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Updated on May 26, 2020, 6:00 am

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26 May: @ 05:57:11 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 26, 2020 (Tuesday) [Nelson Poirier]
25 May: @ 16:38:41 
Re: Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RAZORBILL, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, BANK & CLIFF SWALLOWS [Roger Burrows]
25 May: @ 15:27:50 
Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RAZORBILL, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, BANK & CLIFF SWALLOWS [Roger Burrows]
25 May: @ 12:14:11 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 25, 2020 (Monday) [Nelson Poirier]
24 May: @ 19:46:27 
Rapport d'observation d'oiseaux le 24 mai 2020 [Denise Godin]
24 May: @ 18:03:46 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 24, 2020 (Sunday) [Nelson Poirier]
24 May: @ 16:51:14 
Fwd: NATURE MONCTON NATURE LINE......SUNDAY, MAY 24 [Nelson Poirier]
24 May: @ 16:37:35 
NATURE MONCTON NATURE LINE......SUNDAY, MAY 24 [Nelson Poirier]
24 May: @ 13:27:22 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 24, 2020 (Sunday) [Nelson Poirier]
24 May: @ 11:06:41 
White Head birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, NORTHERN HARRIER & BAY-BREASTED WARBLER [Roger Burrows]
24 May: @ 08:19:14 
ducklings on the move [Laurie Murison]
24 May: @ 06:08:48 
Girls Day Out~~ Charlotte County [G Taylor]
23 May: @ 20:14:54 
Spring Birds on Grand Manan Last Week [Jim Wilson]
23 May: @ 14:01:39 
White Head birds, inc. RED-EYED VIREO, BOBOLINK, SUMMER TANAGER, 10 WOOD-WARBLER spp. inc. NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH & BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, & NORTHERN CARDINAL [Roger Burrows]
23 May: @ 13:48:14 
Pennfield/Old Saint John Road [Suzanne Bonnell]
23 May: @ 10:36:52 
Pluvier bronzé American Golden Plover [Denise Godin]
23 May: @ 08:52:13 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 23, 2020 (Saturday) [Nelson Poirier]
23 May: @ 07:26:21 
Carouge à tête jaune Yellow-Headed Blackbird [Denise Godin]
23 May: @ 05:23:57 
Where to Find Birds on the Grand Manan Archipelago [Roger Burrows]
23 May: @ 05:14:35 
Re: Jeudi-Oiseaux , Jeudi le 21 mai 2020 [Roger Burrows]
22 May: @ 21:22:36 
Jeudi-Oiseaux , Jeudi le 21 mai 2020 [Rose Alma Mallet]
22 May: @ 19:38:51 
Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RED-NECKED GREBE, AMERICAN KESTREL, PEREGRINE FALCON, RED-EYED VIREO, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, 12 WOOD-WARBLER spp., inc. CAPE MAY, BAY-BREASTED & PINE WARBLERS [Roger Burrows]
22 May: @ 17:50:59 
Re: European Goldfinch seen at Fredericton [Roger Burrows]
22 May: @ 17:18:35 
European Goldfinch seen at Fredericton [D G Gibson]
22 May: @ 08:27:16 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 22, 2020 (Friday) [Nelson Poirier]
21 May: @ 19:24:03 
Today's sightings [jane LeBlanc]
21 May: @ 14:18:55 
White Head birds, inc. WHITE-RUMPED, LEAST & SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, NORTHERN HARRIER, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, 12 WOOD-WARBLER spp., inc. NORHERN WATERTHRUSH & WILSON'S WARBLER, ORCHARD ORIOLE & ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Roger Burrows]
21 May: @ 10:14:32 
Re: St. George Marsh West [Roger Burrows]
21 May: @ 10:09:28 
Re: St. George Marsh West [Todd Watts]
21 May: @ 09:54:18 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 21, 2020 (Thursday) [Nelson Poirier]
21 May: @ 09:31:53 
Re: St. George Marsh West [naturenb_rpm]
21 May: @ 06:49:13 
Re: St. George Marsh West [Andrew Olive]
21 May: @ 05:50:10 
St. George Marsh West [G Taylor]
20 May: @ 18:19:51 
Grand Mana, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. LEAST SANDPIPER, WARBLING VIREO, BANK SWALLOW & 13 wood-warbler spp, inc. PINE & PRAIRIE WARBLERS [Roger Burrows]
20 May: @ 12:57:49 
Point Lepreau Bird Observatory Spring 2020 Report [Todd Watts]
20 May: @ 10:44:28 
South Musquash Marsh [Suzanne Bonnell]
20 May: @ 05:48:34 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 20, 2020 (Wednesday) [Nelson Poirier]
19 May: @ 15:33:36 
White Head & Ferry birds, inc. HOODED MERGANSER, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, LEAST SANDPIPER, WILSON'S SNIPE, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, 11 wood-warbler spp., inc. CAPE MAY, BLACKBURNIAN & PINE WARBLERS [Roger Burrows]
19 May: @ 12:34:10 
Correction to my blog link [Fredrica Givan]
19 May: @ 10:56:20 
Re: Yellowlegs [Roger Burrows]
19 May: @ 10:08:01 
Yellowlegs [Fredrica Givan]
19 May: @ 07:13:52 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 19, 2020 (Tuesday) [Nelson Poirier]
18 May: @ 18:25:42 
hummingbird [Margaret Doyle]
18 May: @ 16:54:56 
White Head birds, inc. RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, LESSER YELLOWLEGS,, BROWN THRASHER, WHITE-CROWNED & LINCOLN'S SPARROWS, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, 14 warbler spp., inc. TENNESSEE, PINE & WILSON'S WARBLERS, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Roger Burrows]
18 May: @ 15:45:38 
Merlins in Rothesay [Hank Scarth]
18 May: @ 12:02:06 
GRAND MANAN, WHITE HEAD & FERRY birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, ALDER FLYCATCHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD, GRAY CATBIRD, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, BALTIMORE ORIOLE & R0SE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Roger Burrows]
18 May: @ 11:44:50 
Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, RAZORBILL, GREAT BLUE HERON, EASTERN KINGBIRD, GRAY CATBIRD, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, BALTIMORE ORIOLE & ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Roger Burrows]
18 May: @ 05:55:23 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Monday, May 18, 2020 [Nelson Poirier]
17 May: @ 16:36:23 
Re: White Head birds, inc. HARLEQUIN DUCK, RED-NECKED GREBE, OSPREY, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, AMERICAN KESTREL, LEAST FLYCATCHER, [Roger Burrows]
17 May: @ 14:11:47 
White Head birds, inc. HARLEQUIN DUCK, RED-NECKED GREBE, OSPREY, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, AMERICAN KESTREL, LEAST FLYCATCHER, [Roger Burrows]





Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 26, 2020 (Tuesday)
Date: Tue May 26 2020 5:57 am
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 26, 2020 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information
line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com


Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
if any errors are noted in wording
or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed
additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript
but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is
recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the
BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. _The BlogSpot can always be
accessed from the website._


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com_

Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

** On Sunday, May the 24^th Carmella Melanson spent the day birding on
Miscou Island and Inkerman regions with friends from the Club de
Naturalistes de la Peninsule Acadienne. Between them they saw a total of
87 species. In Inkerman they searched the marsh where ManonCormier had
found 2 AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVERS [Pluvier bronz] the day before on May
23^rd , but the birds were not there. After the outing was over, and
they all went their separate ways, Carmella returned to the area and
relocated the 2 Plovers about a kilometre out on the beach. She had
never seen them in such beautiful breeding plumage, as her excellent
photos show. It was also impressive to see a kettle of 11 TURKEY
VULTURES[Urubu tte rouge]including 1 BLACK VULTURE [Urubu noir] and a
kettle of 6 BROAD-WINGED HAWKS [Petite Buse] soaring the sky not far
from the Miscou Island lighthouse. Other highlights included a
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD [Carouge tte jaune], RUSTY BLACKBIRD
[Quiscale rouilleux], and PIPING PLOVERS [Pluvier siffleur].

** Every spring Gabriel Gallant likes to scan a neighbours flooded cow
pasture for feeding shorebirds in St. Marie. Most years he can observe
GREATER YELLOWLEGS [Grand Chevalier] and KILLDEER [Pluvier kildir], but
other years other species appear. On Sunday he watched a SEMIPALMATED
PLOVER [Pluvier semipalm]feeding with a group of 5 LEAST SANDPIPERS
[Bcasseau minuscule]and a KILLDEER. Four GREATER YELLOWLEGS were
spotted two weeks ago but have since left. Some other birds Gabriel
noted while on a walkabout on his property included an EASTERN KINGBIRD
[Tyran tritri], LEAST FLYCATCHERS [Moucherolle tchbec], expected
warbler species, and a VEERY [Grive fauve].

** Mac Wilmot was able to spot at least one GREAT HORNED OWLET
[Grand-duc d'Amrique] that is now venturing from a nest in a tall pine
tree on his Lower Coverdale property. It still has very much that teddy
bear look and Mac suspects it may be on one of its first ventures from
the nest.

** Gordon Rattray did a hike in the White Rock Recreation area in
Hillsborough that held plenty to see. Nature Moncton will be going to
this area in late June. Gordon saw several HERMIT THRUSH [Grive
solitaire]along the trail and heard OVEN BIRDS [Paruline couronne] and
a PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand pic]. He also saw GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET
[Roitelet couronne dore], NORTHERN PARULA WARBLER[Paruline
collier], RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle poitrine rousse],
BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLERS [Paruline noir et blanc], AMERICAN
REDSTART[Paruline flamboyante], PINE SISKINS [Tarin des pins],
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW [Bruant gorge blanche],BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER
[Paruline gorge orange], BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER [Paruline
gorge noire], and BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES[Msange tte noire], and got
some great photos of several of them.

** My trail camera provided 2 BLACK BEARS[Ours noir]coming to fish
entrails. The pair is potentially a sow bear with her 2-year old cub. If
that be the case, the 2-year old cub will soon be advised to head out on
its own as the sow will be coming into estrus in approximately a month.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton





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Subject: Re: Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RAZORBILL, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, BANK & CLIFF SWALLOWS
Date: Mon May 25 2020 16:38 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 25 con.

White Head: Coastal Trail 1745-1800
Yellow Warbler (little activity)

White Head: Brooks Marsh 1810-1820
5+ Canada Geese+ 2 pairs+3 & 5 goslings, 12 American Black Ducks, 3
Green-winged Teals, Greater Yellowlegs, WHITE-RUMPED, 5 LEAST & 2
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS

Roger Burrows
White Head

On Mon, May 25, 2020 at 5:27 PM Roger Burrows wrote:

> May 25
>
> White Head Village 0710-0740
> 2 Mourning Doves, Double-crested Cormorant, Northern Flicker, Tree & Barn
> Swallows, Magnolia Warbler
>
> White Head Ferry 0745-0810
> 28 Common Eiders, Mourning Dove, RAZORBILL, Common Loon, 6 Double-crested
> Cormorants
>
> Red Point Trail 0820-0950
> RING-NECKED PHEASANT calling, adult BROAD-WINGED HAWK, 2 courting Northern
> Flickers, Alder Flycatcher, Gray Catbird, 5 wood-warbler spp., inc. singing
> Blackpoll Warbler
>
> Bancroft Point & Trail 1030-1100
> first-of-spring EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, 4 BANK SWALLOWS, inc. pair mating, 4
> Tree & 4 Barn Swallows, 12+ CLIFF SWALLOWS visiting nest gourds (very
> active), 2 Black-and-white Warblers, 2q Northern Parulas
>
> White Head Ferry 1330-1355
> male Mallard, 17 Common Eiders, 2 Black Guillemots, 14 Double-crested
> Cormorants
>
> I also saw an AMERICAN COPPER, 5 CLOUDED SULPHUR, 3 CABBAGE WHITE, SPRING
> AZURE & LADY spp. butterflies on Grand Manan. Flowers in bloom included
> DEWBERRY & SPEEDWELL spp.
>
> Roger Burrows
> White Head
>

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Subject: Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RAZORBILL, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, BANK & CLIFF SWALLOWS
Date: Mon May 25 2020 15:27 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 25

White Head Village 0710-0740
2 Mourning Doves, Double-crested Cormorant, Northern Flicker, Tree & Barn
Swallows, Magnolia Warbler

White Head Ferry 0745-0810
28 Common Eiders, Mourning Dove, RAZORBILL, Common Loon, 6 Double-crested
Cormorants

Red Point Trail 0820-0950
RING-NECKED PHEASANT calling, adult BROAD-WINGED HAWK, 2 courting Northern
Flickers, Alder Flycatcher, Gray Catbird, 5 wood-warbler spp., inc. singing
Blackpoll Warbler

Bancroft Point & Trail 1030-1100
first-of-spring EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, 4 BANK SWALLOWS, inc. pair mating, 4
Tree & 4 Barn Swallows, 12+ CLIFF SWALLOWS visiting nest gourds (very
active), 2 Black-and-white Warblers, 2q Northern Parulas

White Head Ferry 1330-1355
male Mallard, 17 Common Eiders, 2 Black Guillemots, 14 Double-crested
Cormorants

I also saw an AMERICAN COPPER, 5 CLOUDED SULPHUR, 3 CABBAGE WHITE, SPRING
AZURE & LADY spp. butterflies on Grand Manan. Flowers in bloom included
DEWBERRY & SPEEDWELL spp.

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 25, 2020 (Monday)
Date: Mon May 25 2020 12:14 pm
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
*NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 25, 2020 (Monday)*

**

*To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to*

*http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca *

**

*To respond by e-mail, address your message to the information line
editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com *

**

*Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo
labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may
not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always
appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those
wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the
email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.*

**

*For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com *

**

*Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
*

*Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com *

*Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)*

**

**

**

**

*** St. Martins is hosting some great birds. Jane LeBlanc got some
excellent photos of an EASTERN TOWHEE [Tohi flancs roux] on Main
Street, St. Martins, on Sunday.*

**

**

*** Bob Blake reports that they had a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER [Pic
macul] come to raw suet on Sunday. This does not happen very often.
Ive had them come to jam and to peanut butter, but never suet or its
blends.*

**

*** Brian Stone got a nice photo of a moth, BLUISH SPRING MOTH
[Arpenteuse du crisier], which sure is one to watch for when
identifying butterflies, as it is very easily mistaken for the NORTHERN
AZURE BUTTERFLY. It may be quite common but I have only seen it once
before and have never seen it come to my moth light. It is a day-flier
and it is seen at this time of year only.*

*Brian also got some nice photos of a cooperative singing CHESTNUT-SIDED
WARBLER, a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT WARBLER,YELL)W WARBLER, and a SAVANNAH
SPARROW. A NORTHERN GREEN-STRIPED GRASSHOPPER also posed nicely.*

*Brian also noted EASTERN TENT CATERPILLARS at the tent nests.*

**

***Dave Christie sends photos of the female summer Tanager that first
appeared in his Marys Point feeder yard on Monday, May 18. He didnt
see it again until the following Wednesday evening when it visited
several times. He did not see it on Thursday or Friday morning but it
stopped briefly on late Friday, however on Saturday May 23^rd he was
able to see it several times and also back again Sunday morning.*

**

**

*** Jill Greening sends a photo of a BALTIMORE ORIOLE [Oriole de
Baltimore] enjoying an orange half in her yard, in Ewan Saskatchewan.
Jill would not be far from where a Bullocks Oriole [Oriole de Bullock]
could wander in, but the solid black head with narrow white wing-bar
says adult male Baltimore Oriole.*

**

**

*** In follow up to yesterdays fern photos by Gordon Rattray, and a few
I noted on Sunday, one photo shows the OSTRICH FERN [Ptrtide
noduleuse] just emerging. This is the wild spring delicacy that we call
Fiddleheads. However, all ferns do form fiddlehead structures as they
emerge, and many are not edible. Also included is the sporophyte stage
of the Ostrich Fern that has overwintered that does resemble an ostrich
feather with a bit of imagination. It is important to be very respectful
of this sporophyte stalk, as folklore says witches use to cast evil
spells on folks you dont care for!*

**

*Also included is a bad photo of an emerging SENSITIVE FERN [Onocle
dlicate] getting its name because it is very sensitive to frost, so
this plant is possibly pushing its luck.*

**

**

**

*nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com *

*Nelson Poirier,*

*Nature Moncton*

**


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Subject: Rapport d'observation d'oiseaux le 24 mai 2020
Date: Sun May 24 2020 19:46 pm
From: 000000a06363d504-dmarc-request AT listserv.unb.ca
 
Bonsoir  tous,
Aujourd'hui, dimanche 24 mai 2020, Jolande St-Pierre, Corinne DeGrce, Rosemonde Duguay, Louis Lgre, Andrew Olive, Carolane Gillis (Campbellton), Carmella Melanson ( Shediac), Nicole Ferron et Denise Godin sont partis pour l'le Miscou pour une journe d'observation. Beau soleil, 6 degrs Celsius et un vent lger 8 h et c'est le dpart. Comme nous sommes dans la priode de distanciation sociale, nous avons respect les rgles du confinement. Voici la liste des oiseaux observs :
Bertrand : Pic flamboyant, Hirondelle bicolore, Chardonneret jaune, Corneille d'Amrique, Colibri gorge rubis, Merlebleu de l'Est, Pigeon biset, Msange tte noire;
Village Blanchard : Merle d'Amrique, Quiscale bronz;
Inkerman : Carouge tte jaune, Goglu des prs, Bruant chanteur, tourneau sansonnet, Balbuzard pcheur. Grand Hron;
Chemin de la Mousse : Pluvier semipalm, Bernache du Canada, Grive solitaire, Pluvier siffleur, Pluvier bronz (2), Bcasseau semipalm, Bcasseau minuscule;
Plaines Shippagan : Canard d'Amrique, Canard noir;
Haut-Shippagan : Marouette de Caroline, Sarcelle d'hiver;
Lamque : Crcerelle d'Amrique;
Pont de Miscou : Bihoreau gris, Goland marin, Goland argent, Cormoran aigrettes, Tourterelle triste;
Miscou : Plongeon huard, Geai bleu, Quiscale rouilleux, Pluvier argent;
Phare de Miscou : Fou de Bassan, Macreuse ailes blanches, Bruant familier, Viro tte bleue, Bruant des prs, Harelde kakawi, Paruline masque, Bruant couronne blanche, Moucherolle sp. ;
Petit-Bois : Gobemoucheron gris-bleu, Paruline noir et blanc, Paruline bleue, Paruline collier, Paruline flamboyante, Urubu tte rouge (11), Urubu noir (1), Paruline tigre, Petite Buse (6), Paruline poitrine baie;
Roches bleues : Mouette tridactyle, Harle hupp, Goland bec cercl, Eider duvet, Goland arctique;
Lac Frye : Fuligule collier, Fuligule milouinan, Garrot oeil d'or, Macreuse front blanc, Busard des marais, Grand Corbeau, Buse queue rousse;
Chemin Vibert : Canard colvert, Paruline couronne rousse, Paruline obscure, Bruant des marais, Paruline gorge noire;
Chemin Ward : Roselin pourpr, Roitelet couronne rubis;
Chemin Gallien : Bruant gorge blanche;
Wilson Point : Paruline des ruisseaux, Roitelet couronne dore, Pygargue tte blanche juvnile (2), Grand Chevalier, Petit Chevalier, Chevalier solitaire, Faucon merillon, Sittelle poitrine rousse;
Chemin Nardini : Grbe bec bigarr, Paruline jaune.
Pour un beau total de 87 espces! Quelle belle journe, bien du plaisir, et un gros merci Andrew et Carolane ainsi qu' Carmella pour votre prsence dans la Pninsule acadienne!
Denise Godin pour le groupe










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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 24, 2020 (Sunday)
Date: Sun May 24 2020 18:03 pm
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
Eileen Pike has pointed out the problem which sure will watch for from
now on. There was a space after the BlogSpot site that should not have
been there.

Thank Eileen


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 24, 2020 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to

http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

To respond by e-mail, address your message to the information line
editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo
labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may
not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always
appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those
wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the
email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com___

Transcript by: David Christie _maryspt@mac.com_

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

** Debrorah Morins photo of the oriole from White Head Island, from
yesterday, provided lots of discussion and consideration, which
illustrate well how the varying plumage of the orioles by gender and age
can lead to potential confusion. Other species such as Hooded Warbler
were considered but the size of the bird, being definitely smaller than
the nearby Baltimore Oriole gave the strong suggestion that was indeed
an immature ORCHARD ORIOLE [Oriole des vergers]. Those photos are
re-attached today, for those of us less-experienced to peruse again, but
keep in mind that the photos alone do not show the size comparison that
is a very helpful clue.

** Sybil Wentzell shares a very pleasant array of recent bird photos,
some with a different slant. The photos show a first-summer, male INDIGO
BUNTING [Passerin indigo] that visited her Harvey, Albert County, yard,
with some plumage completion to occur, along with a first-summer male
ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Cardinal poitrine rose] with the same scenario
to happen. Sybil shows an adult male BOBOLINK [Goglu des prs] and also
a male Bobolink in its early spring plumage, which we dont get to see
much of at this time of the season.

Sybils photo of the GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat] does show a nice hint
of its burgundy under-tail covert. A BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER [Moqueur
chat] also co-operated for a nice portrait.

** A BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER [Paruline gorge noire] dropped by
Jane LeBlancs St. Martins yard on Saturday morning and co-operated for
a nice photo.

** Brian Coyle sends some recent photos. The WILSONS SNIPE [Bcassine
de Wilson] continue to entertain him. He discovered something new, at
least to Brian. One snipe would be calling from the ground, right in
front of him, while another would be in the air, winnowing, then the
one on the ground would fly up to meet the other, and they would winnow
together. He had always assumed that it was the male putting on a
display for the female, but he had no way of telling the genders apart
and assumed that it was a coupled effort. Knowing whether the ones in
the air were male and female, two females or two males he never knew
whether it was. Brian is getting some excellent photos because he is
using a blind.

Brian also includes photos of the not easily seen SWAMP SPARROW [Bruant
des marais] except at this time of year when they claim territory. He
also got the beautiful sheen of the COMMON GRACKLE [Quiscale bronz],
the bright epaulettes of the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD [Carouge
paulettes], and he as well has the female RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS
[Colibri gorge rubis] arriving to join the males in feeder combat.

** Gordon Rattray took note of some spring plants coming to life,
including blooms of FORGET-ME-NOT [Myosotis] and SERVICEBERRY
[Amlanchier] shrubs. He also noted INTERRUPTED FERN [Osmonde de
Clayton] emerging, OSTRICH FERN [Matteuccie fougre--lautruche], (the
common edible one called Fiddleheads at this time of year, yet most
emerging ferns do form a fiddlehead) LADY FERN [Fougre femelle] , and
the COMMON FIELD HORSETAIL [Queue de renard] sterile shoot

** Our yard GRAY CATBIRDS [Moqueur chat] were not long in finding the
jam feeder to savour the sweet booty. It happens to be a raspberry jam,
but grape jelly or inexpensive other jams fill the bill equally well.

We have lots of photos of the male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Cardinal
poitrine rose], as they are so easy to spot, but not many of the females
as they are less in the open at the moment, with nesting taking place.
Im attaching a photo of a female at the feeder, that shows the white
supercilium over the eyes, the large bill, and the pattern of breast
streaking. A few photos of it are joined by a PINE SISKIN [Tarin des
pins] that show the relative size; it is frequently confused with the
smaller female Purple Finch [Roselin pourpr].

This is the first year that I can recall of having 3 male Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks at the feeders. Usually two is the maximum for me. There
appears to be only one female, but maybe more, because the females spend
less time at the feeder.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton


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Subject: Fwd: NATURE MONCTON NATURE LINE......SUNDAY, MAY 24
Date: Sun May 24 2020 16:51 pm
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
Try going to www.naturemoncton.com

and open it from home page. Hope gremlins beat it by tomorrow....Nelson
-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: NATURE MONCTON NATURE LINE......SUNDAY, MAY 24
Date: Sun, 24 May 2020 18:37:30 -0300
From: Nelson Poirier
To: NATURENB AT LISTSERV.UNB.CA



Some folks have reported the could not open the blogSpot today, not sure
why. Always appreciated when folks let me know there is a problem as it
opened as send it to myself as a check.

Try

http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca_
_

_
_


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Subject: NATURE MONCTON NATURE LINE......SUNDAY, MAY 24
Date: Sun May 24 2020 16:37 pm
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
Some folks have reported the could not open the blogSpot today, not sure
why. Always appreciated when folks let me know there is a problem as it
opened as send it to myself as a check.

Try

http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca_
_

_
_


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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 24, 2020 (Sunday)
Date: Sun May 24 2020 13:27 pm
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 24, 2020 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to

http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca__

To respond by e-mail, address your message to the information line
editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo
labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may
not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always
appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those
wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the
email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com___

Transcript by: David Christie _maryspt@mac.com_

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

** Debrorah Morins photo of the oriole from White Head Island, from
yesterday, provided lots of discussion and consideration, which
illustrate well how the varying plumage of the orioles by gender and age
can lead to potential confusion. Other species such as Hooded Warbler
were considered but the size of the bird, being definitely smaller than
the nearby Baltimore Oriole gave the strong suggestion that was indeed
an immature ORCHARD ORIOLE [Oriole des vergers]. Those photos are
re-attached today, for those of us less-experienced to peruse again, but
keep in mind that the photos alone do not show the size comparison that
is a very helpful clue.

** Sybil Wentzell shares a very pleasant array of recent bird photos,
some with a different slant. The photos show a first-summer, male INDIGO
BUNTING [Passerin indigo] that visited her Harvey, Albert County, yard,
with some plumage completion to occur, along with a first-summer male
ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Cardinal poitrine rose] with the same scenario
to happen. Sybil shows an adult male BOBOLINK [Goglu des prs] and also
a male Bobolink in its early spring plumage, which we dont get to see
much of at this time of the season.

Sybils photo of the GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat] does show a nice hint
of its burgundy under-tail covert. A BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER [Moqueur
chat] also co-operated for a nice portrait.

** A BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER [Paruline gorge noire] dropped by
Jane LeBlancs St. Martins yard on Saturday morning and co-operated for
a nice photo.

** Brian Coyle sends some recent photos. The WILSONS SNIPE [Bcassine
de Wilson] continue to entertain him. He discovered something new, at
least to Brian. One snipe would be calling from the ground, right in
front of him, while another would be in the air, winnowing, then the
one on the ground would fly up to meet the other, and they would winnow
together. He had always assumed that it was the male putting on a
display for the female, but he had no way of telling the genders apart
and assumed that it was a coupled effort. Knowing whether the ones in
the air were male and female, two females or two males he never knew
whether it was. Brian is getting some excellent photos because he is
using a blind.

Brian also includes photos of the not easily seen SWAMP SPARROW [Bruant
des marais] except at this time of year when they claim territory. He
also got the beautiful sheen of the COMMON GRACKLE [Quiscale bronz],
the bright epaulettes of the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD [Carouge
paulettes], and he as well has the female RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS
[Colibri gorge rubis] arriving to join the males in feeder combat.

** Gordon Rattray took note of some spring plants coming to life,
including blooms of FORGET-ME-NOT [Myosotis] and SERVICEBERRY
[Amlanchier] shrubs. He also noted INTERRUPTED FERN [Osmonde de
Clayton] emerging, OSTRICH FERN [Matteuccie fougre--lautruche], (the
common edible one called Fiddleheads at this time of year, yet most
emerging ferns do form a fiddlehead) LADY FERN [Fougre femelle] , and
the COMMON FIELD HORSETAIL [Queue de renard] sterile shoot

** Our yard GRAY CATBIRDS [Moqueur chat] were not long in finding the
jam feeder to savour the sweet booty. It happens to be a raspberry jam,
but grape jelly or inexpensive other jams fill the bill equally well.

We have lots of photos of the male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Cardinal
poitrine rose], as they are so easy to spot, but not many of the females
as they are less in the open at the moment, with nesting taking place.
Im attaching a photo of a female at the feeder, that shows the white
supercilium over the eyes, the large bill, and the pattern of breast
streaking. A few photos of it are joined by a PINE SISKIN [Tarin des
pins] that show the relative size; it is frequently confused with the
smaller female Purple Finch [Roselin pourpr].

This is the first year that I can recall of having 3 male Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks at the feeders. Usually two is the maximum for me. There
appears to be only one female, but maybe more, because the females spend
less time at the feeder.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton


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Subject: White Head birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, NORTHERN HARRIER & BAY-BREASTED WARBLER
Date: Sun May 24 2020 11:06 am
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 24

White Head: Village & Long Point Road 0835-0915
male RING-NECKED PHEASANT, Red-eyed Vireo, singing Gray Catbird,
Black-and-white Warbler, Common Yellowthroat

White Head: Brooks Marsh 0920-0925
7 Canada Geese+2 pairs+3 & 5 goslings, American Wigeon, 7 American Black
Ducks+female+5 newly-hatched ducklings, male NORTHERN HARRIER, 4 Tree & 2
Barn Swallows

White Head: Coastal Trail 0925-0950
Northern Flicker, 2 Black-and-white Warblers, singing Common Yellowthroat,
& Magnolia Warbler, male BAY-BREASTED WARBLER

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: ducklings on the move
Date: Sun May 24 2020 8:19 am
From: gmwhale AT nbnet.nb.ca
 
We had a lovely viewing last night at 8 pm of a black duck hen and 11 newly hatched ducklings on their way presumably to the ocean.  Not sure where they hatched but somewhere close in our neighbourhood.  

When I spotted them from our kitchen window, the hen was taking them up Old Airport Road which runs past our house. When she got to our neighbour's yard, the brood split as they went through the large rose bush and reformed on the other side except for one duckling. The hen took them through the lawn away from the ocean with ten in tow and one still in the rose bush. The latter was calling loudly. The hen made a loop, also calling and started heading now down Fern Street past our neighbour's house, across Old Airport Road and continued down another neighbour's paved driveway toward Pettes Cove.

The lost duckling's calling now seemed much further away. As we watched, the lost duckling joined the brood on the driveway and they continued toward Pettes Cove. The only way the lost duckling got to the brood was to go into a small culvert which joins a larger culvert and swim until it opened up near the neighbour's garage, climb the bank, run alongside the garage and out onto the short driveway that joins their longer driveway.

We were amazed that all of this was organized through the communication and triangulation between the hen and lost duckling. The duckling was fortunate the culvert was not continuous to Pettes Cove so it could emerge to let its mother know where it was. It was also fortunate there was no traffic or anything else to bother them.

Our next wish was that the hen could find her way to Pettes Cove since there is a large tall rock barrier the full length of the cove that would be impossible for the little ducklings to scale. There is one area where the barrier rocks open up to access the cove's cobble beach, not too far from where she was headed. Or the lost duckling could lead the way through another culvert under the road!

Laurie Murison
Pettes Cove, Grand Manan.

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Subject: Girls Day Out~~ Charlotte County
Date: Sun May 24 2020 6:08 am
From: 000002429e81770b-dmarc-request AT listserv.unb.ca
 
Saturday, May 23, 2020 -- Charlotte County - St. George, to St. Stephen, and then to Back Bay and Mascarene





On this sunny day with brisk winds, Joanne and I with social distancing in mind started our day on the South side trail of the St. George Marsh up to the overpass and then back through.



We traveled to a marshy area outside of town while heading West to St. Stephen. We drove to visit some birding friends in Mayfield. Over to Milltown Park and boat launch and a few side streets.



We were getting hungry so we headed back to St. George for some great Uncle Mayns Fish & Chips, and then headed out for a bit more birding as there were still lots of birds to be seen. So off to Back Bay and Mascarene.



A total of 45 species were found, and I have to give all the credit to Joanne who has the greatest eyes for birding. She was pointing here and there and I couldn't keep up.



So here is our list of species that we located on our day out together. Joanne and Sarah were the first group of ladies to take me out on my first birding day some six years ago.





WHITE-THROATED SPARROW

SWAMP SPARROW

SONG SPARROW

MOURNING DOVE

AMERICAN CROW

OSPREY

COMMON GRACKLE

RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD (Male & Female)

RED-EYED VIREO

BLUE-HEADED VIREO

WARBLING VIREO (lifer for me)

COMMON YELLOWTHROAT

BLACK-THROATED GREEN

OVENBIRD

NORTHERN PARULA

TENNESSEE WARBLER (lifer for me)

AMERICAN REDSTART

BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER

YELLOW WARBLER

MAGNOLIA WARBLER

WILSON'S WARBLER

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER

BELTED KINGFISHER

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH

WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH

VEERY THRUSH

HERMIT THRUSH

SWAINSON'S THRUSH (lifer for me)

BLUEJAY

TURKEY VULTURE

GRAY CATBIRD

EASTERN PHOEBE

EASTERN KINGBIRD

TREE SWALLOW

AMERICAN ROBIN

DC CORMORANT

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH

PURPLE FINCH

SORA (heard)

HERRING GULL

ROCK PIGEON

BALTIMORE ORIOLE

AMERICAN BITTERN

CANADA GOOSE

EUROPEAN STARLING

RAVEN

WINTER WREN (heard only)



Thanks ever so much Joanne for a special surprise when you asked me to go on a brid outing with you along with social distancing. It has been way too long young lady and you certainly kept me hopping that's for certain. It was a whole lot of fun.





Joanne Savage -- Quispamsis, NB

Gail Taylor -- St. George, NB

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Subject: Spring Birds on Grand Manan Last Week
Date: Sat May 23 2020 20:14 pm
From: jgw AT nbnet.nb.ca
 
Jean and I spent the past week on Grand Manan, birding both that island and
White Head.



In total, counting birds starting at the parking lot in Black's Harbour and
making the round trip back to there we saw a total of 115 species. We
typically see between 115-120 species in recent years although last spring
we tallied 131 (an exceptional trip).





Some of the more interesting birds follow. Please note that we saw several
of these that had been found by others.



BLUE-WINGED TEAL - normally hard to find on the islands, particularly in
spring, a pair was at the "goose pond" on White Head I. on May 20th.



BUFFLEHEAD - two female-plumaged birds were still at Long and Great ponds on
Grand Manan on the late date of May 16th.



NORTHERN GOSHAWK - always a special find anywhere, a non-adult flew overhead
on Whistle Road not far beyond Eel Brook on Grand Manan on the 17th.



LAUGHING GULL - a handsome pair rested at Castalia Marsh for a few hours on
the very windy afternoon of May 21st. These birds could well have been
brought from Maine by the heavy southwest winds that day.



CASPIAN TERN - a single Caspian rested with gulls on Castalia Beach the
afternoon of May 16th.



BARRED OWL - one was quite vocal on Dark Harbour Road at the first large
brook the night of the 19th.



WHITE-EYED VIREO - we found a colourful individual in shrubbery on White
Head Island on May 20th at the end of the short roadway opposite civic #
375.



BOREAL CHICKADEE - this retiring species is increasingly hard to find in
southern NB these days, even on the islands. We found one silent adult
feeding in spruces along the old airport runway on White Head on the 20th.



BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER - a female gnatcatcher was feeding in willows beside
civic # 203 on White Head the afternoon of May 20th.



SUMMER TANAGER - a female was fly-catching in a copse of trees and shrubs at
the east end of the Anglican Church Hall in Grand Harbour the morning of the
19th.



FIELD SPARROW - a singing male was on a lawn near the end of the pavement on
the road to the White Head Lighthouse on the morning of the 18th. Another
non-vocal Field Sparrow spent a few days in the vicinity of the former
dumpsite on Whistle Road on Grand Manan. We saw it there briefly, on the
16th.



INDIGO BUNTING - a bright male visited feeders on Fleet Street in Seal Cove
during the early part of our stay. We saw it on the 15th and again on May
17th.



BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD - this is another songbird that's becoming increasingly
difficult to see in recent years. A male was at feeders on Fleet Street in
Seal Cove on the 15th and 17th.



ORCHARD ORIOLE - this oriole is now an annual overshoot to Grand Manan and
White Head in the last decade. However the second half of May is about the
only time one has a reasonable chance of seeing one in NB. A first-year male
was at feeders at Fleet Street on May 17th, a female was at feeders beside
the church on White Head Island the following day, and another female landed
on a treetop in Grand Harbour on May 19th. She stayed only long enough to
provide a definite ID.



On our drive from Quispamsis to Black's Harbour at around 8:15 AM on May
15th we saw a hen WILD TURKEY foraging on the grass embankment of Route 1
near Pennfield. Wild Turkeys are gradually expanding their range northeast
along Route 1 each year.



Jim Wilson




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Subject: White Head birds, inc. RED-EYED VIREO, BOBOLINK, SUMMER TANAGER, 10 WOOD-WARBLER spp. inc. NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH & BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, & NORTHERN CARDINAL
Date: Sat May 23 2020 14:01 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 23

White Head Feeders 0900-0910
American Goldfinch, adult female Baltimore Oriole

White Head: Brooks Marsh & Woods 0915-1025 (partly with Mark Morse)
3 Greater Yellowlegs, RED-EYED VIREO 6 Tree Swallows, 2 Gray Catbirds, 2
BOBOLINKS, 6 wood-warbler spp., inc. singing NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH

White Head: Langmaid Cove, Interior Woods & Old Dump 1035-1130
Double-crested Cormorant, Blue-headed Vireo, Gray Catbird, thrush spp.,
advanced 1st-spring SUMMER TANAGER (almost Veery-coloured), 2 wood-warbler
spp.

White Head: Main Road 1135-1240
3 Gray Catbirds, 6 American Goldfinches, 3 wood-warbler spp., male NORTHERN
CARDINAL

White Head: Coastal Trail 1240-1300
Canada Goose calling, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Gray Catbird, 4 wood-warbler
spp., inc. first-of-spring female BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER

HEAL-ALL was in bloom and I found what looked like the flower buds of
MEADOW CRANESBILL No butterflies, though...perhaps too windy.

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Pennfield/Old Saint John Road
Date: Sat May 23 2020 13:48 pm
From: bonnbed AT nb.sympatico.ca
 
This morning 4 birders from NSJ set out to bird the Pennfield area and return via the Old Saint John Road. Conditions were sunny but the wind was brisk and temps around 7 degrees.
Species numbered 47
Ring-neck duck, wild turkey, turkey vulture, bald eagle, broad-wing hawk and American kestral.

Mourning dove, ruby-throated hummingbird, downy woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, least flycatcher, eastern kingbird.

Blue-headed vireo, red-eyed vireo, American crow.
.
Black-capped chickadee, red-breasted nuthatch, winter wren, golden-crown kinglet, ruby-crowned kinglet,
.
Hermit thrush, American robin,gray catbird, brown thrasher.

Wood Warblers: ovenbird,black and white, nashville, common yellowthroat, American redstart, northern parula, magnolia, bay-breasted, yellow, chestnut-sided, black-throated blue, palm, pine, yellow-rumped, black-throated green.

Song, swamp, white-throated sparrows, dark-eyed junco.

Common grackle, American goldfinch.

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Subject: Pluvier bronzé American Golden Plover
Date: Sat May 23 2020 10:36 am
From: 000000a06363d504-dmarc-request AT listserv.unb.ca
 
Bonjour  tous,

Deux Pluviers bronzs \ American Golden Plovers ont t observs et photographis par Manon Cormier dans le chemin de la Mousse, chemin Four Roads, Inkerman. Elle tait accompagne de Rosemonde Duguay. Jolande St-Pierre et Denise Godin ont eu la chance de les voir et de les photographier.Les Pluviers sont faciles voir puisqu'ils se tiennent dans les mares d'eau prs du chemin de la mousse.Des photos seront mises sur le site du CNPA et sur Birding NB.
Bonne journe tous!!Denise Godin

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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 23, 2020 (Saturday)
Date: Sat May 23 2020 8:52 am
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 23, 2020 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information
line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
.

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
if any errors are noted in wording
or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed
additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript
but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is
recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the
BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. _The BlogSpot can always be
accessed from the website._


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com_

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

**Roger Burrows can't identify an oriole which turned up at his feeder
and that of Debbie Morin (#120 & 123 White Head Road) on Whitehead
Island. Debbie and Irene Doyle have photographs that Roger comments
clearly show it is too big and heavy for an Orchard Oriole and too
yellow and green for a Baltimore Oriole. The closest oriole he can find
in Sibley Birds is a female SCOTT'S ORIOLE as the plumage is right and
the bill curved with blue at the base, but it also has features like
that of an adult female STREAK-BACKED ORIOLE. Hopefully it will stay
around so I can see it and other birders, too. Comments welcome and will
be distributed pronto.

** Suzanne Rousseau in Sussex had some great days observing Mother
Natures community in her yard. A Pair of NORTHERN CARDINALS [Cardinal
rouge] came by a few weeks ago with the male feeding the female in
courtship behaviour, a great sign for Suzannes yard. She also had a
BALTIMORE ORIOLE [Oriole de Baltimore] come by and as well a bright male
adult INDIGO BUNTING [Passerin indigo]. A RED TRILLIUM is in full bloom
in her yard, commenting that she will enjoy it until the White-tailed
Deer get it. The Red Trillium is a real beauty but has an offensive
odour, especially when picked, that attracts pollinating flies. This has
led to its other nickname of Stinking Willie a very degrading name
for such a beautiful plant.

** St. Martins seems to be the Oriole Headquarters of New Brunswick.
Jane Leblanc got a photo of a female ORCHARD ORIOLE [Oriole des vergers]
in the same area that she photographed a male Orchard Oriole recently.
BALTIMORE ORIOLES [Oriole de Baltimore] are there as well. Jane got
another photo of a handsome male and another that may be a first spring
male or possibly a female. Immature plumages of Baltimore Orioles can be
variable and confusing. The Orchard Orioles usually run about an inch
smaller than the Baltimore Orioles which can be another helpful clue.

** Dale Gaskin at Dawson Settlement has lots of female RUBY-THROATED
HUMMINGBIRDS [Colibri gorge rubis] as of Friday. He also has an
EASTERN BLUEBIRD [Merlebleu de l'Est] family nesting on the west side of
a field by his home and a flock of 20 to 25 EVENING GROSBEAKS [Gros-bec
errant] arrived which was a real surprise. Dale had a few WHITE-TAILED
DEER [Cerf de Virginie] in a field near his home to be joined by a RED
FOX [Renard roux]. One of the White-tailed Deer chased the Fox back into
the woods in no uncertain terms! Dale also comments that the BLACKFLIES
have arrived in full force.

** Louise Nichols had an interesting Swallow box scenario. She has one
box on the side of her pond closest to the house. Last year Chickadees
nested in that one. This year too Louise saw a BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE
[Msange tte noire] carrying in nesting material a couple weeks ago
and then a few days ago she saw a Chickadee approach the box and feed
another adult Chickadee that was in the box. She assumed that one must
be on a nest incubating but on Thursday the TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle
bicolore] were all around the box. A chickadee tried to approach the
entrance but was chased off by a Swallow. Friday morning a Swallow was
sitting on top of the box. She is not sure whats going on there or who
is winning the war. She felt bad for the poor Chickadees.

** Brian Stone visited one of his now favorite nature sites behind
Crandall University on Thursday to see his first DREAMY DUSKYWING
BUTTERFLY [Hesprie givre] of the season, a NORTHERN AZURE BUTTERFLY
[Azur printanier], a very sharply dressed YELLOW WARBLER [Paruline
jaune], SERVICEBERRY shrubs were in full bloom, a female PUSSY WILLOW
catkin that had gone to seed and male pollen catkins that were still
shedding pollen.

** GRAY CATBIRDS [Moqueur chat] seem to have really moved back in over
the last few days with several reports of them. Aldo Dorio photographed
some in Tabusintac and my own pair arrived on Thursday as did a pair to
a neighbors yard.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton





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Subject: Carouge à tête jaune Yellow-Headed Blackbird
Date: Sat May 23 2020 7:26 am
From: 000000a06363d504-dmarc-request AT listserv.unb.ca
 
Bonjour  tous,
Un Carouge tte jaune \Yellow-Headed Blackbird a t observ chez Jean-Guy Robichaud et Ginette Doucet au 1932, chemin Four Roads, Inkerman, E8P 1B1. No de tlphone du propritaire : 506 336-9262. L'oiseau est toujours prsent ce matin et les propritaires permettent aux observateurs d'oiseaux d'aller l'observer. S'il vous plat de respecter les consignes du confinement et la distanciation sociale.

Plusieurs observateurs du Club de Naturalistes de la Pninsule acadienne ont eu la chance de l'observer!

Denise Godin pour Jean-Guy et Ginette
727-6305724-2690




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Subject: Where to Find Birds on the Grand Manan Archipelago
Date: Sat May 23 2020 5:23 am
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
For those interested, this 126-page self-published book is now available to
anyone planning to visit Grand Manan. It is an expanded update of the
section on Grand Manan in my Birding in New Brunswick with my own photos.
I am selling it for $20 and offering it to NB nature clubs at $18 so that
it can be used to raise funds. At least three shops on Grand Manan will be
selling it, likely at $25+, so there is a saving. I don't know what the
shipping costs would be if I were to mail it. If travel restrictions are
lifted, I may be travelling throughout NB to bird and promote the book, but
that depends on how the pandemic situation progresses.

Roger Burrows
White Head

NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
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Subject: Re: Jeudi-Oiseaux , Jeudi le 21 mai 2020
Date: Sat May 23 2020 5:14 am
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
Excellent outing that shows just ho much is around now.

Roger Burrows
White Head

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 11:22 PM Rose Alma Mallet
wrote:

> Nature Sud-Est
>
> Les Ami.e.s de la Nature Sud-Est sont en mode ralenti et reste prs de
> leur
> demeure. On fait de l'observation d'oiseaux chez-soi et lors de nos
> marches. Les sorties du Jeudi-Oiseaux se font chacun de notre ct.
> ( We bird individually,we don't have a chance to wave at each orther)
>
> Excellente quipe! Observ 100 espces dans une journe.
>
> Jeudi le 21 mai 2020, 10 membres du club dont Elaine Gallant ,
> Rjean Laforge,Jean-Claude Gagnon, Guylaine Gagnon, Stuart Tingley,
> Germaine Lger, Rosemonde Chiasson-Duguay, Normand Belliveau,
> Rose-Alma Mallet et un peu d'aide de Gilles Belliveau ont observ 100
> espces d'oiseaux dont 15 espces de parulines. Journe de trs grand
> vent le long de la cte. Un gros merci tous ces membres qui ont
> gentiment accept de faire un compte d'oiseaux prs de chez-eux et
> un peu plus loin. Ensemble on voit beaucoup d'espces.
> Les * sont l pour attirer l'attention.
> Bonne lecture.
>
> Moncton (terrain de golf Lakeside)
> Bernache du Canada 10+6petits/Canada Goose
> Canard d'Amrique 6/Am. Wigeon
> Canrard colvert 2/Mallard
> Hirondelle bicolore 40+/Tree Swallow*
> Corneille d'Am. 6/Am. Crow
> Martin-pcheur d'Am. 1/Belted Kingfisher
> Pic flamboyant2/No. Flicker
> Pic macul 2/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Carouge paulettes 8/Red-winged Blackbird
> Quiscale bronz 4/Common Grackle
> Merle d'Am. 6/Am. Robin
> Bruant chanteur 6/Song Sparrow
> Bruant gorge blanche 2/White-throated Sparrow
> Bruant familier 2/Chipping Sparrow
> Paruline collier 2/No. Parula
> Paruline croupion jaune 2/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Chardonneret jaune 10/Am. Goldfinch
> Msange tte noire 6/Black-capped Chickadee
> Jaseur d'Am. 6/Cedar Waxwing
> ( un rat musqu/ Muskrat)
>
> Dieppe ( une piste rgion terrain de golf)
> Paruline collier 1/No. Parula
> Paruline croupion jaune 3/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Paruline jaune 2/Yellow Warbler
> Paruline flancs marron 1/Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Canard colvert 2+6 bbs/ Mallard
> Bernache du Canada 2+3 bbs/Canada Goose
> Corneille d'Am.1/Am. Crow
> Carouge paulettes 5/Red-winged Blackbird
> Chardonneret jaune 4/Am. Goldfinch
>
> Sackville (Ch.White Birch)
> Corneilles d'Am. 2/Am. Crow
> Carouge paulettes 15/Red-winged Blackbird
> Marouette de Caroline 2/Sora
> Bcassine de Wilson 1/Wilson Snipe
> Bernache du Canada 13/Canada Goose
> Paruline jaune 3/Yellow Warbler
> Paruline masque 1/Common Yellowthroat
> Paruline collier 1/No. Parula
> Hirondelle rustique 3/Barn Swallow
> Hirondelle bicolore 10/Tree Swallow
> Faisan de Colchide 1/Ring-necked Pheasant
> Canard noir 5/Black Duck
> Balbuzard pcheur 1/Osprey
> Canard d'Amrique 2/Am. Wigeon
> Moucherolle tchbec 1/Least Flycatcher*
> Grand corbeau 1/Common Raven
> tourneau sansonnet 4/Eu. Starling
> Bruant chanteur 5/Song Sparrow
> Bruant des marais 3/Swamp Sparrow
>
> Scoudouc (sortie la transcanadienne)
> Urubu tte rouge 4/Turkey Vulture
> Scoudouc (cours/Ch. Malakoff)
> Moucherolle phbi 2/Eastern Phoebe
> Grive solitaire 2/Hermit Thrust
> Viro tte bleue 2/Blue-headed Vireo
> Hirondelle bicolore 6/ Tree Swallow
> Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
> Pic chevelu 2/Hairy Woodpecker
> Pic flamboyant 2/ No. Flicker
> Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Tourterelle triste 8/Mourning Dove
> Chardonneret jaune 10/Am. Goldfinch
> Sittelle poitrine rousse 2/Red-breasted Nuthatch
> Msange tte noire 8/Black-capped Chickadee
> Corneille d'Am.4/Am. Crow
> Geai bleu 8/Blue Jay
> Pigeon biset 5/Rock Pigeon
> Grand corbeau 2/Common Raven
> Roselin pourpr 8/Purple Finch
> Bruant chanteur 4/Song Sparrow
> Bruant familier 3/Chipping Sparrow
> Bruant gorge bl. 2/White-throated Sparrow
> Colibri gorge rubis 3/Ruby-throated Hummingbird
> Paruline croupion jaune 4/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Paruline noir et blanc 2/Black-and-White Warbler
> Paruline couronne 2/ Ovenbird
> Paruline collier 3/No. Parula
> Paruline gorge noire 1/Black-throated Green
> Oriole de Baltimore 1/Baltimore Oriole*
> Bcasse d'Amrique 2/ Am. Woodcook*
> Merle d'Am. 10/Am. Robin
> Quiscale bronz 6/Common Grackle
> tourneau sansonnet 3/Eu. Starling
>
> Shdiac ( cours Prom. Riverside) yard birds
> Roselin poupr 8/Purple Finch
> Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
> Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Chardonneret jaune 7/ Am. Goldfinch
> Cardinal rouge 2(mle et femelle) /No.Cardinal*
> Cardinal poitrine rose(mle et femelle) 2/ Rose-breasted Grossbeak*
> Geai bleu 3/Blue Jay
> Tourterelle triste 2/Mourning Dove
> Msange tte noire 8/Black-capped Chickadee
> Bruant familier 2/Chipping Sparrow
> Bruant gorge blanche 1/White-throated Sparrow
> Bruant chanteur 1/Song Sparrow
> Sittelle poitrine rousse 2/Red-breasted Nuthatch
> Merle d'Am.1/Am. Robin
> Quiscale bronz 1/Common Grackle
> Goglu des prs 2/Bobolink *
>
> Pointe-du-Chne (rue Railroad)
> Sterne pierregarin 30+/Common Tern*
> Hirondelle bicolore 12/Tree Swallow
> Grand chevalier 2/Greater Yellowlegs
> Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
> Quiscale bronz 8/Common Grackle
> tourneau sansonnet 6/Eu. Starling
> Merle d'Am.6/Am. Robin
> Pigeon biset 22/Rock Pigeon
> Corneille d'Am.8/Am. Crow
> Tourterelle triste 1/Mourning Dove
> Roselin familier 2/House Finch*
>
> Cap Brl
> De la route seulement Cap-Brl, et de la route 133.
> La lagune est ferme au traffic et le chemin vers
> la plateforme d'observation est barricad./On peut observer
> le marais avec un telescope de la route./The birds viewing
> platform is close.
> Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald eagle
> Paruline noir et blanc 3/Black-and-White Warbler
> Paruline jaune 3/Yellow Warbler
> Paruline calotte noire 2/Wilson Warbler
> Paruline masque 1/Common Yellowthroat
> Paruline flamboyante 2/Am. Redstart
> Paruline flancs marron 1/Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Moqueur chat 2/Gray Catbird
> Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
> Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
> Brant des marais 1/Swamp Sparrow
> Grand chevalier 4/Greater Yellowlegs
> Chevalier semi-palm 1/Willet
> Petit fuligule 4/Lesser Scaup
> Fuligule collier 4 /Ring-necked Duck
> Bernache du Canada 8/Canada Goose
> Sarcelle d'hiver 2/ Green-winged teal
> Canard d'Amrique 20/Am. Wigeon
> Canard noir 27/Black Duck
> Canard souchet 6/No. Shoveler
> Canard chipeau 8/Gadwall
> Grand harle 3/Common Merganser
> Harle hupp 10/Red-breasted Merganser
> Harle couronn 2/Hooded Merganser
> Grand hron 6/Great Blue Heron
> Corneille d'Am.14/Am. crow
> Cormoran aigrettes 44/Double-crested Cormorant
> Goland bec cercl 8/Ring-billed Gull
> Goland argent 10/Herring Gull
> Goland arctique 12/Iceland Gull
> Goland brun 1/Lesser Black-back Gull
> Goland marin 1/Great Black-back Gull
> Carouge paulettes 4/Red-winged Blackbird
> Quiscale bronz 14/Common Grackle
> Chardonneret jaune 6/Am. Goldfinch
> Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
> tourneau sansonnet 4/Eu. Starling
> Hirondelle bicolore 6/Tree Swallow
> Viro tte bleue 1/Blue-headed Vireo*
>
> Boudreau -Ouest (une cours/Yard birds)
> Vacher tte brune 1/Brown-headed Cowbird
> Quiscale bronz 6/Common Grackle
> Carouge paulettes 6/Red-winged Blackbird
> Roselin pourpr 12/Purple Finch
> Chardonneret jaune 20/Am. Goldfinch
> Msange tte noire 6/Black-capped Chickadee
> Bruant chanteur 4/Song Sparrow
> Bruant gorge bl. 2/ White-throated Sparrow
> Bruant des prs 4/Savannah Sparrow
> Bruant familier 4/Chipping Sparrow
> Bruant couronne bl. 1/White-crowned Sparrow*
> Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
> Tourterelle triste 6/Mourning Dove
> Geai bleu 3/Blue Jay
> Faisan de Colchide 2/Ring-necked Pheasant
> Pic mineur 4/Downy Woodpecker
> Pic chevelu 2/Hairy Woodpecker
> Pic flamboyant 3/No. Flicker
> tourneau sansonnet 8/Eu. Starling
> Pigeon biset 2/Rock Pigeon
> Corneille d'Am 2/Am. crow
> Cardinal poitrine rose 1/Rose-Breasted Cardinal*
> Gros-bec errant 4/Evening Grosbeak*
>
> Cap Bimet
> Grand hron 1/Great Blue Heron
> Harle hupp 2/Red-breasted Merganser
> Sterne pierregarin 6/Common Tern*
> Hirondelle bicolore 4/Tree Sparrow
> Quiscale bronz 8/Common Grackle
> Carouge paulettes 4/Red-winged Blackbird
> Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
>
> Grand Barachois (Pont des Robichaud)
> Balbuzard pcheur 2/Osprey
> Sterne pierregarin 6/Common Tern*
> Pigeon biset 4/Rock Pigeon
> Quiscale bronz 2/Common Grackle
>
> Cap-Pel (Ch. des chalets l'Aboiteau et chemin parc de l'Aboiteau )
> Paruline collier 1/No. Parula
> Paruline noir et blanc 2/Black-and-White Warbler
> Paruline jaune 1/Yellow Warbler
> Paruline gorge noire 1/Black-throated Green Warbler
> Paruline tte cendre 1/Magnolia Warbler
> Paruline flamboyante 2/Am. Redstart
> Paruline couronne 2/Ovenbird
> Grive solitaire 1/Hermit Thrush
> Msange tte noire 10/Black-capped Chickadee
> Corneille d'Am. 2/Am. Crow
> Bruant gorge bl. 2/White-throated Sparrow
> Sittelle poitrine rousse 1/Red-breasted Nuthatch
> Viro tte bleue 2/Blue-headed Vireo
>
> Ch. Niles (Bas-Cap-Pel)
> Hirondelle bicolore 4/Tree Swallow
> Goland argent 8/Herring Gull
> Goland marin 2/Great Black-backed Gull
> Goland bec cercl 6/Ring-billed Gull
> Goland arctique 9/ Iceland Gull
>
> Petit-Cap
> Martin-pcheur d'Am.1/Belted Kingfisher
>
> Shemogue
> Merlebleu de l'Est 1/Eastern Bluebird*
> Urubu tte rouge 2/Turkey Vulture
> Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald Eagle
> Quiscale bronz 3/Common Grackle
> Hirondelle bicolore 2/Tree Swallow
> Canard noir 2/Black Duck
> Bernache du Canada 2/Canada Goose
> Crcerelle d'Am.1/Am. Kestrel
>
> Murray Corner Road
> Paruline joues grises 2/ Nashville Warbler
> Paruline couronne 4/Ovenbird
> Paruline noire et bl. 2/Black-and-White Warbler
> Paruline croupion jaune 4/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Msange tte noire 8/Black-capped Chickadee
> Petit chevalier 2/Lesser Yellowlegs
> Grand chevalier 6/Greater Yelloelegs
> Sarcelle d'hiver 1/Green-winged Teal
> Canard noir 7/Black Duck
> Canard colvert 3/Mallard
> Canard d'Am. 2/Am. Wigeon
> ( un orignal /Moose)
>
> Johnston Pt.
> Paruline gorge orange 1/Blackburnian Warbler
> Paruline collier 5/No. Parula
> Paruline flamboyante 4/Am. Redstart
> Paruline tte cendre 4/Magnolia Warbler
> Paruline noir et bl. 5/Black-and White Warbler
> Paruline croupion jaune 2/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Paruline joues grises 1/Nashville Warbler
> Paruline flancs marron 5/Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Viro tte bleue 4/Blue -headed Vireo
> Roitelet couronne rubis 1/Ruby -crowned Kinglet
> Msange tte noire 4/Black-capped Chickadee
> Bruant chanteur 1/Song Sparrow
> Bruant gorge bl. 2/Whhite-throated Sparrow
> Bec-crois bifasci 5/White-winged Crossbill
> Merle d'Am.1/Am. Robin
> Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald Eagle
> Faucon merillon 1/Merlin
> tourneau sansonnet 20/Eu. Starling
> Pigeon biset 6/Rock Pigeon
>
> Amos Pt.
> Paruline masque 1/Common Yellowthroat
> Paruline collier 6/No. Parula
> Paruline croupion jaune 7/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Paruline noir et blanc 4/Black-and-White warbler
> Paruline couronne 3/Ovenbird
> Paruline flamboyante 6/Am. Redstart
> Paruline flancs marron 3/Chestnut -sided warbler
> Colibri gorge rubis 1/Ruby-crowned Hummingbird
> Viro tte bleue 2/Blue-headed Vireo
> Bec-croiss bifasci 9/White-winged Crossbill
> Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
> Merlebleu de l'Est 2/Eastern Bluebird
> Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald Eagle
> Goland marin 1/Great Black-backed Gull
> Autour des palombes 1/No. Goshawk
> ( femelle sur le nid)
>
> Murray Road
> Hirondelle rustique 8/Barn Swallow
> Busard des marais 1/No. Harrier
> Pigeon biset 3/Rock Pigeon
> tourneau sansonnet 4/Eu. Starling
> Roitelet couronne dore 1/Golden-crowned Kinglet
> Paruline croupion jaune 4/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Paruline flans marron 2/Chestnut -sided Warbler
> Geai bleu 4/Blue jay
>
> Grand Digue (cours/Yard)
> Colibri gorge rubis 1/Ruby-crowned Hummingbird*
> Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
> Geai bleu 1/blue Jay
> Chardonneret jaune 3/Am. Goldfinch
> Msange tte noire 2/Black-capped Chickadee
> Quiscale bronz 1/Common Grackle
> Pigeon biset 3/Rock Pigeon
> Corneille d'Am. 3/Am. Crow
> Grand hron 1/Great Blue Heron
> Bernache du Canada 9+2bbs/Canada Goose
> Grand chevalier 1/Greater Yellowlegs
> Tourterelle triste 1/Mourning Dove
> Roselin pourpr 2/Purple Finch
> Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
> Faisan de Colchide 1/Ring-necked Pheasant
> Hirondelle bicolore 2/Tree Swallow
> Martin-pcheur d'Am. 1/Belted Kingfisher
>
> Cormierville (une cours/Yard birds)
> Bernache du Canada 6/Canada Goose
> Canard noir 1/Black Duck
> Harle couronn 1/Hooded Merganser
> Pigeon biset 3/Rock Pigeon
> Tourterelle triste 10/Mourning Dove
> Colibri gorge rubis2/Ruby-crowned Hummingbird
> Bcasseau minuscule 2/Least Sandpiper*
> Grand chevalier 6/Greater Yellowlegs
> Chevalier semi-palm 1/Willet
> Goland bec cercl 1/Ring-billed Gull
> Cormoran aigrettes 20/Double-crested Cormorant
> Grand hron 15/Great Blue Heron
> Balbuzard pcheur 3/Osprey
> Pygargue tte bl. 2/Bald Eagle
> Martin-pcheur d'Am.2/Belted Kingfisher
> Pic macul 3/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
> Pic chevelu 1/Hairy Woodpecker
> Pic flamboyant 2/No. Flicker
> Viro tte bleue 2/Blue- headed Vireo*
> Geai bleu 4/Blue Jay
> Msange tte noire 3/Black-capped Chickadee
> Hirondelle bicolore 8/Tree Swallow
> Roitelet couronne rubis 1/Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> Sittelle poitrine rousse 1/Red-breasted Nuthatch
> tourneau sansonnet 6/Eu. Starling
> Grive solitaire 1/Hermit Thrush (enten
> Moqueur chat 1/Gray Catbird*
> Grive fauve-Veery*
> Grive solitaire1 /Hermit Thrush
> Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
> Jaseur d'Am. 14/Cedar Waxwing
> Roselin poupr 2/Purple Finch
> Chardonneret jaune 6/Am. Goldfinch
> Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
> Bruant des prs 1/Savannah Sparrow (entendu)
> Bruant familier 1/Chipping Sparrow
> Bruant gorge bl. 2/White-throated Sparrow
> Goglu des prs 1/Bobolink
> Carouge paulettes 5/Red-winged Blackbird
> Quiscale bronz 2/Common Grackle
> Paruline noir et blanc 1/Black-and-White Warbler
> Paruline couronne 2/Ovenbird
> Paruline flamboyante 1/Am. Redstart
> Paruline collier 2/No. Parula
> Paruline flancs marron 1/Chestnut-sided Warbler
>
> Cocagne (Ch.Pierre--Fabien)
> Petite buse 1/Broad-winged Hawk*
> Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied sapsucker
> Grand pic 1/Pileaded Woodpecker
> Viro tte bleue 3/Blue-headed Vireo
> Msangeai du Canada 2/ canada Jay*
> Geai bleu 4/Blue jay
> Corneille d'Am. 1/Am. Crow
> Msange tte noire 2/Black-capped Chickadee
> Roitelet couronne rubis 2/Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> Merle d'Am. 3/Am. Robin
> Roselin pourpr 6/Purple Finch
> Tarin des pins 2/Pin Siskin
> Chardonneret jaune 4/Am. Goldfinch
> Bruant gorge bl. 1/White-throated Sparrow
> Paruline couronne 4/Ovenbird
> Paruline joues grises 3/Nashville Warbler
> Paruline collier 2/No. Parula
> Paruline tte cendre 1/Magnolia Warbler
> Paruline gorge orange 2/Blackburnian Warbler
> Paruline flancs marron 4/Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Paruline croupion jaune 1/Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Paruline gorge noire 2/Black-throated Green
> Paruline noire et bl. 3/Black-and-White Warbler
>
> NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
> Foire aux questions de NatureNB
> http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
>

NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
Foire aux questions de NatureNB http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...



Subject: Jeudi-Oiseaux , Jeudi le 21 mai 2020
Date: Fri May 22 2020 21:22 pm
From: malletra AT nbnet.nb.ca
 
Nature Sud-Est

Les Ami.e.s de la Nature Sud-Est sont en mode ralenti et reste prs de leur
demeure. On fait de l'observation d'oiseaux chez-soi et lors de nos
marches. Les sorties du Jeudi-Oiseaux se font chacun de notre ct.
( We bird individually,we don't have a chance to wave at each orther)

Excellente quipe! Observ 100 espces dans une journe.

Jeudi le 21 mai 2020, 10 membres du club dont Elaine Gallant ,
Rjean Laforge,Jean-Claude Gagnon, Guylaine Gagnon, Stuart Tingley,
Germaine Lger, Rosemonde Chiasson-Duguay, Normand Belliveau,
Rose-Alma Mallet et un peu d'aide de Gilles Belliveau ont observ 100
espces d'oiseaux dont 15 espces de parulines. Journe de trs grand
vent le long de la cte. Un gros merci tous ces membres qui ont
gentiment accept de faire un compte d'oiseaux prs de chez-eux et
un peu plus loin. Ensemble on voit beaucoup d'espces.
Les * sont l pour attirer l'attention.
Bonne lecture.

Moncton (terrain de golf Lakeside)
Bernache du Canada 10+6petits/Canada Goose
Canard d'Amrique 6/Am. Wigeon
Canrard colvert 2/Mallard
Hirondelle bicolore 40+/Tree Swallow*
Corneille d'Am. 6/Am. Crow
Martin-pcheur d'Am. 1/Belted Kingfisher
Pic flamboyant2/No. Flicker
Pic macul 2/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Carouge paulettes 8/Red-winged Blackbird
Quiscale bronz 4/Common Grackle
Merle d'Am. 6/Am. Robin
Bruant chanteur 6/Song Sparrow
Bruant gorge blanche 2/White-throated Sparrow
Bruant familier 2/Chipping Sparrow
Paruline collier 2/No. Parula
Paruline croupion jaune 2/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Chardonneret jaune 10/Am. Goldfinch
Msange tte noire 6/Black-capped Chickadee
Jaseur d'Am. 6/Cedar Waxwing
( un rat musqu/ Muskrat)

Dieppe ( une piste rgion terrain de golf)
Paruline collier 1/No. Parula
Paruline croupion jaune 3/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Paruline jaune 2/Yellow Warbler
Paruline flancs marron 1/Chestnut-sided Warbler
Canard colvert 2+6 bbs/ Mallard
Bernache du Canada 2+3 bbs/Canada Goose
Corneille d'Am.1/Am. Crow
Carouge paulettes 5/Red-winged Blackbird
Chardonneret jaune 4/Am. Goldfinch

Sackville (Ch.White Birch)
Corneilles d'Am. 2/Am. Crow
Carouge paulettes 15/Red-winged Blackbird
Marouette de Caroline 2/Sora
Bcassine de Wilson 1/Wilson Snipe
Bernache du Canada 13/Canada Goose
Paruline jaune 3/Yellow Warbler
Paruline masque 1/Common Yellowthroat
Paruline collier 1/No. Parula
Hirondelle rustique 3/Barn Swallow
Hirondelle bicolore 10/Tree Swallow
Faisan de Colchide 1/Ring-necked Pheasant
Canard noir 5/Black Duck
Balbuzard pcheur 1/Osprey
Canard d'Amrique 2/Am. Wigeon
Moucherolle tchbec 1/Least Flycatcher*
Grand corbeau 1/Common Raven
tourneau sansonnet 4/Eu. Starling
Bruant chanteur 5/Song Sparrow
Bruant des marais 3/Swamp Sparrow

Scoudouc (sortie la transcanadienne)
Urubu tte rouge 4/Turkey Vulture
Scoudouc (cours/Ch. Malakoff)
Moucherolle phbi 2/Eastern Phoebe
Grive solitaire 2/Hermit Thrust
Viro tte bleue 2/Blue-headed Vireo
Hirondelle bicolore 6/ Tree Swallow
Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
Pic chevelu 2/Hairy Woodpecker
Pic flamboyant 2/ No. Flicker
Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Tourterelle triste 8/Mourning Dove
Chardonneret jaune 10/Am. Goldfinch
Sittelle poitrine rousse 2/Red-breasted Nuthatch
Msange tte noire 8/Black-capped Chickadee
Corneille d'Am.4/Am. Crow
Geai bleu 8/Blue Jay
Pigeon biset 5/Rock Pigeon
Grand corbeau 2/Common Raven
Roselin pourpr 8/Purple Finch
Bruant chanteur 4/Song Sparrow
Bruant familier 3/Chipping Sparrow
Bruant gorge bl. 2/White-throated Sparrow
Colibri gorge rubis 3/Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Paruline croupion jaune 4/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Paruline noir et blanc 2/Black-and-White Warbler
Paruline couronne 2/ Ovenbird
Paruline collier 3/No. Parula
Paruline gorge noire 1/Black-throated Green
Oriole de Baltimore 1/Baltimore Oriole*
Bcasse d'Amrique 2/ Am. Woodcook*
Merle d'Am. 10/Am. Robin
Quiscale bronz 6/Common Grackle
tourneau sansonnet 3/Eu. Starling

Shdiac ( cours Prom. Riverside) yard birds
Roselin poupr 8/Purple Finch
Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Chardonneret jaune 7/ Am. Goldfinch
Cardinal rouge 2(mle et femelle) /No.Cardinal*
Cardinal poitrine rose(mle et femelle) 2/ Rose-breasted Grossbeak*
Geai bleu 3/Blue Jay
Tourterelle triste 2/Mourning Dove
Msange tte noire 8/Black-capped Chickadee
Bruant familier 2/Chipping Sparrow
Bruant gorge blanche 1/White-throated Sparrow
Bruant chanteur 1/Song Sparrow
Sittelle poitrine rousse 2/Red-breasted Nuthatch
Merle d'Am.1/Am. Robin
Quiscale bronz 1/Common Grackle
Goglu des prs 2/Bobolink *

Pointe-du-Chne (rue Railroad)
Sterne pierregarin 30+/Common Tern*
Hirondelle bicolore 12/Tree Swallow
Grand chevalier 2/Greater Yellowlegs
Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
Quiscale bronz 8/Common Grackle
tourneau sansonnet 6/Eu. Starling
Merle d'Am.6/Am. Robin
Pigeon biset 22/Rock Pigeon
Corneille d'Am.8/Am. Crow
Tourterelle triste 1/Mourning Dove
Roselin familier 2/House Finch*

Cap Brl
De la route seulement Cap-Brl, et de la route 133.
La lagune est ferme au traffic et le chemin vers
la plateforme d'observation est barricad./On peut observer
le marais avec un telescope de la route./The birds viewing
platform is close.
Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald eagle
Paruline noir et blanc 3/Black-and-White Warbler
Paruline jaune 3/Yellow Warbler
Paruline calotte noire 2/Wilson Warbler
Paruline masque 1/Common Yellowthroat
Paruline flamboyante 2/Am. Redstart
Paruline flancs marron 1/Chestnut-sided Warbler
Moqueur chat 2/Gray Catbird
Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
Brant des marais 1/Swamp Sparrow
Grand chevalier 4/Greater Yellowlegs
Chevalier semi-palm 1/Willet
Petit fuligule 4/Lesser Scaup
Fuligule collier 4 /Ring-necked Duck
Bernache du Canada 8/Canada Goose
Sarcelle d'hiver 2/ Green-winged teal
Canard d'Amrique 20/Am. Wigeon
Canard noir 27/Black Duck
Canard souchet 6/No. Shoveler
Canard chipeau 8/Gadwall
Grand harle 3/Common Merganser
Harle hupp 10/Red-breasted Merganser
Harle couronn 2/Hooded Merganser
Grand hron 6/Great Blue Heron
Corneille d'Am.14/Am. crow
Cormoran aigrettes 44/Double-crested Cormorant
Goland bec cercl 8/Ring-billed Gull
Goland argent 10/Herring Gull
Goland arctique 12/Iceland Gull
Goland brun 1/Lesser Black-back Gull
Goland marin 1/Great Black-back Gull
Carouge paulettes 4/Red-winged Blackbird
Quiscale bronz 14/Common Grackle
Chardonneret jaune 6/Am. Goldfinch
Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
tourneau sansonnet 4/Eu. Starling
Hirondelle bicolore 6/Tree Swallow
Viro tte bleue 1/Blue-headed Vireo*

Boudreau -Ouest (une cours/Yard birds)
Vacher tte brune 1/Brown-headed Cowbird
Quiscale bronz 6/Common Grackle
Carouge paulettes 6/Red-winged Blackbird
Roselin pourpr 12/Purple Finch
Chardonneret jaune 20/Am. Goldfinch
Msange tte noire 6/Black-capped Chickadee
Bruant chanteur 4/Song Sparrow
Bruant gorge bl. 2/ White-throated Sparrow
Bruant des prs 4/Savannah Sparrow
Bruant familier 4/Chipping Sparrow
Bruant couronne bl. 1/White-crowned Sparrow*
Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
Tourterelle triste 6/Mourning Dove
Geai bleu 3/Blue Jay
Faisan de Colchide 2/Ring-necked Pheasant
Pic mineur 4/Downy Woodpecker
Pic chevelu 2/Hairy Woodpecker
Pic flamboyant 3/No. Flicker
tourneau sansonnet 8/Eu. Starling
Pigeon biset 2/Rock Pigeon
Corneille d'Am 2/Am. crow
Cardinal poitrine rose 1/Rose-Breasted Cardinal*
Gros-bec errant 4/Evening Grosbeak*

Cap Bimet
Grand hron 1/Great Blue Heron
Harle hupp 2/Red-breasted Merganser
Sterne pierregarin 6/Common Tern*
Hirondelle bicolore 4/Tree Sparrow
Quiscale bronz 8/Common Grackle
Carouge paulettes 4/Red-winged Blackbird
Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin

Grand Barachois (Pont des Robichaud)
Balbuzard pcheur 2/Osprey
Sterne pierregarin 6/Common Tern*
Pigeon biset 4/Rock Pigeon
Quiscale bronz 2/Common Grackle

Cap-Pel (Ch. des chalets l'Aboiteau et chemin parc de l'Aboiteau )
Paruline collier 1/No. Parula
Paruline noir et blanc 2/Black-and-White Warbler
Paruline jaune 1/Yellow Warbler
Paruline gorge noire 1/Black-throated Green Warbler
Paruline tte cendre 1/Magnolia Warbler
Paruline flamboyante 2/Am. Redstart
Paruline couronne 2/Ovenbird
Grive solitaire 1/Hermit Thrush
Msange tte noire 10/Black-capped Chickadee
Corneille d'Am. 2/Am. Crow
Bruant gorge bl. 2/White-throated Sparrow
Sittelle poitrine rousse 1/Red-breasted Nuthatch
Viro tte bleue 2/Blue-headed Vireo

Ch. Niles (Bas-Cap-Pel)
Hirondelle bicolore 4/Tree Swallow
Goland argent 8/Herring Gull
Goland marin 2/Great Black-backed Gull
Goland bec cercl 6/Ring-billed Gull
Goland arctique 9/ Iceland Gull

Petit-Cap
Martin-pcheur d'Am.1/Belted Kingfisher

Shemogue
Merlebleu de l'Est 1/Eastern Bluebird*
Urubu tte rouge 2/Turkey Vulture
Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald Eagle
Quiscale bronz 3/Common Grackle
Hirondelle bicolore 2/Tree Swallow
Canard noir 2/Black Duck
Bernache du Canada 2/Canada Goose
Crcerelle d'Am.1/Am. Kestrel

Murray Corner Road
Paruline joues grises 2/ Nashville Warbler
Paruline couronne 4/Ovenbird
Paruline noire et bl. 2/Black-and-White Warbler
Paruline croupion jaune 4/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Msange tte noire 8/Black-capped Chickadee
Petit chevalier 2/Lesser Yellowlegs
Grand chevalier 6/Greater Yelloelegs
Sarcelle d'hiver 1/Green-winged Teal
Canard noir 7/Black Duck
Canard colvert 3/Mallard
Canard d'Am. 2/Am. Wigeon
( un orignal /Moose)

Johnston Pt.
Paruline gorge orange 1/Blackburnian Warbler
Paruline collier 5/No. Parula
Paruline flamboyante 4/Am. Redstart
Paruline tte cendre 4/Magnolia Warbler
Paruline noir et bl. 5/Black-and White Warbler
Paruline croupion jaune 2/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Paruline joues grises 1/Nashville Warbler
Paruline flancs marron 5/Chestnut-sided Warbler
Viro tte bleue 4/Blue -headed Vireo
Roitelet couronne rubis 1/Ruby -crowned Kinglet
Msange tte noire 4/Black-capped Chickadee
Bruant chanteur 1/Song Sparrow
Bruant gorge bl. 2/Whhite-throated Sparrow
Bec-crois bifasci 5/White-winged Crossbill
Merle d'Am.1/Am. Robin
Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald Eagle
Faucon merillon 1/Merlin
tourneau sansonnet 20/Eu. Starling
Pigeon biset 6/Rock Pigeon

Amos Pt.
Paruline masque 1/Common Yellowthroat
Paruline collier 6/No. Parula
Paruline croupion jaune 7/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Paruline noir et blanc 4/Black-and-White warbler
Paruline couronne 3/Ovenbird
Paruline flamboyante 6/Am. Redstart
Paruline flancs marron 3/Chestnut -sided warbler
Colibri gorge rubis 1/Ruby-crowned Hummingbird
Viro tte bleue 2/Blue-headed Vireo
Bec-croiss bifasci 9/White-winged Crossbill
Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
Merlebleu de l'Est 2/Eastern Bluebird
Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pygargue tte bl. 1/Bald Eagle
Goland marin 1/Great Black-backed Gull
Autour des palombes 1/No. Goshawk
( femelle sur le nid)

Murray Road
Hirondelle rustique 8/Barn Swallow
Busard des marais 1/No. Harrier
Pigeon biset 3/Rock Pigeon
tourneau sansonnet 4/Eu. Starling
Roitelet couronne dore 1/Golden-crowned Kinglet
Paruline croupion jaune 4/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Paruline flans marron 2/Chestnut -sided Warbler
Geai bleu 4/Blue jay

Grand Digue (cours/Yard)
Colibri gorge rubis 1/Ruby-crowned Hummingbird*
Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
Geai bleu 1/blue Jay
Chardonneret jaune 3/Am. Goldfinch
Msange tte noire 2/Black-capped Chickadee
Quiscale bronz 1/Common Grackle
Pigeon biset 3/Rock Pigeon
Corneille d'Am. 3/Am. Crow
Grand hron 1/Great Blue Heron
Bernache du Canada 9+2bbs/Canada Goose
Grand chevalier 1/Greater Yellowlegs
Tourterelle triste 1/Mourning Dove
Roselin pourpr 2/Purple Finch
Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
Faisan de Colchide 1/Ring-necked Pheasant
Hirondelle bicolore 2/Tree Swallow
Martin-pcheur d'Am. 1/Belted Kingfisher

Cormierville (une cours/Yard birds)
Bernache du Canada 6/Canada Goose
Canard noir 1/Black Duck
Harle couronn 1/Hooded Merganser
Pigeon biset 3/Rock Pigeon
Tourterelle triste 10/Mourning Dove
Colibri gorge rubis2/Ruby-crowned Hummingbird
Bcasseau minuscule 2/Least Sandpiper*
Grand chevalier 6/Greater Yellowlegs
Chevalier semi-palm 1/Willet
Goland bec cercl 1/Ring-billed Gull
Cormoran aigrettes 20/Double-crested Cormorant
Grand hron 15/Great Blue Heron
Balbuzard pcheur 3/Osprey
Pygargue tte bl. 2/Bald Eagle
Martin-pcheur d'Am.2/Belted Kingfisher
Pic macul 3/Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pic mineur 2/Downy Woodpecker
Pic chevelu 1/Hairy Woodpecker
Pic flamboyant 2/No. Flicker
Viro tte bleue 2/Blue- headed Vireo*
Geai bleu 4/Blue Jay
Msange tte noire 3/Black-capped Chickadee
Hirondelle bicolore 8/Tree Swallow
Roitelet couronne rubis 1/Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Sittelle poitrine rousse 1/Red-breasted Nuthatch
tourneau sansonnet 6/Eu. Starling
Grive solitaire 1/Hermit Thrush (enten
Moqueur chat 1/Gray Catbird*
Grive fauve-Veery*
Grive solitaire1 /Hermit Thrush
Merle d'Am. 2/Am. Robin
Jaseur d'Am. 14/Cedar Waxwing
Roselin poupr 2/Purple Finch
Chardonneret jaune 6/Am. Goldfinch
Bruant chanteur 2/Song Sparrow
Bruant des prs 1/Savannah Sparrow (entendu)
Bruant familier 1/Chipping Sparrow
Bruant gorge bl. 2/White-throated Sparrow
Goglu des prs 1/Bobolink
Carouge paulettes 5/Red-winged Blackbird
Quiscale bronz 2/Common Grackle
Paruline noir et blanc 1/Black-and-White Warbler
Paruline couronne 2/Ovenbird
Paruline flamboyante 1/Am. Redstart
Paruline collier 2/No. Parula
Paruline flancs marron 1/Chestnut-sided Warbler

Cocagne (Ch.Pierre--Fabien)
Petite buse 1/Broad-winged Hawk*
Pic macul 1/Yellow-bellied sapsucker
Grand pic 1/Pileaded Woodpecker
Viro tte bleue 3/Blue-headed Vireo
Msangeai du Canada 2/ canada Jay*
Geai bleu 4/Blue jay
Corneille d'Am. 1/Am. Crow
Msange tte noire 2/Black-capped Chickadee
Roitelet couronne rubis 2/Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Merle d'Am. 3/Am. Robin
Roselin pourpr 6/Purple Finch
Tarin des pins 2/Pin Siskin
Chardonneret jaune 4/Am. Goldfinch
Bruant gorge bl. 1/White-throated Sparrow
Paruline couronne 4/Ovenbird
Paruline joues grises 3/Nashville Warbler
Paruline collier 2/No. Parula
Paruline tte cendre 1/Magnolia Warbler
Paruline gorge orange 2/Blackburnian Warbler
Paruline flancs marron 4/Chestnut-sided Warbler
Paruline croupion jaune 1/Yellow-rumped Warbler
Paruline gorge noire 2/Black-throated Green
Paruline noire et bl. 3/Black-and-White Warbler

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Subject: Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RED-NECKED GREBE, AMERICAN KESTREL, PEREGRINE FALCON, RED-EYED VIREO, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, 12 WOOD-WARBLER spp., inc. CAPE MAY, BAY-BREASTED & PINE WARBLERS
Date: Fri May 22 2020 19:38 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 22

White Head Ferry (south side) 0745-0810
24 Common Eiders, Black Scoter, Black Guillemot, 8 Double-crested Cormorants

Souther Head & trails 0840-0935
14 Common Eiders, RED-NECKED GREBE, Bald Eagle, Least Flycatcher,
Blue-headed Vireo, Barn Swallow, Gray Catbird, 6 wood-warbler spp., inc.
CAPE MAY WARBLER

Deep Cove 1035-1045
Canada Goose pair (earlier), 9 Common Eiders, Mourning Dove

Thoroughfare Road 1105-1125
2 Canada Geese, American Black Duck, Greater Yellowlegs, female PEREGRINE
FALCON

White Head Ferry 1140-1205
6 Common Eiders, Black Guillemot, 10 Double-crested Cormorants, immature
Bald Eagle

White Head: Main Road 1740
male AMERICAN KESTREL

White Head: Coastal Trail 1750-1815
Least Flycatcher, 2 Blue-headed Vireos, first-of-spring RED-EYED VIREO,
BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, 8 wood-warbler spp., inc. PINE WARBLER &
first-of-spring male BAY-BREASTED WARBLER

I also saw a LADY spp., 3 CLOUDED SULPHUR & 2 CABBAGE WHITE butterflies on
Grand Manan. BUNCHBERRY flowers were just opening on the Southern Head
trail

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Re: European Goldfinch seen at Fredericton
Date: Fri May 22 2020 17:50 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
The winds were right for a single bird (or flock) to reach North America.
European Goldfinches do undertake long migrations at time and get caught
up in storms that deposit them a long way from their destination. A
cagebird is the most likely explanation, but I wouldn't rule out unaided
migration.

Meanwhile, I have a strange oriole on White Head that I haven't seen yet,
but the photographs suggest SCOTT'S or STREAK-BACKED ORIOLE rather than a
variant or hybrid of the regular Canadian species. I have sent two photos
to Nelson Poirier to post on the Moncton blogsite.

Roger Burrows
White Head

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 7:18 PM D G Gibson wrote:

> Approximately one week ago a EUROPEAN GOLDFINCH made a brief visit to a
> feeder at Fredericton. Fortunately the homeowner got a photo of the bird
> albeit distant but there is no doubt about the identity. I believe that
> most such sightings in this area are considered to be of escaped birds.
>
>
>
> Don Gibson
>
> 50 Golf Club Road
>
> Fredericton NB
>
> E3B 5M4
>
> 506-454-3261
>
>
>
>
> NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
> Foire aux questions de NatureNB
> http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
>

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Subject: European Goldfinch seen at Fredericton
Date: Fri May 22 2020 17:18 pm
From: gibsondg AT nbnet.nb.ca
 
Approximately one week ago a EUROPEAN GOLDFINCH made a brief visit to a
feeder at Fredericton. Fortunately the homeowner got a photo of the bird
albeit distant but there is no doubt about the identity. I believe that
most such sightings in this area are considered to be of escaped birds.



Don Gibson

50 Golf Club Road

Fredericton NB

E3B 5M4

506-454-3261




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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 22, 2020 (Friday)
Date: Fri May 22 2020 8:27 am
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 22, 2020 (Friday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
if any errors are noted in wording or
photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com


Transcript by: Louise Nichols _nicholsl@eastlink.ca_

Info Line # 506-384-6397



Subject: Today's sightings
Date: Thu May 21 2020 19:24 pm
From: perkyleb2309 AT gmail.com
 
My husband and I drove the Fundy Trail today. First time going through to
Sussex. I didn't realize the 'connector' road was gravel. Oh well. Our big
thrill was seeing a BLACK BEAR with THREE CUBS. They were very small and
cute and I got some horrible photos because I stayed in the car for safety.
After arriving home, I let the dog out for a run ,going down to the
river,camera in hand, looking for warblers, etc. The dog, as usual, decided
she didn't want to come back to me, so I came back to the house, put the
camera away, and went back down the hill to chase the dog...only to almost
run into a MALE SCARLET TANAGER!! I ran back to the house for the camera (
the dog still hadn't come back) and was lucky to find the bird close to
where it was before. It allowed photos, but I was huffing and puffing from
running for the camera and couldn't hold the camera steady. I finally
managed some half decent shots. The dog finally came back.
Moral of the story is....I will take the camera with me everywhere...even
the bathroom!!!
Black flies were brutal, too.
I sent some photos to the Nature Moncton blogspot.
Jane LeBlanc
St. Martins

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Subject: White Head birds, inc. WHITE-RUMPED, LEAST & SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, NORTHERN HARRIER, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, 12 WOOD-WARBLER spp., inc. NORHERN WATERTHRUSH & WILSON'S WARBLER, ORCHARD ORIOLE & ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
Date: Thu May 21 2020 14:18 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 21

White Head: Brooks Marsh & Woods 0750-0815
4 Canada Geese+pair+5 goslings, Alder & Least Flycatchers, Gray Catbird, 3
wood-warbler spp., ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK

White Head: Coastal Trail 0815-0835
2 American Black Ducks, 3 wood-warbler spp.

White Head: Main Road 0835-0850 & 0925-1015
Canada Goose pair+4 goslings (Northern Pond), American Wigeon pair, 5
American Black Ducks, Green-winged Teal pair, female NORHERN HARRIER, 2
Least Flycatchers, 2 BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHERS, male Baltimore Oriole10
wood-warbler spp., inc. first-of-spring NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, Blackpoll
Warbler, & WILSON'S WARBLER

White Head: Langmaid Cove, Interior Woods & Old Dump 1020-1115
Canada Goose, American Black Duck pair, Alder Flycatcher, 3 Hermit
Thrushes, 5 wood-warbler spp.

White Head: Brooks Marsh 1145-1150
WHITE-RUMPED, SEMIPALMATED & 2 LEAST SANDPIPERS, GREATER YELLOWLEGS
DUNLINS were reported by the group from Campbellton, but these were the
only birds present when I visited

White Head Feeders 1420
2 male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS An immature male ORCHARD ORIOLE was
photographed by the Campbellton group earlier in the day

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Re: St. George Marsh West
Date: Thu May 21 2020 10:14 am
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
I agree with Paul about the marshbird spp.   A Least Bittern is patterned
in dark on the back and beige patches on the wings that are very
obvious...the size is very small: reminds me of a scrawny chicken. The
legs are usually straw-coloured rather than bright yellow or orange. The
Green Heron is larger with lots of tan on the head and nape and usually
bright orange legs that dangle when it is flushed.

On Thu, May 21, 2020 at 11:31 AM naturenb_rpm wrote:

> Hi Gail, re: the bittern, have you considered Green Heron as a
> possibility? Least Bittern is tiny (relatively), whereas the Green Heron is
> more intermediate in size between the two. When I see a Least Bittern fly I
> am always struck by its small size.
> Just a thought...
> Great observations!
> Good birding,
>
> Paul Mansz
> Rothesay, NB
>
> On Thu., 21 May 2020 at 7:50, G Taylor<
> 000002429e81770b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UNB.CA> wrote: 5:30 PM - 7 PM
> St. George Marsh -- West End -- Only a Short Walk to the Barricade, but the
> warblers were on the chase.
>
>
>
> Hi to All,
>
>
>
>
>
> Flushed a BITTERN (American or Least ???) from the left side of the trail
> about 300 feet back from the barricade. I never saw it and all I could see
> was the legs and the tan colored body. As it flew it did not appear like
> the larger American Bittern that I have seen in flight and not as dark
> either. The legs were yellowish orange, and not green in color.
>
>
>
> WILSON'S WARBLER
>
>
>
> YELLOW WARBLER
>
>
>
> NORTHERN FLICKER calling and drumming at his favorite post.
>
>
>
> COMMON YELLOWTHROAT
>
>
>
> YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER - Heard
>
>
>
> BLACK and WHITE WARBLER
>
>
>
> TWO OSPREY - One on the nest and the other on the nest perch
>
>
>
> I am not great at my bird sounds, but thought I heard a NORTHERN
> WATERTHRUSH calling.
>
>
>
> EUROPEAN STARLINGS -- Two
>
>
>
> SWAMP SPARROW
>
>
>
> RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS-- 2
>
>
>
> The highlight of my short visit, and from only a small section at the West
> end was the sight of 3 GREAT BLUE HERONS coming in from well North of the
> Marsh behind the home that is next to the marsh, and all 3 were calling. I
> had never heard that sound from them before. It was the sound that got my
> attention. They sounded like they all had bad head colds....lol~
>
>
>
> The warblers are out in full force
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Gail Taylor
>
> St. George, NB
>
> NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
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> http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
>
> NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
> Foire aux questions de NatureNB
> http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
>

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Subject: Re: St. George Marsh West
Date: Thu May 21 2020 10:09 am
From: buteobuz AT gmail.com
 
For whatever it is worth, an American Bittern was observed on the side of
the trail in the same area a few days ago.

As Paul mentioned, Least Bitterns are quite small. However, they do
frequent the same area.

Likelihood of being seen in the trail is another thing to consider. I could
be wrong, but Least Bittern should be far less likely to be observed out of
the water, other than directly over water in emergent vegetation.

Todd Watts
Bocabec, NB

On Thu, May 21, 2020 at 11:31 AM naturenb_rpm wrote:

> Hi Gail, re: the bittern, have you considered Green Heron as a
> possibility? Least Bittern is tiny (relatively), whereas the Green Heron is
> more intermediate in size between the two. When I see a Least Bittern fly I
> am always struck by its small size.
> Just a thought...
> Great observations!
> Good birding,
>
> Paul Mansz
> Rothesay, NB
>
> On Thu., 21 May 2020 at 7:50, G Taylor<
> 000002429e81770b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UNB.CA> wrote: 5:30 PM - 7 PM
> St. George Marsh -- West End -- Only a Short Walk to the Barricade, but the
> warblers were on the chase.
>
>
>
> Hi to All,
>
>
>
>
>
> Flushed a BITTERN (American or Least ???) from the left side of the trail
> about 300 feet back from the barricade. I never saw it and all I could see
> was the legs and the tan colored body. As it flew it did not appear like
> the larger American Bittern that I have seen in flight and not as dark
> either. The legs were yellowish orange, and not green in color.
>
>
>
> WILSON'S WARBLER
>
>
>
> YELLOW WARBLER
>
>
>
> NORTHERN FLICKER calling and drumming at his favorite post.
>
>
>
> COMMON YELLOWTHROAT
>
>
>
> YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER - Heard
>
>
>
> BLACK and WHITE WARBLER
>
>
>
> TWO OSPREY - One on the nest and the other on the nest perch
>
>
>
> I am not great at my bird sounds, but thought I heard a NORTHERN
> WATERTHRUSH calling.
>
>
>
> EUROPEAN STARLINGS -- Two
>
>
>
> SWAMP SPARROW
>
>
>
> RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS-- 2
>
>
>
> The highlight of my short visit, and from only a small section at the West
> end was the sight of 3 GREAT BLUE HERONS coming in from well North of the
> Marsh behind the home that is next to the marsh, and all 3 were calling. I
> had never heard that sound from them before. It was the sound that got my
> attention. They sounded like they all had bad head colds....lol~
>
>
>
> The warblers are out in full force
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Gail Taylor
>
> St. George, NB
>
> NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
> Foire aux questions de NatureNB
> http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
>
> NatureNB guidelines http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
> Foire aux questions de NatureNB
> http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
>

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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 21, 2020 (Thursday)
Date: Thu May 21 2020 9:54 am
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 21, 2020 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information
line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
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Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
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Edited by: Nelson Poirier _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com_

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

** An update on David Christies female SUMMER TANAGER [Tangara
vermillon] that he had to his Marys Point feeder yard on Monday he
did not see it return on Tuesday, or Wednesday morning, but when he
returned from being away on Wednesday there it was, back at the
sunflower seed feeders. It may well be still in the area and David
comments that he will not be surprised to see it pop in again with the
schedule that it seems to keep.

** Mac Wilmot shares some photos of his GREAT HORNED OWL [Grand-duc
d'Amrique] that he sees regularly on his morning walks about his Lower
Coverdale property. The nest is atop a pine tree with at least 1 owlet.
It is a quiet nest at the moment. The female owl quietly speaks to him
as he goes by with a soft, croupy moan. Mac has found regurgitated
pellets and some feather remains of prey that we are still working on
identification of.

Mac also had to act as midwife for his Mallard Duck hen that decided
to nest in a derelict, roofless duck box on his property as the hatched
ducklings could not navigate their way out. Mac put up a ladder and
bucketed the ducklings out to safety even though the mother felt that
he was up to no good! Take a brief look at the action at the attached
link. The results of the midwifery effort are now out on the pond as
Macs photo shows. Wednesday seems like Mallard Duck hatch day as in
Brian Stones case as well.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/vysy...

** Gordon Rattrays Wednesday started with a male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
[Cardinal poitrine rose] at his Weldon home that ate there the whole
day. He visited the Gray Brook Pond to see a SPOTTED SANDPIPER
[Chevalier grivel]. Gordon went to the White Rock Recreation Area and
found several birds. The forest was alive with bird songs on Wednesday.
Besides the birds photographed he saw a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER [Paruline
flancs marron] and heard the OVENBIRDS [Paruline couronne]. He was
able to photograph a BLUE-HEADED VIREO [Viro tte bleue] that nicely
shows the white spectacles, a NORTHERN PARULA [Paruline collier]
warbler, a male YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER [Pic macul] and a very
cooperative HERMIT THRUSH [Grive solitaire] that shows the reddish-brown
tail that is so often flicking and the white eye ring.

** Jane Leblanc got some nice photos of the measured, smooth flight of a
GREAT BLUE HERON [Grand Hron] that sailed over the St. Martins beach on
Wednesday morning. Jane also photographed a cooperative HERMIT THRUSH
[Grive solitaire].

** Aldo Dorio photographed a NORTHERN PARULA [Paruline collier]
warbler at Hay Island on Wednesday nicely showing its split white eye
ring. The zipper-like vocalization of this bird is now being very
commonly heard. Aldo also photographed a male NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic
flamboyant] showing the black moustache, that the female lacks, clearing
out its nest cavity. Aldo also photographed some BALTIMORE ORIOLES
[Oriole de Baltimore] at Isiae Comeaus place showing some different
plumages.

** Ray Gauvin has had 4 CHIPPING SPARROWS [Bruant familier] at his mixed
seed feeder steadily for about 2 weeks now and got a photo to show 2
from differing angles.

** Bob Blake comments that his first female ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
[Cardinal poitrine rose] arrived to join the males on Wednesday. Our
first female as well arrived to join the 2 males on Tuesday.

** Brian Stone had a very interesting nature visit to a pond behind
Crandall University on Wednesday. There were lots of CADDISFLY larvae
moving about in their underwater stick nests and many other pond
critters including WHIRLIGIG BEETLES. A MALLARD DUCK [Canard colvert]
and her duckling family were in another pond. She sure has a huge family
if they are all hers and will be a very busy mother for a few weeks.
Brian got a nice photo of a LEOPARD FROG [Rana pipiens] to show that
signature spotting on the back. Brian also got some nice views of a
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER [Paruline flancs marron] and YELLOW-RUMPED
WARBLER [Paruline croupion jaune]. He noted a hole that was so choked
with ants coming in and out that you could not even see the hole. I
noted the same scenario on Wednesday evening with thousands of ants
going and coming from 2 small holes in a tree. Approximately 1/3^rd of
them were winged so I assumed a swarm was about to happen. Take a look
at some of the video action Brian got at the attached links below.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ofy3...

https://www.dropbox.com/s/9e4g...

https://www.dropbox.com/s/0ciw...

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton





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Subject: Re: St. George Marsh West
Date: Thu May 21 2020 9:31 am
From: naturenb AT mansz.com
 
Hi Gail, re: the bittern, have you considered Green Heron as a possibility? Least Bittern is tiny (relatively), whereas the Green Heron is more intermediate in size between the two. When I see a Least Bittern fly I am always struck by its small size.
Just a thought...
Great observations!
Good birding,

Paul Mansz
Rothesay, NB

On Thu., 21 May 2020 at 7:50, G Taylor<000002429e81770b-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UNB.CA> wrote: 5:30 PM - 7 PM St. George Marsh -- West End -- Only a Short Walk to the Barricade, but the warblers were on the chase.



Hi to All,





Flushed a BITTERN (American or Least ???) from the left side of the trail about 300 feet back from the barricade. I never saw it and all I could see was the legs and the tan colored body. As it flew it did not appear like the larger American Bittern that I have seen in flight and not as dark either. The legs were yellowish orange, and not green in color.



WILSON'S WARBLER



YELLOW WARBLER



NORTHERN FLICKER calling and drumming at his favorite post.



COMMON YELLOWTHROAT



YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER - Heard



BLACK and WHITE WARBLER



TWO OSPREY - One on the nest and the other on the nest perch



I am not great at my bird sounds, but thought I heard a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH calling.



EUROPEAN STARLINGS -- Two



SWAMP SPARROW



RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS-- 2



The highlight of my short visit, and from only a small section at the West end was the sight of 3 GREAT BLUE HERONS coming in from well North of the Marsh behind the home that is next to the marsh, and all 3 were calling. I had never heard that sound from them before. It was the sound that got my attention. They sounded like they all had bad head colds....lol~



The warblers are out in full force







Gail Taylor

St. George, NB

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Subject: Re: St. George Marsh West
Date: Thu May 21 2020 6:49 am
From: oliveandrew AT hotmail.com
 
Hi Gail and all,
The warblers have finally arrived here in full force as well. This morning saw the first significant push of warblers(besides yellow-rumps) with 10 different species including
Black and white
Black throated green
Cape may
Chestnut sided
Nashville
Common yellowthroat
Northern Parula
American redstart
Northern waterthrush

There were quite a few warbler sp. that seem to be flying with purpose above the tree line heading West parallel to the Restigouche early this morning just after sunrise.

Other notable sightings were 3 Common loons flying over, singing Least flycatcher and two flocks of 12 and 5 White winged crossbills flying fairly high over head heading West.

Good birding everyone
Andrew

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Subject: St. George Marsh West
Date: Thu May 21 2020 5:50 am
From: 000002429e81770b-dmarc-request AT listserv.unb.ca
 
5:30 PM - 7 PM St. George Marsh -- West End -- Only a Short Walk to the Barricade, but the warblers were on the chase.



Hi to All,





Flushed a BITTERN (American or Least ???) from the left side of the trail about 300 feet back from the barricade. I never saw it and all I could see was the legs and the tan colored body. As it flew it did not appear like the larger American Bittern that I have seen in flight and not as dark either. The legs were yellowish orange, and not green in color.



WILSON'S WARBLER



YELLOW WARBLER



NORTHERN FLICKER calling and drumming at his favorite post.



COMMON YELLOWTHROAT



YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER - Heard



BLACK and WHITE WARBLER



TWO OSPREY - One on the nest and the other on the nest perch



I am not great at my bird sounds, but thought I heard a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH calling.



EUROPEAN STARLINGS -- Two



SWAMP SPARROW



RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS-- 2



The highlight of my short visit, and from only a small section at the West end was the sight of 3 GREAT BLUE HERONS coming in from well North of the Marsh behind the home that is next to the marsh, and all 3 were calling. I had never heard that sound from them before. It was the sound that got my attention. They sounded like they all had bad head colds....lol~



The warblers are out in full force







Gail Taylor

St. George, NB

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Subject: Grand Mana, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. LEAST SANDPIPER, WARBLING VIREO, BANK SWALLOW & 13 wood-warbler spp, inc. PINE & PRAIRIE WARBLERS
Date: Wed May 20 2020 18:19 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 20

White Head: Brooks Marsh & Woods 0710-0830
2 Canada Geese+pair+5 goslings, American Wigeon pair, 16 American Black
Ducks, Green-winged Teal pair, 2 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 2 Alder & Least
Flycatchers, WARBLING VIREO, 8 Tree & 6 Barn Swallows, Hermit Thrush, 7
American Goldfinches, 10 wood-warbler spp., inc. BLACKBURNIAN,
BLACK-THROATED BLUE & 3 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS

White Head: Coastal Trail & Main Road 0835-0905
4 Mourning Doves, 7 wood-warbler spp., inc. BLACK-THROATED BLUE & 2
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS

White Head: Brooks Marsh & Flats 0905-0945
9 Canada Geese+2 pairs+3&5 goslings, American Wigeon pair, 24 American
Black Ducks, Green-winged Teal pair, 5 Common Eiders, 2 Mourning Doves, 2
Double-crested Cormorants, Northern Flicker, Barn & 4 Tree Swallows, 2
American Goldfinches, American Redstart, Northern Parula & Chestnut-sided
Warbler

White Head Ferry 1300-1325
34 Common Eiders, 2 Black Scoters, 2 Black Guillemots, 9 Double-crested
Cormorants, 2 Tree & 2 Barn Swallows

Bancroft Point & Trail 1355-1415
2 Common Eiders, BANK SWALLOW, 4 Tree & 2 Barn Swallows, Winter Wren,
Northern Parula, Yellow Warbler, first-of-spring PRAIRIE WARBLER
SERVICEBERRY was in flower and I saw a SPRING AZURE, 2 CLOUDED SULPHUR & 5
CABBAGE WHITE butterflies

Wayne B Kitchen Property 1615-1630
Hermit Thrush, 2 Northern Parulas, male PINE WARBLER (& possibly a second)

Ingalls Head 1635-1645
10 Common Eiders

White Head Ferry 1700-1725
2 Common Eiders, Black Guillemot, Double-crested Cormorant, Bald Eagle pair

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Point Lepreau Bird Observatory Spring 2020 Report
Date: Wed May 20 2020 12:57 pm
From: buteobuz AT gmail.com
 
Point Lepreau Bird Observatory Spring 2020

The 25th year of spring sea-duck migration monitoring at the point has come to an end. As always, there were stormy days, foggy days, beautifully sunny days, as well as, busy days and slow days. This year, COVID 19 related physical/social distancing made it impossible for volunteers to participate.

Data was collected on 44 days between March 15 and May 9. The primary species observed were Black Scoter, Surf Scoter, White-winged Scoter and Common Eider. Secondary species were Long-tailed Duck, Red-throated and Common Loon, Great and Double-crested Cormorant, Brant, Horned and Red- necked Grebe, Razorbill, and Harlequin Duck. Several other species of waterfowl also passed the point in small numbers.

Methods

In order to make travel to the site as safe as possible during the pandemic, the official counter left his home after first light resulting in slightly later start times then previous years.

This season we returned to only counting during morning sessions. Each session consisted of eight fifteen-minute count periods and eight fifteen-minute periods designed to be rests. Traditionally, each count was followed by a rest. However, the official counter volunteered to count continuously through the first session. Doing so increases the likelihood of capturing data on uncommon or rare birds, provides additional opportunities to document the flow of migrants, and provides other opportunities for data analysis. The official counter was present Sunday through Friday, March 27-May 8.

All observations were conducted from the observatory building and were made with the unaided eye and/or 8-10x binoculars. A 22x spotting scope on a shoulder mount and a 25x tripod mounted scope were used to ID some of the most distant migrants. The tripod mounted scope was used infrequently.

All species observed were recorded as moving east, moving west or stopped over.

Weather info was collected at the beginning and end of each session.

Point Lepreau Bird Observatory Spring 2020

A Quick Look at the Season March

The count season began on the 15th and the official counter began work on the 27th. Coverage was very light between the 15th and the 27th. The first days of counting were largely uneventful. Increased activity was observed on the 27th. The seasons first and only King Eider was observed on the 30th.

April

The month began with a good push of Black Scoter on the 1st. The rare birds reported on this day were part of an April Fools prank. Heavy movement of Black Scoter occurred on the 6th. Approximately 10,000 birds were counted on the 9th. A pair of Snow Geese passed the point on the 12th. There are few, if any other spring records of this species at the point. Relatively heavy movement was observed on the 13th. Like many early to mid-season days, Black Scoter dominated. Daily count totals for the remainder of the month were light to moderate. Northern Gannet were somewhat numerous on a couple occasions. Glaucous Gulls were also observed. During the first part of the month, Thick-billed Murre were observed repeatedly.

Overall, the month seemed less busy than 2019. However, we only counted for a single session each day this year, so some heavy afternoon movements might have been missed.

May

The first week of this month was slow. However, fairly strong movement occurred on the 8th. Surf and Black Scoter were the most numerous of the migrants. Red-throated Loons had their best day of the season. Even so, their numbers were far lower than some other years. One thing interesting about this days movement was that Red-throated Loons moved directly over the point during the first minutes of counting. In order to see these birds, the counter had to go outside and look straight up with binoculars.

Jim Wilson staffed the observatory on May 9, the last day of the season. It was stormy day with few birds.

Rare or Uncommon Bird Sightings

2020

March 30 King Eider, first year male (1) April 3 Thick-billed Murre (1)
April 5 Thick-billed Murre (2)
April 9 Thick-billed Murre (1)

Point Lepreau Bird Observatory Spring 2020

April 11 Thick-billed Murre (1)
April 12 Snow Goose (2)
May 8 Pomarine Jaeger (1, spring sightings are rare)

Only one Ipswich Sparrow sighting occurred.
Glaucous Gulls were observed several times.
Overall, the Spring 2020 Season produced fewer uncommon to rare birds than 2018 and 2019 (See below for 2018-19 records).

2019

March March April 2 April 3 April 4 April 9 April 10 April 18 April 23 April 26 April 30 May 1 May 2 May 3 May 7

2018

March
March
March
April 3
April 6
April 12 King Eider - adult male (1) April 18 King Eider - first year male (2) April 23 King Eider - adult male (2) April 25 American Oystercatcher (1) May 3 King Eider - first year male (1) May 7 Blue-grey Gnatcatcher (1)

27 King Eider, first year male (1) 29 King Eider, adult male (1)

Thick-billed Murre (2)
Thick-billed Murre (1)
King Eider, first year male (1), Thick-billed Murre (1) King Eider, first year male (1), Thick-billed Murre (1) King Eider, first year male (1), Thick-billed Murre (1) American Oystercatcher (2)
King Eider, female (1), Thick-billed Murre (1)
King Eider, adult male (1), Lesser Black-backed Gull (3) Field Sparrow (1)

Caspian Tern (8), Field Sparrow (1) Field Sparrow (1)
Caspian Tern (1)
Black Skimmer (1), Caspian Tern (15)

15 Dovekie (1), Thick-billed Murre (1) 18 Thick-billed Murre (1)
26 King Eider - adult male (1)

King Eider - Female (2) Snowy Owl (1)

Point Lepreau Bird Observatory Spring 2020

Analysis of Flight Trends

See NB Naturalist Vol. 41 No 2-3-4 (http://www.naturenb.ca/wp- content/uploads/2017/10/NBNaturalistVol41No2-3-4.pdf)

Threats

Sea-duck populations have been in decline for decades. The causes of these declines are not well understood. However, it is known that juvenile to adult ratios are down. Predation on the breeding grounds could be a cause, as well as, a lower abundance of food resources.

Significant threats are, though not necessarily in this order, habitat loss or degradation, oil spills, climate change, and predation. A large percentage of the worlds scoter populations migrate along the Bay of Fundy, so in the event of a major oil spill, losses could be very heavy. It is worth noting here that the Gulf of Maine, of which the Bay of Fundy is a part, is one of the fastest warming bodies of water on earth.

Personal Notes

My enthusiasm for observing bird migration grows greater with every year. The privilege of working on this project helps to foster in me an ever-growing appreciation of the natural world and all of its complexities. I plan to continue as the official counter working toward a greater understanding of and appreciation for all our feathered friends, as well as the protection of environments important to their health, as well as ours.

Thank you!
This project is supported with funds provided by Ducks Unlimited.

Todd Watts
Official Counter
Point Lepreau Bird Observatory Saint John Naturalists' Club buteobuz@gmail.com
506 321-2125
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Subject: South Musquash Marsh
Date: Wed May 20 2020 10:44 am
From: bonnbed AT nb.sympatico.ca
 
Richard B and myself completed the loup of the South Musquash Marsh commencing at 7:30 am and finishing at 10:30 am with clear skies and no wind.
45 species seen/heard included:
Canada geese, American widgeon, American black, blue-winged teal, green-winged teal, ring-necked ducks, pied-billed grebe (H)
turkey vulture, northern harrier, bald eagle (mature ), virginia Rail (H), sora (H), greater and lesser yellowlegs.
mourning dove, belted kingfisher, northern flicker, woodpecker species, Alder flycatcher, eastern kingbird, bluejay, American crow.
tree swallow, blackcapped chickadee (H), red-breasted nuthatch, MARSH WRENS, hermit thrush (H), American robin, grey-headed catbird,.
ovenbird, black-and-white, common yellowthroat, northern parula, magnolia, blackburniam, yellow , chectnut-sided, yellow-rumped, black-throated green warblers.
savannah, song, and swamp sparrows.

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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 20, 2020 (Wednesday)
Date: Wed May 20 2020 5:48 am
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 20, 2020 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information
line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
.

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
if any errors are noted in wording
or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed
additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript
but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is
recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the
BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. _The BlogSpot can always be
accessed from the website._


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com_

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

** I missed an important part of David Christies message about the
female SUMMER TANAGER [Tangara vermillon] that arrived to his Marys
Point yard on Monday. David mentioned that a Red Squirrel scared it off
quickly after he first saw it in the morning but it returned later in
the afternoon, visiting different feeders, and he saw it until 8:30
Monday night. I dont have a recent update.

David has an interesting scenario with BALD EAGLES [Pygargue tte
blanche] and MERLINS [Faucon merillon] interacting. A pair of adult
Bald Eagles were perched on a tree out a ways on Marys Point when an
immature Eagle came in nearer. Suddenly 2 screaming Merlins went after
it in no uncertain terms and it retreated. David assumes that the
Merlins have a nest in the cottage area at Mays Point.

** Ray Gauvin was taking photos of various birds at his back yard
Shediac feeders and could hear BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu] singing up a storm
at a distance. Then all of a sudden the group landed in the White Birch
tree where his feeders are located. He stepped out on the deck carefully
to get some photos and videos and scared them off to another White Birch
in the back of his property which would be about 50 feet away. There Ray
was entertained for several minutes with 7 Blue Jays in courting
competition on 2 branches about 6 feet apart. From the display that he
saw he assumed there was 1 female and 6 males. The males were singing
and dancing and moving about to impress the female who was crouched down
on the branch not making a sound, just observing, looking at the males
as if to say Ill decide when Im ready. Ray comments that he saw this
same behavior a few years ago with only 2 Blue Jays. Check out the
action at the attached link.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/73v3...

Even though they may be classed as mildly problematic at times, Ray
photographed the vibrant fluorescent hues of the male COMMON GRACKLE
accented by a blooming RED MAPLE tree. He comments they are steadily at
his feeders with a voracious appetite. They should be off seeking
nesting territories soon.

** Dale Gaskin gets a lot of RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS [Colibri gorge
rubis] every season and he reports that he has 3+ at the moment. He had
a sudden flock of 25 to 30 CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amrique] arrive to
his yard recently. ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS [Cardinal poitrine rose]
have arrived and like many has YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS [Paruline
croupion jaune] coming to his yard this year. He also has a SPOTTED
SANDPIPER [Chevalier grivel] at his yard pond.

** Brian Stone got a nice photo of his shy, secretive yard GRAY CATBIRD
[Moqueur chat]. The photo shows its clean gray plumage, black tam and
long dark tail but it was not willing to show its signature undertail
covert feature of a chestnut hue. Brian is going shopping for an orange
to tempt its cuisine and the Baltimore Orioles which may be arriving
soon as well.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton





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Subject: White Head & Ferry birds, inc. HOODED MERGANSER, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, LEAST SANDPIPER, WILSON'S SNIPE, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, 11 wood-warbler spp., inc. CAPE MAY, BLACKBURNIAN & PINE WARBLERS
Date: Tue May 19 2020 15:33 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 19

White Head: Brooks Marsh, Flats & Woods 0935-1035
11 Canada Geese, 19 American Black Ducks, Green-winged Teal pair, HOODED
MERGANSER flying in over Cow Passage, Mourning Dove, 5 BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVERS, 2 first-of-spring RUDDY TURNSTONES on Cow Passage Flats
(photographed), 10 LEAST SANDPIPERS, Greater Yellowlegs, WILSON'S SNIPE
(flushed from driveway), Northern Flicker, Least Flycatcher, Eastern
Kingbird, 5 Tree & 9 Barn Swallows, Gray Catbird, 3 Savannah Sparrows, 3
Northern Parulas, Yellow-rumped Warbler

White Head: Main Road 1035-1100
Mourning Dove, Swamp Sparrow, 3 Yellow-rumped Warblers

White Head: Coastal Trail 1100-1135
Canada Goose pair, Northern Flicker, Alder Flycatcher, Blue-headed Vireo,
Gray Catbird, first-of-spring SWAINSON'S THRUSH, American Redstart, 23+
Black-and-white Warblers, female CAPE MAY WARBLER, 8 Northern Parulas, 2
first-of-spring male BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS, male Black-throated Blue, Pine
& Black-throated Green Warblers, 2 Magnolia, 5 Blackpoll & 2 Yellow-rumped
Warblers

White Head: Brooks Marsh 1140-1210
8 Canada Geese, 19 American Black Ducks, 4 Green-winged Teals, 2
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, 11 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 10 Tree & 2+ Barn Swallows, 4
Savannah Sparrows, singing Red-winged Blackbird

Also seen: SPRING AZURE, CABBAGE WHITE & CLOUDED SULPHUR butterflies

White Head Ferry 1400-1425
18 Common Eiders, COMMON MURRE, 2 RAZORBILLS, 3 Black Guillemots, 4 Tree &
2 Barn Swallows

White Head Ferry 1530-1555
Common Eider, 4 RAZORBILLS, 4 Black Guillemots, Common Loon, 10
Double-crested Cormorants, 2 Tree & 2 Barn Swallows

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Correction to my blog link
Date: Tue May 19 2020 12:34 pm
From: fredann10 AT gmail.com
 
I apologize for posting
an incorrect link to my blog where I have placed yellowlegs photos. The
correct link is: naturetales.blogspot.com
Fredrica Givan

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Subject: Re: Yellowlegs
Date: Tue May 19 2020 10:56 am
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
Fredrica,

The link takes me to an old Celestia blog nothing to do with birds. You
might want to check the linkage.

Roger Burrows
White Head

On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 12:08 PM Fredrica Givan wrote:

> I watched a Yellolegs feeding this morning near the shore of a pond found
> along the Duplesia Road in Central Blissville.The pond is just past the
> railroad tracks on the right.I took many pictures and shall post some
> pictures on my blog at Nature tales.blogspot.com later this afternoon
> which might help some in determining its identification as a greater or
> lesser of the species.
> Fredrica Givan
>
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> http://users.xplornet.com/~mar...
>

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Subject: Yellowlegs
Date: Tue May 19 2020 10:08 am
From: fredann10 AT gmail.com
 
I watched a Yellolegs feeding this morning near the shore of a pond found
along the Duplesia Road in Central Blissville.The pond is just past the
railroad tracks on the right.I took many pictures and shall post some
pictures on my blog at Nature tales.blogspot.com later this afternoon
which might help some in determining its identification as a greater or
lesser of the species.
Fredrica Givan

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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 19, 2020 (Tuesday)
Date: Tue May 19 2020 7:13 am
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 19, 2020 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information
line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
.

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
if any errors are noted in wording
or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed
additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript
but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is
recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the
BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. _The BlogSpot can always be
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For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
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Edited by: Nelson Poirier _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com_

Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

** Anothernice drop-by visitor to New Brunswick! David Christie had a
female SUMMER TANAGER [Tangara vermillon]drop by his Marys Point feeder
yard at approximately 9:15 Monday morning; a RED SQUIRREL [Ecureuil
roux]put the run to it quickly. David also noted a BLUE JAY [Geai
bleu]migration on Monday with his 2-4 regulars jumping to 15.

** John Inman, like Dave, had a fallout of Blue Jays as well, and also a
BLUE GRAY GNATCATCHER visit his yard on Monday.

** Jane LeBlanc checked out her friends yard again, in St. Martins,
that had the BALTIMORE ORIOLES [Oriole de Baltimore], to find a
handsome, adult male ORCHARD ORIOLE [Oriole des vergers]with them,
another special visitor to New Brunswick. Jane also got a nice photo of
a male BOBOLINK [Goglu des prs]and a male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
[Cardinal poitrine rose]. She also got a CHIPPING SPARROW [Bruant
familier], a HERMIT THRUSH [Grive solitaire] and a RED-TAILED HAWK [Buse
queue rousse]to co-operate for her zoom camera.

** Richard Blaquiere on Monday morning was surprised to find a GREAT
CRESTED FLYCATCHER [Tyran hupp] in a small wooded area near the Hampton
sewage lagoon. They used to be a regular presence in Hampton, especially
in trees along the Kennebecasis River but they have become uncommon in
the last several years. Richard was able to capture a great photo to
show the field marks of this large flycatcher including the signature
crest.

** While out on a nature walk on Monday Jamie and Karen Burris spotted 3
BALTIMORE ORIOLES, 2 males and a female. He wasnt able to capture a
photo of the female, but a male seemed to be gathering nesting material.

** Aldo Dorio got a photo of a Baltimore Oriole in Tabusintac on Monday.
It seems to have a fluffed, discontented appearance but this weeks
pleasant sunshine should change its mood like it will all of us.

** Carol Shea has had a large male buck WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de
Virginie]visiting her yard in Upham that appears to have a few war
wounds possibly from male disputes from past seasons. A close-up of the
head shows the pedicels just started that will become a set of antlers
by fall ready for the rut.

** Chris Antle updates her WOOD DUCK [Canard branchu]box action. At 5:30
a.m. a male arrived with 2 females. The females fed constantly, much
like chickens would. All the while, the male followed them around eating
very little himself. After a half hour they moved out of sight and never
once gave the box a brief glance.

While Chris was breakfasting in her garden a GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur
chat]arrived. She watched him forage for about an hour before she moved
on to garden chores. An EASTERN PHOEBE [Moucherolle phbi]is on her nest
but has chosen a neighbours garden this year.

NORTHERN AZURES accompanied her as the TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle
bicolore]were checking out Chriss Eastern Bluebird nest boxes on the
garden fence posts. Chris commented its wonderful to have such
diversions away from COVID-19.

** Magda Kuhn and Grant Ramsay walked around the John Howard Trail at
the Irishtown Nature Park on Wednesday with a few sightings. The
resident COMMON LOONS [Plongeon huard] are back but were not interested
in coming closer. There were a number of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS
[Paruline croupion jaune],and a BELTED KINGFISHER [Martin-pcheur
d'Amrique]who very quickly flew over the water. A pair of CANADA JAYS
[Msangeai du Canada]were hopping in the branches, stopping just enough
to catch a photo. A GARTER SNAKE [Couleuvre raye]slithered across the
trail. Grant was able to get several photos.

** Clifford Twist made a visit to Jemseg on Monday morning to tally lots
of warblers. He spotted one YELLOW WARBLER [Paruline jaune], at least
one NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH [Paruline des ruisseaux], COMMON YELLOWTHROAT
[Paruline masque], lots of BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLERS [Paruline noir et
blanc], and lots of AMERICAN REDSTARTS [Paruline flamboyante]. In Lower
Jemseg he saw a BALTIMORE ORIOLE, a WEASEL, and lots of OSPREY
[Balbuzard pcheur]nests occupied.

** Clarence Cormier spotted one BOBOLINK checking out both fields in
front and behind his Grand Digue home on Monday. He also saw a YELLOW
WARBLER Monday afternoon and the last sighting of any bird species
returning from the south was on April 30^th , a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER.
As per his bird journal migration, his area is much later than in
previous years. It looks like that is all going to change from all of
todays reports!

**Yves and Suzanne Poussart visited the Highland Park in Salisbury on
Monday after havingstoppedat the Wilson Marsh to check for Canada
Geese Goslings. No gosling had been seen during the previousvisit last
Thursday. It was easy to locatea first family with 10 goslings and it
can be anticipated that many more will soon be present in the site. The
Highland Park in the Village of Salisbury offers an interesting
environment and this visitprovided several nice observations. The
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS (Paruline croupion jaune) were numerous as were
the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS (Carouge paulettes) among the CATTAILS
(Quenouille). No other species of warblers were spotted. A pair of
BLUE-WINGED TEALS (Sarcelle ailes bleues) and a pair of PIED-BILLED
GREBE (Grbe bec bigarr) were observed. As reportedrecently on the
Info Line, the BALTIMORE ORIOLES (Oriole de Baltimore) have arrived in
the region and one male was seen but it was not possible to get a photo
this time.

**Barb Jennings got a nice portrait of a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK at the
Salisbury marsh on Monday as well is a GRAY CATBIRD at Wilsons marsh
checking out orange sections.

**Gordon Rattray visited the trails around Hillsborough and found three
more warblers on Monday: American Redstart, Wilsons and Black and
White Warblers. There were also many Yellow-rumped and Common
Yellowthroats who remained mostly unseen.

Gordon found 2 of our early violets: Northern White Violet and Wooly
Blue Violet.

At his Weldon yard he had a Northern Parula Warbler try the orange
slices. He have had 2 male and 2 female Purple Finches coming
constantly to the feeders for several weeks and today I observed a pair
doing mating ritual; it would be great if they nested there.

The Yellow-rumped Warblers, that have numbered 10-12 over the last
week dropped Monday to 2 or 3.In that period they consumed 3.5 of the
Dollarama suet blocks.

**Mac Wilmots Mallard duck hen took a break from housekeeping on Monday
to have a wondrous splash-fest in the nearby pond. Also a male
Rose-breasted Grosbeak serenaded on Monday morning sampling a suet
block, which is not regular fare for a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

**Louise Nichols went out to White Birch Rd. near Sackville on Monday
morning. She counted 34 species in a couple of hours. It seems as
though a lot of warblers arrived overnight because she saw 9 warbler
species today (no unexpected species) as opposed to only two when she
was there a couple of days ago. She also saw and heard her
first-of-the-year Least Flycatcher.

Louise also saw about 10 Bobolinks very close to the road. She took a
video of one singing which is attached below. She been seeing quite a
few Bobolinks lately in different places, so hopes that means they're
doing well. In fact, several showed up in their front yard this
afternoon -- a new yard bird.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/8h69...

Louise also saw one Black Tern flying over one of the impoundments off
White Birch Rd.

** Brian Coyle and Brian Stone visited the area behind Crandall
University where Brian Stone noted what appeared to be a fresh mammal
den. Brian Coyle felt it appeared to be a fox den. Its a very big area
and they had no problem physical distancing in conversation. The
warblers were very active in the trails around the area. They saw
NASHVILLE WARBLERS [Paruline joues grises], WILSON'S WARBLERS
[Paruline calotte noire], and many NORTHERN PARULA WARBLERS. A GRAY
CATBIRD followed them about and a SPOTTED SANDPIPER [Chevalier grivel]
was on a shoreline. They noted YELLOW- SPOTTED SALAMANDER [Salamandre
macule] eggs that had hatched out. All were in a water-filled tire rut.

Brian got two videos. One shows the salamander larvae and the other of
the Spotted Sandpiper are attached below.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/pb9j...

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ew7o...

** Sherman Sherrard pointed out a GRAY CATBIRD nest to me from last
season on Monday. It was in a tangle of shrubbery and approximately 2
feet off the ground (54 cm), suspended in a crotch. The exterior was
larger twigs with a finer twig lining. Gray Catbird nests are very hard
to locate when the leaves are on the shrubbery and they are very
secretive around their nest site.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton





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Subject: hummingbird
Date: Mon May 18 2020 18:25 pm
From: judo AT nbnet.nb.ca
 
Hello



I got my first HIMMINGBIRD tonight at 8:10pm



Wow It is nice to see something new at feeders



A report from the North



Margaret Doyle

Campbellton


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Subject: White Head birds, inc. RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, LESSER YELLOWLEGS,, BROWN THRASHER, WHITE-CROWNED & LINCOLN'S SPARROWS, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, 14 warbler spp., inc. TENNESSEE, PINE & WILSON'S WARBLERS, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
Date: Mon May 18 2020 16:54 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 18

White Head Feeders 1445-1515
2 Mourning Doves, 5 American Goldfinches, immature male BALTIMORE ORIOLE, 3
Common Grackles, male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK

White Head: Main Road 1530-1615
Mourning Dove pair courtship, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, flycatcher spp.,
Barn Swallow, Gray Catbird, BROWN THRASHER (flew up from bushes in front of
Miriam Cossaboom's house), Chipping & Savannah Sparrows, dark-lored
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, 2 female BALTIMORE ORIOLES, 4 Red-winged Blackbirds,
8 Common Grackles, male Common Yellowthroat, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK pair
I also saw a SPRING AZURE & 4 CABBAGE WHITE butterflies

White Head: Coastal Trail 1615-1645
13 wood-warbler spp., inc. TENNESSEE, NASHVILLE, BLACKPOLL, BLACK-THROATED
BLUE, PINE & WILSON'S WARBLERS

White Head: Brooks Marsh & Woods 1645-1730
Canada Goose pair+5 goslings, American Wigeon pair, 14 American Black
Ducks, 2 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, 6 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 3 Greater
Yellowlegs, 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, Alder Flycatcher, Eastern Phoebe, 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Gray Catbird, LINCOLN'S SPARROW, 8 wood-warbler
spp., inc. TENNESSEE & female BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLERS

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Merlins in Rothesay
Date: Mon May 18 2020 15:45 pm
From: hhcs AT bellaliant.net
 
We have a pair of MERLINs nesting just behind our home in Rothesay.  The little raptors with attitude are living up to their reputation. The local AMERICAN CROWS avoid the airspace near the nest.  If one enters, the MERLIN takes flight and fearlessly repels the intruder, screaming its displeasure.  We hope we will be here about 30 days from now as fledging day is always exciting with a series of crash landings and much vocalizing by the anxious adults. 

Hank and Carolyn Scarth
Rothesay.

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Subject: GRAND MANAN, WHITE HEAD & FERRY birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, ALDER FLYCATCHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD, GRAY CATBIRD, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, BALTIMORE ORIOLE & R0SE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
Date: Mon May 18 2020 12:02 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 18

White Head Feeders 0715-0915
male RING-NECKED PHEASANT, first-of-spring female RUBY-THROATED
HUMMINGBIRD, 2 GRAY CATBIRDS, 3 American Goldfinches, immature male
BALTIMORE ORIOLE, Black-and-white Warbler, male BLACK-THROATED BLUE
WARBLER, 3 Common Grackles, male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK

White Head Ferry 0930-0955
2 Common Eiders, 2 Black Guillemots, 3 Common Loons, 20 Double-crested
Cormorants, 4 Tree & 2 Barn Swallows

Ingalls Head 0955-1010
American Wigeon pair, American Black Duck, 3 Mourning Doves, ALDER
FLYCATCHER, American Goldfinch

Ox Head 1010-1035
3 American Black Ducks, first-of-spring SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 2 EASTERN
KINGBIRDS, Tree Swallow, male Common Yellowthroat

Kitchen Property 1035-1125
2 American Wigeon pairs, 3 American Black Ducks, RING-NECKED PHEASANT
calling, 3 Double-crested Cormorants, singing Winter Wren, GRAY CATBIRD, 2
White-throated Sparrows, male Red-winged Blackbird, 2 Common Grackles
Also seen: SPRING AZURE butterfly; LEATHERLEAF & BAKEAPPLE flowers

White Head Ferry 1140-1205
28 Common Eiders, 3 Red-breasted Mergansers, 3 RAZORBILLS, 7 Black
Guillemots, 8 Double-crested Cormorants, 2 GREAT BLUE HERONS, 2 Tree & 3
Barn Swallows

White Head Feeders 1230-1245
2 American Goldfinches, immature male BALTIMORE ORIOLE, male ROSE-BREASTED
GROSBEAK

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Grand Manan, White Head & Ferry birds, inc. RING-NECKED PHEASANT, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, RAZORBILL, GREAT BLUE HERON, EASTERN KINGBIRD, GRAY CATBIRD, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, BALTIMORE ORIOLE & ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
Date: Mon May 18 2020 11:44 am
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Monday, May 18, 2020
Date: Mon May 18 2020 5:55 am
From: nelsonpoirier435 AT gmail.com
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Monday, May 18, 2020

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go
tohttp://nminfoline.blogspot.ca


To respond by email, please address your message to the information line
editor, _nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com_

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
if any errors are noted in wording or
photo labelling. Note that *corrections, deletions, or delayed
additions* may not always appear on the info line and email transcript
but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is
recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the
BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. _The BlogSpot can always be
accessed from the website_.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website
atwww.naturemoncton.com


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com


Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

**Gordon Rattray explored the main trails in Hillsborough by the Village
office on Sunday.Hewas expecting a larger turn out of warblers after
hearing of the numbers in St. Martens a couple of days ago. He did see
Yellow-rumped Warblers, Yellow Warbler (a beautiful male showing the red
breast striping), Wilsons warbler and Common Yellowthroat Warbler. A
pair of Northern Shoveler Ducks appeared to be contentedly monitoring a
nest.

A Gray catbird posed briefly to show its burgundy under tail coverts
and black tam. Gordon heard but did not see Bobolinks and surprised a
couple of White-tailed Deer on the path.

Also at home I had a female Hummer visiting the feeder

**Chris Antle reports a pair of Wood Ducks were sitting under their box
on Sunday morning at her Maquapit Lake site. She hopes to see them
entering and leaving soon among with regular other warblers, there was a
male Black-throated Blue in her garden Sunday morning and doesnt recall
seeing one there in the past. Another infrequent visitor was a Brown
Creeper. Chris comments with so much activity its a challenge to attend
to her gardening!

**Brian Stone comments he heard of a reliable report of a Black Bear
that has been observed in Mapleton Park. I dont believe this is the
first time a Black Bear has wandered into the park. This is very likely
a two year old bear that has been sent out on its own by his mother and
not yet established a territory.

**A Mallard Duck noted in a roofless derelict Wood Duck box in Mac
Wilmots Lower Coverdale yard has indeed nested there. It is a seemingly
odd spot for a mallard duck to nest. Mac got a photo from above to look
down into the house to make sure there was a wire mesh lining so the
ducklings could get out and indeed there was one present plus the 9 egg
clutch seem to be doing fine.

**Baltimore orioles are moving in. Jane LeBlanc has a neighbor in St.
Martins who she comments is getting a very impressive selection of birds
to his yard including Baltimore Orioles that Jane got several nice
photos of and a Gray Catbird is looking on in one photo. Time to get
orange and pink grapefruit sections out!

Jane also got a few photos of a Black-and-white Warbler and a Common
Yellowthroat Warbler suddenly appeared. A pair of Common Mergansers were
on the marsh before the nearby campers awoke

**Jim Johnson in Scotch Settlement has been waiting patiently for the
birds to arrive that seemed had forgotten where he lived. But in the
last few days the finches have returned, half dozen Bobolinks, and Tree
Swallows galore (20 -25). Also at least 6 Cliff Swallows (hard to count)
have arrived. Hes keeping an eye on them to see if they will use the 2
man-made clay nests placed last year with a new colony establishing
under the eaves of his home. Only 1 Hummingbird has arrived so far but
expects more this week. Jim put up another swallow nest box Sunday
morning in the field by his home and they were checking it out before he
got back to the house. There is also a pair of American Kestrels around
near his home as well.

Jim watched an amusing incident recently. He was out after supper the
other night, across the road there was a duck flying ahead of an Bald
Eagle being chased by 2 crows all in a row about 100 feet apart.

**Clifford Twist took a hike on the Dobson trail on Sunday to be very
entertained by vocalizing Ovenbirds and also Black-throated Green Warblers

**Dave Christie reports the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds that seemed to be
just dropping by as they were passing through change their tactics on
Sunday when at least a pair arrived and fed most of the day.

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com


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Subject: Re: White Head birds, inc. HARLEQUIN DUCK, RED-NECKED GREBE, OSPREY, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, AMERICAN KESTREL, LEAST FLYCATCHER,
Date: Sun May 17 2020 16:36 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 17

White Head: Main Road 1650-1700
2 Canada Geese, 3 American Black Ducks, Northern Flicker, male Red-winged
Blackbird, male INDIGO BUNTING (Colwell feeders)

White Head: Coastal Trail 1710-1730
2+ Northern Parulas, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, Black-and-white,
Yellow-rumped, 4 Magnolia & 4 Black-throated Green Warblers, 4+ warbler spp.

White Head: Brooks Marsh 1735-1740
8 Canada Geese+pair+5 goslings, American Wigeon pair, 7 American Black
Ducks, 2 Greater Yellowlegs, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, Double-crested Cormorant

White Head Feeders 1800
male BALTIMORE ORIOLE, 3 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS

Roger Burrows
White Head

On Sun, May 17, 2020 at 4:11 PM Roger Burrows wrote:

> May 17
>
> White Head Feeders 1020
> 1+ Baltimore Orioles
>
> White Head Island 1035-1455
> 5 Canada Geese, American Wigeon pair, 11 American Black Ducks, 4
> Green-winged Teals, 5 Common Eiders, 26 HARLEQUIN DUCKS (late: tight flock
> of 24 at Lookout Point on Southern Shore), Red-breasted Merganser,
> RED-NECKED GREBE (breeding plumage Southern Shore), Ring-necked Pheasant
> (Southern Shore), 3 Greater Yellowlegs, Black Guillemot, OSPREY, up to 10
> SHARP-SHINNED HAWKS, Bald Eagle, Northern Flicker, AMERICAN KESTREL, 3
> Least Flycatchers, Eastern Kingbird, Boreal Chickadee, Tree Swallow, Barn
> Swallow pair, Winter Wren, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hermit Thrush, 6 American
> Goldfinches, first-of-spring BOBOLINK pair (Colwells), Swamp Sparrow,
> first-of-spring male TENNESSEE & WILSON'S WARBLERS, Black-throated Blue & 2
> Yellow-rumped Warblers
>
> Roger Burrows
> White Head
>

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Subject: White Head birds, inc. HARLEQUIN DUCK, RED-NECKED GREBE, OSPREY, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, AMERICAN KESTREL, LEAST FLYCATCHER,
Date: Sun May 17 2020 14:11 pm
From: rtburrows AT gmail.com
 
May 17

White Head Feeders 1020
1+ Baltimore Orioles

White Head Island 1035-1455
5 Canada Geese, American Wigeon pair, 11 American Black Ducks, 4
Green-winged Teals, 5 Common Eiders, 26 HARLEQUIN DUCKS (late: tight flock
of 24 at Lookout Point on Southern Shore), Red-breasted Merganser,
RED-NECKED GREBE (breeding plumage Southern Shore), Ring-necked Pheasant
(Southern Shore), 3 Greater Yellowlegs, Black Guillemot, OSPREY, up to 10
SHARP-SHINNED HAWKS, Bald Eagle, Northern Flicker, AMERICAN KESTREL, 3
Least Flycatchers, Eastern Kingbird, Boreal Chickadee, Tree Swallow, Barn
Swallow pair, Winter Wren, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hermit Thrush, 6 American
Goldfinches, first-of-spring BOBOLINK pair (Colwells), Swamp Sparrow,
first-of-spring male TENNESSEE & WILSON'S WARBLERS, Black-throated Blue & 2
Yellow-rumped Warblers

Roger Burrows
White Head

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