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Birding News
ABA's Birding News >> Massachusetts

Massachusetts bird news by date

Updated on June 13, 2021, 3:10 pm

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13 Jun: @ 15:01:41 
Southwick WMA [Josh]
12 Jun: @ 20:03:12 
Transitional surprise [dovekie]
10 Jun: @ 04:10:12 
Black crowned night herons - Gloucester [Barbara Volkle]
09 Jun: @ 22:41:39 
Black Crowned Night Heron - Goldfish Pond - Lynn [Barbara Volkle]
09 Jun: @ 20:15:20 
Late female Harlequin Duck in Rockport [Barbara Volkle]
09 Jun: @ 13:19:00 
Re: Unexplained Hummer Death [linda pivacek]
08 Jun: @ 20:17:00 
Unexplained Hummer Death [Barbara Volkle]
08 Jun: @ 04:11:13 
FYI - decline of Red Knot [Barbara Volkle]
07 Jun: @ 21:46:59 
6/5 Common Nighthawks over Coolidge Corner in Brookline [Barbara Volkle]
07 Jun: @ 12:45:15 
Re: Unexplained Hummer Death [Marty Burns]
07 Jun: @ 08:52:43 
Re: Little Private Beach, Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts [Andy Sanford]
07 Jun: @ 04:19:04 
Re: Unexplained Hummer Death [G M ARCHAMBAULT]
07 Jun: @ 03:47:09 
Unexplained Hummer Death [Barbara Volkle]
07 Jun: @ 01:14:10 
Little Private Beach, Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts [Ronald Zigler]
07 Jun: @ 01:11:29 
Martin Burns WMA, Jun 6, 2021 [Linda Ferraresso]
06 Jun: @ 18:57:19 
Fwd: eBird -- Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit -- Jun 6, 2021 [Cliff Cook]
05 Jun: @ 22:58:49 
Mt Greylock State Reservation - 6/5/21 [Bill Lafley]
05 Jun: @ 19:01:03 
Quabbin - Federated State Forest [Barbara Volkle]
05 Jun: @ 18:56:35 
6/4 Common Nighthawk at Cold Spring Park in Newton, etc. [Barbara Volkle]
05 Jun: @ 01:02:46 
RE: Purple Martins & Cold, wet Weather [Barbara Volkle]
04 Jun: @ 03:11:03 
A grisly discovery [Stuart Walker]
04 Jun: @ 01:10:08 
6/2 Common Nighthawk in Brookline [Barbara Volkle]
04 Jun: @ 00:10:27 
Red Crossbills in Concord, MA [meaghan q. sinclair]
02 Jun: @ 21:30:52 
5/27 Fowl Meadow in Milton and Canton [Barbara Volkle]
02 Jun: @ 20:47:50 
Things that fly in the night and hang out in the day [redpoll]
01 Jun: @ 16:05:36 
June 2021 Issue of Bird Observer Now Online [Marsha Salett]
01 Jun: @ 15:37:51 
Alder Flycatcher, Nahant, 5-31 [Shilo McDonald]
01 Jun: @ 03:25:52 
May 31, 2021 Rock Meadow, Belmont...(unofficial) Last day of Spring Migration [Barbara Volkle]
01 Jun: @ 00:44:28 
Eiders lost in storm. Note re Monarchs [Barbara Volkle]
01 Jun: @ 00:15:12 
Yellow-Crowned Night Herons - South Dartmouth [Barbara Volkle]
31 May: @ 17:28:18 
Re: Hooded mergs Topsfield [tracy fischer]
31 May: @ 13:31:37 
Hooded mergs Topsfield [James MacDougall]
31 May: @ 12:50:30 
Big Day - correction [Barbara Volkle]
31 May: @ 12:50:30 
Big Day [Barbara Volkle]
31 May: @ 02:47:11 
White-winged Tern - Race Point [Barbara Volkle]
31 May: @ 00:59:41 
Purple Martin viewing at colony in Easton, Mass [Barbara Volkle]
30 May: @ 17:33:32 
RE: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders' [Bob Crowley]
30 May: @ 16:40:49 
NH Audubon Pelagic Birding Trip tomorrow CANCELLED [Jon Woolf]
30 May: @ 15:44:18 
Re: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders' [Peter Trull]
30 May: @ 15:00:10 
Re: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders' [Rajesh Mohan]
30 May: @ 14:59:25 
Black Birders Week 2021 [Barbara Volkle]
30 May: @ 13:51:33 
Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders' [Barbara Volkle]
30 May: @ 09:49:31 
Re: Heerman's Gull - Horseneck Beach, Westport [Justin Lawson]
30 May: @ 09:45:40 
Secondhand: Heermann’s Gull Westport [William Freedberg]
30 May: @ 06:02:33 
Re: Good nighthawk count last week, Pittsfield [blafley]
30 May: @ 06:02:19 
Re: bizarre report of roadrunner in Beverly [Robert Ross]
29 May: @ 03:53:18 
bizarre report of roadrunner in Beverly [Barbara Volkle]
28 May: @ 01:33:22 
Good nighthawk count last week, Pittsfield [Young, John (DPU)]
28 May: @ 01:30:56 
Every Bit of Wild Matters [Barbara Volkle]
27 May: @ 21:56:07 
Cumberland Farms auction update [Barbara Volkle]





Subject: Southwick WMA
Date: Sun Jun 13 2021 15:01 pm
From: opihi AT mindspring.com
 
Hi MassBirders,

Birding at Southwick Wildlife Management Area, in southern Hampden County, has been insanely good recently. I haven’t been there recently, but have been following reports via eBird and Western Mass Birders. The site actually straddles the CT state line, with the section south of the border named Suffield WMA. The area is about 450 acres, formerly tobacco farmland, being restored to grassland habitat. It gets used for hunting in season, especially Ring-necked Pheasant, but its breeding birds are increasingly noteworthy, and NHESP is starting to manage for state-rare species of other taxa here as well.

Worth noting: very important to stick to trails. Ticks are certainly abundant, and the sandy soil and grassy habitat makes the place about as likely to harbor chiggers as anywhere in the state. Not only are some of the breeding bird species locally rare, so are some of the local plants, reptiles, amphibians, and probably insects, all of which can be negatively impacted by people walking off-trail.

Some birders who have visited recently mentioned issues with off-leash dogs. Until recently this was permitted; but as of January 2019, dogs in MA WMAs must be leashed and waste picked up, unless those dogs are involved with licensed hunting activity or some other MassWildlife permit. I’m not sure to whom observed violations should be reported, but would guess either the state environmental police, or MassWildlife staff?
https://thewestfieldnews.com/n...

Anyway, about the birds, the place has been known for years as having one of the healthier populations of Grasshopper Sparrow in the Valley. In mid-May of this year, a male Blue Grosbeak was photographed there
https://ebird.org/checklist/S8...
And has been intermittently reported through this past Wednesday, mostly from the MA side of the border.

More excitingly, a couple of weeks later, a male Dickcissel was photographed there, and reported singing:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S8...
Many subsequent reports from both sides of the state line have noted multiple birds, with one citing two males and two females:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S8...

Things escalated even further yesterday when Jon Skinner recorded an apparent Western Meadowlark:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S9...

Hopefully Upland Sandpiper will start breeding there at some point soon, but as far as I can tell, only one has been observed there so far this year, in late April.

Good birding,

Josh




Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
https://www.facebook.com/opihi

Vice-president, Hampshire Bird Club
https://hampshirebirdclub.org/

Northeast Chapter head, Dragonfly Society of the Americas
https://www.dragonflysocietyam...

Citizen science pages:
http://bugguide.net/user/view/...
https://www.inaturalist.org/ob...
https://ebird.org/profile/MTk1...



Subject: Transitional surprise
Date: Sat Jun 12 2021 20:03 pm
From: dovekie AT comcast.net
 
I headed over to Plum Island just after the morning's rains had
stopped. Having recently returned from chasing the last vestiges of the
spring migration up at the Connecticut Lakes region of New Hampshire where
my companions and I had legendary looks at Mourning Warbler, I was preparing
for the transitional period after migration. For that the day was near
perfect. It was cloudy and cool and this managed to suppress the annoying
biting insects and beach-weasels. I encountered and chatted with Tom Wetmore
but saw no one else. Just right for the quiet transition I sought. Although
there were no sightings of Seaside Sparrow, I did have seven Saltmarsh
Sparrows out in the salt marshes between Lot two and the Pannes.

It was a fine transitional day. Gone was the electricity of the
migration, the anxiety and excitement of tracking down reported sightings,
now I was free of the chasing of year birds and rumors of life birds.
Everything had mellowed into a soft tonal quality that soothed rather than
excited. Now, instead of seeing birds, I could watch them. I loved it.

The morning was replete with unhurried sedate events that
indicated that the birds had finished sorting out their pairings and vying
for attention. At Hellcat I could still hear the plaintive and persistent
song of the luckless Yellow-throated Vireo still pathetically calling for a
mate. Out on the Marsh spur there was a Swamp Sparrow with a beak full of
former insects, chipping aggressively at me before diving down into the
phrags, and a Marsh Wren singing and pirouetting above the top of the
cattails. Lots of Catbirds and lots of Cedar Waxwings about. But both seemed
to be more deliberate and quick and paid scant attention to my presence.
Willow Flycatchers were calling here and there and at the edge of the
cattail marsh I caught sight of an Alder Flycatcher high in a tree calling
out for free beer. They were clearly on the mission of renewal. The nesting
season was transitioning to the hard work of feeding new nestlings. Yellow
Warblers darted past me on the board walk and at one point I saw and heard
an extremely angry Yellowthroat burst out of the underbrush and assail
another yellowthroat who couldn't get away too fast. Even among these little
explosions of activity there was a general aura of peace and a basic calm
that seemed to indicate that the birds' lives had returned to the general
order of things.

Although I can't come up with a special instance, my memory tells
me that during this placid time I have encountered some unexpected and
special events. I had one today. As I walked out to the deck where the old
blind used to be in Hellcat I stopped as I thought I heard a Virginia Rail
grunt. I stopped and listened, but nothing was repeated. I wasn't surprised
that I heard it for Virginia rails have nested here in the past. Then when I
stepped onto the deck, I immediately noticed a small bird swimming across
the channel that connected the pool right in front of the deck with the main
North Pool. It was immediately clear that this wasn't a duck. Before I could
bring my binoculars to bare it flew to the left side. A Virginia Rail no
doubt. I was overjoyed. I had seen Virginia Rail a few times this spring,
but this was the first for Plum Island. I wondered if they could have nested
here this year. Almost instantly my wondering stopped as I spotted to tiny
forms making their way out into the channel from where the Rail had flown.
Two tiny black birds awkwardly heading for the right side and then two more
appeared and then a fifth. In my binoculars there was no doubt. Five tiny
black puff balls; Virginia Rail chicks. Although they seemed to struggle,
they continued to persist and make headway. When the first pair were just
about to make it to the marshes the adult suddenly flew out of the left side
of the channel marsh and right over the chicks to vanish into the reeds on
the other side. They couldn't have been more than a few days old and here
they were pushing gamely across the short stretch of open water with the
nervous and frantic adult in attendance.

Needless to say, I was beyond excitement. It was the event of the
day, probably of the migration and maybe, the year. And perhaps one of the
most memorable sightings of my lifetime. At least it seems so right now. I
only wish that my friends Tom Graham and/or Dave Adrien were there with
their cameras. As it is this sight is now lodged firmly in my memory, where
it belongs.



Doug Chickering

Newburyport

dovekie@comcast.net



Subject: Black crowned night herons - Gloucester
Date: Thu Jun 10 2021 4:10 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Caroline Haines for this followup.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: caroline
Subject: Black crowned night herons
Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2021 01:34:42 +0000


Many BC night herons along the Annisquam river in Gloucester tonight.
Very nice looks of two who were fishing along Blynman canal. Their
plumage was a delightful contrast-one an adult with a very long white
breeding plume, the other a first year bird with a black crown, a pale
brown back and a teensy ( about an inch) beginning of a breeding plume.
Sweet!
Caroline Haines
Songbirder@hotmail.com
Gloucester


Sent from my iPhone-please excuse brevity, typos, or insults.



Subject: Black Crowned Night Heron - Goldfish Pond - Lynn
Date: Wed Jun 9 2021 22:41 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Bill Crawford for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

Date:  Wed, 9 Jun 2021 21:34:20
From:  crawfordwm@verizon.net
Subject:  Black Crowned Night Heron - Goldfish Pond - Lynn


Alice (and Bruce): Earlier this afternoon, I saw what I thought was a
1st Yr. Black Crowned Night Heron (pls correct me if I am mistaken) at
Goldfish Pond in Lynn.  This bird did not have the feather from the
back-of-head - also "washed out" plumage - not as "sharp" as adults seen
in other years.

Carol just called to let me know  that she is "on" both my 1st yr. bird
(??) as well as an adult bird.  Both were on the "island."

Bill (& Carol) Crawford, Nahant



Subject: Late female Harlequin Duck in Rockport
Date: Wed Jun 9 2021 20:15 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Dave Peterson for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

From:? environment@juno.com
Subject:? Late female Harlequin Duck in Rockport
Date:? Wed, 9 Jun 2021 16:23:46 GMT

There is a single female harlequin duck at Gully Point, Rockport, along
with 40 or more common eiders and their ducklings.? This is the latest
I've seen harlequins here at Gully Point.
Dave Peterson
Rockport, MA



Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death
Date: Wed Jun 9 2021 13:19 pm
From: lpivacek AT comcast.net
 
I have found a Downy Woodpecker in similar situation. Apparently stunned, upside down with feet wrapped around a thin branch and not moving.  I assumed it was stunned from hitting a window.   I gently removed it, put it in a box with a cover.  It was awake and alert after an hour,  and flew away. 


 


Linda


Linda Pivacek, lpivacek@comcast.net



On 06/08/2021 4:02 PM Barbara Volkle <
barb620@theworld.com> wrote:


 


 


Thanks to Walt Webb for this followup.


 


Barbara Volkle


Northborough, MA


barb620@theworld.com


 


*


 


From: Walt Webb <
waltwebb24@gmail.com>


Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2021 10:39:56 -0400


Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death


 


 


Thanks for the input on my post. My Medfield friend asserts that when she


discovered the deceased hummer, its feet weren't caught between rods or


wires but instead its feet were clinging tightly to a single rod of the


wall feeder support. She had to pull it off the rod.


 


Walt Webb


Westwood, MA


waltwebb24@gmail.com



Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death
Date: Tue Jun 8 2021 20:17 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Walt Webb for this followup.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

From: Walt Webb
Date: Tue, 8 Jun 2021 10:39:56 -0400
Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death


Thanks for the input on my post. My Medfield friend asserts that when she
discovered the deceased hummer, its feet weren't caught between rods or
wires but instead its feet were clinging tightly to a single rod of the
wall feeder support. She had to pull it off the rod.

Walt Webb
Westwood, MA
waltwebb24@gmail.com



Subject: FYI - decline of Red Knot
Date: Tue Jun 8 2021 4:11 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Suzanne Sullivan for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: Suzanne Sullivan
Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2021 22:07:10 -0400
Subject: FYI


This decline has been evident at Plum Island also as anyone who loves and
observes shorebirds can attest. Very sad.
https://www.waderquest.net/202...

--
Suzanne M. Sullivan
Wilmington, MA
swampy435@gmail.com
Be the Voice of the River
http://www.ipswichriver.org



Subject: 6/5 Common Nighthawks over Coolidge Corner in Brookline
Date: Mon Jun 7 2021 21:46 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Paul Peterson for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2021 20:18:14 +0000 (UTC)
From: Paul Peterson
Subject: 6/5 Common Nighthawks over Coolidge Corner in Brookline


At 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, there were two Common Nighthawks flying
overhead, feeding on insects. This occurred while I was standing in
front of Young Israel of Brookline on Green St. near Dwight St. A bit
later, the same thing on Babcock St. diagonally across from the Coolidge
Corner fire station. This whole area is near the heart of Coolidge
Corner, where the Coolidge Corner Cinema and the Brookline Booksmith are
located.

Paul Peterson
petersonpaul63@yahoo.com
Boston



Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death
Date: Mon Jun 7 2021 12:45 pm
From: mistermarty55 AT gmail.com
 
I agree with the poster below. I’ve seen a bird get its leg caught in a link of one of those tray feeders that’s suspended by chains. The bird broke its leg struggling to get free.

Simpler is better when it comes to feeders.

Mary Burns
Florence, MA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 7, 2021, at 12:17 AM, G M ARCHAMBAULT wrote:
>
> ?
> I'm suspicious that a foot was caught in the hardware of the bracket assembly. I've seen birds get caught in various hardware items. Once I had to use wire cutters to destroy a standard suet cage to free, ugh, a male House Sparrow that had gotten hopelessly trapped inside the cage, which I know sounds crazy, but it happened. My sister had to rescue a Pileated Woodpecker that had become trapped when it poked its bill into a "Peterson" bluebird box (the famous triangular bluebird nest box style) -- Its bill was embedded in the far wall through the entry hole of the nest box, and she had to remove the entire box, including the post, to free the bird.The tiniest aperture or seam in manmade objects can trap a bird's nails, and then when the bird changes its position or posture in an effort to disentangle itself, it moves itself into a doomed position that can only be thwarted by immediate human intervention. We humans are such huge creatures compared to most birds, that we might miss tiny traps that could ensnare a bird. Just like an open vertical pipe or conduit can claim the lives of dozens of birds who enter to explore a possible nest cavity but cannot get out. Please cap all pipe posts or conduits to prevent bird deaths.
> A close photo might have revealed the hummingbird's nail to be pinched by a tiny aperture in the bracket components. Given that it was hanging by its claws, I'm suspicious of a manmade explanation. I'd examine that bracket very closely, even if the event is unlikely to happen again. Best regards, -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama
> On Sunday, June 6, 2021, 10:49:00 PM CDT, Barbara Volkle wrote:
>
>
> Thanks to Walt Webb for this post.
>
> Barbara Volkle
> Northborough, MA
> barb620@theworld.com
>
> *
>
>
> From: Walt Webb
> Date: Sun, 6 Jun 2021 11:33:27 -0400
> Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death
>
>
> My Medfield friend maintains three hummingbird feeders in her yard. Two
> days ago she discovered a dead male hanging by its claws upside-down on
> part of a wall bracket holding a hummingbird feeder. Does anyone have a
> possible explanation for what might have caused this hummer's death?
>
> Walt Webb
> Westwood, MA
> waltwebb24@gmail.com
>
>



Subject: Little Private Beach, Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts
Date: Mon Jun 7 2021 8:52 am
From: asanford2000 AT gmail.com
 
Hi, yes, the public can bird this small beach from the public sidewalk and road, but you cannot go onto the beach or rocks themselves, as they are private (which is well-marked with a fence and signs).  Since the beach is very narrow, there is really no need to go onto it anyhow; you can see everything (including the grebe!) from the sidewalk.

Regards,
-Andy Sanford, Marblehead

> On Jun 6, 2021, at 9:11 PM, Ronald Zigler wrote:
>
> ?
> I am new to Massachusetts, so this may be a silly question. But. I would like to know if whether it is possible for the public to bird at what is identified on eBird as the "Little Private Beach, Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts"?
>
> Thanks
>
> Ron Zigler



Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death
Date: Mon Jun 7 2021 4:19 am
From: gm72125 AT bellsouth.net
 
I'm suspicious that a foot was caught in the hardware of the bracket assembly. I've seen birds get caught in various hardware items. Once I had to use wire cutters to destroy a standard suet cage to free, ugh, a male House Sparrow that had gotten hopelessly trapped inside the cage, which I know sounds crazy, but it happened. My sister had to rescue a Pileated Woodpecker that had become trapped when it poked its bill into a "Peterson" bluebird box (the famous triangular bluebird nest box style) -- Its bill was embedded in the far wall through the entry hole of the nest box, and she had to remove the entire box, including the post, to free the bird.The tiniest aperture or seam in manmade objects can trap a bird's nails, and then when the bird changes its position or posture in an effort to disentangle itself, it moves itself into a doomed position that can only be thwarted by immediate human intervention. We humans are such huge creatures compared to most birds, that we might miss tiny traps that could ensnare a bird. Just like an open vertical pipe or conduit can claim the lives of dozens of birds who enter to explore a possible nest cavity but cannot get out. Please cap all pipe posts or conduits to prevent bird deaths.
A close photo might have revealed the hummingbird's nail to be pinched by a tiny aperture in the bracket components. Given that it was hanging by its claws, I'm suspicious of a manmade explanation. I'd examine that bracket very closely, even if the event is unlikely to happen again. Best regards, -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama On Sunday, June 6, 2021, 10:49:00 PM CDT, Barbara Volkle wrote:

Thanks to Walt Webb for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: Walt Webb
Date: Sun, 6 Jun 2021 11:33:27 -0400
Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death


My Medfield friend maintains three hummingbird feeders in her yard. Two
days ago she discovered a dead male hanging by its claws upside-down on
part of a wall bracket holding a hummingbird feeder. Does anyone have a
possible explanation for what might have caused this hummer's death?

Walt Webb
Westwood, MA
waltwebb24@gmail.com



Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death
Date: Mon Jun 7 2021 3:47 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Walt Webb for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: Walt Webb
Date: Sun, 6 Jun 2021 11:33:27 -0400
Subject: Unexplained Hummer Death


My Medfield friend maintains three hummingbird feeders in her yard. Two
days ago she discovered a dead male hanging by its claws upside-down on
part of a wall bracket holding a hummingbird feeder. Does anyone have a
possible explanation for what might have caused this hummer's death?

Walt Webb
Westwood, MA
waltwebb24@gmail.com



Subject: Little Private Beach, Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts
Date: Mon Jun 7 2021 1:14 am
From: ronaldzigler AT yahoo.com
 
I am new to Massachusetts, so this may be a silly question. But. I would like to know if whether it is possible for the public to bird at what is identified on eBird as the "Little Private Beach, Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts"?
Thanks
Ron Zigler



Subject: Martin Burns WMA, Jun 6, 2021
Date: Mon Jun 7 2021 1:11 am
From: tattler1 AT comcast.net
 
The BBC trip to Martin Burns bumped up its start time to try to beat the
heat - it served us well!   Most of the expected nesting species were
present and accounted for though Prairie Warbler and Field Sparrow were
notable as missing.  RT Hummingbirds were little jewels everywhere we
looked.   Excellent spotters were key to finding birds on this warm
morning.

Cheers,
Linda

Martin Burns WMA, Essex, Massachusetts, US
Jun 6, 2021 7:00 AM - 10:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: BBC trip sunny, 64 -84 degrees
41 species

Mourning Dove 5
Chimney Swift 3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 8
Great Blue Heron 2
Turkey Vulture 2
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
Willow Flycatcher 2   along the powerline
Great Crested Flycatcher 4
Yellow-throated Vireo 2  along the powerline near the heron rookery
Warbling Vireo 3
Red-eyed Vireo 4
Blue Jay 1
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 2
Tree Swallow 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
House Wren 3
Carolina Wren 1
Gray Catbird 7
American Robin 4
Cedar Waxwing 2
American Goldfinch 3
Chipping Sparrow 3
Eastern Towhee 8
Baltimore Oriole 7
Red-winged Blackbird 12
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
Common Grackle 6
Ovenbird 7
Blue-winged Warbler 5
Common Yellowthroat 4
Yellow Warbler 1
Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
Scarlet Tanager 4
Northern Cardinal 4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2
Indigo Bunting 3

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S8...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

--
Linda Ferraresso
Salem, MA
tattler1(at)comcast(dot)net

"Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark" - Tagore



Subject: Fwd: eBird -- Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit -- Jun 6, 2021
Date: Sun Jun 6 2021 18:57 pm
From: ccook13 AT gmail.com
 
Had a good morning at Great Meadows in Concord despite the heat.  I had
given up on Least Bittern when one started calling quite far down the path
along the upper impoundment, around where the cattails close in and start
to form a wide channel along the path. The Alder Flycatchers were along
the lower impoundment path where the vegetation opens up between the path
and the river. Was hoping for Sora but probably started too late. I didn't
bird the woods so might have missed a few things there. Very few raptors.
Guess the heat is a bit too much for them today.

Cliff Cook
Watertown

Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit
Jun 6, 2021
6:22 AM
Traveling
3.40 miles
221 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes

108 Canada Goose -- Two families with 5 and 6 young.
9 Mute Swan -- 2 adults 9 young
17 Wood Duck
3 Mallard
1 Hooded Merganser
14 Mourning Dove
1 Black-billed Cuckoo -- Calling near boat landing at river
5 Virginia Rail -- Grunt display from multiple birds at various locations
2 Killdeer
1 Least Bittern -- Display call coo coo coo at far end of upper impoundment
just north of bench.
7 Great Blue Heron
1 Osprey
1 Red-tailed Hawk
3 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
3 Eastern Wood-Pewee
2 Alder Flycatcher -- Along lower impoundment path by river where
vegetation opens up. Recollect that they have bred here before. At least
one and probably two birds giving a variety of brrreea breerr pip and peep
calls with a couple three part reeebreea songs mixed in. Appeared to be a
silent bird accompanying one singing bird and think there were two singing
birds given spacing of calls. Calling it 2 birds to be conservative.
5 Willow Flycatcher
3 Great Crested Flycatcher
8 Eastern Kingbird
1 Yellow-throated Vireo -- Single bird along lower impoundment path about
halfway down.
17 Warbling Vireo -- Exact and careful count. Not surprising for this
location.
7 Blue Jay
2 Black-capped Chickadee
6 Tufted Titmouse
8 Tree Swallow
4 White-breasted Nuthatch
5 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1 House Wren
18 Marsh Wren -- Exact and careful count. Not surprising for this location.
1 Carolina Wren
8 Gray Catbird
6 American Robin
6 Cedar Waxwing
10 American Goldfinch
1 Chipping Sparrow -- Pine woods
22 Song Sparrow
10 Swamp Sparrow
9 Baltimore Oriole
10 Red-winged Blackbird
25 Common Grackle
2 Ovenbird
7 Common Yellowthroat
26 Yellow Warbler
1 Pine Warbler
3 Scarlet Tanager
5 Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Number of Taxa: 48


Sent from my iPhone


--
Cliff >> ccook13@gmail.com



Subject: Mt Greylock State Reservation - 6/5/21
Date: Sat Jun 5 2021 22:58 pm
From: blafley AT gmail.com
 
Hello,

We hiked up to the Saddleball Ridge on Mt Greylock today. Blackburnians
(23! minimum) and the Winter Wren's beautiful song serenaded us along the
ridge and the Blackpolls were in the areas with the most extensive spruce
and fir. Got some stunning views of the Blackburnians in the shorter trees
at the higher elevation. Only heard one Swainson's Thrush along the
ridge.

Mt. Greylock State Reservation, Berkshire, Massachusetts, US
Jun 5, 2021 8:15 AM - 3:17 PM
Protocol: Traveling
10.0 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: Hiked up Cheshire Harbor Trail to Appalachian Trail
southbound near summit, then the AT south along Saddleball ridge to Old
Adams Rd back to Cheshire Harbor
33 species

Ruffed Grouse 1
Turkey Vulture 2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
Blue-headed Vireo 2
Red-eyed Vireo 17
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 1
Common Raven 1
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Tree Swallow 1
Red-breasted Nuthatch 2
Brown Creeper 1
Winter Wren 8 Several along Saddleball ridge and couple along Cheshire
Harbor Trail
Swainson's Thrush 1
Hermit Thrush 2
American Robin 4
Purple Finch 4
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 8
Ovenbird 21 minimum
Black-and-white Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 1
American Redstart 4
Magnolia Warbler 1
Blackburnian Warbler 23 minimum- one was always within earshot along
Saddleball ridge
Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
Blackpoll Warbler 5 Along Saddleball ridge in more extensive spruce
and fir areas
Black-throated Blue Warbler 9
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 9
Black-throated Green Warbler 6
Canada Warbler 1
Scarlet Tanager 2

Bill Lafley
New Salem
blafley@gmail.com



Subject: Quabbin - Federated State Forest
Date: Sat Jun 5 2021 19:01 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Strickland Whellock for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


Date: Sat, 5 Jun 2021 18:02:55 +0000 (UTC)
From: Strickland Wheelock
Subject: Quabbin - Federated State Forest


One special birding adventure for me this Sat. morning [6/5] was to bird
the Federated State Forest road located off Rt 122 N just immediately
pass the sign for entering New Salem on the left. Beth Milke and I
arrived around 6:30 am [late start] driving very slowly down this narrow
paved road through various habitats - tall pine forest, cleared brush
areas, ponds created by beavers and eventually a wide power line
creating another whole habitat.A short distance down the road in the
tall pine forest with much undergrowth we enjoyed beautiful looks at a
Canada Warbler plus Pine Warblers, Am Redsarts, Blk thr Blue & Green
Warblers, Blk & Wht Warblers, Ovenbirds, many Veery, Red-eyed Vireos,
Yellow-B Sapsuckers, Hairy & Downy Woodpeckers, Red-b Nuthatch, Blk-c
Chickadees, etcA little down the road on the right was a large cleared
area that was full of song and species along the edges - some of the
species we saw were a N Waterthrush, Prairie & Chestnut-sided Warblers,
Blackburnian & Magnolia Warblers, C Yellowthroats, Towhees, Catbirds,
Scarlet Tanagers, distant Winter Wren singing, Mourning Doves plus many
ofthe other previous species.Further down on the left is a beautiful
beaver pond that yielded Least & Gt-crested Flycatchers, Wood Pewees,
Blue-headed & Yellow-thr Vireos, Winter Wren, Tree Swallows, Baltimore
Orioles, Wood Thrush plus again many of the above species - a lovely
location.The stream exiting from the dam normally has a Louisiana
Waterthrush but not today.

A short distance down from the pond the road ends at a gate - if you
walk up the road to the right pass the gate, you ascend to a wide power
line where we found many species including Blk-billed Cuckoo, Field &
Chipping Sparrows, N Parula, Chestnut-sided & Prairie Warblers, Towhees
C Yellowthroats plus all the tanagers, Cardinals, Blue Jays, Chickadees,
etcIf you love to ID bird song, the woods were alive all the way with
Veery, Blk-thr Green& Blue Warblers, Am Redstarts, Pine & Blk & Wht
Warblers, Wood Pewees, 3 types of Vireos & so much more. The key is
arriving early when the woods are alive with these woodland species
singing .Over & beyond the birds are volumes of wildflowers, species of
ferns, wildlife from turtles to mammals - do not forget to bring insect
repellant for mosquitos plus beware of ticks in the woods.Nearby are
other Quabbin gates to explore for eagles, other raptors, wide variety
of passerines, etc to fill your day.

Strickland Wheelock
Uxbridge MA



Subject: 6/4 Common Nighthawk at Cold Spring Park in Newton, etc.
Date: Sat Jun 5 2021 18:56 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Paul Peterson for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


Date: Sat, 5 Jun 2021 18:29:35 +0000 (UTC)
From: Paul Peterson
Subject: 6/4 Common Nighthawk at Cold Spring Park in Newton, etc.


Highlights from yesterday evening were the following:

American Woodcock 1               flushed in marsh at dusk; soon
returned to its original spot
Common Nighthawk 1               at 8:17 p.m. flew over calling
Scarlet Tanager 1                      trees at edge of passive field,
which is next to the dog park field
Little Brown Bat 2                      presumed; night

Paul Peterson
petersonpaul63@yahoo.com
Boston



Subject: RE: Purple Martins & Cold, wet Weather
Date: Sat Jun 5 2021 1:02 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Amy Hayden for this comment.


Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: Amy Hayden
Date: Fri, 4 Jun 2021 14:59:26 +0000
Subject: RE: Purple Martins & Cold, wet Weather

Martin's all did well on quonie pond half the nest have eggs



-------- Original message --------
From: Bruce Kindseth
Date: 6/3/21 3:07 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: RE: Purple Martins & Cold, wet Weather

Prior to the storm, I had a lot of martins and was expecting close to capacity on my 16 gourds at Pt. Judith. However, I dont think the martins were tolerant of the wind and the constant swinging of the gourds and by Sunday morning, only about 6 were still around. Last evening, the count was upto about a dozen. I checked the nests yesterday and there were no eggs, thats not saying house sparrows didnt get the eggs. I dont know ifthe increase in numbers is martins returning or new martins. So in a nutshell, I dont have a clue in what happened, just that the numbers droppedsignificantly.
Bruce Kindseth



Subject: A grisly discovery
Date: Fri Jun 4 2021 3:11 am
From: stuarttwalker AT comcast.net
 
A serial killer is stalking birds in my back yard.  Three times now, I have found wing parts — the primaries, secondaries and tertials (basically the outermost flight feathers) plus a fragment of bloody bone from what is, I guess, the “elbow” of the wing — on the ground.  Something has chewed the wings off the bodies of small birds, leaving them adhered to the ground by drying blood  One appears to come from a House Sparrow, the other two were gray and may have come from a titmouse or a chickadee.  All are small.  There have been no other feathers, no beaks or legs or toes.

I have seen no cats in the yard. There are a lot of squirrels. The wings appear to come from small but relatively mature birds, not nestlings. What could be killing and eating them? Could this be the work of a weasel? In thirty years of living in this house I have never seen the like of it.

Stuart Walker
Jamaica Plain
stuarttwalker@comcast.net



Subject: 6/2 Common Nighthawk in Brookline
Date: Fri Jun 4 2021 1:10 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Paul Peterson for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

Date: Fri, 4 Jun 2021 00:31:23 +0000 (UTC)
From: Paul Peterson
Subject: 6/2 Common Nighthawk in Brookline


At 9:30 p.m., there was a Common Nighthawk calling above me in Coolidge
Corner. This was both at the Coolidge Corner branch of the Brookline
Public Library on Pleasant St., and also at Harvard St. and Babcock.
This area apparently has nesting birds on one or some of the many flat
rooftops in the Brookline/Allston neighborhoods. Almost every evening
that I'm here in the summer months, I hear one or multiple birds. This
is in the John St., Green St., Pleasant St., Babcock St., and Harvard
St. area. This is a rather compact area, and your best bet is to just
wander around untill you hear or see them.

Paul Peterson
petersonpaul63@yahoo.com
Boston



Subject: Red Crossbills in Concord, MA
Date: Fri Jun 4 2021 0:10 am
From: meaghanq AT gmail.com
 
I had a flock of between 12-20 Red Crossbills land high in
an evergreen tree across the street from my house this afternoon. They
proceed to fly around my neighborhood (Barretts Mill Road in Concord) for
several hours. It was definitely a surprise!

I took some pretty horrible pictures but have posted them to eBird.
Wondering if they plan to stick around?

Meaghan Sinclair
Concord, MA

--
*Meaghan Q. Sinclair*
meaghanq.com



Subject: 5/27 Fowl Meadow in Milton and Canton
Date: Wed Jun 2 2021 21:30 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Paul Peterson for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


Date: Wed, 2 Jun 2021 19:03:30 +0000 (UTC)
From: Paul Peterson
Subject: 5/27 Fowl Meadow in Milton and Canton

I covered not only the two mile length of this place, but also the
right-hand trail at the four-way intersection as well as the uplands.
(accessed by taking the left at the four-way intersection) . I birded
here before all the recent rains came. (luckily)

Green Heron 1
Wood Duck 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 1
Eastern Phoebe 3
Eastern Kingbird 2
Eastern Wood-Pewee 4
Willow Flycatcher 1
Warbling Vireo 3+
Red-eyed Vireo 2
Common Raven 1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
Brown Creeper 2                                  nest here in uplands
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5
Wood Thrush 13
Veery 1
Common Yellowthroat 40
Black and White Warbler 2
Blue-winged Warbler 3+              one near four-way intersection,  one
in uplands, and one well down past four-way
Yellow Warbler 30
American Redstart 4
Ovenbird 7
Pine Warbler 2
Eastern Towhee 5
Swamp Sparrow 4
Scarlet Tanager 1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 6
Orchard Oriole 1+                   immature seen and heard singing
Baltimore Oriole 6
Garter Snake 2
Northern Water Snake 1
Snapping Turtle 1
Pickerel Frog 1
Green Frog 6
Little Wood-Satyr 6
Pearl Cresecent 6
Tiger Swallowtail 3
Black Swallowtail 4
Spring Azure 5
skipper sp. 8
Ebony Jewel-wing 13
Cicada 1                       noisy
Blue Flag
Wild Geranium
Fawn 1
Red Squirrel 1

Paul Peterson
petersonpaul63@yahoo.com
Boston



Subject: Things that fly in the night and hang out in the day
Date: Wed Jun 2 2021 20:47 pm
From: redpoll AT comcast.net
 
Odd happenings along the road at Hellcat at the Parker River NWR today.

First, Susan and I, and a bunch of other people, clearly heard an Eastern
Whip-poor-will call a couple of times from the marsh side of the north road
crossing. Later, when we were at the Pines Trail, we got word that a
whip-poor-will had been spotted roosting near the Goodno crossing at
Hellcat. So, we stopped by to look, take photos, and enthuse with the rest.
Turns out that the roosting bird was not a whip-poor-will but a Common
Nighthawk. The power of suggestion-the vocalization of one bird and the
sighting of another, similar bird-is powerful. But anyway you slice it, two
caprimulgids before lunch is pretty cool.



David Larson

Bradford, MA 01835

redpoll@comcast.net



Subject: June 2021 Issue of Bird Observer Now Online
Date: Tue Jun 1 2021 16:05 pm
From: msalett AT gmail.com
 
Massbirders,
Bird Observer announces that its June 2021 issue is now online at www.birdobserver.org .

Where to Go Birding highlights “Birding the East End of Nantucket” by Skyler Kardell.

Feature articles include “The Status of American Oystercatchers in Massachusetts” by Katharine C. Parsons and “Squam Lake and its Loons: Holding a Mirror Up to New Hampshire’s Loon Population” by Tiffany Grade and John Cooley, Jr. The photo essay features Kittie Wilson’s Common Loons.

Field Notes describe “An Eastern Phoebe Dips for Minnows” by Dennis Durette, “The Eastern ‘Kingfisher’ Phoebe” by Shawn Carey, and “Bathing by Double-crested Cormorants” by William E. Davis, Jr.

As usual, we include Musings from the Blind Birder by Martha Steele, About Books by Mark Lynch, Bird Sightings for January-February 2021 by Neil Hayward and Robert H. Stymeist, Bygone Birds, Hot Birds, and Wayne Petersen's "At A Glance.”

The cover art features Barry Van Dusen’s Northern Waterthrush. “About the Cover: Northern Waterthrush” is written by William E. Davis, Jr.

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/birdo...
Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BirdObserv...
Bird Observer is a nonprofit, tax-exempt corporation under section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Marsha Salett
Editor
Bird Observer
msalett@gmail.com
Needham, MA.



Subject: Alder Flycatcher, Nahant, 5-31
Date: Tue Jun 1 2021 15:37 pm
From: shilocm AT yahoo.com
 
Hello MassBird,
Yesterday, while walking the Heritage Trail in Nahant, I recorded an Alder Flycatcher offering me Free Beer. I politely declined. And explained to him that while it was true, I did have the day off from work, timing-wise it wasn't even noon yet.

Complete eBird Report with 55 Photos and 10 Audio Recordings:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S8...

Corrections welcome. Thank you. 

Good Birding,
Shilo McDonald
Lynn, Massachusetts
ShiloCM@yahoo.com


Nahant--Heritage Trail & Lowlands Park, Essex, Massachusetts, US
May 31, 2021 8:46 AM - 10:59 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.711 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: Enjoyed a leisurely stroll on the Heritage Trail on my day off (Memorial Day).
37 species (+1 other taxa)

Mallard 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 9 On the roof of (and flying by) the house with the Solar Panels.
Mourning Dove 5
Black-billed Cuckoo 0 Twice, I thought I heard a cuckoo. Twice, I couldn't find it. Recording as quantity zero as a matter of record.
Killdeer 2 Please give wide berth.
Herring Gull 27 Most of these were foraging the waterlogged grass of the baseball field.
gull sp. 4 Distant.
Double-crested Cormorant 7 Flybys.
Northern Flicker 1 Heard only. Kyeer call.
Alder Flycatcher 1 Emphatically offering Birders everywhere, "Free Beer!" Photos and an audio recording attached.
American Crow 3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
Barn Swallow 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
House Wren 2 Seen and heard. Photos and an audio recording attached.
Carolina Wren 3
European Starling 50 Conservative estimate. Most of these were foraging the waterlogged grass of the baseball field.
Gray Catbird 6 One Catbird has learned how to mimic a piece of what I believe is the Northern Waterthrush song? I wouldn't have believe it, if I hadn't seen it with my own eyes. Audio recording attached.
Northern Mockingbird 1 In the Stump Dump.
American Robin 9
Cedar Waxwing 3
House Sparrow 4
House Finch 1 Heard only. Singing.
American Goldfinch 4
White-throated Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 10
Eastern Towhee 1
Baltimore Oriole 4
Red-winged Blackbird 16 Photos and an audio recording attached.
Brown-headed Cowbird 1 Heard only. Singing.
Common Grackle 20 Audio recording of begging fledgling attached.
Common Yellowthroat 4
American Redstart 2 Photos and an audio recording attached.
Northern Parula 1 Audio recording attached.
Magnolia Warbler 1
Yellow Warbler 6 Photos and an audio recording attached.
Blackpoll Warbler 1
Canada Warbler 1 Only saw an obstructed view of yellow underneath, gray blue atop. Thankfully, my iPhone 11 is also an audio recorder. MP3 attached.
Northern Cardinal 7



Subject: May 31, 2021 Rock Meadow, Belmont...(unofficial) Last day of Spring Migration
Date: Tue Jun 1 2021 3:25 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Matt S. for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: "Matt S."
Date: Mon, 31 May 2021 23:03:59 -0400
Subject: May 31, 2021 Rock Meadow, Belmont...(unofficial) Last day of
Spring Migration


Hi All,

I took a final trip of May to Rock Meadow today...FOY willow flycatcher
over in the reeds and several oriole nests were the highlight for me.
Usually I go out a lot these last few days of May, and think "maybe this is
the year some of these migrants stick around!"...wishful thinking! Then a
day comes when you realize "it's over" for the spring, at some point that
last week of May. This year didn't have that dramatic effect...This
migration, if plotting density, would look like an upside-down V, with the
spike on May 14 and the typical slow drip of usual late-arriving migrants
(Canadas, Pewee, etc) after. That start was so slow, and I assume our
usual visitors just hopped right on over us after bulking up to our south.
I wish them happy travels, and much success in the northern forests.

I was curious to quantify migration this year, and since I spent a lot of
time at Rock Meadow both this year and last, I checked out some eBird
stats. In 2020 I saw 70 species at Rock Meadow, there were a few people in
the 60s as well. This year I saw 54 species, the most at Rock
Meadow...next highest was in the high 30s. There was a definite dip there,
despite similar numbers of visits; oddly my Nahanton list was identical at
61 species both years. My Rock Meadow number was a result of both migrant
misses (almost a dozen fewer warbler species), and some breeders that
didn't materialize this year. I suppose that's just the cycle though, some
down, some up; I've never seen more Baltimore Orioles than I have this
year.

Other observations: For the second straight year Hermit Thrushes were MUCH
rarer at spots I went to; for two straight years I've seen more Veeries
than Hermit Thrushes, which I never had happen before. I noticed on e-bird
that checklists for many spots were down, and it seemed like fewer birders
were out, maybe from folks returning to work? Maybe Mt Auburn being more
open pulled people from other spots?

Lastly...I realized today that this was the last spring migration of my
30s. My goodness, where does the time go? I looked back and saw some
pictures of the owlets at Mt Auburn...That was a decade ago. I love looking
back at past trips, because when I see the photos I can usually remember
exactly where I was and what was going on with the birds and the people I
was with. A decade ago though...my goodness....I could have sworn it was
like 6 years....It's made me realize I'd rather retire earlier and live
more modestly so I can see more birds in whatever time I have left.
Another gift from this passion.



That's all for now,
Matt S.
Newton, MA
Accipiter22@gmail.com

-----------------------------
Rock Meadow Conservation Area, Belmont, Middlesex, Massachusetts, US
May 31, 2021 9:16 AM - 10:32 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.42 mile(s)
26 species

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 4
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 2
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) 1
Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) 1 Fitzbew! Same day I had them
last year here
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) 1
Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) 1
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 7
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 1
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 2
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) 1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 5
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 6
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 3
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 11
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) 2 Not sure why this is labeled as
uncommon, they breed here. Would have taken photo if I had known
Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) 6
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 12
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) 1
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 4
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 1
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 3
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 2
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S8...



Subject: Eiders lost in storm. Note re Monarchs
Date: Tue Jun 1 2021 0:44 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Alice Morgan for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


Date: Mon, 31 May 2021 18:41:08 -0400 (EDT)
From: linda pivacek
Subject: Eiders lost in storm. Note re Monarchs

I have been keeping a tally for C Eider chicks with their mothers at
Short Beach Cove, Nahant for several years.  The recent storm from
Friday evening through Sunday, 5/28-5/30, was unusually long lasting
thus devastating for the young eiders.  Before the stormy days with east
winds, the count of chicks was typical, increasing to 108 by May 27. 
The difference in this stormy weather was the duration, resulting not
only in waves that were swells, but were white surf from far out to sea
into the shore. In these conditions the young were struggling night and
day with little rest, although they were with mothers and other adult
females. Eventually the Great Black-backed Gulls got the picture and
attacked the Eider families, grabbing the chicks.
  The resulting count went from /108 down to 5 chicks today/.
 Not a bird, but Monarch Butterflies have taken a big hit in Mexico. In
La Lagunita,  where the Monarchs have been wintering in numbers over 200
million, the forest has been cleared. This appears to be the result of
the pandemic, since visitors to the Park stopped, and the locals have
been cutting the trees for lumber.
Sorry I don't have better news,
Linda Pivacek



Subject: Yellow-Crowned Night Herons - South Dartmouth
Date: Tue Jun 1 2021 0:15 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Alice Morgan for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

From: alice morgan
Date: Mon, 31 May 2021 19:18:01 -0400
Subject: Yellow-Crowned Night Herons


After returning from a trip to Vermont, we settled down to watch the marsh
and were rewarded with four adult YCNHs.

--
Alice & Dane Morgan
Brookline & S. Dartmouth, MA



Subject: Hooded mergs Topsfield
Date: Mon May 31 2021 17:28 pm
From: thefishmama AT gmail.com
 
Wow! That is so amazing!! Lucky you

Tracy Fischer
Newburyport

On Mon, May 31, 2021 at 9:28 AM James MacDougall wrote:

> Hi,
>
> We have a newly confirmed breeding bird in the yard, Hooded Merganser.
> Yesterday there were 6 ducklings with a female in our little vernal pool of
> 1/4 acre. We have had adult size young in years past but I assumed they
> flew in.
>
> Also a Mallard has hatched 10 young and a Wood Duck has had 9. Productive
> little pond this year!
>
> On the down side, Barn Swallows have declined from 8 pairs last year down
> to just 3 this year. Bummer.
>
> Sent by:
> Jim MacDougall
> Topsfield, MA
>



Subject: Hooded mergs Topsfield
Date: Mon May 31 2021 13:31 pm
From: jm3 AT me.com
 
Hi,

We have a newly confirmed breeding bird in the yard, Hooded Merganser. Yesterday there were 6 ducklings with a female in our little vernal pool of 1/4 acre. We have had adult size young in years past but I assumed they flew in.

Also a Mallard has hatched 10 young and a Wood Duck has had 9. Productive little pond this year!

On the down side, Barn Swallows have declined from 8 pairs last year down to just 3 this year. Bummer.

Sent by:
Jim MacDougall
Topsfield, MA



Subject: Big Day - correction
Date: Mon May 31 2021 12:50 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to David Bates for this correction.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: David Bates
Date: Mon, 31 May 2021 08:31:31 -0400
Subject: Big Day


Correction to last post--we did this on May 28. I am still recovering!

--
David Bates
david.bates@gmail.com



Subject: Big Day
Date: Mon May 31 2021 12:50 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to David Bates for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: David Bates
Date: Mon, 31 May 2021 08:29:46 -0400
Subject: Big Day


Deb Kovacs and I did a Mass Big day on May 29. We did very well given the
conditions, which were not very good. There was almost no migration.
Still, we ended up with 155--we have had as many as 172 on this route. It
rained from 5:30 on, and even though we birded it made us miss many things
we could have had on Plum Island.

Our route was less ambitious than the one done by MJI's team a week ago--we
started on Mt. Watatic, worked our way down through Boston, hit the coast
at Pico Beach, went northward via Revere, Nahant and Marblehead, and then
finished on Plum Island.

On Big Days, I always think about the misses. These included hummingbird,
Manx, night herons, loons, Blackpoll, BT Blue, Bay-breast, Cape May,
Swainson's Thrush. Poor raptor and shorebird day. We had essentially no
rare migrants--we have previously had good days this late by picking up
many of these. We had only 3 scoters (two Common, one White-winged), one
Long-tailed Duck and an RB Merg.

Turkey Vulture was a particular challenge. Because it was cold, I think
they weren't flying. At nearly 4, we still hadn't seen one, despite lots
of scanning, and seeing a dozen Red-tails. Finally, we decided to give up
and head to PI. Then on Scotland Road, there were two on an aerial--and we
saw 5 more in the next couple of miles! We also had a kingfisher swoop by
at the Chain Bridge--that is always a hard bird on this Big Day route.

Had to skip a peregrine nest and Ruddy Duck because we were short on time
in Boston. The numbers of individuals were very low on Watatic, I suspect
because it has been so dry.

Best things were King Eider at S end of Plum (had been found by Suzanne
Sullivan--thank you SS), a Horned Lark on the island, Least Bittern at
Bolton Flats, Mourning Warbler in Nahant (thicket) and a lingering Horned
Grebe at Little Private Beach in Marblehead (in breeding plumage).

While it was nice that it wasn't too hot, a bit warmer would have been
nice--I wore two jackets all day, a winter hat and gloves much of the time.

Always great to do this in the spring.

--
David Bates
david.bates@gmail.com
(617)923-1347



Subject: White-winged Tern - Race Point
Date: Mon May 31 2021 2:47 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Below is a report from Steve Arena on facebook today.I don't have
additional details.

Thanks to Steve Arena for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

From Steve Arena:

Yesterday and today were 2 of the best spring birding days I’ve had at
Race Point. Today was punctuated by an adult alternate plumage
WHITE-WINGED TERN. instead of swapping out my scope for my camera I made
sure another birder saw it through my scope. The massive totals from
both days are staggering. I’m still trying to process all the Arctic
Tern I saw.



Subject: Purple Martin viewing at colony in Easton, Mass
Date: Mon May 31 2021 0:59 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Madeleine Linck for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

From: Madeleine Linck
Date: Sun, 30 May 2021 17:38:53 -0400
Subject: Purple Martin viewing at colony in Easton, Mass


All,
Easton Country Club welcomes birders to come view its very active Purple
Martin colony on Monday evenings, 7 pm. beginning June 7th. If interested
in seeing and hearing these delightful largest of North American swallows,
please call Tom Lombardi at 508-238-2500 ext. 101.

Madeleine Linck
Rehoboth, Mass



Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'
Date: Sun May 30 2021 17:33 pm
From: crbob AT fairpoint.net
 
I love it. Funny but true.

Bob Crowley
Chatham, NH

From: Barbara Volkle
Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2021 9:52 AM
To: massbird
Subject: [MASSBIRD] Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'

Thanks to Bob Muldoon for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: Bob Muldoon
Date: Thu, 27 May 2021 13:14:49 -0400
Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'



https://amp.worcestermag.com/a...

I wrote this piece In Worcester Magazine.

Bob Muldoon

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: NH Audubon Pelagic Birding Trip tomorrow CANCELLED
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To: massbird@TheWorld.com
From: Jon Woolf
Subject: [MASSBIRD] NH Audubon Pelagic Birding Trip tomorrow CANCELLED
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Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'
Date: Sun May 30 2021 15:44 pm
From: petrull AT comcast.net
 
Hey Bob, there are all types of people that love birds... some love birds, others love birding. I’ll never be as sharp as some of my friends.....Just get outside and enjoy all aspects of Nature. Have some cheese with your whine. Birds are cool.
P. Trull
Brewster
petrull@comcast.net

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 30, 2021, at 9:53 AM, Barbara Volkle wrote:
>
> ?Thanks to Bob Muldoon for this post.
>
> Barbara Volkle
> Northborough, MA
> barb620@theworld.com
>
> *
>
>
> From: Bob Muldoon
> Date: Thu, 27 May 2021 13:14:49 -0400
> Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'
>
>
>
> https://amp.worcestermag.com/a...
>
> I wrote this piece In Worcester Magazine.
>
> Bob Muldoon
>
> Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'
Date: Sun May 30 2021 15:00 pm
From: rmohan26 AT yahoo.com
 
Love it !!! -- I am not even a beta birder....imagine my plight.  You encounter an invertebrate expert or plant expert in the woods - it is an educational experience.  It is not so with birders. While every year, I meet some wonderful people in the migratory season,  I feel like I am the dumbest person on the planet when i meet 'alpha birders'.  

RajeshWoburn, MA
On Sunday, May 30, 2021, 09:41:38 AM EDT, Barbara Volkle wrote:

Thanks to Bob Muldoon for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: Bob Muldoon
Date: Thu, 27 May 2021 13:14:49 -0400
Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'



https://amp.worcestermag.com/a...

I wrote this piece In Worcester Magazine.

Bob Muldoon

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Black Birders Week 2021
Date: Sun May 30 2021 14:59 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Black Birders Week 2021 is here!

Here's a link from National Audubon:

https://www.audubon.org/black-...

It's certainly been a turbulent year.  Here's an opportunity to reflect
on where we are.


Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com



Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'
Date: Sun May 30 2021 13:51 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Bob Muldoon for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*


From: Bob Muldoon
Date: Thu, 27 May 2021 13:14:49 -0400
Subject: Encounters with birds and 'Alpha Birders'



https://amp.worcestermag.com/a...

I wrote this piece In Worcester Magazine.

Bob Muldoon

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Heerman's Gull - Horseneck Beach, Westport
Date: Sun May 30 2021 9:49 am
From: justindlawson AT gmail.com
 
Yes. Heerman’s Gull. Flew west into Rhode Island from Richmond Pond

On Thu, May 27, 2021 at 5:06 PM Barbara Volkle wrote:

> There's a report from this afternoon, from the RI RBA of a Heerman's
> Gull at Horseneck Beach, Bristol County, just over the RI line.
> Straight out f rom the curvy entrance road.
>
> photo - http://s.groupme.com/77zEGMO
>
> Found by Nicole Kirko's husband and relayed by Alan Kneidel.
>
> Thanks to Alan, Nicole and her husband.
>
> Current report is that it has flown north to Richmond Pond. Thanks to
> Danny MacKinnon for this update.
>
>
> Barbara Volkle
> Northborough, MA
> barb620@theworld.com
>
--
Justin Lawson



Subject: Secondhand: Heermann’s Gull Westport
Date: Sun May 30 2021 9:45 am
From: 4mrfish AT gmail.com
 
Just getting the word out. Posts in the MA Rare Bird Alert FB page and GroupMe indicate an adult Heermann’s Gull photographed at Horseneck Beach in Westport that moved at 4:50 to Richmond Pond, also in Westport. The bird an adult with some limited dark on the head but appears to be close to breeding plumage. My impression is that this is the first state record.

Cheers
Will Freedberg
Belmont



Subject: Good nighthawk count last week, Pittsfield
Date: Sun May 30 2021 6:02 am
From: blafley AT gmail.com
 
Hello

Earlier this week while fly fishing on the Millers River in Erving there was a large caddis fly hatch as the sun was setting and two nighthawks circled above me for a while. Like the rising fish around me, they seemed to be taking advantage of the bounty.

Bill Lafley
New Salem
blafley@gmail.com

> On May 27, 2021, at 9:29 PM, Young, John (DPU) wrote:
>
> ?
> ?If folks are interested in nighthawk counts . . . Not really knowing what I was doing, I waited a while for sunset at Brielman Marsh / Utility Drive at the Pittsfield wastewater plant, thinking it would be a good place to see some nighthawks migrating north. A week ago, 5/20. I almost missed them, not even naked-eye birds, a high elevation group of 23 birds generally heading NW. That's a good number. Hoffman Bird Club's annotated list suggests a possible max of 40 over Lake Pontoosuc in 1946. Cheers. Happy birding.
>
> John Young
>
> Jamaica Plain
> john.young@mass.gov



Subject: bizarre report of roadrunner in Beverly
Date: Sun May 30 2021 6:02 am
From: plumisl AT gmail.com
 
Also, a coyote was seen leaving the ACME TNT factory with a large box and,
oddly, an anvil.

On Fri, May 28, 2021 at 11:48 PM Barbara Volkle
wrote:

> A regular massbird contributor reports that there is a report on one of
> the Facebook lost pet sites they follow of a Roadrunner spotted in Beverly,
> MA, yesterday. No other details are available, but one of the site
> moderators believes this is a credible sighting. People near Beverly may
> want to keep their eyes open. If better location information becomes
> available, I'll pass this on.
>
>
> Barbara Volkle
> Northborough, MA
> barb620@theworld.com
>
>
>
>



Subject: bizarre report of roadrunner in Beverly
Date: Sat May 29 2021 3:53 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
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Subject: [MASSBIRD] bizarre report of roadrunner in Beverly
References: <202105290041.14T0f411016567@TheWorld.com>
To: massbird
From: Barbara Volkle
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Subject: Good nighthawk count last week, Pittsfield
Date: Fri May 28 2021 1:33 am
From: john.young AT state.ma.us
 
?If folks are interested in nighthawk counts . . .  Not really knowing what I was doing, I waited a while for sunset at Brielman Marsh / Utility Drive at the Pittsfield wastewater plant, thinking it would be a good place to see some nighthawks migrating north.  A week ago, 5/20.  I almost missed them, not even naked-eye birds, a high elevation group of 23 birds generally heading NW.  That's a good number.  Hoffman Bird Club's annotated list suggests a possible max of 40 over Lake Pontoosuc in 1946.  Cheers.  Happy birding.

John Young

Jamaica Plain
john.young@mass.gov



Subject: Every Bit of Wild Matters
Date: Fri May 28 2021 1:30 am
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Dave Gibson for this report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com

*

From: David Gibson <20cabot@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 May 2021 16:55:59 -0400
Subject: Every Bit of Wild Matters


MA birders, I wrote "Every Bit of Wild" a year ago for the Chesapeake
Conservation Landscaping Council, an organization formed to protect
the Chesapeake Bay. The piece may have a local flavor, but it's about
meeting the needs of birds everywhere. You'll enjoy the photos and
recordings. Here's the URL:
http://birdpartner.com/2021/05... All the best,

Dave Gibson
Chesapeake, VA
https://birdpartner.com/



Subject: Cumberland Farms auction update
Date: Thu May 27 2021 21:56 pm
From: barb620 AT theworld.com
 
Thanks to Nate Marchessault for this update!


Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620@theworld.com


*


From: Nate Marchessault
Date: Wed, May 26, 2021, 8:39 PM
Subject: Cumberland Farms auction update
To:


Friends,

A quick update on the situation with Cumbies;

Good news- the auctioning off of the three parcels which consist of the
area that birders know of as the Cumberland Farms Fields has been
postponed. Groupings 1 and 2, consisting of a little under 400 acres
along River St have been postponed indefinitely due to title-related
issues. Auction group 3, which consists of 1100+ acres and is the vast
majority of the rest of the fields, has been postponed until July 14th
at a minimum (no specification as to why).

The rest of the auction groups are still up for sale. Theoretically,
today property on the opposite side of Route 105 from the fields was
auctioned off. I am unsure if this is residential or the farm fields
across the street from the sycamore tree, but the website lists ~15
acres. Other property included in the parcel is elsewhere on Plain St
and Plymouth St. Tomorrow the remaining parcels (5-7) will go off to
auction. Group 5 has four ~2 acre parcels on Wood St along the fields,
but these are all already within areas that are residential. The Groups
6 and 7 consist of property up for auction is in Bridgewater and West
Bridgewater near the old West Bridgewater Model Airplane Field and Maple
Street entrance to the Hockomock Swamp. Though near important natural
areas the parcels for sale are of small acreage and the Hockomock Swamp
is protected, so I don’t think these are of great concern.

Overall this is encouraging to hear and at the very least buys more time
for our conservation allies.

Lastly, I want to say thanks to all of those that sent letters out.
Several figures within these organizations have told me they were
grateful to see how concerned people were and to be made aware if they
hadn’t been already. Just by voicing our concerns we really did make a
difference. See the statement from Mass Audubon below:
https://www.massaudubon.org/ne...

Thanks again and we’ll be sure to keep you posted on any updates.

Best,

Nate
South Shore Bird Club



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