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Updated on May 23, 2019, 11:45 am

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23 May: @ 11:36:02 
Re: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof, [Dan Thalmann]
23 May: @ 11:35:09 
Re: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof, [Dan Thalmann]
23 May: @ 11:29:26 
Early April 2019 arrival of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (and the weather) [Kenneth Kinman]
23 May: @ 10:00:48 
Re: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof, [Kenneth Kinman]
22 May: @ 15:45:33 
Nest Updates [Jeff Hansen]
22 May: @ 15:31:44 
Franklin County Shorebirds [Malcolm Gold]
22 May: @ 15:03:40 
Southern DG Co this morning (5/22) [Molly Zahn]
22 May: @ 12:15:46 
Quivira conditions, 22 May 2019 [Barry Jones]
21 May: @ 22:01:12 
Fitch hooded warbler [Molly Zahn]
21 May: @ 21:37:13 
Johnson County Shorebirds [Aaron Batterbee]
21 May: @ 10:37:15 
Hummingbirds, or lack thereof, [Dan Mulhern]
21 May: @ 09:22:10 
Canada Warbler at Wilderness Wetlands [jandlbosnak]
20 May: @ 08:09:13 
Galena Mississippi Kite 5-20-19 [Jenn Rader]
19 May: @ 22:11:38 
Re: Yellow-breasted Chat in Bourbon Co. [Chuck & Jaye Otte]
19 May: @ 22:01:25 
Bay-breasted Warbler in Dickinson Co. / 18 May [Scott Seltman]
19 May: @ 20:01:04 
Yellow-breasted Chat in Bourbon Co. [Daniel Kerr]
19 May: @ 10:49:22 
Dan Kilby exhibit at Wichita Audubon [TRE Enterprises]
18 May: @ 18:42:14 
Wichita Audubon Trip to Quivira & Cheyenne Bottoms [Kevin Groeneweg]
17 May: @ 15:15:10 
Fwd: Bronzed Cowbird [James Nickel]
17 May: @ 11:08:12 
Burroughs June Field Trips - RSVP for MN trip [Malcolm Gold]
17 May: @ 07:51:17 
Thrushes... [Andrew Burnett]
17 May: @ 07:24:51 
No Subject [Mark Keller]
17 May: @ 07:21:51 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Kenneth Kinman]
17 May: @ 00:59:00 
Oak Park, Wichita [Paul Griffin]
16 May: @ 21:46:40 
KOS Spring Meeting Species List [Chuck & Jaye Otte]
16 May: @ 20:06:54 
Re: Morton County [Pete Janzen]
16 May: @ 18:18:17 
Fwd: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Dan Mulhern]
16 May: @ 16:01:27 
Re: Morton County [Scott Seltman]
16 May: @ 14:22:09 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Dan Mulhern]
16 May: @ 14:11:31 
Re: thrush search [Dan Mulhern]
16 May: @ 13:57:23 
Morton County [Ted Cable]
16 May: @ 13:39:24 
Steve Lloyd Wetlands, Clay County [Chuck Otte]
16 May: @ 13:00:42 
Wabaunsee County [Carol Morgan]
16 May: @ 12:57:20 
thrush search [Ted Cable]
16 May: @ 12:34:59 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Galen Pittman]
16 May: @ 12:23:38 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Kenneth Kinman]
16 May: @ 11:29:39 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Dan Mulhern]
16 May: @ 11:14:32 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Kenneth Kinman]
16 May: @ 10:26:15 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Dan Mulhern]
16 May: @ 10:02:44 
Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Sebastian Patti]
16 May: @ 09:52:59 
Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan [Dan Mulhern]
16 May: @ 01:11:30 
A week of birding [Henry Armknecht]
15 May: @ 07:13:52 
KOS Spring Meeting List by county [Chuck & Jaye Otte]
15 May: @ 00:13:14 
Re: SO FUNNY! [Marla Shoemaker]
14 May: @ 20:02:02 
Re: SO FUNNY! [Kenneth Kinman]
14 May: @ 19:59:23 
scissor tails and bobolinks [Laura Kirk]
14 May: @ 19:27:42 
SO FUNNY! [Marla Shoemaker]
14 May: @ 18:12:35 
blues [Stuart Lovejoy]
14 May: @ 18:11:58 
Ruddy turnstone [John Row]
14 May: @ 17:28:22 
Flint Hills Nature Trail - Franklin County [Malcolm Gold]





Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,
Date: Thu May 23 2019 11:36 am
From: editor AT bluevalley.net
 
Dang it. 

I didn™t include my location - Palmer, Washington County.

Sent from my iPhone

-Dan Thalmann

Foundation, Marketing & Communications Director, Clay County Medical Center

Publisher, Washington County News

(C) 785-747-6980 - text me
(H) 785-692-4252

> On May 23, 2019, at 10:00 AM, Kenneth Kinman wrote:
>
> Hi Dan,
> I haven't seen any responses to your post, so here's my two cents worth. With climate change and other factors resulting in earlier spring arrivals, I would recommend putting out your feeders by April 15th (rather than waiting until you see one). The migration of Ruby-throated hummingbirds probably varies from year to year due to that year's weather, but this year's temperature swings and lots of cool damp days probably hasn't helped. Anyway, if I were an early hummingbird, I think I might tend to prefer going through Wichita and then up the turnpike to the Topeka-Lawrence-Kansas City area. Lots more people means a lot more feeders.
> Below is a weblink to a 2013 paper discussing the earlier migrations of Ruby-throated hummingbirds. Figure 2 is particularly interesting. Although they attribute this mainly to climate change, I can't help but wonder if more humans putting out feeders for them is also a factor.
> ---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
> https://bioone.org/journals/Th...
>
> ________________________________
> From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
> Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:36 AM
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,
>
> On April 28 I saw the first hummingbird of the year in my yard, a male trying to get nectar out of our geraniums. Feeling sorry for his futile effort, I put up the feeder that day.
> About a week later, my wife saw a female in the yard. Possibly another week passed and we watched a female at the feeder (cleaned and refilled several times in the intervel). Neither of us have any other sightings in our yard.
> A typical scenario for us is to see the first bird, put up the feeder, and then entertain a steady stream of visitors till fall migration has concluded.
> Anyone have any similar experiences with hummingbirds this spring, or does anyone have thoughts on why it is so different from the norm? Could it be all the rainfall this year? We've had a number of rain free days that still didn't bring birds to our feeder.
> Whatever is causing this anomaly is not affecting larger fruit and nectar eaters. Between Orioles, catbirds and cardinals, I'm lucky to be able to skip a day refilling the jelly jar.
> By the way, these are Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I live in Manhattan, which is east of US Highway 77, which I have been assured by my dear friend and year class member Chuck Otte is a no-cross barrier for western species of hummers.
>
> Dan Mulhern
> Manhattan
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
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> mailto:[email protected]
>
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> mailto:[email protected]
>

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Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,
Date: Thu May 23 2019 11:35 am
From: editor AT bluevalley.net
 
I™ve had a higher-than-normal level of RT hummingbird activity since early May. I have four feeders up and all are active - male and female. Our front feeder had three at a time once, which is unusual for me for spring. I™m usually happy to have one hummingbird around in the spring and summer. 

We had huge numbers last fall. Thirty at a time on two adjacent feeders. Maybe they remembered me fondly and had me on their internal map for a spring stop-by.

Sent from my iPhone

-Dan Thalmann

Foundation, Marketing & Communications Director, Clay County Medical Center

Publisher, Washington County News

(C) 785-747-6980 - text me
(H) 785-692-4252

> On May 23, 2019, at 10:00 AM, Kenneth Kinman wrote:
>
> Hi Dan,
> I haven't seen any responses to your post, so here's my two cents worth. With climate change and other factors resulting in earlier spring arrivals, I would recommend putting out your feeders by April 15th (rather than waiting until you see one). The migration of Ruby-throated hummingbirds probably varies from year to year due to that year's weather, but this year's temperature swings and lots of cool damp days probably hasn't helped. Anyway, if I were an early hummingbird, I think I might tend to prefer going through Wichita and then up the turnpike to the Topeka-Lawrence-Kansas City area. Lots more people means a lot more feeders.
> Below is a weblink to a 2013 paper discussing the earlier migrations of Ruby-throated hummingbirds. Figure 2 is particularly interesting. Although they attribute this mainly to climate change, I can't help but wonder if more humans putting out feeders for them is also a factor.
> ---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
> https://bioone.org/journals/Th...
>
> ________________________________
> From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
> Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:36 AM
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,
>
> On April 28 I saw the first hummingbird of the year in my yard, a male trying to get nectar out of our geraniums. Feeling sorry for his futile effort, I put up the feeder that day.
> About a week later, my wife saw a female in the yard. Possibly another week passed and we watched a female at the feeder (cleaned and refilled several times in the intervel). Neither of us have any other sightings in our yard.
> A typical scenario for us is to see the first bird, put up the feeder, and then entertain a steady stream of visitors till fall migration has concluded.
> Anyone have any similar experiences with hummingbirds this spring, or does anyone have thoughts on why it is so different from the norm? Could it be all the rainfall this year? We've had a number of rain free days that still didn't bring birds to our feeder.
> Whatever is causing this anomaly is not affecting larger fruit and nectar eaters. Between Orioles, catbirds and cardinals, I'm lucky to be able to skip a day refilling the jelly jar.
> By the way, these are Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I live in Manhattan, which is east of US Highway 77, which I have been assured by my dear friend and year class member Chuck Otte is a no-cross barrier for western species of hummers.
>
> Dan Mulhern
> Manhattan
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:[email protected]
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:[email protected]
>

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Subject: Early April 2019 arrival of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (and the weather)
Date: Thu May 23 2019 11:29 am
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi All,
Just to followup on my previous post, I decided to check out early arrivals of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. April 9th was banner day with reports in Harper, Wichita, and even Manhattan, and numerous places in Oklahoma. And even earlier reports on April 7th at Rose Hill, Kansas, and Lees Summit, Missouri (perhaps others?).
A check of the weather at the time in Wichita shows temperatures well above normal April 7th-April 10th (and presumably some brisk south winds during that period as well). Then on April 11th the high temperatures tumbled into the 50's and a low of 32 degrees on April 12th. Therefore, warm temperatures and south winds probably produced this early influx of hummingbirds into the region. Hopefully most of those early hummingbird migrants survived with longer periods of torpor (and feeders put out by then).
----------------Ken Kinman (Hays)

Wichita weather (April 2019): https://www.accuweather.com/en...
Hummingbird sightings: https://www.hummingbirdcentral...


________________________________
From: Kenneth Kinman
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 10:00 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,

Hi Dan,
I haven't seen any responses to your post, so here's my two cents worth. With climate change and other factors resulting in earlier spring arrivals, I would recommend putting out your feeders by April 15th (rather than waiting until you see one). The migration of Ruby-throated hummingbirds probably varies from year to year due to that year's weather, but this year's temperature swings and lots of cool damp days probably hasn't helped. Anyway, if I were an early hummingbird, I think I might tend to prefer going through Wichita and then up the turnpike to the Topeka-Lawrence-Kansas City area. Lots more people means a lot more feeders.
Below is a weblink to a 2013 paper discussing the earlier migrations of Ruby-throated hummingbirds. Figure 2 is particularly interesting. Although they attribute this mainly to climate change, I can't help but wonder if more humans putting out feeders for them is also a factor.
---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
https://bioone.org/journals/Th...

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:36 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,

On April 28 I saw the first hummingbird of the year in my yard, a male trying to get nectar out of our geraniums. Feeling sorry for his futile effort, I put up the feeder that day.
About a week later, my wife saw a female in the yard. Possibly another week passed and we watched a female at the feeder (cleaned and refilled several times in the intervel). Neither of us have any other sightings in our yard.
A typical scenario for us is to see the first bird, put up the feeder, and then entertain a steady stream of visitors till fall migration has concluded.
Anyone have any similar experiences with hummingbirds this spring, or does anyone have thoughts on why it is so different from the norm? Could it be all the rainfall this year? We've had a number of rain free days that still didn't bring birds to our feeder.
Whatever is causing this anomaly is not affecting larger fruit and nectar eaters. Between Orioles, catbirds and cardinals, I'm lucky to be able to skip a day refilling the jelly jar.
By the way, these are Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I live in Manhattan, which is east of US Highway 77, which I have been assured by my dear friend and year class member Chuck Otte is a no-cross barrier for western species of hummers.

Dan Mulhern
Manhattan

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G

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Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,
Date: Thu May 23 2019 10:00 am
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi Dan,
I haven't seen any responses to your post, so here's my two cents worth. With climate change and other factors resulting in earlier spring arrivals, I would recommend putting out your feeders by April 15th (rather than waiting until you see one). The migration of Ruby-throated hummingbirds probably varies from year to year due to that year's weather, but this year's temperature swings and lots of cool damp days probably hasn't helped. Anyway, if I were an early hummingbird, I think I might tend to prefer going through Wichita and then up the turnpike to the Topeka-Lawrence-Kansas City area. Lots more people means a lot more feeders.
Below is a weblink to a 2013 paper discussing the earlier migrations of Ruby-throated hummingbirds. Figure 2 is particularly interesting. Although they attribute this mainly to climate change, I can't help but wonder if more humans putting out feeders for them is also a factor.
---------------Ken Kinman (Hays, Kansas)
https://bioone.org/journals/Th...

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:36 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,

On April 28 I saw the first hummingbird of the year in my yard, a male trying to get nectar out of our geraniums. Feeling sorry for his futile effort, I put up the feeder that day.
About a week later, my wife saw a female in the yard. Possibly another week passed and we watched a female at the feeder (cleaned and refilled several times in the intervel). Neither of us have any other sightings in our yard.
A typical scenario for us is to see the first bird, put up the feeder, and then entertain a steady stream of visitors till fall migration has concluded.
Anyone have any similar experiences with hummingbirds this spring, or does anyone have thoughts on why it is so different from the norm? Could it be all the rainfall this year? We've had a number of rain free days that still didn't bring birds to our feeder.
Whatever is causing this anomaly is not affecting larger fruit and nectar eaters. Between Orioles, catbirds and cardinals, I'm lucky to be able to skip a day refilling the jelly jar.
By the way, these are Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I live in Manhattan, which is east of US Highway 77, which I have been assured by my dear friend and year class member Chuck Otte is a no-cross barrier for western species of hummers.

Dan Mulhern
Manhattan

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G

For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
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To contact a listowner, send a message to
mailto:[email protected]

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Subject: Nest Updates
Date: Wed May 22 2019 15:45 pm
From: jeff.hansen.sd AT gmail.com
 
I did a nest check in my Topeka yard today.

Yesterday before the tornado outbreak I was trying to capture video of the
chickadees fledging. I did see one stick his head out and almost fly. I
assumed they wouldn't fledge in the evening with the bad weather. But by
morning they were gone. So while I was seeking shelter they must have
fledged. I opened the box and it was empty. This was my first successful
chickadee nest. I believe one reason they nested here is I eradicated all
of the house sparrows in my neighborhood. This was the first spring I
didn't have to trap house sparrows in nest boxes. I caught them all in the
repeating elevator trap.

The house wren nest has 8 eggs. I think the volume of the eggs is more
than the wren that laid them. Pretty amazing.

I did not check the bluebirds or flickers as they are nearly ready to
fledge. I've been noticing flickers at two other nest boxes. One box has
an egg in it today. I expect the other box to also have a pair nest. I'd
put money on it that both lost their nests to starlings. This is the first
spring that I didn't trap any starling once the flickers were incubating.
Maybe all these years of trapping has reduced their numbers so the flickers
can nest in peace. I only trapped 41 starlings in my yard this year.
Previous years I trapped from 125 to 372.

--
Jeff Hansen
https://www.youtube.com/Backya...
http://www.kansasnativeplants....
https://kansasgarden.blogspot....

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Subject: Franklin County Shorebirds
Date: Wed May 22 2019 15:31 pm
From: malcolmgold AT gmail.com
 
Like many areas across the central and eastern part of the state, the
Marais des Cygnes river is flooded. I checked the fields north and east of
Rantoul in Franklin County a couple of times today with a walk in between.
Flyover Whimbrels were the highlight of the day, but a mixed flock of
shorebirds on my second search of the same fields contained a single
Semipalmated Sandpiper. Both of which are new to the county list. FYI, the
tar roads headed into Rantoul from the west, north, and east are all closed
due to flooding. It was the talk of the town and no one seemed upset that I
was parked next to the water's edge scoping.

https://ebird.org/view/checkli... (1st search)

https://ebird.org/view/checkli... (2nd search)



I had a few lingering migrants today, but the woods along the Flint Hills
Nature Trail north of Rantoul and the Prairie Spirit Trail south of Ottawa
felt like summer.

https://ebird.org/view/checkli... (Flint Hills Nature Trail)

https://ebird.org/view/checkli... (Prairie Spirit Trail)


Good Birding,
Malcolm Gold (Overland Park, Johnson County, Kansas)

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Subject: Southern DG Co this morning (5/22)
Date: Wed May 22 2019 15:03 pm
From: mollymzahn AT gmail.com
 
With the break in the rain Peter and I decided to procrastinate on grading
by checking out Globe Prairie and Colyer Cemetary in southern Douglas Co.
We had good luck with the grassland specialities, finding a very
cooperative Upland Sandpiper and an almost-as-cooperative Loggerhead
Shrike. We heard numerous grasshopper sparrows and a couple blue grosbeaks.
Thought we heard bobwhite but there was also a mockingbird in the area so
can't be sure.

Colyer cemetary was really gorgeous; a pair of red-headed woodpeckers and a
scissor-tailed flycatcher put on a show, along with alder and least
flycatchers, another grasshopper sparrow, and blue grosbeak. No Bell's
vireo there, though we did find one around Globe.

We drove briefly through Chicken Creek (E 850 Rd) on the way back; it
seemed fairly birdy but we were feeling too guilty to spend much time. Best
bird was a possible chestnut-sided that would not appear for us.

Good birding (stay dry!),
Molly Zahn
Lawrence

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Subject: Quivira conditions, 22 May 2019
Date: Wed May 22 2019 12:15 pm
From: barjones78 AT gmail.com
 
A word about Quivira conditions:  many areas of the Refuge, including NE 170th between the ends of the Wildlife Drive, are unsafe for travel. Although there are still shorebirds around, there so much water coming through the Refuge right now that there are very few accessible areas to view them (at least not safely accessible). The Wildlife Drive is currently closed again due to high water over the spillways, and access across the spillway on the north end of Little Salt Marsh could be closed soon.  Persons wishing to visit would be best advised to wait until conditions improve.  More rain is forecast through Memorial Day.

Barry Jones
Quivira NWR

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Subject: Fitch hooded warbler
Date: Tue May 21 2019 22:01 pm
From: mollymzahn AT gmail.com
 
I unexpectedly had time on my hands yesterday morning (5/20) so I headed to Fitch NHR (Douglas Co) after daycare drop off. Met Stephen DeHart in the parking area on his way out, who told me about the hooded and worm-eating warblers he had found. I dipped on the WEWA but located the hooded singing off the beginning of the west end of the upper loop. Peter was disappointed to miss out on one of his favorite birds, so we tried again this afternoon after the rain stopped, and refound the hooded giving nice looks off the biology trail between the two ends of the upper loop. That makes our 4th new KS warbler species this spring”what this year has lacked in quantity it has made up in quality! Still Tennessees singing, so maybe migration isn™t quite done.

Molly Zahn
Lawrence

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Johnson County Shorebirds
Date: Tue May 21 2019 21:37 pm
From: abatterbee25 AT gmail.com
 
Good evening,
This evening I searched flooded fields in Northwest Johnson County.
Previously I found 7 Black bellied plovers resting on a pipe in the middle
of a sand pit. One was spotted tonight just south of that in a flooded
field. I was not able to relocate that bird but did find an ongoing
sanderling, two great egrets, and one snowy egret amongst a mix bag of
sandpipers including white rumped, pectoral, spotted, and semipalmated.
There was also a semi-palmated plover as well. Fields east of 43rd and K7
in Shawnee were impassable with cars but I walked in and found there
weren't any shorebirds except killdeer.

Happy birding,

Aaron Batterbee
Shawnee, KS
5/21/19

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Subject: Hummingbirds, or lack thereof,
Date: Tue May 21 2019 10:37 am
From: browndog06 AT cox.net
 
On April 28 I saw the first hummingbird of the year in my yard, a male trying to get nectar out of our geraniums. Feeling sorry for his futile effort, I put up the feeder that day.
About a week later, my wife saw a female in the yard. Possibly another week passed and we watched a female at the feeder (cleaned and refilled several times in the intervel). Neither of us have any other sightings in our yard.
A typical scenario for us is to see the first bird, put up the feeder, and then entertain a steady stream of visitors till fall migration has concluded.
Anyone have any similar experiences with hummingbirds this spring, or does anyone have thoughts on why it is so different from the norm? Could it be all the rainfall this year? We've had a number of rain free days that still didn't bring birds to our feeder.
Whatever is causing this anomaly is not affecting larger fruit and nectar eaters. Between Orioles, catbirds and cardinals, I'm lucky to be able to skip a day refilling the jelly jar.
By the way, these are Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I live in Manhattan, which is east of US Highway 77, which I have been assured by my dear friend and year class member Chuck Otte is a no-cross barrier for western species of hummers.

Dan Mulhern
Manhattan

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G

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Subject: Canada Warbler at Wilderness Wetlands
Date: Tue May 21 2019 9:22 am
From: jandlbosnak AT kc.rr.com
 
Monday morning on our morning bird walk at the Wilderness Wetlands, 167th and Nall in Overland Park, we saw a Canada Warbler. We saw it about 9 am near the spot where the trail is flooded about half way from the west end.  Other noteworthy species included two Chestnut-sided Warblers, a Yellow Warbler, a Yellow-throated Vireo, about eight Chimney swifts, and a Ruby-throated Hummingbird.  Complete list of sightings and a not-so-great but diagnostic photo of the Canada Warbler are on the ebird listing.

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

John and Laura Bosnak
Overland Park, KS

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Subject: Galena Mississippi Kite 5-20-19
Date: Mon May 20 2019 8:09 am
From: jennrader34 AT gmail.com
 
This morning, I had a Mississippi Kite fly over my yard while I was talking
to a neighbor. About 15 minutes later it flew over again and nabbed a stick
(approx. 8 in. Long) from the silver maple in my yard.
I assume it™s gathering nesting material. I™ll have to watch for a pair in
the neighborhood.

Stay safe out there this week! Weather looks to get active for many.

Jenn Rader
Galena, KS
--
Jenn Rader
Galena, KS

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Subject: Yellow-breasted Chat in Bourbon Co.
Date: Sun May 19 2019 22:11 pm
From: otte2 AT cox.net
 
>How is this thing a warbler?

In short - it isn't. In 2017 The North American Checklist Committee of the
American Ornithological Society (formerly the American Ornithologists Union)
moved the Yellow-breasted Chat out from under the Warblers classification
and put it in it's own family between sparrows and blackbirds/orioles. The
exact wording in the Checklist Supplement published in the Auk was:

"Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences
indicate that Icteria virens is not a member of the Parulidae (e.g., as in AOU
1998) but instead represents a lineage distinct from other nineprimaried
oscines (Barker et al. 2013, 2015)."

This confirmed what ornithologists knew for decades. The Chat wasn't a
warbler but no one knew what the heck to do with it so it sat at the end of the
Warblers. If you look at the current Kansas Checklist:
http://ksbirds.org/checklist/K...
You will find it placed immediately following Dark-eyed Junco at the end of
the Sparrows and right before Yellow-headed Blackbird at the beginning of
the Blackbirds, Orioles. It is in it's own little grouping, that for lack of a better
term, we simply called, Chats!

Chuck

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Subject: Bay-breasted Warbler in Dickinson Co. / 18 May
Date: Sun May 19 2019 22:01 pm
From: sselt AT gbta.net
 
I birded my way home from KC on Saturday started at the always interesting
Wyandotte County Lake. There were lots of birds but few obvious migrants.
I did have one singing Blue-headed Vireo. I left when it began to pour down
rain.



After a brief stop in Shawnee County where I also got rained out, I drove
west to Dickinson County. At the south end of the East/Old Herington Lake I
heard a vaguely unfamiliar warbler song. I never got a great look, but it
sang long enough for me find an exact audio match on my Sibley app. It was
a Bay-Breasted Warbler, apparently a new species for Dickinson.



From there I drove through the Maxwell Bison Preserve in McPherson County
and on west towards Lyons where the skies opened up and dropped what felt
like about an 1" of rain per minute. I had to pull off the road several
times because you simply could not see the way forward.



Diane saw one Ruby-throated Hummingbird here at our house this evening, 19
May.



Scott Seltman

Larned, Kansas






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Subject: Yellow-breasted Chat in Bourbon Co.
Date: Sun May 19 2019 20:01 pm
From: daniel.adjuster AT gmail.com
 
Alright, not big news for most but I saw my first Yellow-breasted Chat ever
today on my family's property in Bourbon Co..

After doing some research on their specific habitat preferences I narrowed
down an area, studied the vocalization and sure enough, he was there in a
thicket of wild plums and close to a massive blackberry patch. He was
imitating a flicker and a jay, remarkably well, too. How is this thing a
warbler? DNA similarities no doubt but the likeness stops there. Seems
like a mix between a tanager and a thrasher.

A Bell's Vireo was nearby, insistent in its vocalization which I was able
to record and figure out later. I saw it well enough to corroborate the
vocalization.

--
Daniel Kerr
(620) 224-8110

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Subject: Dan Kilby exhibit at Wichita Audubon
Date: Sun May 19 2019 10:49 am
From: ewert.tom AT gmail.com
 
Bird lovers,
Dan Kilby was a charter member of the Wichita Audubon Society. He passed
away November 15, 2018. Dan was also a noted artist who painted and drew
many pieces of bird art. Some of his art was featured in American Birding
Magazine and the Kansas Breeding Bird Atlas.
Wichita Audubon will have an exhibit of some of Dan Kilby's art at the
Great Plains Nature Center, starting on Tuesday, May 21 and running through
June 3. We have paintings from the Kilby family collection as well as
pieces loaned by Pete Janzen, Kevin Groeneweg, Cheryl MIller, Roy Bekemeyer
and Tom Shane, among others.
The exhibit and Great Plains Nature Center are free and open to the public.
We invite you to come join us for our regular monthly program on Tuesday at
7:00 at GPNC. This program will feature photographs taken by many WAS
members.

For more information about WAS or this exhibit, contact me at
[email protected]

Tom Ewert
WAS President


Virus-free.
www.avast.com

<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

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Subject: Wichita Audubon Trip to Quivira & Cheyenne Bottoms
Date: Sat May 18 2019 18:42 pm
From: kgroeneweg AT sbcglobal.net
 
We had 6 participants on the Wichita Audubon trip to Quivira and Cheyenne
Bottoms. We managed to stay west of the big storms, but it was cool and
cloudy. As others have reported, with all of the water, shorebird diversity
was low. We started on the little salt marsh at Quivira with a Red-necked
Phalarope. On the big salt marsh Stilt Sandpipers were numerous, with a few
Sanderlings as well. We were treated to great looks at a pair of Least
Terns. We didn't see the Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks west of Ellinwood,
but we did see a Burrowing Owl SW of there. The only shorebirds at Cheyenne
Bottoms were phalaropes, but we had a great look at a Red-necked. There was
also a lingering Ross's Goose.



Kevin Groeneweg

Wichita


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Subject: Fwd: Bronzed Cowbird
Date: Fri May 17 2019 15:15 pm
From: jbnickelk2a AT gmail.com
 
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: James Nickel
Date: Fri, May 17, 2019 at 3:11 PM
Subject: Bronzed Cowbird
To: [email protected]


I saw a Bronzed Cowbird at Arkalon Park near Liberal May 5. The bird was in
the same place as last year, on the east side of the campground area.
I was at Morton county for several days before that. I saw many birds,
but the Green Tailed Towhee was probably my best bird at Middle Spring.
I tried to bird Cheyenne Bottoms, but a huge hail storm hit the area. It
looked like winter with 1 to 2 inches of hail on the ground. That couldn™t
have been good for the birds. The birding was as bad as I have ever seen it
there, for many years, due to high water. Jim Nickel Peabody, KS

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Subject: Burroughs June Field Trips - RSVP for MN trip
Date: Fri May 17 2019 11:08 am
From: malcolmgold AT gmail.com
 
Burrough's Audubon society of Kansas City has four field trips planned for
June. All are welcome.

Sunday, June 2nd “ Dunn Ranch (most of the day with time in the car)
Saturday, June 8th “ Blue River Parkway (morning walk)
Tuesday, June 11th “ Jerry Smith Park (morning walk)
Saturday, June 15th through Tuesday, June 18th “ Sax-Zim Bog

I ask that you email me if you are planning to attend the MN trip if I
haven't already talked with you. In the coming week, I will be sending
emails to attendees to formalize plans for the trip.

Sincerely,

Malcolm Gold (Overland Park, Johnson County, Kansas)

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Subject: Thrushes...
Date: Fri May 17 2019 7:51 am
From: aburnett9180 AT gmail.com
 
On the topic of thrushes...  I have been monitoring nocturnal flight calls
for 4 years now at my residence in Neosho Co. Thrushes are relatively easy
to separate by their nocturnal flight call. I have long hoped for a
wayward Bicknell's to end up on my recordings. Hasn't happened yet. But
what has happened is I have recorded a much higher % of Gray-cheeked
Thrushes than I ever thought I would. Makes a guy wonder if they either
call more frequently during nocturnal flight or there are more of them out
there than one would suspect. Some nights I will record one Gray-cheeked
for every 3 or 4 Swainson's.

Another strange tidbit is I did not have a single Swainson's thrush last
fall on my recordings, when typically I would have several hundred if over
a thousand. The first fall any sort of drop off like that has occurred.

IF anyone is doing any work on migratory thrushes in Kansas I'd be happy to
get you copies of the nocturnal flight calls for analysis.

Andrew Burnett
rural Erie, KS

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Subject:
Date: Fri May 17 2019 7:24 am
From: markrat61 AT gmail.com
 
Found a Hooded Warbler in Cheyenne County yesterday.
Mark Keller

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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Fri May 17 2019 7:21 am
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
I think it would be quite exciting if this was another Bicknell's-Veery hybrid.  A hybrid could have a song that is more Bicknell's, while other such hybrids could have a song that is more Veery.  And the same could be true of other possible hybrid combinations within genus Catharus.  Who knows.
As for their songs, that first-hand account of the Bicknell's-Veery hybrid says: "And at that moment I heard it, the bird let out a long flute-like song with the first half pure Veery and the second half pure Bicknells Thrush, rising upward at the end rather than spiraling downward. The Veery and the Bicknells were one and the same. I listened in disbelief as the bird switched back and forth between a full Veery and the half Bicknells song."
The Bicknell's breeding range also hosts breeding Veery Thrushes, so hybridization could be more common than we realize (especially at intermediate elevations). And a hybrid could migrate across Kansas along with normal (full-blooded) Veery thrushes during the spring. It certainly merits further scrutiny and more people looking out for possible hybrids.
---------------Ken Kinman (Hays)
P.S. As for Bicknell's and Gray-Cheeked Thrushes, could climate change be forcing some Bicknell's a bit further north into Gray-Cheeked breeding areas (and/or vice versa)? They have only have been considered separate species for less than 25 years, and there could be small areas of overlap between their breeding ranges which could expand (and where hybridization could increasingly occur). The following mentions a possible hybrid between them and other evidence of admixture: https://pqdtopen.proquest.com/...

________________________________
From: Kenneth Kinman
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 12:22 PM
To: Dan Mulhern
Cc: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan


Here is a very interesting first-hand account of encountering (and studying) the Bicknell's-Veery hybrid:
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/...

Ken Kinman, Hays

________________________________
From: Dan Mulhern
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 11:29 AM
To: Kenneth Kinman
Cc: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan

My first thought was a hybrid Gray-cheeked with Swainson's. The song led me to Bicknell's. I'm open to correction.

Dan


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Kenneth Kinman wrote:

Hi Dan,
I wonder if there is any possibility that it could be a hybrid between Bicknell's and one of the related thrushes of that genus. It seems that documenting thrush hybrids in the genus Catharus can be rather difficult unless you have DNA (as in the following recent publication):
https://bioone.org/journals/th...

------------Ken Kinman, Hays, Kansas

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 10:25 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan

My phone is virtually worthless for both photos and videos. The bird appeared to be a tan-ish Gray-cheeked, with more of a hint of eye ring. The song completely threw me till I listened to several thrush songs on the Cornell site allaboutbirds.org. Bicknell's was a perfect match.

Dan Mulhern

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Sebastian Patti wrote:

>
>
>wow...get a recording of that puppy.
>
>
>
>
>Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
>
>-------- Original message --------
>
>From: Dan Mulhern
>
>Date: 5/16/19 7:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
>
>To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
>Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
>
>
>5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.
>
>Dan Mulhern
>Manhattan
>
>Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
>
>For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
>For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>mailto:[email protected]
>


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Subject: Oak Park, Wichita
Date: Fri May 17 2019 0:59 am
From: pgriffin1 AT cox.net
 
Hi Folks,

It appears most of the bird migration has gone through Oak Park. Over the weekend, almost all of the birds that were in Oak Park for so long with the North winds and rain, have left. They were waiting for the South winds, which finally arrived. I haven™t seen a warbler for three days, along with all of the other species. I expect a few stragglers for a few days, but it will be hard to see them as Oak Park is very dense this year with all of the resent rain. I don™t remember a worse year than this year, cold temperatures, North winds, etc. But, hey, that is what you have to do, if you want to see the birds. On the good side, it has been so cold, so far no mosquitos and chiggers. But, that won™t take long for them to show up. It does appear the Hummingbirds have arrived in force this year, which is good to see, so far I™ve only seen Ruby-throated hummingbirds, but it is early.

Happy birding,

Paul Griffin, Wichita
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Subject: KOS Spring Meeting Species List
Date: Thu May 16 2019 21:46 pm
From: otte2 AT cox.net
 
The final version of the KOS Spring Meeting species list, broken down by
county, has been posted at:

http://ksbirds.org/kos/2019_Sp...

Note that the fall KOS Meeting will be in Wichita October 4 - 6. Details should
be on the website by late July or early August.

Chuck

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
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613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Subject: Morton County
Date: Thu May 16 2019 20:06 pm
From: pete.janzen AT sbcglobal.net
 
I heard third hand that Jim Nickel found one or several Bronzed Cowbirds somewhere in SW KS in the May 4-May 7 time frame but at this time I do not know the particulars. I™m sure it represents a valid record. 
Pete Janzen. Wichita, KS

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 16, 2019, at 4:00 PM, Scott Seltman wrote:
>
> I have three quick additions to Ted's report:
>
> I saw a Curve-billed Thrasher in the Hugoton Cemetery on 13 May (Monday).
> They have been recorded there many times in the last 5 or so years, but on
> any given day they can also be absent, so no guarantees.
>
> A Greater Roadrunner was along the 'river road' in Seward County on 15 May
> about 3 miles east of the Big Samson Bridge. It was my first roadrunner for
> Seward even though I've birded there for decades and even did some atlas
> blocks. I think Seward would be the 14th county where I've recorded a GRRO.
>
> I drove home through Liberal in order to check the Arkalon area for Bronzed
> Cowbirds. We are approaching the first anniversary of the first state
> record down there. There were lots of birds in the Arkalon Campground and
> also the nearby Big Samson rest area along US 54, but I saw zero Bronzed
> Cowbirds. Hopefully others will keep checking this spot during June.
>
> Scott Seltman
> Larned, Kansas
>
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> mailto:[email protected]

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Subject: Fwd: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 18:18 pm
From: browndog06 AT cox.net
 
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
From: Dan Mulhern
To: "Mark A. Corder"
CC:

I'm pretty certain that no jury would, or should, revise the State checklist based on no more information than I've been able to provide. I've done more research and will supply these additional comments.

I've seen a few pictures of tan-ish Gray-cheeked Thrush to erode my confidence of a visual confirmation of the bird I saw. Which leaves me with the song.

I've listened to several audio recordings of both species, and I maintain that TO MY EARS, the songs are separable. It's like with Veery and Wood Thrush, both songs have a similar ethereal quality, but you can still tell one from another, bird unseen.

The way the songs of Bicknell's and Gray-cheeked bounce off my particular set of eardrums makes it possible for me to tell them apart. And what I heard was a Bicknell's song, again based on audio recordings and absolutely no prior experience with the critter.

Using this information, each member of the jury will have to decide for themselves. As I said, I'm not expecting a checklist revision.

Dan

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

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Subject: Morton County
Date: Thu May 16 2019 16:01 pm
From: sselt AT gbta.net
 
I have three quick additions to Ted's report:

I saw a Curve-billed Thrasher in the Hugoton Cemetery on 13 May (Monday).
They have been recorded there many times in the last 5 or so years, but on
any given day they can also be absent, so no guarantees.

A Greater Roadrunner was along the 'river road' in Seward County on 15 May
about 3 miles east of the Big Samson Bridge. It was my first roadrunner for
Seward even though I've birded there for decades and even did some atlas
blocks. I think Seward would be the 14th county where I've recorded a GRRO.

I drove home through Liberal in order to check the Arkalon area for Bronzed
Cowbirds. We are approaching the first anniversary of the first state
record down there. There were lots of birds in the Arkalon Campground and
also the nearby Big Samson rest area along US 54, but I saw zero Bronzed
Cowbirds. Hopefully others will keep checking this spot during June.

Scott Seltman
Larned, Kansas

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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 14:22 pm
From: browndog06 AT cox.net
 
Ok, thanks for all the helpful information from many folks. And thanks, Galen, aka Captain Obvious, for making sure I knew the bird isn't on the Kansas list. (jk, Galen, you know I love you).
I'm going to rephrase my report. This morning I observed a bird that looked and sounded just like the Bicknell's Thrush from the Cornell web site. However, due to frequency of hybridization, variations in song, and sheer distance, it is more likely the bird was at least part Gray-cheeked.

Dan Mulhern

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Dan Mulhern wrote:

>5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.
>
>Dan Mulhern
>Manhattan
>
>Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

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Subject: thrush search
Date: Thu May 16 2019 14:11 pm
From: browndog06 AT cox.net
 
That's interesting, Ted. This morning I observed zero warblers and probably 8-10 Swainson's Thrush. And one persistently singing Summer Tanager.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Ted Cable wrote:

>Since I live only a couple of miles from the site of the Bicknell's Thrush report I went over and looked for it. I arrived about an hour or so after the report. I searched for 30 minutes and was eventually joined by Lowell Johnson who hadn't seen the report, but just happened to be birding there. No thrushes of any kind were seen or heard by us. Did get to photograph several redstarts and had a Prothonotary Warbler picking bugs off my car in the parking lot! - Ted
>
>
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Subject: Morton County
Date: Thu May 16 2019 13:57 pm
From: tcable AT ksu.edu
 
I just returned last night from three days of birding in Morton County. Most of the time I was birding with Scott Seltman. The weather, wildflowers and grasslands were beautiful, and the birds weren't too bad either.  We saw and photographed western species like Western Tanager, Cassin's Kingbird,  Ash-throated Flycatcher, Lazuli Buntings, Lark Buntings, Black-headed Grosbeaks,and Scaled Quail.  Warblers included Parulas, Redstarts, single Mourning and MacGillivray's, several Northern Waterthrushes and many Yellow-rumps of both types.  The Shelterbelt held a displaying male Black-chinned Hummingbird, Olive-sided Flycatcher,  Rose-breasted Grosbeak, five Broad-wing Hawks, lots of Pine Siskins and waxwings,  and a thriving Black-crowned Night Heron colony.  Out on the grasslands we saw three Common Ravens and discovered that an old raven nest site is now being used by a pair of Barn Owls. Over the three days some of what we saw at the sewer ponds included three Cinnamon Teal, three White Pelicans, White-faced Ibis, two Stilt Sandpipers, Willet, Avocet, Black-necked Stilt, Black Terns, lots of phalaropes, cormorants, and the normal assortment of more common ducks and shorebirds. -- Ted


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Subject: Steve Lloyd Wetlands, Clay County
Date: Thu May 16 2019 13:39 pm
From: cotte AT ksu.edu
 
After getting home from KOS Sunday afternoon Jaye and I headed right back
out and went up to the flooded wetlands (does that sound weird??) on the
north end of Milford Lake. I'd seen the Janzen/Groeneweg/Ewert birding
party report of Ruddy Turnstones at the Steve Lloyd Wetlands so wondered
if they were still around. We found zero shorebirds but did have a couple
of very vocal Sedge Wrens.

Seeing John Row's report from Tuesday of Ruddy Turnstones from the same
location, we headed back there last night. This time we found numerous
shorebirds (and a pair of copulating gopher snakes!). This time we DID
find a Ruddy Turnstone, 8 very noisy Willets, a Greater Yellowlegs, some
White-rumped Sandpipers and miscellaneous other shorebirds. It was kind of
hard to spend much time concentrating on them as a Peregrine kept poofing
them into flight!

Milford Lake is nearly 17 feet high right now with no relief in sight in
the near future for it to drop and lots of opportunity for it to go
higher. Once they start releasing water it will be quite a while before it
can return to "normal" level. All of this to say that we could have a very
good July/August situation for shorebirds at Milford. In 1993, when the
lake hit record high levels 20 feet higher than it is now, there was a
huge dead bathtub ring all around the lake. When vegetation is under water
as long as it has been now it tends to degrade to nothing. Whenever the
lake level drops there will be extensive mud flats. In late summer 1993 we
had incredible shorebird numbers and species diversity. We could see that
again this year. It also means that unless the water drops soon and we get
a flush of growth of vegetation these bath tub ring areas will be devoid
of birds (sparrows, finches, etc.) this fall and winter. Many trees in
this flood zone will also likely die due to submersion. Which means that 2
to 4 years from now we'll likely have a big jump in woodpecker numbers, as
we saw following the 1993 flood. Areas around Tuttle Creek and Perry Lakes
will also likely see the same thing!

When life gives you lemons...

Chuck

-----
Chuck Otte [email protected]
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28 785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028 FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/


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Subject: Wabaunsee County
Date: Thu May 16 2019 13:00 pm
From: crxmorgan AT gmail.com
 
I birded a few of my favorite spots in Wabaunsee County this morning.  The
strong south wind was blocked by the cliff at Echo Cliff Park, and two
Acadian flycatchers sang their iconic *peet-zeet* call. They are
probably nesting there again. A yellow-throated vireo also gave good
looks.
At Mission View Cemetery I was pleasantly surprised to see a Mississippi
kite flying overhead, and two Bewick's wrens sang and scolded. Bewick's
wrens have been loyal to this location; if you need them for a list, this
is a good place to find them.
There were many other common and expected species.

--
Carol Morgan
[email protected]
Cell: 785-554-5112

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Subject: thrush search
Date: Thu May 16 2019 12:57 pm
From: tcable AT ksu.edu
 
Since I live only a couple of miles from the site of the Bicknell's Thrush report I went over and looked for it. I arrived about an hour or so after the report.  I searched for 30 minutes and was eventually joined by Lowell Johnson who hadn't seen the report, but just happened to be birding there.  No thrushes of any kind were seen or heard by us. Did get to photograph several redstarts and had a Prothonotary Warbler picking bugs off my car in the parking lot!  - Ted


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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 12:34 pm
From: galenpitt AT gmail.com
 
Bicknell's Thrush is not on the KANSAS list.... be prepared to document
this one, Dan !!
Galen Pittman

On Thu, May 16, 2019, 10:02 AM Sebastian Patti
wrote:

> wow...get a recording of that puppy.
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Dan Mulhern
> Date: 5/16/19 7:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
>
> 5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the
> North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek
> reservoir.
>
> Dan Mulhern
> Manhattan
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>
> https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>
> https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:[email protected]
>
> For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
> For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:[email protected]
>

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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 12:23 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Here is a very interesting first-hand account of encountering (and studying) the Bicknell's-Veery hybrid:
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/...

Ken Kinman, Hays

________________________________
From: Dan Mulhern
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 11:29 AM
To: Kenneth Kinman
Cc: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan

My first thought was a hybrid Gray-cheeked with Swainson's. The song led me to Bicknell's. I'm open to correction.

Dan


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Kenneth Kinman wrote:

Hi Dan,
I wonder if there is any possibility that it could be a hybrid between Bicknell's and one of the related thrushes of that genus. It seems that documenting thrush hybrids in the genus Catharus can be rather difficult unless you have DNA (as in the following recent publication):
https://bioone.org/journals/th...

------------Ken Kinman, Hays, Kansas

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 10:25 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan

My phone is virtually worthless for both photos and videos. The bird appeared to be a tan-ish Gray-cheeked, with more of a hint of eye ring. The song completely threw me till I listened to several thrush songs on the Cornell site allaboutbirds.org. Bicknell's was a perfect match.

Dan Mulhern

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Sebastian Patti wrote:

>
>
>wow...get a recording of that puppy.
>
>
>
>
>Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
>
>-------- Original message --------
>
>From: Dan Mulhern
>
>Date: 5/16/19 7:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
>
>To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
>Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
>
>
>5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.
>
>Dan Mulhern
>Manhattan
>
>Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
>
>For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
>For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>mailto:[email protected]
>


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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 11:29 am
From: browndog06 AT cox.net
 
My first thought was a hybrid Gray-cheeked with Swainson's. The song led me to Bicknell's. I'm open to correction.

Dan


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Kenneth Kinman wrote:

>Hi Dan,
> I wonder if there is any possibility that it could be a hybrid between Bicknell's and one of the related thrushes of that genus. It seems that documenting thrush hybrids in the genus Catharus can be rather difficult unless you have DNA (as in the following recent publication):
> https://bioone.org/journals/th...
>
> ------------Ken Kinman, Hays, Kansas
>
>________________________________
>From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
>Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 10:25 AM
>To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
>
>My phone is virtually worthless for both photos and videos. The bird appeared to be a tan-ish Gray-cheeked, with more of a hint of eye ring. The song completely threw me till I listened to several thrush songs on the Cornell site allaboutbirds.org. Bicknell's was a perfect match.
>
>Dan Mulhern
>
>Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
>
>Sebastian Patti wrote:
>
>>
>>
>>wow...get a recording of that puppy.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>>
>>
>>-------- Original message --------
>>
>>From: Dan Mulhern
>>
>>Date: 5/16/19 7:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
>>
>>To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>
>>Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
>>
>>
>>5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.
>>
>>Dan Mulhern
>>Manhattan
>>
>>Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
>>
>>For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>>https://eur03.safelinks.protec... KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>>https://eur03.safelinks.protec... contact a listowner, send a message to
>>mailto:[email protected]
>>
>
>
>For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
>For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>mailto:[email protected]
>
>For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
>For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>mailto:[email protected]


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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 11:14 am
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi Dan,
I wonder if there is any possibility that it could be a hybrid between Bicknell's and one of the related thrushes of that genus. It seems that documenting thrush hybrids in the genus Catharus can be rather difficult unless you have DNA (as in the following recent publication):
https://bioone.org/journals/th...

------------Ken Kinman, Hays, Kansas

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Dan Mulhern
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 10:25 AM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan

My phone is virtually worthless for both photos and videos. The bird appeared to be a tan-ish Gray-cheeked, with more of a hint of eye ring. The song completely threw me till I listened to several thrush songs on the Cornell site allaboutbirds.org. Bicknell's was a perfect match.

Dan Mulhern

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Sebastian Patti wrote:

>
>
>wow...get a recording of that puppy.
>
>
>
>
>Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
>
>-------- Original message --------
>
>From: Dan Mulhern
>
>Date: 5/16/19 7:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
>
>To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
>Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
>
>
>5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.
>
>Dan Mulhern
>Manhattan
>
>Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
>
>For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
>For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec...
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>mailto:[email protected]
>


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To contact a listowner, send a message to
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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 10:26 am
From: browndog06 AT cox.net
 
My phone is virtually worthless for both photos and videos. The bird appeared to be a tan-ish Gray-cheeked, with more of a hint of eye ring. The song completely threw me till I listened to several thrush songs on the Cornell site allaboutbirds.org. Bicknell's was a perfect match.

Dan Mulhern

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Sebastian Patti wrote:

>
>
>wow...get a recording of that puppy.
>
>
>
>
>Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
>
>-------- Original message --------
>
>From: Dan Mulhern
>
>Date: 5/16/19 7:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
>
>To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
>Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
>
>
>5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.
>
>Dan Mulhern
>Manhattan
>
>Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
>
>For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec... KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
>https://eur03.safelinks.protec... contact a listowner, send a message to
>mailto:[email protected]
>


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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 10:02 am
From: sebastianpatti AT hotmail.com
 
wow...get a recording of that puppy.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Dan Mulhern
Date: 5/16/19 7:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan

5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.

Dan Mulhern
Manhattan

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush, Manhattan
Date: Thu May 16 2019 9:52 am
From: browndog06 AT cox.net
 
5 minutes ago (9:45 am) I saw and heard sing a Bicknell's Thrush at the North end of the Cottonwood Trail at River Pond State Park, Tuttle Creek reservoir.

Dan Mulhern
Manhattan

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

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Subject: A week of birding
Date: Thu May 16 2019 1:11 am
From: armknecht AT ruraltel.net
 
I left Hays on Wednesday morning 5/8 to travel to Fort Scott for spring KOS
meeting and just returned Wednesday night 5/15. It was seven days of dawn to
dark birding and a great trip.

5/8 was a travel rather than a birding day. I stopped by the Wetlands
Education Center in Barton County on the way to Leavenworth so birded some
in Rush, Rice, Ellsworth, Saline, and Shawnee counties. Highlights were
Godwits and Avocets in flooded fields as well as seeing at least 25 Eastern
Kingbirds in one small tree.

Thursday morning, I birded Ft. Leavenworth with John Schukman and Kathy
Carol. It was a gorgeous morning with many birds singing and calling.
Warblers, Tanagers, and Thrushes seemed to be calling and singing
everywhere. I was glad to be with experience birders who could pick out and
identify the various bird sounds and help me try to learn them.

Thursday afternoon I birded my way to Franklin County spending a little time
in Leavenworth, Johnson, Douglas, and Franklin counties. Highlights included
Bobolinks on the Douglas/Johnson County line right where Cathy told me they
would be.

Friday morning was spent on the trails near Rantoul in Franklin county with
a group led by Malcolm Gold. It was another beautiful morning spent in
great habitat surrounded by singing birds. Much thanks go to Malcolm and
Jeff Calhoun for helping me learn more about how to hear the sounds around
us. A highlight was a Lazuli Bunting.

Thursday afternoon Jeff Calhoun, John Schukman and I birded our way to Ft.
Scott. We hit spots in Franklin and mostly Anderson County. A highlight was
warblers at Garnett north lake park and Bobolinks in a random pasture
somewhere southeast of Garnett.

Friday evening, all day Saturday and Sunday morning were spent at KOS. I
spent the entire KOS in Bourbon County. Friday evening Daniel Kerr invited
us to his farm to listen for nightjars. A few Chuck's called, but we didn't
hear Whips. It didn't matter because the evening and the setting were both
beautiful. Saturday Chuck Otte led a trip to various parks and lakes. A
highlight was a Painted Bunting standing on a rock right in the road and
turning all sides toward us to make sure we were able to appreciate his
beauty. A Palm Warbler did the same thing, but somehow it didn't have the
same impact. A highlight of KOS meetings is always getting to spend time
with other birders and learning from them as we enjoy the birds and the
experience together.

Sunday afternoon, I birded my way to Garnett. A highlight was Lehigh
Portland Trails near Iola in Allen County. Other KOS birders had found a lot
of good birds there Sunday morning and I was fortunate to find a few Sunday
afternoon. I didn't see all of the good warblers seen in the morning, but I
did see 5 Ovenbirds and 6 Magnolia Warblers and 9 total warbler species. Who
could ask for more?

Sunday evening and Monday morning, I tried for Whip-poor-Wills around
Garnett but only got Chuck's. It was still beautiful to be out and hear
birds I don't hear around Hays.

Monday the 13th I birded Anderson, Coffey, and Osage counties. Highlights
included being able to identify Nashville, Black-and-white, Prothonotary,
Kentucky, and Louisiana Waterthrush all by song before I saw them. Another
highlight was finding a male Lazuli Bunting on the trail at Lake Garnett
Park. The Lazuli Bunting is apparently new to the Anderson County list.

Tuesday's objective was to work on my county lists in Shawnee, Jackson, and
Jefferson counties. THE highlight was finding a female Cape May Warbler in
Felker Park in Topeka. It was my first one in Kansas.

Wednesday 5/15 was the last day of this trip. I went with Malcolm Gold and a
fairly large group of birders on his Burroughs Audubon walk at Mill Creek
Streamway Trail in Johnson County. It was evident that migration is winding
down, but still a great morning. A highlight was getting to bird with a
group of people in a beautiful somewhat natural setting in the city.

After leaving the park, I visited some flooded fields. The first with
Malcolm Gold near Mill Creek Streamway Trail. We picked up several species
of shorebirds. I then stopped by some fields north of DeSoto (thanks to
Aaron Batterbee) where highlights included an American Golden Plover,
Semi-palmated Plover, and a flyover of 4 Hudsonian Godwits.

Other stops on the way home included a visit to my mother-in-law on the farm
in Riley County. I took her some flowers and was rewarded by adding Bell's
Vireo and Kentucky Warbler to my Riley County list.

The last stop on my week of birding was to the flooded fields on Jeep Road
in Dickinson County. One field looked like a lake to me and apparently to
some birds too. Highlights included Black Terns, American Golden and
Semi-palmated Plovers, and 2 Ruddy Turnstones.

I also saw at least 5 Buff-breasted Sandpipers. This is the first time I
have ever seen this species in the spring. I don't know how common spring
sightings are. It is also apparently new to the Dickinson County list. They
were the last species I spotted on my week of birding early to late every
day. This was a fantastic way to end one of the very best weeks of my life.
As any of you who have birded with me know, I really struggle to learn bird
songs, but I could definitely see progress over the week.

Thanks to the many people who helped make my week so great.

Henry A.
Hays

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Subject: KOS Spring Meeting List by county
Date: Wed May 15 2019 7:13 am
From: otte2 AT cox.net
 
I have compiled the county by county breakdown of what was seen at the
spring KOS meeting this past weekend. The link is posted below. We are
currently at 159 species.

There are two orphan species that were called out at the compilation on
Sunday that don't show up on the big checklists. If you called out Mallard or
Least Bittern, please drop me an email so I can assign them to their proper
county. If not, they will be removed from the master list.

http://ksbirds.org/kos/2019_Sp...

Thank you!
Chuck

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chuck & Jaye Otte mailto:[email protected]
613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Subject: SO FUNNY!
Date: Wed May 15 2019 0:13 am
From: marlaswhisperingpines AT gmail.com
 
That's exactly what they were doing, Ken, only they didn't stay on it that
long. Just three or four seconds at a time, then they'd fly to a branch,
then come back in for the same. Quite the show!

Marla

On Tue, May 14, 2019, 8:02 PM Kenneth Kinman wrote:

> Hi All,
> I guess some animals don't mind such attacks on their back ends.
> Here is video of a dog getting the same kind of hair removal, and seems to
> act like it has happened before. These are smart little birds that seem to
> know it best to attack the back end (far away from the mammal's teeth):
> YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?...
>
> -----------Ken Kinman, Hays, Kansas
>
> ________________________________
> From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on
> behalf of Marla Shoemaker
> Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 7:27 PM
> To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: SO FUNNY!
>
> I've been watching birds for years and years, and I've never laughed as
> hard at them as I did yesterday. I was looking out my kitchen window,
> watching the silly raccoon hanging almost upside down in order to eat the
> seed in the feeder. Her back legs were hooked over a branch, leaving her
> front feet free to forage. Two titmice started coming in behind her, then
> flying in and landing on her upturned rump where they snatched hair right
> out of her coat! The raccoon would whip her head around but she was -
> literally- in no position to be able to get to them, and they certainly
> knew it! They "harvested" hair for about 10 minutes! I've heard of them
> landing on people reclining on their decks and snatching hair for their
> nests, but I've never seen them actually doing anything like this before!
> It was hilarious!
>
> Marla in Manhattan
> Riley County
>
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> mailto:[email protected]
>
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> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> mailto:[email protected]
>

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Subject: SO FUNNY!
Date: Tue May 14 2019 20:02 pm
From: kinman AT hotmail.com
 
Hi All,
I guess some animals don't mind such attacks on their back ends. Here is video of a dog getting the same kind of hair removal, and seems to act like it has happened before. These are smart little birds that seem to know it best to attack the back end (far away from the mammal's teeth):
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

-----------Ken Kinman, Hays, Kansas

________________________________
From: Birds & Their Habitats in Kansas on behalf of Marla Shoemaker
Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 7:27 PM
To: KSBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: SO FUNNY!

I've been watching birds for years and years, and I've never laughed as
hard at them as I did yesterday. I was looking out my kitchen window,
watching the silly raccoon hanging almost upside down in order to eat the
seed in the feeder. Her back legs were hooked over a branch, leaving her
front feet free to forage. Two titmice started coming in behind her, then
flying in and landing on her upturned rump where they snatched hair right
out of her coat! The raccoon would whip her head around but she was -
literally- in no position to be able to get to them, and they certainly
knew it! They "harvested" hair for about 10 minutes! I've heard of them
landing on people reclining on their decks and snatching hair for their
nests, but I've never seen them actually doing anything like this before!
It was hilarious!

Marla in Manhattan
Riley County

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https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
To contact a listowner, send a message to
mailto:[email protected]

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Subject: scissor tails and bobolinks
Date: Tue May 14 2019 19:59 pm
From: lauraellenkirk AT gmail.com
 
Saw a pair of scissor tails south of Lawrence on farm, bobolinks at Baker
Wetlands, and kingbirds on fences. Indigo buntings, Orioles, colorful times
around Lawrence. If only a crossbill for my life list ... will travel.
About to go to Northwestern CT for warbler bonanza. My old CT birding group
would travel here to see a scissor tail.

Happy Spring

Laura Kirk
Lawrence, KS

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Subject: SO FUNNY!
Date: Tue May 14 2019 19:27 pm
From: marlaswhisperingpines AT gmail.com
 
I've been watching birds for years and years, and I've never laughed as
hard at them as I did yesterday. I was looking out my kitchen window,
watching the silly raccoon hanging almost upside down in order to eat the
seed in the feeder. Her back legs were hooked over a branch, leaving her
front feet free to forage. Two titmice started coming in behind her, then
flying in and landing on her upturned rump where they snatched hair right
out of her coat! The raccoon would whip her head around but she was -
literally- in no position to be able to get to them, and they certainly
knew it! They "harvested" hair for about 10 minutes! I've heard of them
landing on people reclining on their decks and snatching hair for their
nests, but I've never seen them actually doing anything like this before!
It was hilarious!

Marla in Manhattan
Riley County

For KSBIRD-L archives or to change your subscription options, go to
https://listserv.ksu.edu/ksbir...
For KSBIRD-L guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/KSBIRD-...
To contact a listowner, send a message to
mailto:[email protected]



Subject: blues
Date: Tue May 14 2019 18:12 pm
From: okiestu AT gmail.com
 
Today I had the peaceful experience of watching my great Blues come back,  they are gorgeous but from a distance difficult to tell xx from xy.  They are gorgeous though.

Stuart
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Subject: Ruddy turnstone
Date: Tue May 14 2019 18:11 pm
From: johmarrow AT hotmail.com
 
Hi All. Just got back from Steve Lloyd Wetland north of Milford Lake. From the entrance I spotted 13 ruddy turnstone on a log. Not far from there on a closer log, 3 black-bellied plover and an additional turnstone were spotted.

John Row
Manhattan, KS

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Flint Hills Nature Trail - Franklin County
Date: Tue May 14 2019 17:28 pm
From: malcolmgold AT gmail.com
 
Terry Swope and I returned to Franklin County this morning and explored the
Flint Hills Nature Trail headed west from Rantoul. The first 0.35 miles of
this trail includes nice habitat that has held migrants on each of my four
visits. Both Waterthrushes, a couple of Magnolia, a Black-throated Green, a
silent Ovenbird, and a silent male Bay-breasted Warbler were the highlights
in this section of the trail today.

But today was more about walking 2 miles and checking out the wooded
habitat along the Marais Des Cygnes River. The habitat on this section of
trail is similar to the trail headed east out of Rantoul (yet in Franklin
County) with mature hardwood forests close by, yet it has more brush and
lower canopy trees as you might expect with areas that transition between
habitat types.

A nice mixed flock of warblers was along the trail after we turned around,
with a Mourning Warbler and another Black-throated Green Warbler at eye
level. As we stopped to look at these a Black-billed Cuckoo landed above
our heads. I believe this my personal highest number of warbler species in
one day in Kansas, and it was great to share it with Terry.

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Good Birding,

Malcolm Gold (Overland Park, Johnson County, Kansas)

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