawk - Somerville Mine, Gibson/Pike Counties [Wilkins, Vern W]
31 Jan: @ 18:34:01 
Diving ducks near Eagle Creek 1/31 [Liz Day]
31 Jan: @ 18:33:07 
Pigeon River FWA Golden Eagles [Leland Shaum]
31 Jan: @ 16:49:19 
NW Indiana (31Jan15) Lesser Black-backed Gull & N. Shrike [Kenneth J. Brock]
31 Jan: @ 16:17:46 
Illiana Birds: Hammond Marina [Carolyn A. Marsh]
31 Jan: @ 15:43:29 
Indiana Dunes State Park [Brendan Grube]
31 Jan: @ 12:10:21 
Little Gull--turtle creek [Mike P. Maxwell]
31 Jan: @ 08:38:42 
Ferrugenous Hawk located 1/31 [Jeff Timmons]
30 Jan: @ 22:53:00 
Ross's Goose, Ferruginous Hawk, Golden Eagle [Peter Scott]
30 Jan: @ 22:17:04 
sleeping wren pix 2nd try [Liz Day]
30 Jan: @ 22:06:52 
sleeping wren pix [Liz Day]
30 Jan: @ 21:22:52 
birding Sat. [Liz Day]
30 Jan: @ 19:04:04 
Hemmer Woods Ferruginous Hawk [Langell, Gary]
30 Jan: @ 16:29:30 
Dabblers and Divers [David Crouch]
30 Jan: @ 16:07:07 
Long eared Owl [russ Allison]
30 Jan: @ 14:21:00 
Re: Bald Eagles Playing [Patricia Reynolds]
30 Jan: @ 14:09:58 
Re: another aspect on the hawk issue [Patricia Reynolds]
30 Jan: @ 13:14:05 
Bald Eagles Playing [Dan Kaiser]
30 Jan: @ 12:18:17 
another aspect on the hawk issue [Jeremy Ross]
30 Jan: @ 08:34:48 
Re: Ferruginous Hawk [Evan Speck]
30 Jan: @ 05:59:22 
Somerville Ferruginous Hawk [Don & Char Allen]
29 Jan: @ 22:31:14 
Ferruginous Hawk [Evan Speck]
29 Jan: @ 18:47:58 
SW Allen Co. Robins, RWBL-- Jan 29 PM [Rodger Rang]
29 Jan: @ 18:28:09 
reminder on bird viewer behavior [Patricia Reynolds]
29 Jan: @ 18:00:05 
Greene county SNOW [jeremy.ross]
29 Jan: @ 16:42:15 
Lake Lemon Golden Eagle! [Hengeveld, Susan E.]
29 Jan: @ 15:11:07 
SW Allen Robins, RWBL-- Jan. 29 PM [Rodger Rang]
29 Jan: @ 12:00:34 
Monthly Bird Survey at Gene Stratton-Porter State Historic Site [Conrad, Tiffany]
29 Jan: @ 09:33:10 
Diving ducks, Celery Bog Nature Area, Jan 29, 2015 [Dunning, John B]
29 Jan: @ 09:30:18 
Daviess County Loggerhead Shrikes 1-28-15 [Kearns, Amy]
29 Jan: @ 07:52:19 
28 Jan 2015 S.W. Indiana Loop: Ferruginous Hawk & Little Gull [Kenneth J. Brock]
28 Jan: @ 21:12:08 
Ferruginous Hawk: Gibson County TODAY [Lynea]
28 Jan: @ 19:46:33 
Ferruginous Hawk: Gibson County [Evan Speck]
27 Jan: @ 16:16:21 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker [rmichaelbrattain]
27 Jan: @ 15:32:46 
Open water Eagle Creek with massive numbers of ducks geese. [Spike Selig]
27 Jan: @ 08:33:21 
Rough-legged Hawk [Trice Berkley]
27 Jan: @ 08:09:42 
Eagle Watch Weekend - 1/24 [Hengeveld, James David]
27 Jan: @ 06:35:48 
Goose Pond today 1/26/15 [Steven]
26 Jan: @ 19:36:56 
Greene Co. Snowy Owl, NO Sighting [misty fields]
26 Jan: @ 19:28:48 
Goose Pond [Whitehead, Donald R.]
26 Jan: @ 18:33:25 
Chinook Mine, Short-eared Owls [Peter Scott]
26 Jan: @ 17:53:11 
Snowy Owl - Hoosier Park - Anderson, IN [Jeff Timmons]
26 Jan: @ 13:31:17 
Ferruginous Hawk, Somerville [tatms@fullnet.com]
26 Jan: @ 10:39:57 
Greene County Snowy [tatms@fullnet.com]
26 Jan: @ 10:12:31 
Ferruginous Hawk [Evan Speck]
25 Jan: @ 19:54:31 
Notre Dame, Sunday Jan. 25 [Laura Fuderer]
25 Jan: @ 15:55:10 
Eagle Creek Resevoirt Sunday morning. [Spike Selig]
25 Jan: @ 14:47:01 
Re: Fwd: Greene Co Snowy Owl [brown.jd]
25 Jan: @ 13:45:36 
White-winged Scoter at Charlestown SP, Clark Co. [Johnson Brian]
25 Jan: @ 13:30:35 
Eagle Creek Park, Sunday January 25, 2015 [Don Williams]





Subject: Ferruginous Hawk - Somerville Mine, Gibson/Pike Counties
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 19:39 pm
From: vwilkins AT indiana.edu
 
Just wanted to mention that the Ferruginous was seen, early afternoon again today.  I'm sure others will post, but I think it was seen south of 900S and 1050E at some point after Jeff Timmons' post.  I started out this morning at the north end of the mine and slowly worked my way south.  I pulled up to 900S/1050E at 12pm (timestamp is an hour off on the photos) and instantly saw a bird soaring in from quite a ways south, that just looked right (even though I had never seen the bird before).  For once I was just flat out lucky.  I watched it coming head-on for a minute and with the angle I couldn't get a single field mark until it passed overhead, at which point the ID was easy.  The bird was climbing really fast and went completely out of sight to the northeast at an impressive speed for a buteo.  I lost it for a while, but after a few more minutes searching the sky, I was pretty sure I could see it circling very high, for a few minutes, way out over the mine to the northeast.  I stayed for an hour or two after that and was unable to locate the bird again, although at one point I saw a suspect at relatively close range, that appeared to fly in to the east edge of Hemmer Woods.  I searched all around the edge of the woods and could not relocate the bird at that point, and continued on to other locations.  If no one saw the bird in the afternoon, I'd suspect it stayed over the northeastern part of the mine, east of 1200.

I wanted to be sure I got the ID right first, so by the time I put binoculars down and got my camera on the bird, it was incredibly distant. I still should have been able to crop and have better results than I did, but the atmospheric conditions seemed to make the distant photos even worse...distance was over a mile. For those who have been there, the photo was taken from just east of 900/1050, with the bird incredibly high, northeast of the white tanks that you can see way out in the distant fields. Just posting a couple of these poor photos to show how easy it is to ID this bird even from an incredible distance. With just binoculars, the most visible features for me were the gray head, the rufous shoulders and back, , white windows in the wings, and probably the easiest feature to spot from an incredible distance, the white appearance of the tail from above or below. Feathered legs were very visible when he flew directly overhead.

http://vw.homelinux.net/z/picture.php?/11172/category/173
http://vw.homelinux.net/z/picture.php?/11173/category/173

Anyway, thanks for the continued posting. I never did get the bird last year, and I only went again this year because I also wanted to do my usual route from Somerville to Gibson, searching for Golden Eagle. I have not seen Golden Eagle at Somerville yet this year, but I did get an immature at the far southwestern end of Gibson Lake, late this afternoon. There were at least a dozen Bald Eagles in the area, and 1000's more Snow Geese coming in from the north, to join the 10's of thousands already there. Throughout the day I saw a lot of waterfowl coming in from the north, maybe a sign that winter isn't over yet, but oddly enough I saw a few big flocks soaring very high and going north too. I didn't find the greatest waterfowl diversity around Gibson, but there was a pretty good mix and thousands of ducks everywhere. Lots of Green-winged Teal, more Mallards than I could ever count, Northern Pintails, Gadwalls...nothing that hasn't been reported recently though. There were 30+ Common Mergansers in their usual spot on the Gibson perimeter. It's odd how they have such a strong preference for that one small lake.

I also scouted some different mining property around Pike County and found some additional SEOW locations (new to me anyway). Had a conservative count of 13 at one location. There were also a lot of swans, usually small numbers of just 2-5, but seen in numerous pits. Some were positively ID'd as Tundra, but many were too distant and I didn't scope them. I also saw two swans sleeping on ice in a pond off I69, on the way home, but it was too dark to ID them. Great Horned Owl was seen off I69, roughly two miles south of the Washington/Vincennes exit.

Vern




Subject: Diving ducks near Eagle Creek 1/31
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 18:34 pm
From: lizday44 AT sbcglobal.net
 
In mid-afternoon, I visited the area north of Rick's Boatyard (Indianapolis). There are two good-sized areas of open water visible from the place you pull off the road opposite the condo complex. The rest is frozen; I saw some people walk nearly to the center of the ice to fish; they said it was 7" thick.  The water right around Ricks and the dam is completely frozen.  I did not investigate north of the 56th St. bridge.The ducks seen needed a scope to get a decent view and still were pretty far away. Ruddy duck 1Common merganser 6 Red-breasted merganser 1Goldeneye roughly 20 - some doing the display where they throw back their headsBlack duck about 2Bald eagle 1 - it sat
on the ice but didn't eat anythingUnidentified gulls about 8Mallards and Canada geese several. Mallards mating.LizIndianapolis



Subject: Pigeon River FWA Golden Eagles
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 18:33 pm
From: sleepyck AT maplenet.net
 
Perry Miller and son Andrew, Marcus Miller and son Timothy, and my son Thaddaeus and I, birded Pigeon River Fish and Wildlife Area today, hoping to see the Golden Eagles again. We were successful, and saw a few other good birds also. We had a total of 39 raptors on the day in Elkhart, LaGrange, and Steuben counties.

Highlights, all in Pigeon River unless noted otherwise.

Aldrich Lake PRFWA
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
White-throated Sparrow 1

Curtis Creek Bridge PRFWA
Gadwall 2
Northern Shoveler 3
Bald Eagle 4 2 first year, 2 ad.
Swamp Sparrow 1
Purple Finch 1 f

CR 300N about 1 mile west of Mongo PRFWA
Golden Eagle 2 Both adults. First seen at quite close range perched beside each other. Golden heads were easily visible, and neither of these birds had the white upper tail we saw on the three birds last week. Photographed.

Mongo Dam PRFWA
Bald Eagle 1 first year

CR 300N about 1 mile east of th waterfowl resting area. (Steuben Co.)
Rough-legged Hawk 1 (Dark morph...all black when perched)

LaGrange Co. 650N west of 100W
Clay-colored Sparrow 1 We saw Benjamin Miller's continuing bird after a search.


Leland Shaum
Goshen, IN



Subject: NW Indiana (31Jan15) Lesser Black-backed Gull & N. Shrike
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 16:49 pm
From: kj.brock AT comcast.net
 
Today (31 Jan 2015) John Cassady, Lynea Hinchman, Randy Pals, and I birded the lakefront and then executed a Long-eared Owl run to Prophetstown S.P.

Our lakefront targets were Lesser Black-backed Gull and Northern Shrike, which we nailed. However, we dipped out on the Long-eared Owl at Prophetstown S.P.

—E. BEVERLY SHORES (along Beverly Drive)
Red-headed Woodpecker,1
Hairy Woodpecker,1

—CENTRAL BEVERLY SHORES
Red-headed Woodpecker,2
Red-bellied Woodpecker,2
Red-headed Woodpecker,1
Downy Woodpecker,1
NORTHERN SHRIKE,1- being harassed by Blue Jays
Blue Jay,2
Black-capped Chickadee,1

—W. BEVERLY SHORES
Red-shouldered Hawk,1

—PORT OF INDIANA
Canada Goose,10
American Black Duck,2
Mallard,50
Redhead,20
Greater Scaup,200
Bufflehead,4
Common Merganser,5
Red-breasted Merganser,15
Ring-billed Gull,2
Herring Gull,40
Thayer’s Gull,1 adult
Great Black-backed Gull,3- adult, 1st & 2nd cycles
Horned Lark,1

—WHITING REFINERY BEACH (a recent fish kill had attracted an enormous number of gulls)
Mallard,20
Common Goldeneye,5
Common Merganser,5
Red-breasted Merganser,5
American Coot,1 dead on the beach
Ring-billed Gull,20
Herring Gull,900
Thayer’s Gull,2 an adult & a 3rd cycle
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL,1 first-cycle
Great Black-backed Gull,28- 12 adults & 18 immatures

—HAMMOND from I-90: Bald Eagle,1 immature

—GARY AIRPORT from I-90: Red-tailed Hawk,2

—S. LAKE COUNTY (along I-65)
Canada Goose,300- flock in flight
Red-tailed Hawk,1

—JASPER COUNTY (along I-65)
Red-tailed Hawk,6
Rough-legged Hawk,1 light-morph
American Crow,2

—WHITE COUNTY (along I-65)
Red-tailed Hawk,1
Rough-legged Hawk,1 light-morph

—TIPPECANOE COUNTY (along I-65)
Bald Eagle,1

— PROPHETSTOWN S.P. (no luck with the LEOW)
Blue Jay,3
Song Sparrow,2

Ken Brock
Chesterton, IN




Subject: Illiana Birds: Hammond Marina
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 16:17 pm
From: cmarshbird AT prodigy.net
 
31 January 2015 - The SNOWY OWL with the black cap and black feathers in
white was on the Hammond Marina breakwall about midway from the end of the
green railing. The ICELAND GULL was seen at the same time at 1:30 p.m.



Carolyn Marsh, Whiting, IN




Subject: Indiana Dunes State Park
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 15:43 pm
From: grube.brendan AT gmail.com
 
A brilliant sunny morning on Lake Michigan, with a bone shivering, light
south wind. Ice floes had the waterfowl moving about, including a
surprising Red-throated Loon count.

Red-throated Loon-58 almost all birds were flying past to the west.
Herring Gull-125
Great Black-backed Gull-1
Bald Eagle-1
Horned Lark-8

Brendan Grube



Subject: Little Gull--turtle creek
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 12:10 pm
From: mmaxwell AT clarkquinnlaw.com
 
For what it is worth, the little gull has been showing this morning from the 700 CR loop at Turtle Creek. 

Michael P. Maxwell, Jr.
Clark Quinn LLC
317-637-1321
mmaxwell@clarkquinnlaw.com



Subject: Ferrugenous Hawk located 1/31
Date: Sat Jan 31 2015 8:38 am
From: jeffreytimmons AT comcast.net
 
Present at 900 and 1050 e.

Sitting in field south of intersection
--
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.



Subject: Ross's Goose, Ferruginous Hawk, Golden Eagle
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 22:53 pm
From: Peter.Scott AT indstate.edu
 
On a trip south from Terre Haute to Gibson County, highlights were a Ross's Goose in southern Vigo County, the Ferruginous Hawk in southeast Gibson County, and an adult Golden Eagle at Gibson Lake.

HARLAN ROAD POND, Vigo, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 9:00 AM - 9:20 AM (EST)
Protocol: Traveling
0.1 mile(s)
Comments: private ponds along Harlan Road (north side) near intersection with Hwy 159. Viewed from roadside.
4 species

Greater White-fronted Goose 100
ROSS’S GOOSE 1 white bird with dusky crown, small relative to GWFG, very small relative to CANG. Rounded head, stubby bill, warty protuberances at base, vertical plane where base of bill meets feathers, rather than curved. Photos, video taken. Walking and swimming among Canadas and GWFG.
Canada Goose 500
Mallard 20

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21608123
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org

SOMERVILLE MINE south of Hemmer Woods, Gibson, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 10:20 AM - 12:30 PM (CST)
Protocol: Traveling
12.0 mile(s)
Comments: Drove county roads around Hemmer Woods, returning periodically to the intersection of 1050E and 900S. Met Gary Langell. Mostly sunny, 30% clouds, 37 degrees F, NW wind 10 mph. Roads very passable.
15 species

Great Blue Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Northern Harrier 3 two near Hemmer Woods diving at Red-tailed Hawk in flight, and soaring
Red-tailed Hawk 3
FERRUGINOUS HAWK 1 light morph, continuing since discovery Jan 26. As Gary Langell and I stood at intersection of 1050E and 900S, the bird "materialized" in flight just west of 1050E and circled slowly toward us, and directly over us, between 50 and 100 feet overhead before rising and drifting off to the south. During the 2 minutes or so of close observation, Gary got an excellent photo of underside. We saw the upperside also, with the whitish primaries, reddish suffusion on white tail, and reddish back.
Rough-legged Hawk 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 4
Northern Flicker 3
American Kestrel 3
Horned Lark 16
European Starling 140
American Tree Sparrow 6
Northern Cardinal 6
Red-winged Blackbird 7
Eastern Meadowlark 11 some singing

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21608581
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

GIBSON GENERATING STATION -- Outer Perimeter County Roads, Gibson, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 1:40 PM - 3:15 PM Central Time
Protocol: Traveling
10.0 mile(s)
Comments: Drove on CR 150S to Cane Ridge WMA (data reported separately for that area), then north to Carmel-Princeton highway.
14 species

Greater White-fronted Goose 100
Snow Goose 7
Canada Goose 500
Gadwall 15
American Black Duck 2
Mallard 40
Common Merganser 32 two flocks on different ponds adjacent to road
Great Blue Heron 1
GOLDEN EAGLE 1 adult, circling low overhead at point where CR 150S meets Gibson Lake and departs to east; eagle was over lake at first (where unseen Snow Geese made a clamour) the flew over road to east, circling slowly and barely flapping. Joined by a juvenile Bald Eagle.
Bald Eagle 1 dark juvenile with limited but widespread white spotting on underparts; circled below Golden Eagle.
Ring-billed Gull 300
Song Sparrow 1
Swamp Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21608708
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

CANE RIDGE WMA, Gibson, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Central Time. Observed lakes from observation platform. Lakes open (unfrozen). Sunny, 10% clouds, NW wind 10 mph, 39 degrees F.
18 species

Greater White-fronted Goose 160
Snow Goose 1 on dike of Gibson lake adjacent to refuge
Canada Goose 800
American Black Duck 2
Mallard 8
Northern Pintail 7
Green-winged Teal 20
Ring-necked Duck 4
Lesser Scaup 4
Bufflehead 20
Common Goldeneye 2
Hooded Merganser 2
Common Merganser 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Northern Harrier 3
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 immature
Northern Flicker 1
American Tree Sparrow 5

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21608644



Subject: sleeping wren pix 2nd try
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 22:17 pm
From: lizday44 AT sbcglobal.net
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Sorry, I couldn't figure out how to link to the right photos. (I hate Flickr!)

These are the Carolina wrens that sleep on my balcony. Photos by Alan Brown.

Liz
Indianapolis




Subject: sleeping wren pix
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 22:06 pm
From: lizday44 AT sbcglobal.net
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/... are the Carolina wrens that sleep on my balcony.  Photos by Alan Brown.LizIndianapolis



Subject: birding Sat.
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 21:22 pm
From: lizday44 AT sbcglobal.net
 
Is anyone going someplace where there are ducks, like Goose Pond or
Turtle Creek or ??
Am hoping to bird but cannot drive. pls email....
cheers,
Liz
Indianapolis

ps - coming soon! - cute wren photos.




Subject: Hemmer Woods Ferruginous Hawk
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 19:04 pm
From: glangell AT dnr.in.gov
 
Observed the FEHA twice this afternoon, both times from CR 900S, just south of Hemmer Woods. The second time, Peter Scott had arrived and been there for about 1 and 1/2 hours when it came out of the northwest and soared directly over the top of us. Below is the link to the photo I was able to take. This was around 1:00 local time.

http://flic.kr/p/qZBjYE

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Dabblers and Divers
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 16:29 pm
From: Nighthawk AT prograde.net
 
I did a Duck recon today, finding representative numbers of dabblers at Muscatatuck and small numbers of several diver species in Bartholomew County. A couple of Bald Eagles added a little spice to the day.
Following are the reports:

Dave Crouch Seymour


Muscatatuck NWR - Jackson County, Jackson, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 9:35 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
Comments: All lakes and ponds free of ice. Temp 31F, stout N wind. Nothing of note (except 2 Otters) on large Jennings Co. side lakes.
12 species

Canada Goose 450 In all areas visited.
Gadwall 7
American Black Duck 6
Mallard 250
Northern Shoveler 22
Northern Pintail 13
Red-tailed Hawk 3
Sandhill Crane 60 Several foraging in Moist soil units.
Belted Kingfisher 1
Northern Mockingbird 1
Dark-eyed Junco 12
Northern Cardinal 10

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21602747

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Big box store ponds, Bartholomew, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 10:55 AM - 11:25 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Two Eastern lakes were frozen. Primary action at Western lake which was 60% ice free.
6 species

Canada Goose 250
Common Goldeneye 2
Turkey Vulture 1
Bald Eagle 1 Likely third year. Interacting with Crows.
Red-tailed Hawk 1
American Crow 4

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21602797

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Harrison Lakes, Bartholomew, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 11:50 AM - 12:20 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Mostly frozen. One open lead and bay at North end of main lake held all reported waterfowl.
10 species

Canada Goose 20
Mute Swan 2
Redhead 3
Ring-necked Duck 24
Lesser Scaup 3
Bufflehead 7
Hooded Merganser 3
Ruddy Duck 2
Mourning Dove 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21602856

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Grandview Lake, Bartholomew, US-IN
Jan 30, 2015 12:45 PM - 1:05 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Lake was 90% ice free. Unfortunately it was virtually waterfowl free.
4 species

Bald Eagle 1 Adult perched on snag on West shore.
American Coot 4
American Kestrel 2 Perched on wires just south of lake.
Eastern Bluebird 2 just south of lake.

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21602914

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Long eared Owl
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 16:07 pm
From: grounds11 AT frontier.com
 
I visited 3 Tippecanoe area today. The best bird was a Long eared Owl at
Prophetstown State park. The sun felt nice for a change. I first stopped at
the Celery Bog for an hour and a half. I went to the Williamsburg apts. for
an hour. I finished up at Prophetstown State Park.

My list for today:

Celery Bog--

American Coot--6

Canvasback--7

Canada Goose--100

Mallard--9

Redhead--5

Red tailed Hawk--2--first seen sitting together in the sun near the viewing
deck. later west of the Lilly Center

Northern Cardinal--2

Carolina Chickadee--2

House Finch--5

American Goldfinch--20--feeding on weed seed near the water

Blue Jay--2

Dark eyed Junco--15

European Starling--35

White breasted Nuthatch--1

Williamsburg apt. on the Wabash:

Canada Geese--8

Great blue Heron--4

American Crow--3

Prophetstown State Park--

Long eared Owl--1

Northern Harrier--1

Red tailed Hawk--2

American Crow--3

Rock Pigeon--7

Mourning Dove--2



Good birding

Russ Allison, West Lafayette

http://www.flickr.com/photos/r...












Subject: Bald Eagles Playing
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 14:21 pm
From: eagleowl4180 AT sbcglobal.net
 

Great shot!!!!!! We have a 2
yr old bald eagle, the second we have raised, who is on our ed license
due to a shoulder dislocation. The degree of playfulness exhibited by our current resident, and the previous one (who had been kicked out of his nest and died at age two of a congenital, degenerative neurological disease that did not fulminate until he was almost 2 - but mama knew somehow and tossed him out) is remarkable. The current resident is exceptionally talkative, playful, curious, and amenable to training - a delight to work with, and will be a good ambassador for environmental programming.

Thanks for sharing that experience and photo - way to go!

Best regards -


Patti Reynolds
Indiana Raptor Center



On Friday, January 30, 2015 2:14 PM, Dan Kaiser wrote:



Visited Muscatatuck NWR this morning, saw a total of four bald eagles,
two adults and two juveniles. The juveniles put on a brief show
playing. Photo at https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Dan



Subject: another aspect on the hawk issue
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 14:09 pm
From: eagleowl4180 AT sbcglobal.net
 
Thank you Jeremy.  I have received three of four messages now that mirror some of the concerns I listed in my initial message - so this appears to be an issue that will bring about discussion on this mail list for time to come.

A couple of points from a scientific point of view that I would like to add to the discussion: First, birds can see much further distances than we can, so they are usually very much aware of your activity long before you see them. Movement from the site point means that they feel the need to move as you get closer. A casual behavior appearance does not mean no stress - for wild animals, the first line of defense is not their claws, talons or teeth - it is looking like everything is fine. Even wounded and starving animals will try to pull this off - it keeps them from looking week and vulnerable. Also, when a bird moves because of human proximity, you just don't know whether you have chased it off a feed, or prey that it has been stalking. Raptors usually have a 1 in 6 chance of a catch, so every find is important to them.


One thing Evan said that I would like to comment on, if I may - it is impossible to tell from such distance if a bird is affected by Aspergillis. Low grade infections are not uncommon in birds that are under stress - every bird we check in is examined for it, including stethoscope listening. Most birds in a given region have a natural immunity, but it can fail them under hard circumstances such as injury or hunger. Migrants are questionable, depending on where they spend most of their time. At any rate, it is a medical diagnosis that cannot be determined from a distant viewpoint, unless binoculars reveal difficult breathing not related to extended flight.

There are many things to take into consideration when doing serious birding - an additional one is the reputation of one's colleagues in the field, which can be influenced by various factors, including those mentioned by Jeremy in his message. But that is how life runs - we have to take things seriously. Not preaching or condescending here, just sayin' as if we were all siting here in conversation. The Birder's Code of Ethics mentions that first and foremost is the protection of the bird. I would submit to all that everything else is a secondary privilege, and congratulations to those who have earned it. There are many of you on this list, and I am very aware of that. Keep up the good work and do call us if you find any injured birds - we can help to get them back out where they belong.

Best regards -


Patti Reynolds
Indiana Raptor Center



On Friday, January 30, 2015 1:18 PM, Jeremy Ross wrote:




I have read the posts on the FEHA and I agree with Evan’s thoughts. However, Please keep in mind the issue of property ownership as well. Peabody energy and it’s associate companies, such as the land reclamation companies, own much of the land around Somerville. Don't make all birders look bad by trespassing on their land. I know for a fact that Peabody is very concerned with trespass. They will not even allow their own employees to enter on some property. Some folks/companies aren't too concerned about people entering and having a look. Some folks are.



Jeremy Ross
Petersburg, IN



Subject: Bald Eagles Playing
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 13:14 pm
From: dhkaiser AT sprynet.com
 
Visited Muscatatuck NWR this morning, saw a total of four bald eagles,
two adults and two juveniles. The juveniles put on a brief show
playing. Photo at https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Dan



Subject: another aspect on the hawk issue
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 12:18 pm
From: jeremy.ross AT hotmail.com
 
I have read the posts on the FEHA and I agree with Evan’s thoughts.  However, Please keep in mind the issue of property ownership as well.  Peabody energy and it’s associate companies, such as the land reclamation companies, own much of the land around Somerville.  Don't make all birders look bad by trespassing on their land.  I know for a fact that Peabody is very concerned with trespass.   They will not even allow their own employees to enter on some property.  Some folks/companies aren't too concerned about people entering and having a look.  Some folks are.






Jeremy Ross
Petersburg, IN



Subject: Ferruginous Hawk
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 8:34 am
From: carroll656 AT msn.com
 
Actually, the word "chase" was never used.
ECS

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 30, 2015, at 7:10 AM, Peter Scott wrote:
>
> Evan,
> Very well said! Some people don't understand how we use the word "chase". I'm on my way down there in just a few minutes!
> Peter
> ________________________________________
> From: Evan Speck [carroll656@msn.com]
> Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 11:31 PM
> To: IN-BIRDS
> Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] Ferruginous Hawk
>
> I had the pleasure of observing the Gibson County FEHA at fairly close range the other day. The bird appeared not just healthy, but vibrant. It shows no signs of aspergillosis or any other disease. It has returned to winter in a place 1000 miles from its normal winter range. Last winter it endured not just birders, but hunted next to one of the largest and loudest coal shovels on the planet, not to mention the clouds of dust and frequent dynamite blasts. When you consider that the half life of wild bird populations is less than two years, this bird is doing very well.
>
> This bird is thriving because this noisy, dusty reclaimed mine provides its habitat and food requirements. They are known to winter with Harriers and Rough-legged Hawks. FEHA populations are indeed on the decline, but according to Dunne, this is attributed to habitat loss and 12 gauge shotguns (ranchers). It is not attributed to birders tiptoeing across fields.
>
> This bird behaves like other large raptors when approached. It studies you a bit out of curiosity, but mostly ignores you. Get within its zone of comfort, and it lazily picks up and flies to the next post on its circuit. It does not have the least concern about its ability to get away from you. Its circuit at Somerville appears to be on the order of two or three thousand acres.
>
> The ABA code of ethics speaks mainly of harassing nesting birds and repeatedly playing tapes. For the protection of this FEHA I would only add to be suspicious of anyone walking around the area with a shotgun.
>
> Evan Speck
> Evansville
>
> Sent from my iPad
>



Subject: Somerville Ferruginous Hawk
Date: Fri Jan 30 2015 5:59 am
From: donandchar2 AT gmail.com
 
Yesterday, Jan. 29, I went to Somerville Mine in search of the Ferruginous
Hawk. After 3 plus hours of observing several RLHA, NOHA, RTHA, but no
FEHA, I was driving east on CR700S and pulled into Townsley Cemetery (just
west of CR 1150) to turn around. I got a quick look (about 5 seconds) of a
raptor hovering against a strong headwind as the bird was 40 feet above the
ground and about 35 yards away. I was immediately struck by the
“indistinct, all-white appearance” of the underside of the birds wings,
belly, and tail and the obvious “dark wrist commas” (quoting Jerry Liguori,
“Hawks from Every Angle”). This indicates a juvenile light morph FEHA.


Townsley Cemetery is 2.25 miles NNE of CR900S/1050E where we usually start
looking for the FEHA.


A cemetery may not be the usual place to look for raptors. The bird and I
were just passing through.


Don Allen



Subject: Ferruginous Hawk
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 22:31 pm
From: carroll656 AT msn.com
 
I had the pleasure of observing the Gibson County FEHA at fairly close range the other day.  The bird appeared not just healthy, but vibrant.  It shows no signs of aspergillosis or any other disease.  It has returned to winter in a place 1000 miles from its normal winter range.  Last winter it endured not just birders, but hunted next to one of the largest and loudest coal shovels on the planet, not to mention the clouds of dust and frequent dynamite blasts.  When you consider that the half life of wild bird populations is less than two years, this bird is doing very well.

This bird is thriving because this noisy, dusty reclaimed mine provides its habitat and food requirements. They are known to winter with Harriers and Rough-legged Hawks. FEHA populations are indeed on the decline, but according to Dunne, this is attributed to habitat loss and 12 gauge shotguns (ranchers). It is not attributed to birders tiptoeing across fields.

This bird behaves like other large raptors when approached. It studies you a bit out of curiosity, but mostly ignores you. Get within its zone of comfort, and it lazily picks up and flies to the next post on its circuit. It does not have the least concern about its ability to get away from you. Its circuit at Somerville appears to be on the order of two or three thousand acres.

The ABA code of ethics speaks mainly of harassing nesting birds and repeatedly playing tapes. For the protection of this FEHA I would only add to be suspicious of anyone walking around the area with a shotgun.

Evan Speck
Evansville

Sent from my iPad



Subject: SW Allen Co. Robins, RWBL-- Jan 29 PM
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 18:47 pm
From: rrang AT frontier.com
 
As I exited my vehicle after work on this cold, gloomy afternoon, I took note of 90+ American Robins moving from tree to tree in my and several adjoining neighbors' yards.  Somewhere among them was a calling Yellow-rumped Warbler and a singing (what an optimist) Red-winged Blackbird.
Rodger RangFort Wayne



Subject: reminder on bird viewer behavior
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 18:28 pm
From: eagleowl4180 AT sbcglobal.net
 
It was brought to my attention by a member of this list that someone was chasing the Ferrug. hawk at Somerville Mine in order to get it to fly - this statement was made in a post to the IN-BIRD list. REALLY????.  How many times do people have to beg others to be respectful of wildlife?  The posts asking for compliance with decency and respect do not just apply to snowies.  They are for all wildlife - would you want someone to come running at you or your family  in you yard in order to get you to move?  This is what you are doing, and not only that, winter is a high-stress time already for animals in their quest for survival and food-finding. Lists and sitings and photos should always be secondary to conservation.


Real birders do not chase birds. Be real.

For anyone offended by this message - I am sorry, but repetition and outrage seem to be the only way to get results. I don't even know who this person was, but this behavior is still unacceptable. I would not be writing this if there was not reason to do so.

Patti Reynolds
Indiana Raptor Center



Subject: Greene county SNOW
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 18:00 pm
From: jeremy.ross AT hotmail.com
 

Owl was seen this evening at bee hunter ( not the GP marsh but the " town" on the hwy) south and West of the highway railroad crossing. Close enough to road to view.
Jeremy Ross, Petersburg



Subject: Lake Lemon Golden Eagle!
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 16:42 pm
From: shengeve AT indiana.edu
 
We had our first field trip for my ornithology class today.  As is typical we went to Jim’s and my house for the first part of the field trip to work on feeder birds and get use to binoculars, practicing IDing the birds, etc.   Since Lake Lemon was mostly frozen and my scouting at Lake Monroe yesterday only yielded 1 Common Goldeneye and some Canada Geese, I was hesitant to drag the students away from the feeders and our deck.  The overnight rain combined with the warmer temps did open up a bit of the water out from our deck so we had a good # of Ring-bills coming in and ended up with some nice views of the Bald Eagles!  We started with 3 immatures out on the ice which were joined later by two adults (well the adults flew over but didn’t interact).  Nice comparison of the juvenal, 3-cycle and adult plumages!

The highlight was a GOLDEN EAGLE! We were inside the house hoping a Pileated Woodpecker would come back to the feeders for a better view when another immature eagle came in - there was a discussion about how many eagles we had and someone had the 3 immatures on the ice still, so we realized we had a 4th non-adult! We had been discussing the ages and how to determine the age so I got on the bird to help with the aging and realized it wasn’t a Bald Eagle but a juvenile GOLDEN EAGLE! Picture prefect from the field guide! The bird was flying over the mud / grass open area that has been exposed with the lake draw-down. The bird flew very close to the deck and most students got killer looks.

I ask students at the beginning of the semester to figure out a bird based on the range maps could be found during the semester and to tell me which is their “most wanted” to see during the semester. Not atypically, I had a # who said they wanted to see a Golden Eagle. I explained that it wasn’t very likely but that we should see Bald Eagles! Well many students were very happy that my prediction for the Golden Eagle turned out wrong! We got the bird because we decided to spend the morning at the house and skip going to Riddle Pt or places on Lake Monroe. The Golden Eagle was the last new bird we got just before leaving to head back to school! Now if we can only repeat for tomorrow with the 2nd half of the class!

Our list from the house/deck:

Canada Goose: 8
Mallard: 6
Great Blue Heron: 1
Bald Eagle: 2 juv., 1-3rd yr. and 2 adult
Red-shouldered Hawk: 1
GOLDEN EAGLE (Juv): 1
Ring-billed Gull: 48
Mourning Dove: 7
Belted Kingfisher: 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker: 2 (male and female)
Downy Woodpecker: 3
Hairy Woodpecker: 1 female
Pileated Woodpecker: 1
Blue Jay: 4
American Crow: 3
Carolina Chickadee: 4
Tufted Titmouse: 4
White-breasted Nuthatch: 3
Carolina Wren: 1
European Starling: 5
American Tree Sparrow: 11
Song Sparrow: 3
White-throated Sparrow: 4
Dark-eyed Junco: 8
Northern Cardinal: 6 (4 female; 2 male)
Purple Finch: 5 (1 male; 4 female)
American Goldfinch: 37
House Sparrow: 3 (two males; 1 female; there may have been more)

….susan

____________________________________
Dr. Susan Hengeveld
1001 E. 3rd Street
Department of Biology
Indiana University
Bloomington, IN 47405

shengeve@indiana.edu
office -- Morrison Hall 202
office phone -- 812-855-5239




Subject: SW Allen Robins, RWBL-- Jan. 29 PM
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 15:11 pm
From: rrang AT frontier.com
 
 As I exited my vehicle after work on this cold, gloomy afternoon, I took note of 90+ American Robins moving from tree to tree in my and several adjoining neighbors' yards.  Somewhere among them was a calling Yellow-rumped Warbler and a singing (what an optimist) Red-winged Blackbird.
Rodger RangFort Wayne



Subject: Monthly Bird Survey at Gene Stratton-Porter State Historic Site
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 12:00 pm
From: TConrad AT indianamuseum.org
 
The Gene Stratton-Porter State Historic Site is conducting a base line survey on 80 acres of former farm land in Rome City, Indiana. The information will be used to reference against once the land is restored to wetland and prairie grassland. Monthly surveys of the land will be compiled for  5 years and submitted to the Indiana Academy of Science discussing the impact of the restoration of the land and the increased diversity of bird species.  The survey will be taking place in the farm fields to the west of the Gene Stratton-Porter main property, with 5 specific locations in the fields as survey points. We will meet at the Carriage House Visitor's Center at the Gene Stratton-Porter State Historic Site at 8:00 a.m. on Thursday February 5th  . We are located at 1205 Pleasant Point, Rome City, IN 46784. If you have any questions please contact the site naturalist, Tiffany, at 260.854.3790.

This is a monthly survey that occurs on the first Thursday of each month (also the third Thursday during peak migratory months), weather permitting.?



Tiffany Conrad
Interpretive Naturalist
Gene Stratton-Porter SHS
Rome City, IN
tconrad@indianamuseum.org
260.854.3790




Subject: Diving ducks, Celery Bog Nature Area, Jan 29, 2015
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 9:33 am
From: jdunning AT purdue.edu
 
Chuck Tuttle and I had good views of Canvasback, Redhead, and some other diving ducks at Celery Bog this morning.

Barny
jdunning@purdue.edu

Celery Bog Nature Area, Tippecanoe, US-IN Jan 29, 2015 8:15 AM - 8:45 AM
13 species

Greater White-fronted Goose 3
Canada Goose 100
American Black Duck 3
Mallard 200
Canvasback 6
Redhead 8
Lesser Scaup 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
American Coot 10
Downy Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 1
Carolina Chickadee 1
American Goldfinch 1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21588675

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Daviess County Loggerhead Shrikes 1-28-15
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 9:30 am
From: AKearns AT dnr.in.gov
 
I found two Loggerhead Shrikes in two different areas of Daviess County yesterday while driving a shrike survey route. Details below.



Has anyone seen the (Gibson County) Monty's Station loggerhead recently? I have not seen a report of this bird since Sept 2014. Assuming the same individual, this would have been its 3rd winter in the area, if it was present.



Daviess, Daviess, US-IN
Jan 28, 2015 10:00 AM - 3:15 PM
Protocol: Traveling
50.0 mile(s)
Comments: Loggerhead Shrike survey route. My second winter survey in Daviess County (first survey Dec '14 found one individual LOSH in Daviess). Beautiful, spring-like day, high of 41 degrees and sunny.
33 species

Mallard 2
Northern Shoveler 1 drake in a ditch with MALL
Northern Harrier 8 one adult male, 7 fem/imm mostly immatures
Cooper's Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 13
Rough-legged Hawk 1
Ring-billed Gull 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 20
Mourning Dove 30
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1
American Kestrel 7
Loggerhead Shrike 2 I'd like to request that birders share LOSH sightings with me (akearns@dnr.in.gov) as I am tracking this species in the state. I expect to see some early spring migrants moving through in February, with some of the earliest local pairs beginning to build nests and lay eggs in March. Any details shared with me on sightings will be very welcome. In recent years there have been less than 10 breeding pairs found annually statewide. Today's birds were seen actively foraging for insects along fencerows. Both were unbanded. One bird was likely the same individual seen last month (same area, same habits). The other bird was in an area I've never seen shrikes before, but was smack dab in between two recent breeding territories (only about 0.5 mi from either territory as the shrike flies). In a 3rd area that has had active breeding in recent years, I found a rather fresh vole head impaled on barbed wire but no shrike was found.
Blue Jay 8
American Crow 5
Horned Lark 15
Carolina Chickadee 1
Carolina Wren 1
Eastern Bluebird 5
Northern Mockingbird 9
European Starling 1000
Song Sparrow 2
White-crowned Sparrow 30
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 5
Northern Cardinal 10
Red-winged Blackbird 25
Eastern Meadowlark 57 lots of singing and chasing going on already. Exact count - used a clicker. Daviess is a good county for EAME year-round because of all the hay fields and pastures. I did not seek these birds out, this is just the count I got while looking for shrikes, driving county roads with windows down.
Rusty Blackbird 3 females in a ditch, with a few RWBL
Brown-headed Cowbird 300 one gigantic flock with a few RWBL mixed in
American Goldfinch 4
House Sparrow 500

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21588557

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


Amy Kearns
Assistant Nongame Bird Biologist
Indiana Division of Fish & Wildlife
562 DNR Rd Mitchell IN 47446
akearns@dnr.in.gov
(812) 849-4586 ext. 223




Subject: 28 Jan 2015 S.W. Indiana Loop: Ferruginous Hawk & Little Gull
Date: Thu Jan 29 2015 7:52 am
From: kj.brock AT comcast.net
 
28 Jan 2015  S.W. Indiana Loop with John Cassady and Lynea Hinchman.

We departed in the wee hours for a Ferruginous Hawk blitz to Gibson County. Luck was with us and we quickly found the Ferruginous, which provided sufficient time to swing by Turtle Creek Res. All in all it was a very long, but marvelous, birding day.

—MONTGOMERY COUNTY ALONG HWY 231
Cooper’s Hawk,1
Red-tailed Hawk,2
American Crow,13
European Starling,55

—PUTNAM COUNTY ALONG HWY 231
Canada Goose,5
Turkey Vulture,9
Red-tailed Hawk,1
Pileated Woodpecker,1 flew across road
American Crow,5
European Starling,215
House Sparrow,5

—OWEN COUNTY ALONG HWY 231
Red-tailed Hawk,3
Rock Pigeon,1
Mourning Dove,6
Red-headed Woodpecker,1
Red-bellied Woodpecker,2
Downy Woodpecker,1
American Crow,6
European Starling,80
Eastern Towhee,1 male- flew across the road
Northern Cardinal,4
Eastern Meadowlark,12 flock

—GREENE COUNTY ALONG HWY 231
Canada Goose,20
Rock Pigeon,1
Mourning Dove,3
Merlin,1- near Bloomfield
American Kestrel,4- 2 males, 1 fem & 1 unknown
American Crow,7
Eastern Bluebird,4
European Starling,70

—DAVIESS COUNTY ALONG I-69
Mute Swan,2
Red-tailed Hawk,5
Rock Pigeon,13
American Kestrel,3
Mourning Dove,8
Horned Lark,3
American Crow,4
European Starling,55
Common Grackle,500 flock

—PIKE COUNTY ALONG I-69
Red-tailed Hawk,4
American Crow,3
European Starling,20
Common Grackle,1500 several flocks

—GIBSON COUNTY ALONG I-69 & LOCALLY
Canada Goose,34
American Kestrel,5
Blue Jay,1
American Crow,4
Carolina Chickadee,2
European Starling,30

—SOMERVILLE MINE (GIBSON CO) Met Del Striegel (of Georgetown) and Mary _____ (of Kentucky).
Northern Harrier,4- including adult male & female
Red-tailed Hawk,5
Rough-legged Hawk,1 light-morph imm.
FERRUGINOUS HAWK,1 adult light-morph (previously reported) See Lynea's post for details
Northern Flicker,8
Horned Lark,3
Song Sparrow,5
Red-winged Blackbird,50
Eastern Meadowlark,16

—KNOX COUNTY ALONG U.S. 41
Red-tailed Hawk,7
Rock Pigeon,7
American Kestrel,7
Horned Lark,1
American Crow,2

—SULLIVAN COUNTY ALONG U.S. 41 & hwys 58, 63 &154
Red-tailed Hawk,2
Rock Pigeon,5
Mourning Dove,20
Eurasian Collared-Dove,6- near Shelburn
Red-bellied Woodpecker,1
American Kestrel,8
Horned Lark,17

—TURTLE CREEK RESERVOIR
Canada Goose,10
Northern Pintail,57
Hooded Merganser,75
Common Merganser,6
Red-breasted Merganser,1
Pied-billed Grebe,6
Horned Grebe,31
Great Blue Heron,1
Double-crested Cormorant,4
Bald Eagle,1 imm.
American Coot,52
Bonaparte’s Gull,75
LITTLE GULL,1 first-cycle- previously reported
Ring-billed Gull,250
American Kestrel,1
Eastern Bluebird,2
House Finch,1 male
American Goldfinch,4

—VIGO COUNTY ALONG U.S. 41 & I-70
Red-tailed Hawk,1
American Kestrel,1
American Crow,500- in fields off I-70
European Starling,100

—VIGO COUNTY ALONG I-70
Rock Pigeon,20

—PUTNAM COUNTY ALONG HWY 231
Black Vulture,1- North of Greencastle
Turkey Vulture,5

—ran out of sunlight

Ken Brock
Chesterton, IN




Subject: Ferruginous Hawk: Gibson County TODAY
Date: Wed Jan 28 2015 21:12 pm
From: canyonwren AT comcast.net
 
Let me begin by thanking Evan Speck for alerting us to the return of the
Somerville Ferruginous Hawk. I greatly appreciate you posting this info.

Today, John Cassady, Ken Brock and I journeyed down to Somerville in hopes
of seeing the Ferruginous Hawk.

When we arrived in the area, we noted another birder was there so we spoke
with him regarding the hawk. Del Streigel had been watching for more than
two
hours when we arrived, but had not seen the bird. We exchanged phone
numbers and agreed to contact each other should the bird be found.

After that, we set up scopes on the high point on CR 900 South near 1050
East. We scanned and searched looking over all the raptors that we saw.
Ken announced he had a bird on the ground that appeared to be dark. I got
it in my scope and could see the white on the breast and the red in the back
area. I immediately called John Cassady over and he, too, saw the red on
the back. We both agreed that this was the Ferruginous Hawk. At that
point, John decided to walk out in the field towards the bird to see if he
could get a better look or a photo. It was quite distant from where we were
and the light wasn't good at that angle.

In the meantime, I alerted Del Streigel that we had found the bird so he
could get a look at it.

As John walked out in the field a short distance, the bird took the the air
and we all got decent looks at it in flight. We could see the white tail,
the long wings, and the pale patch in the ends of the wings. A No. Harrier
came in and began harrassing the FeHa which gave us a great opportunity for
size comparison. The FeHa was twice the size of the harrier. Very
impressive.

The FeHa flew off to the southwest and landed on the ground again at the
edge of the road that I think was 1000 East. Soon, it flew again and this
time, it landed on the cross bar on the top of a utility pole. We all
mentally marked where the bird was and drove towards it. It was actually on
an east west road that went west off of 1000 East. We parked on 1000 East
and set up our scopes. Again, the bird flew. We all got excellent looks at
it this time. It climbed higher and higher and then began to descend again.
At that point, we put away our scopes and after a short conversation with a
conservation officer driving by and other birders, we departed the area.


Here is a link for a map of the area described above.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Somerville+Mine,+Columbia+Township,+IN+47660/@38.2219826,-87.3549345,14z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x886e17e3d2303171:0x47793350a5855add

If you really want to see this bird, I would encourage you to be sure to
scan the ground. This is a ground loving species so that is a good place to
be sure to check for it.

Good birding!
Lynea


Lynea Hinchman
Michigan City, Indiana
Heart of the Indiana Dunes
canyonwrenATcomcastDOTnet



http://www.flickr.com/photos/c...

”Spread love everywhere you go: first of all in your own home. Give love to
your children, to your wife or husband, to a next door neighbor . . . Let no
one ever come to you without leaving better and happier. Be the living
expression of God’s kindness; kindness in your face, kindness in your eyes,
kindness in your smile, kindness in your warm greeting.” —Mother Teresa




https://www.google.com/maps/place/Somerville+Mine,+Columbia+Township,+IN+47660/@38.2219826,-87.3549345,14z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x886e17e3d2303171:0x47793350a5855add




Subject: Ferruginous Hawk: Gibson County
Date: Wed Jan 28 2015 19:46 pm
From: carroll656 AT msn.com
 
The FEHA was seen again today by multiple observers.  The best time seems to be between 10am and 2pm CST.  The location is cr900 about 2 miles east of Buckskin, IN off hwy 57.  This is newly reclaimed coal mine and makes you feel like you are on the arctic tundra.  The bird moves about this area and can be seen soaring, flying low over, perching on poles or trees or on the ground.  But be warned, some people are lucky and some spend a long time here before they see it.  There are also plenty of Harriers and Rough-legged Hawks in this area.  If you stay till about 4pm, you will see the Short-eared Owls come out.

We haves high hopes this bird will spend the winter here. Some shots I took the other day:

https://flic.kr/p/qG4sD2
https://flic.kr/p/qFXtVd
https://flic.kr/p/qFXss3
https://flic.kr/p/qYrc4Y

Evan Speck



Subject: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Date: Tue Jan 27 2015 16:16 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 

I observed a male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on our soot cake feeder this afternoon near downtown Lafayette. ?Mike Brattain







Subject: Open water Eagle Creek with massive numbers of ducks geese.
Date: Tue Jan 27 2015 15:32 pm
From: spikeselig AT sbcglobal.net
 
Open the below video from YouTube.  The video was taken with my Sony 400V 100X zoom camera on tripod.  Some of Ids were incorrect because of small screen I was watching as I shot video, however, when the video shows on full page on the computer, none of the birds in the video presented either counting or identification challenges.  The camera ways 23 oz, lighter than most binoculars.  The lens is designed and built by Carl Ziess for Sony.  I could have zoomed to around 400X by setting the camera on manual focus and turning the focus ring. However the extra zoom power reverts back to 100X when you take a picture or a video. See if you can find other ducks, etc. in the masses. My own opinion is that the camera worked far better than using a spotting scope. Even in low early morning light levels, the image was bright and sharp.
Spike

"Your new duck call worked far better than I would ever have expected!!!!"

http://youtu.be/X1S8N_tfHtk



Subject: Rough-legged Hawk
Date: Tue Jan 27 2015 8:33 am
From: cellistharpsichordist AT yahoo.ca
 
Had a magnificent view, with John Davis, of a large, mostly dark, Rough-legged hawk first flying in front of our vehicle, then landing in a small tree  on C.R. 10 just northwest of the Nappanee Street Extension intersection at about 430pm on Monday, in Elkhart.  I have never gotten one so close to town before.Entire belly, almost to throat was dark, shoulder patches on wing undersides were dark and there was the terminal band on the tail.



Subject: Eagle Watch Weekend - 1/24
Date: Tue Jan 27 2015 8:09 am
From: jhengeve AT indiana.edu
 
Between noon and 3:00 on Saturday afternoon, Susan & I along with Don & Betsy Whitehead were stationed with our telescopes at the beach at Fairfax S.R.A. on Lk. Monroe in order to point out eagles to the attendees of the Eagle Watch Weekend festivities.  The area surrounding the marina and much of the adjacent areas were free of ice though there was still a considerable amount of ice farther out on the lake.  A large group of ~3000 RING-B. GULLS plus ~10 HERRING GULLS roosted well out onto the ice in front of the Four Winds Resort.

In the open water of the Fairfax beach + marina area, there was a pair of WOOD DUCKS, a half dozen BUFFLEHEAD, a few COMMON GOLDENEYE, a COMMON LOON, ~10 PIED-B. GREBES, and a dozen AM. COOTS. There had been a number of Bald Eagles around on Friday but they hadn’t shown themselves yet on Saturday. Shortly after noon, I was looking at the group of gulls loafing on the ice to the southeast when I noticed a single SNOW GOOSE on the ice next to the gulls. As there were no eagles to be found, this turned out to be the main attraction among the “eagle watchers.”

After ~45 minutes, during which time many of the Eagle Watch participants were able to see the white goose, Don Whitehead announced that there was an adult BALD EAGLE coming down to the ice. I looked in my scope, which had been trained on the Snow Goose and, voila, there was the ad. Bald Eagle. It took a few seconds to realize that the eagle was, in fact, on top of the Snow Goose!

Over the next hour, during which time the ad. eagle plucked and devoured much of the Snow Goose, lots of folks came to see the spectacle. The adult eagle was joined by two immatures that watched the adult from a short distance away, and later by a second adult that landed a little way to the north of the other 3 birds. After the adult eagle was satiated, the two immatures eventually were able to eat some of the scraps. The eagle watchers not only had nice views of adult and immature Bald Eagles but also interactions among the eagles. It was a fun weekend!

Jim & Susan Hengeveld
Unionville, IN





Subject: Goose Pond today 1/26/15
Date: Tue Jan 27 2015 6:35 am
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
I Went down to Goose Pond on Monday 1/26/15.  
Started off with GP5/6 MPW. Water is still pretty high.  Was treated at the login station, with a good look at a Rough-legged hawk.  I knew it was going to be a good day.
1 - Rough-Legged hawk
2 - Am. Kestrels6 mallards20 Canada goose
GP 7/16 along 59300 - Canada Goose30 mallards 2 Hooded Merganser

The same Rough-legged hawk was hunting over here now.
I kept seeing Sandhills fly over, so I decided to find out where they were going.  I went west on 400s.  At the crossroad of 400s and 1450w, on the se corner the cornfield, there they were.  Approximately 800 with 20-40 landing every few minutes.
GP9/10/11/12
250 Canada goose12 sparrows (I wasn't too sure of what they were exactly. I want to say Prairie sparrows, but I don't want to call them that.)6 pairs of Cardinals1 Red tailed hawk1 sharp shinned hawk2 Am. Kestrels6 crows45- Am. Tree Sparrow6 - White-cr. Sparrow 2 - big white birds...Yes I know what they were, but we don't talk about them.50+ ring billed guls they were a little hard to count because there were about 8-10 constantly flying in and out.
BH4/5:8- Gr. White-fr. Goose100-  Canada Goose 30 - Mallard10 - No. Pintai2 - Hooded Merganser1 - Sharp-shinned HawkRing-billed Gull - 7

1100w:1- No. Harrier2 - Am. Kestrel20 - Am. Tree Sparrow 
200S (BH 2/3):20 - Gr. White-fr. Goose2 - Am. Black Duck10 - Mallard2 - Am. Kestrel 
1200w1 - imm eagle 1st maybe 2nd year.  I'm not all that up yet on what they look like at different ages.  It had white under the wings and no mistake about the head.  1 - Sharp Shinned hawk 1 - Red Tailed hawk on one the high tension towers south of 500s.
While here I saw probably 3-400 sandhills fly over in a huge group.
It was a good day, much better than my hunt along the wabash e of peru on sunday.
Steven



Subject: Greene Co. Snowy Owl, NO Sighting
Date: Mon Jan 26 2015 19:36 pm
From: mistyfields75 AT gmail.com
 
My daughter and I ventured out to the known locations and sightings of the
Greene Co. SnowyOwl that has been recently seen over the weekend and we
could not locate it from 4pm to 6pm. We went down all the roads, side roads
and had to use our 4W drive truck to maneuver down the horrible muddy
roads. We did get stuck but managed to get out. Anyone else have any luck
today in the afternoon?

Misty Fields
knox Co.
Mistyfields75@gmail.com



Subject: Goose Pond
Date: Mon Jan 26 2015 19:28 pm
From: whitehea AT indiana.edu
 
This morning Bill Jones, Bob Dodd, Bob Kissel and I birded a number of sites in the Goose Pond Complex - tried for the Snowy Owl, but failed. thousands and thousands of geese and ducks - clouds in the air. What a sight!



100S:

Gr. White-fronted Goose - 175 (flyover)

Snow Goose - 750 (flyover)

Canada Goose - 12

Bald Eagle - 1 (ad)

No. Harrier - 2 (1 male, 1 imm)

Horned Lark - 6

White-cr. Sparrow - 7

E. Meadowlark - 4

House Finch - 2

BH4/5:

Gr. White-fr. Goose - 12

Canada Goose - 200

Mallard - 30

No. Pintail - 12

Hooded Merganser - 2

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Sandhill Crane - 11

Ring-billed Gull - 7

1100:

No. Harrier - 1 (male)

Am. Kestrel - 2

Am. Tree Sparrow - 19

1225:

Gr.White-fr. Goose and Snow Goose - 10-20,000! An unbelievable sight! Probably 65% Snow Geese

Sandhill Crane - 17

1200:

Gadwall - 90

Am. Wigeon - 2

Mallard - 400

No. Pintail - 250

Bald Eagle - 3 (2 ad., 1 juv)

No. Harrier - 3 (imm)

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Ring-billed Gull - 18

plus thousands of ducks in the air

Rt.59, DD:

Canada Goose - hundreds

Gadwall - 120

Mallard - hundreds

Redhead - 2

No. Harrier - 4 (imm)

Rough-legged Hawk - 2 (imm light phase)

Sandhill Crane - 45



GP9/10/11/12/13:

Canada Goose - 12

Gr. White-fr. Goose - 50

Gadwall - 12

Am. Black Duck - 3

Mallard - 6

Ring-necked Duck - 9

Bald Eagle - 1 (ad)

No. Harrier - 2 (1 fem, 1 imm)

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Rough-legged Hawk - 2 (1 light imm, 1 light male)

Ring-billed Gull - 50

E. Bluebird - 1

Am. Tree Sparrow - 45

White-cr. Sparrow - 4

200S (BH 2/3):

Gr. White-fr. Goose - 20

Am. Black Duck - 2

Mallard - 8

Am. Kestrel - 2

Sandhill Crane - 17



Don Whitehead

Bloomington

whitehea@indiana.edu



Subject: Chinook Mine, Short-eared Owls
Date: Mon Jan 26 2015 18:33 pm
From: Peter.Scott AT indstate.edu
 
Chinook Mine Northeast (Clay Co.), Clay, US-IN
Jan 26, 2015 5:00 PM - 6:40 PM
Protocol: Traveling
6.0 mile(s)
Comments: Drove the circuit of 650W, 500N, 550W, 600N, and walked along 650W. Snow falling for the past hour, but ground still bare; 28 degrees F, calm. Gravel roads barely cold enough not to be muddy.
13 species

Canada Goose 40 in flight
Gadwall 1 with mallards
Mallard 25 on open (unfrozen) pond on 600N just west of 650W (this pond has enough drainage and flow that it tends to stay open).
Northern Harrier 4 flying near Short-eared Owls at times
Cooper's Hawk 1 scared up a flock of robins and blackbirds
Red-tailed Hawk 2
Rough-legged Hawk 1
SHORT-EARED OWL 4 minimum number, seen in flight at once; possibly a few more. Owls were active from 5:00 pm on, well before dark. Most activity centered on a ridge half a mile north of 500N, not far east of 650W. Perched high in tree line, flew at various heights, including quite high (200 feet up); barking at each other; flying near Harriers at times.

American Robin 100
European Starling 100
American Tree Sparrow 4
Red-winged Blackbird 100
Brown-headed Cowbird 200

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21558648

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



Subject: Snowy Owl - Hoosier Park - Anderson, IN
Date: Mon Jan 26 2015 17:53 pm
From: jeffreytimmons AT comcast.net
 
I have been driving around the county roads looking for Snowy Owls.  I have
not had any luck but my neighbor sent a picture of one at Hoosier Park on
1/16/15. Unfortunately it went to my home (cell) phone that we never check
because only telemarketers call :( If you are in the area keep an eye out
for a Snowy Owl.


Jeff Timmons




Subject: Ferruginous Hawk, Somerville
Date: Mon Jan 26 2015 13:31 pm
From: tatms AT fullnet.com
 
Thank you Evan Speck! We zipped from Goose Pond down to Hemmer Woods and seen the Ferruginous hawk at 900 s. On the south side of 900 south, up from Hemmer Woods. 

Theresia Schwinghammer

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Greene County Snowy
Date: Mon Jan 26 2015 10:39 am
From: tatms AT fullnet.com
 
The snowy owl is present this morning in Greene county along co road 700 in the corn stubble. It's to the west and north of the bridge where it was seen the other day. 

Theresia Schwinghammer

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Ferruginous Hawk
Date: Mon Jan 26 2015 10:12 am
From: carroll656 AT msn.com
 

A Ferruginous Hawk has returned to Somerville, Gibson County. Same place by Hemmers Woods.
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID



Subject: Notre Dame, Sunday Jan. 25
Date: Sun Jan 25 2015 19:54 pm
From: Laura.S.Fuderer.1 AT nd.edu
 
There was an amazing number of geese and ducks on St. Joseph's Lake this
evening:

ca. 300 Canada Geese
ca. 300 Goldeneye
50 Hooded Mergansers
24 Common Mergansers
30 Buffleheads
ca. 150 Mallards
1 coot
ca. 150 Herring Gulls
ca. 50 Ring Billed Gulls

Laura Fuderer
Conservation Chair
South Bend-Elkhart Audubon Society



Subject: Eagle Creek Resevoirt Sunday morning.
Date: Sun Jan 25 2015 15:55 pm
From: spikeselig AT sbcglobal.net
 
I arrived at the EC launch ramps at 6:30 AM in total darkness.  I set my Sony 50X optical zoom on manual.  Then I set the aperture at widest setting and set the shutter speed at a1/4 second.  next, I set the ISO at the highest setting of 3,,200. at  these settings in the early almost dark, the viewfinder was still vary dark but when I took a test picture, the picture came out looking like mid day.  I zoomed to the max 100X and took pictures of the thousands of Canada Geese and ducks.  Later after many pictures I tried to do a video and found that I had left the cameras memory card at home, with no card all picture attempts failed, no pictures.  I then use the camera like a scope and set the camera to manual focus. On this camera, when you turn the focus ring while on manual focus, the camera turns to and stays on way over 200 power   The images of ducks .7 miles away were great!   Laurie stopped by and I gave her the birds I had found for the EC Sunday
count. I left and came back at 1PM where I found a Coot, a Northern Pintail, and 2 Herring Gulls that came in during my absence. These birds did not get included on the Sunday count just published in In-bird which would bring the lists total to 47.

Some birds of note:

Greater White fronted Goose 79 counted at left end of open water in ice. There were probably over 100 as I did not count the open water's right, East end.

Canada Geese well over 1000. I will get pics tomorrow before morning fly and get pictures for accurate cont. I hope the other birders I saw studying the mass of ducks and geese this morning will publish their own counts for comparison. I will get a video sweep and publish tomorrow night.
Mallards I will get meaningful counts from pictures tomorrow
American Golden eye will get meaningful counts from pictures tomorrow.
Coot 1
Red-breasted Merganser 2
Common Merganser 4
Ring-billed Gull 8
Hearing Gull 2
Northern Pintail 1



Subject: Fwd: Greene Co Snowy Owl
Date: Sun Jan 25 2015 14:47 pm
From: brown.jd AT comcast.net
 
Lee,

A slight correction to the location. This morning Gary and I were looking at the owl from the corner of 600S and 1225W. (1225W is what Google maps calls it...)

You are correct that the roads are in bad shape. I found the owl by driving south from 600S on 1225W about 200 yards at which point I decided not to go further due to ruts. I stopped and scanned the fields and was lucky enough to find it in the field to the right of the road about 1/2 mile south.

There were thousands of geese in the fields east of 1225W at the time.



JB

----- Original Message -----

From: "Lee W. Sterrenburg"
To: "in-bird-l@list indiana. edu"
Cc: "Gary Langell"
Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2015 11:48:23 AM
Subject: [IN-BIRD-L] Fwd: Greene Co Snowy Owl

Reposting a message from Gary Langell and Jim Brown. With their permission.

I talked with Gary by phone before doing this current posting. It is on ebird too.

Please admire the Snowy Owl from afar. Don't harass it.

Roads are reportedly getting terrible with the continued thaw.

People have told me CR 1250 W and CR 700 S are close to (or are) actually impassible today for almost all vehicles.

Shades of the way the muddy, rutted roads can become at the end of February or early March.

--Lee Sterrenburg
Bloomington


Begin forwarded message:




From: "Langell, Gary" < glangell@dnr.IN.gov >
Date: January 25, 2015 11:20:26 AM EST
To: Sterrenburg Lee < sterren@INDIANA.EDU >, Kearns Amy < greenpertplus@hotmail.com >
Subject: Greene Co Snowy Owl

Viewed snowy owl at 10:25 this AM with Jim Brown from 600 S. It was south of 600s and west of 1250 W. About 3/4 of the way to 700 S. And a few hundred feet west of 1250 W.

Sent from my iPhone








Subject: White-winged Scoter at Charlestown SP, Clark Co.
Date: Sun Jan 25 2015 13:45 pm
From: in-bird-l AT list.indiana.edu
 
One female/immature WWSC seen at the boat ramp swimming with some Scaups this morning.
Also of note were 21 American Black Ducks seen at the beaver works at the mouth of the creek south of the boat ramp.  Seeing that large of a number of ABDUs at one time, especially for Clark County, was very unusual and a real treat.
Brian Johnson "Living hard will take its toll."



Subject: Eagle Creek Park, Sunday January 25, 2015
Date: Sun Jan 25 2015 13:30 pm
From: sailbird AT tds.net
 
Weather   Cloudy, misty
Temp. middle 30's

Sunday morning bird walk tallied 44 species. The list includes

Greater White-fronted Goose
Canada Goose
Cackling Goose
American Black Duck
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Great blue Heron
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Coot
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Barred Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
European Starling
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
House Finch
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Bird walk begins at 9 AM each Sunday at the Ornithology Center, all are welcome.

Don Williams



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