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Updated on August 4, 2020, 2:40 pm

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04 Aug: @ 14:33:53 
Re: Now over 820 whooping cranes [Jeff Keating]
03 Aug: @ 22:03:27 
Now over 820 whooping cranes [Kenneth Kinman]
02 Aug: @ 22:18:08 
Neighborhood birds gone (or molting); plus the eastern Whooping Crane efforts [Kenneth Kinman]
02 Aug: @ 11:00:53 
Flycatcher at Burcham [Antonio, Robert J.]
02 Aug: @ 00:01:25 
County Listing Totals to be Updated August 7 [Kevin Groeneweg]
31 Jul: @ 08:10:25 
Birds on the move [Chuck Otte]
30 Jul: @ 10:24:37 
Least Flycatcher - Elk County [Chad Gardner]
27 Jul: @ 15:15:28 
Graham County today [Henry Armknecht]
26 Jul: @ 17:42:38 
Cliff Swallow creches between fledging and migration [Kenneth Kinman]
26 Jul: @ 16:37:58 
Re: Cliff Swallow Fall Migration [Kenneth Kinman]
26 Jul: @ 13:01:47 
Cliff Swallow Fall Migration [Lloyd Davies]
26 Jul: @ 10:56:28 
Burcham: Sunday Morning [Antonio, Robert J.]
26 Jul: @ 09:14:23 
BROADTAILED-HUMMER [51meyer50]
25 Jul: @ 11:32:21 
FW: feed question [Antonio, Robert J.]
25 Jul: @ 11:16:05 
feed question [Antonio, Robert J.]
25 Jul: @ 10:33:57 
Lesser Goldfinch (and belated Broad-tailed Hummingbird) [Jeff Calhoun]
25 Jul: @ 09:59:23 
KOS fall meeting [Cheryl Miller]
24 Jul: @ 17:25:05 
Spring meeting 2020 - Horned Lark [armknecht]
24 Jul: @ 12:22:47 
Re: Quivira on Thursday [Rader, Mike [KDWPT]]
23 Jul: @ 17:23:44 
Quivira on Thursday [Gregg Friesen]
23 Jul: @ 13:38:31 
Road Closure on Cheyenne Bottoms Preserve [Robert Penner]
22 Jul: @ 21:45:09 
kingbird family hanging around [Kenneth Kinman]
22 Jul: @ 15:49:09 
Change of Address [Michelle Folster]
22 Jul: @ 15:43:49 
KOS publications [tom.shane]
21 Jul: @ 09:55:56 
Re: Western hummingbird reports from Wichita [DON KAZMAIER]
20 Jul: @ 18:45:48 
Western hummingbird reports from Wichita [Pete Janzen]
20 Jul: @ 17:29:54 
Greater Roadrunner Harvey county [Carolyn Schwab]
20 Jul: @ 17:08:10 
CB Tricolored Heron [mike rader]
20 Jul: @ 10:37:52 
Meade County [tflowers@carrollsweb.com]
20 Jul: @ 09:53:28 
Least Flycatchers [Jeff Calhoun]
20 Jul: @ 03:05:37 
Gove/Logan/Sheridan sightings [Christopher Frick]
19 Jul: @ 21:19:11 
First Hummingbird [Donna Meyer]
19 Jul: @ 15:15:41 
Osprey [Ted Cable]
19 Jul: @ 09:32:28 
Wilson's Warbler [Antonio, Robert J.]
18 Jul: @ 22:05:36 
Re: Wichita Eagle Newspaper Bird Articles [Robert Gress]
18 Jul: @ 22:00:36 
Re: Wichita Eagle Newspaper Bird Articles [j43fox]
18 Jul: @ 21:04:13 
Update: Young kingbird fell from nest [Kenneth Kinman]
18 Jul: @ 17:31:07 
Wichita Eagle Newspaper Bird Articles [ok_forbs]
18 Jul: @ 10:01:41 
Re: FOS Rufous Hummingbird [Jeff Calhoun]
17 Jul: @ 07:32:19 
Re: History of the Birds of Kansas book from 1891 [mary herold]
17 Jul: @ 06:57:50 
Re: History of the Birds of Kansas book from 1891 [Robert Gress]
17 Jul: @ 06:38:41 
History of the Birds of Kansas book from 1891 [mary herold]
15 Jul: @ 13:25:41 
Please help me to help receive these posts for Kansas [DON KAZMAIER]
15 Jul: @ 13:19:59 
Fwd: FOS Rufous Hummingbird [51meyer50]
15 Jul: @ 10:07:15 
Re: Mississippi Kite diet [Forrest Miller]
15 Jul: @ 07:36:20 
Re: FOS Rufous Hummingbird [Jeff Calhoun]
15 Jul: @ 07:04:14 
FOS Rufous Hummingbird [Jeff Calhoun]
15 Jul: @ 06:18:24 
Mississippi Kite diet [G & J Fenton Friesen]
13 Jul: @ 20:55:42 
Young kingbird fell from nest [Kenneth Kinman]
13 Jul: @ 20:24:50 
Morris County Birds [Gary Haden]





Subject: Now over 820 whooping cranes
Date: Tue Aug 4 2020 14:33 pm
From: jffkeats AT gmail.com
 
Ken,

Thanks for the information. With any decent reproductive year, they should
be pushing 4 digits in total population by today.

Jeff Keating

On Mon, Aug 3, 2020 at 10:03 PM Kenneth Kinman wrote:

> Hi All,
> I was reading a news report about a man in Louisiana recently
> ordered to pay a fine and restitution costs (for a total of $85,000) for
> killing two whooping cranes four years ago. And then I looked for
> up-to-date information on how many whooping cranes we now have. The
> Quivira website shows there are a total of 826 whooping cranes (as of
> February 2020). See the two weblinks below.
> ---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
> Fine and restitution costs for killing two whooping cranes:
> https://abcnews.go.com/US/wire...
>
> Quivira website on how many whooping cranes there are (breakdown below):
> https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Qui...
>
> Wood-Buffalo/Aransas Flock 504
> Wisconsin/Florida Migratory 85
> Florida Non-migratory 9
> Louisiana Non-migratory 69
> Captive Birds 159
> TOTAL
> 826
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
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> mailto:ksbird-l-request@listserv.ksu.edu
>

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Subject: Now over 820 whooping cranes
Date: Mon Aug 3 2020 22:03 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi All,
I was reading a news report about a man in Louisiana recently ordered to pay a fine and restitution costs (for a total of $85,000) for killing two whooping cranes four years ago. And then I looked for up-to-date information on how many whooping cranes we now have. The Quivira website shows there are a total of 826 whooping cranes (as of February 2020). See the two weblinks below.
---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
Fine and restitution costs for killing two whooping cranes: https://abcnews.go.com/US/wire...

Quivira website on how many whooping cranes there are (breakdown below): https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Qui...

Wood-Buffalo/Aransas Flock 504
Wisconsin/Florida Migratory 85
Florida Non-migratory 9
Louisiana Non-migratory 69
Captive Birds 159
TOTAL
826
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


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Subject: Neighborhood birds gone (or molting); plus the eastern Whooping Crane efforts
Date: Sun Aug 2 2020 22:18 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi All,
Seems like almost all the birds in my neighborhood are gone. Or maybe some of them are still around and just hiding a lot during their molting period. One robin still hanging around and looking a bit ragged (so apparently molting), plus a boring pair of doves (with one young) doing nothing interesting at all.
I especially hate seeing my western kingbirds disappear the last week of July. And large groups of migrating nighthawks won't be arriving until the middle of the month, which I always look forward to. Meanwhile, I suppose the stagnant weather will not offer much hope of anything arriving in my yard anytime soon.
------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
P.S. I was listening to a radio interview about the eastern Whooping crane flock and how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting that effort:
https://www.wpr.org/listen/166...

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Subject: Flycatcher at Burcham
Date: Sun Aug 2 2020 11:00 am
From: anto AT ku.edu
 
At the end of my morning walk at the north head of the river trail was a small Empid flitting & catching insects at or below eye level - it buzzed me. The bird did not vocalize but I think it was a Least FC returning southward. A Spotted Sandpiper was bobbing around the KU boat dock at the start of my walk. Bird song of many of the breeding birds has been diminishing.  The part of the colony of Cliff Swallows that remains at the Mass Street bridge, however, have been increasingly active and calling for more than a week. I counted 17 Common Vultures back at their summer-long post in the dead trees near the bridge on the river trail - it had been 10 max prior. Really comfortable and bright morning - a friendly bicyclist stole my line - beautiful morning along the Kaw.

Bob Antonio
Lawrence

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Subject: County Listing Totals to be Updated August 7
Date: Sun Aug 2 2020 0:01 am
From: kgroeneweg AT sbcglobal.net
 
County Listers,

Please send me your lifetime county updates, as well as updates to your Kansas life and year list totals, by Friday, August7. To participate you must have seen or heard a minimum of 75 species to be "listable" in a county. Send your updates tokgroeneweg@sbcglobal.net. Please send only updates to your list totals and not your entire list of county totals. Let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks,
Kevin Groeneweg
Wichita


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Subject: Birds on the move
Date: Fri Jul 31 2020 8:10 am
From: cotte AT ksu.edu
 
Just before 8 a.m. this morning I was outside and heard multiple Upland Sandpipers calling overhead clearly heading south (Junction City, Geary County). With clear skies and northerly breezes forecast for the next couple of days birds are certainly going to be on the move so stay alert!

Chuck


Chuck Otte cotte@ksu.edu

County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources

Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28 785-238-4161

Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028 FAX 785-238-7166

http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

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Subject: Least Flycatcher - Elk County
Date: Thu Jul 30 2020 10:24 am
From: 000001064936e2d7-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
I was birding at Polk Daniels Lake and came across a small flycatcher. Ok, drab olive/grayish, two prominent white wingbars, slight crest. Typical Eastern Wood-pewee, however it had a white eyering and the wings were fairly short. Then it made a call, and it was definitely a Least Flycatcher. 

Chad Gardner

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Subject: Graham County today
Date: Mon Jul 27 2020 15:15 pm
From: whatabirder AT hotmail.com
 
Jeff Calhoun found White-winged Doves in Hill City and Bogue today. They are apparently new to the Graham County list. Since it was a little cooler today and close enough that I could go without breaking quarantine instructions from the county health department, I went up to look for the doves and managed to hear one in each town.

Jeff also reported an unidentified Grosbeak (Black-headed or Rose-breasted) call near Nicodemus so I tried for that. I did not locate a Grosbeak but did hear and then see a male Spotted Towhee that Jeff had seen earlier today at that location.

The Towhee then proceeded to repeatedly sing a very good Eastern Towhee sounding "Drink your tea." I was never able to see the bird as it sang, but am convinced that it was the same bird that I saw since it was singing from pretty much the same perch. There was nothing about the appearance of the bird that suggested anything but pure Spotted Towhee. Had I not heard the scold of a Spotted and then seen the Spotted, this bird would likely have been recorded as an Eastern Towhee. I did record it as Spotted.

Let the buyer (birder) beware, I guess.

Henry A.
Hays

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Subject: Cliff Swallow creches between fledging and migration
Date: Sun Jul 26 2020 17:42 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi All,
In between the time cliff swallows fledge and start migration, the fledglings assemble in "creches" where the parents continue to feed them. A lot information about the creches of cliff swallows can be found at the weblink below (starting on page 175).
---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
https://books.google.com/books...
[https://books.google.com/books...
Coloniality in the Cliff Swallow
books.google.com


________________________________
From: Kenneth Kinman
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 4:37 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Cliff Swallow Fall Migration

Hi Lloyd,
Since they migrate in flocks, I suspect a lot of them are probably still together. And the parents and fledglings know each other's voices so they can keep track of one another. Although they are long-distance migrants, they apparently take their sweet time moving south and mainly during the day.
And there is "safety in numbers" (from predators), so there probably would be no good reason for them to disperse during migration. Anyway, below are a couple of weblinks to interesting research on cliff swallows in Nebraska and how natural selection has changed them as they adapted to concrete human structures and highways (rather than cliffs).
------------- Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
https://www.kqed.org/quest/509...

https://newterritorymag.com/20...

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Lloyd Davies
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 1:00 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Cliff Swallow Fall Migration

Have been walking nearly every night since June 24th under Hwy 56 overpass
at Luta Creek north of Marion where a colony of many dozen cliff swallows
had built nests. There might be a hundred mud nests under those supports.
Until five days ago there was a cloud swallows coming and going and now
they're gone. Saw one on the 21st.



Are they migrating south with fledges or just dispersed? I've looked up
various migration times and it could be.



Thanks

Lloyd Davies

Marion, Kansas





Btw, hear the red-shouldered hawks almost every evening up and down Luta
Creek (Mud Creek) in Marion itself.



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Subject: Cliff Swallow Fall Migration
Date: Sun Jul 26 2020 16:37 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi Lloyd,
Since they migrate in flocks, I suspect a lot of them are probably still together. And the parents and fledglings know each other's voices so they can keep track of one another. Although they are long-distance migrants, they apparently take their sweet time moving south and mainly during the day.
And there is "safety in numbers" (from predators), so there probably would be no good reason for them to disperse during migration. Anyway, below are a couple of weblinks to interesting research on cliff swallows in Nebraska and how natural selection has changed them as they adapted to concrete human structures and highways (rather than cliffs).
------------- Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
https://www.kqed.org/quest/509...

https://newterritorymag.com/20...

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Lloyd Davies
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 1:00 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Cliff Swallow Fall Migration

Have been walking nearly every night since June 24th under Hwy 56 overpass
at Luta Creek north of Marion where a colony of many dozen cliff swallows
had built nests. There might be a hundred mud nests under those supports.
Until five days ago there was a cloud swallows coming and going and now
they're gone. Saw one on the 21st.



Are they migrating south with fledges or just dispersed? I've looked up
various migration times and it could be.



Thanks

Lloyd Davies

Marion, Kansas





Btw, hear the red-shouldered hawks almost every evening up and down Luta
Creek (Mud Creek) in Marion itself.


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Subject: Cliff Swallow Fall Migration
Date: Sun Jul 26 2020 13:01 pm
From: ldavies AT gpcn.net
 
Have been walking nearly every night since June 24th under Hwy 56 overpass
at Luta Creek north of Marion where a colony of many dozen cliff swallows
had built nests. There might be a hundred mud nests under those supports.
Until five days ago there was a cloud swallows coming and going and now
they're gone. Saw one on the 21st.



Are they migrating south with fledges or just dispersed? I've looked up
various migration times and it could be.



Thanks

Lloyd Davies

Marion, Kansas





Btw, hear the red-shouldered hawks almost every evening up and down Luta
Creek (Mud Creek) in Marion itself.


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Subject: Burcham: Sunday Morning
Date: Sun Jul 26 2020 10:56 am
From: anto AT ku.edu
 
It was a beautiful early morning along the Kaw. I counted 40 species.

I been walking in an around Burcham every non-rainy morning starting between 6 & 6:30. I do a roughly 3 1/2 mile daily walk in and outside park. I am walking without binocs and just listening & seeing what I can but its giving me a rough idea of nesting species and distribution along my rout.

Most days after about July 10-12th my count the low to mid 30s. Today was active - despite missing 3 species I get almost every day - Pileated WP, RB WP, & YB Cuckoo. I decided to put this summer listing up

I had my first returning Spotted Sandpiper today on the KU boat dock where I usually see them in the spring.

Today also was the first day I did not hear a Baltimore Oriole - their songs & notes have been diminishing since the first week of July.

Today, I heard the first Northern Parula song in about 10 days of the 6 I have heard in and around Burcham. The last time I heard the Yellow Throated Warbler was the first week of July.

The last time I heard a Prothonotary W was about a week ago - there have been at least two pair & maybe three - one that nested just south of the bridge on the river trail & another I have heard and seen at the bed of the trail at pond across the tracks. I have also heard one sing at the bend in the road near the stream on the north side of Burcham three times this summer above the KU boathouse.

The numerous Warbling Vireos have sung continuously since their arrival in April. Five or six Red-eyed Vireos have been singing on my route most days. One Yellow-throated Vireo has sung occasionally just below the north head of the river trail - though I have not heard it in over a weekl; I have also heard one at the south end of the trail 2 or 3 times since mid-June.

The 6 or so Eastern Wood Pewees singing on my went silent for about two weeks but have been singing or doing single notes - usually hear at least 2 to 3 in different spots. I have heard Cuckoos regularly - I think there are 3 pairs on my route.

One Eastern Phoebe pair has nested under the walkway at the KU boathouse. I have heard one a couple times at the south end of the river trail, & one a couple of times at the bridge (may be the same bird). I recall 5 or 6 pairs five or six years ago and before.

I have heard the twittering pair & now family of two Eastern Kingbirds - one the river trail and the other on the west side of the pond. I have also heard a Western Kingbird family on the south side of the river trail - I expect the pair that was on the electrical power tower in May.

I have heard or seen 4 bluebird pairs - two to three along the river trail atlthough they are not singing much now.

Some people have discussed on KS Bird possibly declining House Wrens - for the first time in decades I don't have a pair in my yard. I have heard at least 2 & possibly 3 all at the wood edge or in the woods at the south end of the park (consistent with my spring count). There used to be more and reliable ones at the north end of the park.

Carolina Wrens are more numerous than ever - I did not count today but I probably heard 15-20 on my route - often 2 in proximity calling back and forth.

I have heard & seen about 6 Red-headed WPs - about 3 or 4 pair are on the river trail. The pair of Pileated WPs across the Kaw from the center of the park are calling daily or visiting. Unless they are ranging very widely on the west side of the Kaw, there is at least 1 and up to 3 other pairs. I have heard one several times at the wooded terminus of the paved trail with the LMH in sight; I have also heard one several times near the south edge of the water plant outside the park, and one calling from south of the Mass Bridge.

10 Turkey vultures have been roosting & often drying their wings perfectly located in the dead trees near the bridge on the river trail - they have been absent on my last three walks but may still be around. I have seen few hawks & the only semiregular one that I have heard or seen is the Red-shouldered that has nested for years along the wooded north stream on the west side of RR Tracks. The Red-tailed Hawk that camped near the RR tracks at the south side of the park in spring has been absent in summer - I have seen it once. The Fish Crows that I see and hear regularly in the spring have been occasional and usually just one at a time.

This is a bit of musing on what I have been seeing - of course I have not mentioned many of the most common birds here all year.

Morning walks have been good therapy in this covid year - first time that I have walked outside in the summer since in these parts since I did with my good friend Mobe Rucker decades ago in his last year.

Bob Antonio
Lawrence


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Subject: BROADTAILED-HUMMER
Date: Sun Jul 26 2020 9:14 am
From: 51meyer50 AT gmail.com
 
LARNED in town 9am 7-26 just had Broadtailed-Hummingbird go into our waterfall and take a bath . Wasn't quick enough with camera it was more fun watching him. He's also chasing after all the other birds in they yard, took after a house wren, sparrows and even a starling. He's been a blast to watchDONNA MEYERLARNEDSent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

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Subject: FW: feed question
Date: Sat Jul 25 2020 11:32 am
From: anto AT ku.edu
 
Looked at hulled millet online and I think Dan nailed it.
Bob Antonio
Lawrence

-----Original Message-----
From: Dan Hoobler
Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2020 11:25 AM
To: Antonio, Robert J.
Subject: Re: feed question

Sounds like hulled Millet.

Dan Hoobler
Amateur Birder
Cochise Co. Az.

785-256-3745
hootyowl52@gmail.com

> On Jul 25, 2020, at 9:14 AM, Antonio, Robert J. wrote:
>
> About my posting of that Wilson's Warbler at my friends' feeder one week ago - several birders asked about the feed. My friends did not know the name of the type bought in bulk months ago. But I checked it out at their feeder - I don't know the types of feeder seed but this was tiny, round, and whitish - it did not have a husk. Perhaps someone out there knows what that would be - I have no clue.
>
> Bob Antonio
> Lawrence
>
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Subject: feed question
Date: Sat Jul 25 2020 11:16 am
From: anto AT ku.edu
 
About my posting of that Wilson's Warbler at my friends' feeder one week ago - several birders asked about the feed. My friends did not know the name of the type bought in bulk months ago. But I checked it out at their feeder - I don't know the types of feeder seed but this was tiny, round, and whitish - it did not have a husk. Perhaps someone out there knows what that would be - I have no clue.

Bob Antonio
Lawrence

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Subject: Lesser Goldfinch (and belated Broad-tailed Hummingbird)
Date: Sat Jul 25 2020 10:33 am
From: jeffcalhoun11 AT gmail.com
 
At approximately 9:45, I stepped on my back porch and flushed a finch from
my large sunflower patch here in Dodge City (Ford County). To my surprise,
it was a green-backed Lesser Goldfinch perched brilliantly in my dead tree
perch. Alas, it was not seen after I got my camera, but a siskin-sounding
finch flew over and was probably it, so I hope for another visit. I had one
well documented in April, so this is no new tick or anything like that, but
is an interesting record.

Also, I believe I had a Broad-tailed Hummingbird in my yard on July 22-23.
My best observations and a few pictures say that, anyway. No hummingbirds
have been here the past two days.

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS

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Subject: KOS fall meeting
Date: Sat Jul 25 2020 9:59 am
From: avian67226 AT gmail.com
 
Hi everyone. The KOS fall meeting scheduled Oct.3-5 is still on, but WILL
NOT be held in person in Atchison, nor will it be a whole day of Zoom
meetings. However, we have some fun virtual things planned, so stay tuned
for details.

--
Cheryl Miller
Wichita, KS

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Subject: Spring meeting 2020 - Horned Lark
Date: Fri Jul 24 2020 17:25 pm
From: armknecht AT ruraltel.net
 
A big thank you goes to Jeff Calhoun for both organizing and then writing up
the digital spring KOS meeting for the KOS Horned Lark.



I know Jeff didn't do it alone, but an effort like this does require someone
to make it happen.



Thank you, Jeff. It was nice to read the article and relive some good
memories.



Henry A

Hays


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Subject: Quivira on Thursday
Date: Fri Jul 24 2020 12:22 pm
From: Mike.Rader AT ks.gov
 
Might be the same bird I had a couple of weeks ago. It's still there today too.



Mike Rader

Wildlife Education Supervisor

KDWPT

Note: new email address

mike.rader@ks.gov

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Gregg Friesen
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 5:22 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Quivira on Thursday

EXTERNAL: This email originated from outside of the organization. Do not click any links or open any attachments unless you trust the sender and know the content is safe.


I biked around Quivira national wildlife refuge today. The one bird of note was a breeding plumage American Golden Plover seen on the north end of the big salt marsh. It was pretty close to the road. Theres a pretty good photo of it on eBird with my list. I cant remember who reported this bird earlier but it seems like it was Mike Rader.
Gregg Friesen
Newton KS.

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Quivira on Thursday
Date: Thu Jul 23 2020 17:23 pm
From: friesen.fenton AT gmail.com
 
I biked around Quivira national wildlife refuge today. The one bird of note was a breeding plumage American Golden Plover seen on the north end of the big salt marsh. It was pretty close to the road. There™s a pretty good photo of it on eBird with my list. I can™t remember who reported this bird earlier but it seems like it was Mike Rader.  
Gregg Friesen
Newton KS.

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Road Closure on Cheyenne Bottoms Preserve
Date: Thu Jul 23 2020 13:38 pm
From: rpenner AT tnc.org
 
It was brought to my attention that there have been a question or two about why the township road that runs through the Cheyenne Bottoms Preserve is closed. At one time the large wetland basin that lies to the north of this road extended further south.  At some point in time, many years ago,  the township road was built thus cutting the wetland in two.  This year we started the work to reconnect the wetland basin and raise the road so that water will fill the newly reconnected basin when the water level of the main wetland basin comes up.   The reconnected basin will be wet longer and sooner as the water now moves under the road rather than over.  With the raising of the road bed this road most likely will not flood in the future as is has many times in the past.  As soon as the culverts were installed and water started filling the newly connected portion of the basin the birds responded, with dozens of shorebirds moving in, followed by gulls and herons.  Unfortunately, every time we get a rain this delays the project by a couple of weeks, there still is some finish work to be done on the roadbed, followed by the placing of road rock before we can open it up again.  Due to Covid-19 and the resulting economic down turn, the Nature Conservancy has undergone some significant budget cuts, so this wetland restoration and road renovation project will have to be completed in phases.  In the second phase we will continue with extending the newly connected basin further to the south so as to get water back into the entire historic acreage, currently we have restored water to about half of the basin.

Even though this is a township road the Nature Conservancy is paying for the entire cost of the project.

Robert Penner
Avian Conservation Manager
The Nature Conservancy

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Subject: kingbird family hanging around
Date: Wed Jul 22 2020 21:45 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi all,
It's been a week since all three fledgling kingbirds left the nest, and the kingbird family is still in the nearby tree (occasionally on the utility lines during the mornings and evenings when it is cooler). This is the longest I've seen them stick around after abandoning the nest, but I think they just had to abandon the nest unusually early this year due to wear and tear. Not sure if the nest was not as sturdy this year or if the young were just more rambunctious. The nest did seem to look a bit shallower than last year's nest (which remained largely intact all winter until spring storms finally blew it away).
About once a day, I will see one of the parents looking into the nest (probably more times when I'm not watching), but not sure what they might be looking for. Maybe old habits are just hard to break. But this makes me wonder if it is best to leave bird nests alone in case they might be able to use it the next year. I guess it depends on the species. It certainly would save a lot of energy for them building on the old nest (if there were no parasites in it). I can't imagine parasites being able to survive in an old nest the entire winter.
---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
________________________________
From: Kenneth Kinman
Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2020 9:04 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Update: Young kingbird fell from nest

Hi All,
After that first kingbird fledgling ended up in the alley (and on the fence) and then into a nearby tree on Monday, one of the parents was feeding him in that tree on Tuesday. Then on Wednesday, all three of the fledglings were in the tree. Maybe because the nest was rather tattered from all the wing flapping.
This morning I saw all three fledglings on the utility wires, with two of them snuggling closely together for about 15 minutes. Later in the morning, all three of the fledglings were snuggled together for about 30 minutes (as if they were back together in the nest). They certainly weren't doing it to keep warm, so I think they must have discovered that snuggling together makes it easier to keep their balance in a stiff breeze. Then it was back to the tree during the heat of the afternoon. I am certainly going to miss them when they finally depart (which could be any day now).
------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
P.S. When I first saw the two fledglings nestled so closely together, I thought it looked sort of like a two-headed kingbird. Like this photograph: https://www.onthewingphotograp...

________________________________
From: Kenneth Kinman
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 8:55 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Young kingbird fell from nest

Hi all,
I've been watching the three young western kingbirds getting bigger and more active every day in their nest near the top of the utility pole. The largest of three (presumably the eldest) was very vigorously testing its wings today. However, later in the afternoon, I saw one of the younger ones right in the middle of the alley and one of the parents feeding it. I was afraid it might get hit by a car or truck, but it thankfully flew up four feet onto a horizontal board of a privacy fence. I assume that it probably got knocked off the nest by the vigorous wing beating of its larger sibling.
Anyway, it stayed there, occasionally moving along that horizontal board and one of the parents managing to feed it a few times over the course of about 5 hours. Then just about 20 minutes ago, it finally flew about 30 feet across the alley into a tree, with one of the parents following it into the tree. So it is strong enough to fly that distance horizontally, but I doubt if if would yet be a strong enough flyer to fly high enough to get back to the nest. I probably won't get to watch it now, but feel much better that it will be safer in the tree than perching precariously on that narrow horizontal fence board. Will have to watch tomorrow to see if one of the parents is visiting that tree to feed it.
----------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)

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Subject: Change of Address
Date: Wed Jul 22 2020 15:49 pm
From: bdbiff AT cox.net
 
Who do I contact to change my address for the Horned Lark publication and any other records?

Thank you.

Michelle Folster

Not all those who wander are lost J.R.R. Tolkien

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Subject: KOS publications
Date: Wed Jul 22 2020 15:43 pm
From: tom.shane AT sbcglobal.net
 
One KOSN and 3 KOSBs arrived today.
TS 67846

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Subject: Western hummingbird reports from Wichita
Date: Tue Jul 21 2020 9:55 am
From: dlknktk AT cox.net
 
The only year we have had "a lot of western hummers" was the year the flowers in the mountains were virtually non-existent. Sorry, but I can't tell you the exact year. We counted 80 plus birds that year in the yard.  Conversely, an average year would be 30-40 birds. Of course, there is always the danger of counting the same bird twice. Biggest number of birds seen at one time was 5. Of course every year is different, as any avid birder would know. One year we will have more than average number of Rufous, for example.  Next year only 1 or 2.  Of course I'm preaching to the choir. I beg your pardon.  Thanks for letting me spout off.   Donnie K. in Larned
> On July 20, 2020 at 7:45 PM Pete Janzen wrote:
>
>
> I would like to state that reports of swarms of montane-breeding western
> hummingbird species summering in an area of about 40 acres of woodland
> in Oak Park in Wichita, Kansas are not accurate. While it is true that
> Sedgwick County has had a fair number of vagrant western hummingbird
> species documented in the late summer and early fall over the past
> decades, these are always single birds that occur less than annually.
> These species almost all nest in high-altitude pine forests of the Rocky
> Mountains and points west. The more lowland Black-chinned appears to be
> modestly expanding its range in central Oklahoma but it is still an
> accidental species in Sedgwick County, and at any rate it is nearly
> impossible to separate from Ruby-throated in most plumages. None of
> these summer records has been reported to, or vetted by the KBRC and/or
> eBird, photos have not been shared anywhere and they are all being
> reported by someone whose entire birding experiences consist of his time
> spent in Oak Park over a period of years. I've mostly ignored the
> increasingly bizarre claims of vagrant hummingbirds from Oak Park over
> the past few years. I feel compelled to clarify to any birders who are
> taking these reports seriously in even the slightest way that you should
> not do so. The person reporting them has no professional training, does
> not belong to any ornithological or conservation organization, and
> should not be taken seriously. I would like to have said this more
> politely but these reports are just not to be taken seriously-at all.
>
> Oak Park itself is a shadow of its former glory. It is a petri dish of
> invasive plant species that have mostly choked out all native plants
> that were once found there, and I would not recommend going there for
> the purpose of birding for the most part. There are still some warblers
> in the spring but it ain't what it once was, and it never will be again.
>
> --
> Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen@sbcglobal.net
>
> --
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>
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Subject: Western hummingbird reports from Wichita
Date: Mon Jul 20 2020 18:45 pm
From: pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
 
I would like to state that reports of swarms of montane-breeding western
hummingbird species summering in an area of about 40 acres of woodland
in Oak Park in Wichita, Kansas are not accurate. While it is true that
Sedgwick County has had a fair number of vagrant western hummingbird
species documented in the late summer and early fall over the past
decades, these are always single birds that occur less than annually.
These species almost all nest in high-altitude pine forests of the Rocky
Mountains and points west. The more lowland Black-chinned appears to be
modestly expanding its range in central Oklahoma but it is still an
accidental species in Sedgwick County, and at any rate it is nearly
impossible to separate from Ruby-throated in most plumages. None of
these summer records has been reported to, or vetted by the KBRC and/or
eBird, photos have not been shared anywhere and they are all being
reported by someone whose entire birding experiences consist of his time
spent in Oak Park over a period of years. I've mostly ignored the
increasingly bizarre claims of vagrant hummingbirds from Oak Park over
the past few years. I feel compelled to clarify to any birders who are
taking these reports seriously in even the slightest way that you should
not do so. The person reporting them has no professional training, does
not belong to any ornithological or conservation organization, and
should not be taken seriously. I would like to have said this more
politely but these reports are just not to be taken seriously-at all.

Oak Park itself is a shadow of its former glory. It is a petri dish of
invasive plant species that have mostly choked out all native plants
that were once found there, and I would not recommend going there for
the purpose of birding for the most part. There are still some warblers
in the spring but it ain't what it once was, and it never will be again.

--
Pete Janzen Wichita, KS pete.janzen@sbcglobal.net

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Subject: Greater Roadrunner Harvey county
Date: Mon Jul 20 2020 17:29 pm
From: caschwab3591 AT gmail.com
 
The roadrunner was seen again today in Harvey county.  My neighbors thought
they would hear it sometimes, but they were not certain about that. It was
first seen in early May 2020.
Carolyn Schwab
Newton

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Subject: CB Tricolored Heron
Date: Mon Jul 20 2020 17:08 pm
From: mike_rader AT hotmail.com
 
All,

A birder named Alan Neal posted photos in an eBird report of an adult Tricolored Heron from Cheyenne Bottoms today (7/20/2020). I don't know any details as to where exactly it was seen.

Mike Rader
Wilson, KS

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Subject: Meade County
Date: Mon Jul 20 2020 10:37 am
From: tflowers AT carrollsweb.com
 
July 10, 2020, a friend sent me photos of an adult Black-bellied Whistling Duck perched on a powerline in the SE 1/4 of the city of Meade. Today, July 20, 2020, he sent a photo from his yard of two adults and at least 12 chicks strolling across his lawn. New County Record, New Nesting Record for Meade County. Both photos easily recogizable.

Tom Flowers

Meade, Kansas

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Subject: Least Flycatchers
Date: Mon Jul 20 2020 9:53 am
From: jeffcalhoun11 AT gmail.com
 
There are two Least Flycatchers in my backyard this morning. I think that™s
pretty neat.

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS

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Subject: Gove/Logan/Sheridan sightings
Date: Mon Jul 20 2020 3:05 am
From: restlessenergy AT gmail.com
 
Had a number of surprising (for the season) birds along my usual routes in
northwestern Gove, extreme eastern Logan, and extreme southern Sheridan
Counties on 19 July 2020:

Mid-afternoon I had the first Loggerhead Shrike and Northern Harrier I'd
seen in a while in west-central Gove County, followed shortly by a small
group of juvenile and adult Upland Sandpipers just across the line in Logan
County.

Late-evening I had a single Baird's Sandpiper and Solitary Sandpiper on a
small pond a half-mile north of Grinnell just into Sheridan County, and a
singing Eastern Meadowlark in a field across the road.

Back in Gove County, between Grinnell and Grainfield on Old Highway 40, I
had another Solitary Sandpiper, a Lesser Yellowlegs, several Yellow-headed
Blackbirds, three Baird's Sandpipers, and a Greater Yellowlegs, with a
Black-crowned Night-Heron south of the Grinnell waste ponds to round out
the evening.

I've had a couple of Solitary Sandpipers over the past week, but the rest
are the first I've seen in a couple of months. The recent rains have
overfilled many farm ponds but have left suitable shallow puddles in many
field corners and terraces, so may be some local birds that've been waiting
for the right time to come out, or perhaps a sign we're in for an early
start on fall migration. Either way, nice to see some wet fields again,
and the birds that come with them!

-Christopher
--
Christopher D. Frick
Grinnell, Gove County, KS
RestlessEnergy@gmail.com

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Subject: First Hummingbird
Date: Sun Jul 19 2020 21:19 pm
From: 51meyer50 AT gmail.com
 
July 19 6:30pm had one come to our feeders tonight. Not sure what kind came to feed 3 times. Time to start the HUMMER Watch love this time of year see if our flower planting keeps them interested for a while 

Donna Meyer
In town LARNED

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Subject: Osprey
Date: Sun Jul 19 2020 15:15 pm
From: tcable AT ksu.edu
 
On Friday July 17, I had an Osprey below the house on the west shore of Tuttle Creek Reservoir. This mid-July date  seems to be rather unusual.  A few Franklin's Gulls and Forester's Terns showed up on the lake this past week as well.  -- Ted

Ted T. Cable, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus
Park Management and Conservation
Kansas State University


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Subject: Wilson's Warbler
Date: Sun Jul 19 2020 9:32 am
From: anto AT ku.edu
 
I was very surprised to see a female or immature Wilson's Warbler yesterday at my friends' feeder hanging next to a living room window- the bird returned four times & stayed for several minutes each time in the early evening. I was sitting next to the window. Crown was olive with no dark feathers & dark tail (saw both sides). American Goldfinches come to the feeder regularly & even my friends (who have the feeder mostly for indoor entertainment for their two cats), said "look at the bill - its different [from the Goldfinches]."

Bob Antonio
Lawrence

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Subject: Wichita Eagle Newspaper Bird Articles
Date: Sat Jul 18 2020 22:05 pm
From: bobgress AT cox.net
 
Since the article, a single nest hatched 3 chicks on the Arkansas River a couple miles from the original Wichita site.  And a colony of about 12 adults and 7 pre-flighted birds were found on a Cowley County Sand quarry near Oxford.  At least 1 pair was seen transferring fish at Quivira NWR so nesting is likely there.  We never did hear if any were nesting again at the Jeffrey Energy Center near St Mary™s.  
-Bob Gress

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 18, 2020, at 5:31 PM, ok_forbs <000000a92d5fdfe3-dmarc-request@listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:
>
> The fist article is titled:
> "Kansas is losing its birds and it's only getting worse."
>
> The articles says:
> Kansas has 52 bird species that are highly or moderately vulnerable
> to climate change; according the the National Audubon Society.
> Sedgwick County has 4 High risk species: Red-headed Woodpecker,
> Brown Thrasher, Field Sparrow, and Least Tern.
>
>
> The second articles is about Least Terns. The link is at:
>
> https://www.kansas.com/news/lo...
> This is one of the two bird articles in the June 24 Wichita Eagle.
>
>
> It is mainly talking about Bob Gress and others monitoring their
> nesting success in Sedgwick County for the past 20 years. I did not
> realize this is the only known nesting record for this year in Kansas.
>
> Eddie Stegall
> Ok_Forbs@Zoho.com
> Wichita, Ks.
>
> "The arctic is warming faster than anywhere else on earth; at more than
> twice the rate of the global average."
>
> Tom Clynes, Audubon Magazine 2018
>
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> mailto:ksbird-l-request@listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Wichita Eagle Newspaper Bird Articles
Date: Sat Jul 18 2020 22:00 pm
From: j43fox AT gmail.com
 
I™ve changed my gardening practices because of the decrease in bird populations.  Douglas Tallamy™s most recent book is about the decrease.  He says the wild areas we have set aside can™t possibly support decreases and urges all of us to create our own homegrown national park in whatever space we have.  Most important is decreasing the area of our yards devoted to turf grass and planting natives-trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants. I™ve removed many of the introduced species I used to grow and replaced them with natives needed by the specialized pollinators.  I™m raising livestock now-caterpillars, the high fat mainstay in the early diets of many nestlings.  As usual, I have a pair of Brown Thrashers in my back yard.  Read the book, Nature™s Best Hope.

Joan Fox, Wichita

> On Jul 18, 2020, at 5:30 PM, ok_forbs <000000a92d5fdfe3-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> wrote:
>
> The fist article is titled:
> "Kansas is losing its birds and it's only getting worse."
>
> The articles says:
> Kansas has 52 bird species that are highly or moderately vulnerable
> to climate change; according the the National Audubon Society.
> Sedgwick County has 4 High risk species: Red-headed Woodpecker,
> Brown Thrasher, Field Sparrow, and Least Tern.
>
>
> The second articles is about Least Terns. The link is at:
>
> https://www.kansas.com/news/lo...
> This is one of the two bird articles in the June 24 Wichita Eagle.
>
>
> It is mainly talking about Bob Gress and others monitoring their
> nesting success in Sedgwick County for the past 20 years. I did not
> realize this is the only known nesting record for this year in Kansas.
>
> Eddie Stegall
> Ok_Forbs@Zoho.com
> Wichita, Ks.
>
> "The arctic is warming faster than anywhere else on earth; at more than
> twice the rate of the global average."
>
> Tom Clynes, Audubon Magazine 2018
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request@listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Update: Young kingbird fell from nest
Date: Sat Jul 18 2020 21:04 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi All,
After that first kingbird fledgling ended up in the alley (and on the fence) and then into a nearby tree on Monday, one of the parents was feeding him in that tree on Tuesday. Then on Wednesday, all three of the fledglings were in the tree. Maybe because the nest was rather tattered from all the wing flapping.
This morning I saw all three fledglings on the utility wires, with two of them snuggling closely together for about 15 minutes. Later in the morning, all three of the fledglings were snuggled together for about 30 minutes (as if they were back together in the nest). They certainly weren't doing it to keep warm, so I think they must have discovered that snuggling together makes it easier to keep their balance in a stiff breeze. Then it was back to the tree during the heat of the afternoon. I am certainly going to miss them when they finally depart (which could be any day now).
------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
P.S. When I first saw the two fledglings nestled so closely together, I thought it looked sort of like a two-headed kingbird. Like this photograph: https://www.onthewingphotograp...

________________________________
From: Kenneth Kinman
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2020 8:55 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Young kingbird fell from nest

Hi all,
I've been watching the three young western kingbirds getting bigger and more active every day in their nest near the top of the utility pole. The largest of three (presumably the eldest) was very vigorously testing its wings today. However, later in the afternoon, I saw one of the younger ones right in the middle of the alley and one of the parents feeding it. I was afraid it might get hit by a car or truck, but it thankfully flew up four feet onto a horizontal board of a privacy fence. I assume that it probably got knocked off the nest by the vigorous wing beating of its larger sibling.
Anyway, it stayed there, occasionally moving along that horizontal board and one of the parents managing to feed it a few times over the course of about 5 hours. Then just about 20 minutes ago, it finally flew about 30 feet across the alley into a tree, with one of the parents following it into the tree. So it is strong enough to fly that distance horizontally, but I doubt if if would yet be a strong enough flyer to fly high enough to get back to the nest. I probably won't get to watch it now, but feel much better that it will be safer in the tree than perching precariously on that narrow horizontal fence board. Will have to watch tomorrow to see if one of the parents is visiting that tree to feed it.
----------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)

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Subject: Wichita Eagle Newspaper Bird Articles
Date: Sat Jul 18 2020 17:31 pm
From: 000000a92d5fdfe3-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
 
The fist article is titled:
"Kansas is losing its birds and it's only getting worse."

The articles says:
Kansas has 52 bird species that are highly or moderately vulnerable
to climate change; according the the National Audubon Society.
Sedgwick County has 4 High risk species: Red-headed Woodpecker,
Brown Thrasher, Field Sparrow, and Least Tern.


The second articles is about Least Terns. The link is at:

https://www.kansas.com/news/lo...
This is one of the two bird articles in the June 24 Wichita Eagle.


It is mainly talking about Bob Gress and others monitoring their
nesting success in Sedgwick County for the past 20 years. I did not
realize this is the only known nesting record for this year in Kansas.

Eddie Stegall
Ok_Forbs@Zoho.com
Wichita, Ks.

"The arctic is warming faster than anywhere else on earth; at more than
twice the rate of the global average."

Tom Clynes, Audubon Magazine 2018

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Subject: FOS Rufous Hummingbird
Date: Sat Jul 18 2020 10:01 am
From: jeffcalhoun11 AT gmail.com
 
So I guess I should post one more time for the bird record keepers and my
own personal integrity. Further observation nailed this ID as a Rufous and
I am 99% sure about it. This RUHU was present July 15-16 but absent July
17-present. Interestingly, the Rufous Hummingbird present 1 mile west on
July 14-15 was a different individual. I will be curious to see what cold
fronts bring in the coming weeks. Obviously this species is moving, as are
a few others per CO reports.

No other signs of southbound bird traffic or post-breeding dispersal, but
my backyard isn™t the best indicator and is all I™ve been sampling. I soon
hope to be scouring my area for Falcons, Shorebirds, Empids, and such.

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS



On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 7:36 AM Jeff Calhoun
wrote:

> So, after the last 20 minutes or so I™m starting to think that I let my
> biases affect my previous judgement. Whereas Christi™s bird yesterday was
> clearly a Rufous, additional looks at mine are giving me a distinct
> Calliope vibe. At this time I only know that it is clearly a different
> individual than Christi™s, anyway.
>
> The take home message is still the same ... we™re out here along the 100th
> meridian playing in our own little sandbox and and are puzzling over
> hummingbirds... in mid-July!
>
> Jeff Calhoun
> Dodge City, KS
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 7:03 AM Jeff Calhoun
> wrote:
>
>> I was very surprised to hear of and see photos of Christi McMillen™s FOS
>> Rufous Hummingbird in Dodge City yesterday, 7/14. Sure enough, this morning
>> (7/15) I have a Rufous Hummingbird in my yard about a mile west.
>>
>> I thought I had at least 10 more days so my the sunflowers blocking my
>> photo angles aren™t cleared out yet. My photos this morning are little more
>> than doc shots of this early record.
>>
>> Jeff Calhoun
>> Dodge City, KS
>>
>

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Subject: History of the Birds of Kansas book from 1891
Date: Fri Jul 17 2020 7:32 am
From: herold4us AT gmail.com
 
The book has a new home!  Thanks

On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 6:38 AM mary herold wrote:

> Would anyone be interested in a book....
> History of the Birds of Kansas by N. S. Goss?
>
> It was published in 1891 and is in fair condition.
>
> Please reply to Herold4us@gmail.com
>
>

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Subject: History of the Birds of Kansas book from 1891
Date: Fri Jul 17 2020 6:57 am
From: bobgress AT cox.net
 
This is THE classic!!!  I have one.  These rarely are available for serious bird book collectors!!!
-Bob Gress

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 17, 2020, at 6:39 AM, mary herold wrote:
>
> Would anyone be interested in a book....
> History of the Birds of Kansas by N. S. Goss?
>
> It was published in 1891 and is in fair condition.
>
> Please reply to Herold4us@gmail.com
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request@listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: History of the Birds of Kansas book from 1891
Date: Fri Jul 17 2020 6:38 am
From: herold4us AT gmail.com
 
Would anyone be interested in a book....
History of the Birds of Kansas by N. S. Goss?

It was published in 1891 and is in fair condition.

Please reply to Herold4us@gmail.com

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Subject: Please help me to help receive these posts for Kansas
Date: Wed Jul 15 2020 13:25 pm
From: dlknktk AT cox.net
 
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Subject: Fwd: FOS Rufous Hummingbird
Date: Wed Jul 15 2020 13:19 pm
From: 51meyer50 AT gmail.com
 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
-------- Original message --------From: Jeff Calhoun Date: 7/15/20 7:03 AM (GMT-06:00) To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU Subject: FOS Rufous Hummingbird I was very surprised to hear of and see photos of Christi McMillen™s FOSRufous Hummingbird in Dodge City yesterday, 7/14. Sure enough, this morning(7/15) I have a Rufous Hummingbird in my yard about a mile west.I thought I had at least 10 more days so my the sunflowers blocking myphoto angles aren™t cleared out yet. My photos this morning are little morethan doc shots of this early record.Jeff CalhounDodge City, KSFor KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go tohttps://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir... KSBIRD-L guidelines go tohttp://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-... contact a listowner, send a message tomailto:ksbird-l-request@listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Mississippi Kite diet
Date: Wed Jul 15 2020 10:07 am
From: forrestm AT hesston.edu
 
Lots of Kites here at Hesston College in Hesston as well, counted 12
sitting on the high lines on the west side of campus and they swoop down
and pick bugs right out of the air. It is quite entertaining to watch!

Forrest Miller

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 6:18 AM G & J Fenton Friesen <
friesen.fenton@gmail.com> wrote:

> There is a place two blocks from me in Newton, KS where Mississippi Kites
> gather on the high line wires and utility poles. The sidewalk below is
> littered with dead june bugs and part of deceased june bugs (legs, shells,
> wings, etc. . . ). Interesting to see.
>
> --
> Gregg & Joanna Fenton Friesen
> Newton, KS
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:ksbird-l-request@listserv.ksu.edu
>


--
*Forrest "Woody" Miller*
Grounds Specialist
620-327-8189



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Subject: FOS Rufous Hummingbird
Date: Wed Jul 15 2020 7:36 am
From: jeffcalhoun11 AT gmail.com
 
So, after the last 20 minutes or so I™m starting to think that I let my
biases affect my previous judgement. Whereas Christi™s bird yesterday was
clearly a Rufous, additional looks at mine are giving me a distinct
Calliope vibe. At this time I only know that it is clearly a different
individual than Christi™s, anyway.

The take home message is still the same ... we™re out here along the 100th
meridian playing in our own little sandbox and and are puzzling over
hummingbirds... in mid-July!

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS



On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 7:03 AM Jeff Calhoun
wrote:

> I was very surprised to hear of and see photos of Christi McMillen™s FOS
> Rufous Hummingbird in Dodge City yesterday, 7/14. Sure enough, this morning
> (7/15) I have a Rufous Hummingbird in my yard about a mile west.
>
> I thought I had at least 10 more days so my the sunflowers blocking my
> photo angles aren™t cleared out yet. My photos this morning are little more
> than doc shots of this early record.
>
> Jeff Calhoun
> Dodge City, KS
>

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Subject: FOS Rufous Hummingbird
Date: Wed Jul 15 2020 7:04 am
From: jeffcalhoun11 AT gmail.com
 
I was very surprised to hear of and see photos of Christi McMillen™s FOS
Rufous Hummingbird in Dodge City yesterday, 7/14. Sure enough, this morning
(7/15) I have a Rufous Hummingbird in my yard about a mile west.

I thought I had at least 10 more days so my the sunflowers blocking my
photo angles aren™t cleared out yet. My photos this morning are little more
than doc shots of this early record.

Jeff Calhoun
Dodge City, KS

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Subject: Mississippi Kite diet
Date: Wed Jul 15 2020 6:18 am
From: friesen.fenton AT gmail.com
 
There is a place two blocks from me in Newton, KS where Mississippi Kites
gather on the high line wires and utility poles. The sidewalk below is
littered with dead june bugs and part of deceased june bugs (legs, shells,
wings, etc. . . ). Interesting to see.

--
Gregg & Joanna Fenton Friesen
Newton, KS

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Subject: Young kingbird fell from nest
Date: Mon Jul 13 2020 20:55 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi all,
I've been watching the three young western kingbirds getting bigger and more active every day in their nest near the top of the utility pole. The largest of three (presumably the eldest) was very vigorously testing its wings today. However, later in the afternoon, I saw one of the younger ones right in the middle of the alley and one of the parents feeding it. I was afraid it might get hit by a car or truck, but it thankfully flew up four feet onto a horizontal board of a privacy fence. I assume that it probably got knocked off the nest by the vigorous wing beating of its larger sibling.
Anyway, it stayed there, occasionally moving along that horizontal board and one of the parents managing to feed it a few times over the course of about 5 hours. Then just about 20 minutes ago, it finally flew about 30 feet across the alley into a tree, with one of the parents following it into the tree. So it is strong enough to fly that distance horizontally, but I doubt if if would yet be a strong enough flyer to fly high enough to get back to the nest. I probably won't get to watch it now, but feel much better that it will be safer in the tree than perching precariously on that narrow horizontal fence board. Will have to watch tomorrow to see if one of the parents is visiting that tree to feed it.
----------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)

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Subject: Morris County Birds
Date: Mon Jul 13 2020 20:24 pm
From: gchaden AT outlook.com
 
I went to work in the garden and to do some spraying down at our farm in western Morris County Sunday and had many of the usual summer suspects, along with a couple more uncommon birds.

Birds found along 2800 Road included: Loggerhead Shrike, Red-Winged Blackbird, 2 Red-tailed Hawks, 2 Eastern Kingbirds, 10 Mourning Doves, Common Nighthawk, 2 Bobwhite, Wild Turkey, 2 Brown Cowbirds, 2 Grasshopper Sparrows, 4 Crows, Mockingbird, 10 Meadowlark Sp.

Birds seen or heard while working: 2 Bobwhite, 5 crows, 2 Barred Owls, 2 Cardinals, ~5 Indigo Buntings, 2 Lark Sparrows, 2 Field Sparrows, Eastern Phoebe, 2 Purple Martins, 2 Killdeer, Upland Sandpiper, Bluebird, 2 Red-eyed Vireos, Carolina Wren.

* Gary Haden, Manhattan





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