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Updated on October 30, 2020, 8:35 am

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30 Oct: @ 08:22:02 
Waterfowl fallout [Pam Hunt]
30 Oct: @ 06:52:53 
Can you ID this Winter Visitor? [birdrecords]
30 Oct: @ 03:48:57 
Jaffrey Birds [Chris Heys]
29 Oct: @ 16:52:36 
Lyme Bald Eagles Thursday ['Blake Allison' via NHBirds]
29 Oct: @ 16:31:51 
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory (29 Oct 2020) 1 Raptor [reports]
29 Oct: @ 14:58:06 
Migration [Robin Schweikart]
29 Oct: @ 13:54:55 
Fox Sparrow in Etna today -- PHOTOS [Jim Block]
29 Oct: @ 13:51:51 
Coast [Aaronian, Richard S.]
29 Oct: @ 12:39:21 
12 Evening Grosbeaks in Exeter [Len Medlock]
29 Oct: @ 11:53:03 
Pine Siskins in Barrington [Steve Hale]
29 Oct: @ 11:52:34 
eBird Tip - Keep a Yard List and Find Birding Hot Spots [birdrecords]
29 Oct: @ 11:41:18 
Bewick's Wrens [Nancy Childress]
29 Oct: @ 11:34:50 
Godwits [Aaronian, Richard S.]
29 Oct: @ 07:54:29 
Geese on Great Bay [Jon Woolf]
28 Oct: @ 18:45:50 
shrike at Elm Brook Park [raqbirds via NHBirds]
28 Oct: @ 17:00:44 
Franklin/Newfound duck run [Pam Hunt]
28 Oct: @ 13:58:51 
Sandwich Bohemians & more [Ken Klapper]
28 Oct: @ 11:35:37 
soggy day along the coast [DEBRA M POWERS]
28 Oct: @ 11:09:56 
Lyme Bald Eagle Wednesday ['Blake Allison' via NHBirds]
27 Oct: @ 19:45:06 
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory (27 Oct 2020) 96 Raptors [reports]
27 Oct: @ 16:14:44 
Crow migration [Corinne in Bedford, NH]
27 Oct: @ 15:25:29 
Moore Fields, Durham 10/27 [Dorsey, Kurk]
27 Oct: @ 15:13:19 
Purple Finch and Wood Ducks in Londonderry [Sandra Dahlfred]
27 Oct: @ 14:29:06 
busy crows [Sylvia Miskoe]
26 Oct: @ 18:55:19 
Red-breasted merganser, Grafton county [Elaine Faletra]
26 Oct: @ 18:20:30 
Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, October 26, 2020 [mrsuomala@marksbirdtours.com]
26 Oct: @ 17:32:34 
Evening Grosbeaks [Tim Spahr]
26 Oct: @ 15:18:10 
Pheasants -Exeter Rte.27 [S. Lewis]
26 Oct: @ 14:50:33 
Finally, I have seen a real American Crow migration [Dana Fox]
26 Oct: @ 14:44:55 
NH Coast Sea Watch (Leach's SP, Scoters Loons, Mergansers, etc.) [Stephen Mirick]
26 Oct: @ 14:13:28 
surf scoters [Kathy Dube]
26 Oct: @ 11:57:59 
RE: Waterfowl moving today: Four Lake Loop in Grafton County [Pam Hunt]
26 Oct: @ 11:45:35 
Ovenbird, Nottingham [Robbie Prieto]
26 Oct: @ 10:30:04 
Grackles, Blackbirds, Keene [Brian R]
26 Oct: @ 10:08:42 
first snow buntings of fall [hector galbraith]
26 Oct: @ 09:06:25 
Thorne Pond Scoters [Charlie Nims]
26 Oct: @ 08:35:44 
Thrush [Sylvia Hartmann]
26 Oct: @ 06:38:43 
Horseshoe Pond - Vesper Sparrow, 51 species, [rsuomala2]
25 Oct: @ 22:00:01 
Waterfowl moving today: Four Lake Loop in Grafton County [Wayne Scott]
25 Oct: @ 20:15:34 
Pack Monadnock RMO (25 Oct 2020) 231 Raptors including 1 Golden Eagle [reports]
25 Oct: @ 18:33:20 
Junket of Juncos Arrives in Hollis, along with a Snow Bunting [Susan Wrisley]
25 Oct: @ 17:31:56 
Odiorne Point State Park - changes in seasons [Stephen Mirick]
25 Oct: @ 16:15:38 
Durham/Newmarket this weekend [Dorsey, Kurk]
25 Oct: @ 15:44:02 
global warming northern cardinal [Robert Rotberg]
25 Oct: @ 15:14:51 
Sandhill Crane(s) in Weare [Pam Hunt]
25 Oct: @ 12:35:59 
Whooper, gallinule [Roger Stephenson]
25 Oct: @ 11:20:25 
Penacook: Boreal Chickadee, Grasshopper Sparrow, Chestnut-sided Warbler! [Pam Hunt]
25 Oct: @ 11:15:05 
Chestnut-collarded Longspur - NO (11:45am) Hollis [Susan Wrisley]
25 Oct: @ 07:02:42 
Yard birds [Jennifer Frost -Dunbarton]
25 Oct: @ 05:24:00 
Longspur updates appreciated! [Pam Hunt]





Subject: Waterfowl fallout
Date: Fri Oct 30 2020 8:22 am
From: biodiva AT myfairpoint.net
 
On my way home from groceries this morning I stopped at Turtle Pond in Concord and found 19 Long-tailed Ducks!!! Also 2 WW Scoters, 2 Common Mergansers, 3 DC Cormaorants, and ~90 geese overhead. Other nearby ponds had nothing except 1-3Bufflhead. A report from the Connecticut River in the Upper Valley includes all sorts of stuff-so get out and check local water bodies if you can!
 Heading back out after breakfast!
Pam Hunt
Penacook
 “The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed the world.”
      - Alexander von Humboldt
 



Subject: Can you ID this Winter Visitor?
Date: Fri Oct 30 2020 6:52 am
From: birdrecords AT nhaudubon.org
 
                While uncommon, a regular winter visitor to the state is the Lapland Longspur (not to be confused with the recently-sighted and rarer Chestnut-collared Longspur!). 
The Lapland Longspur is usually found in fallow agricultural fields along with similar-looking birds such as Horned Larks and Vesper and Savannah Sparrows. 
Learn how to tell them apart from these similar-looking birds and check out the photo that clearly shows why they’re named “longspurs” in the Winter 2014-15 issue of New Hampshire Bird Records: 
https://nhbirdrecords.org/nhbr...
(“Quiz Photo” on page 1 with Answer on page 43).
               
Other articles in this issue include: 
Winter Birding in Manchester, NH; Emerald Ash Borer – What You Need to Know and How Birders Can Help; Owl versus Crow (with very interesting photos!) and photos and field notes from the 2014-15 winter season. 
Enjoy them all!

                New Hampshire Bird Records is providing free access to its archives during the Covid-19 outbreak to help birders find information on birding locally and to remind us of the joy of birding.

                For information on how to subscribe:  
http://nhbirdrecords.org/subsc...

or go directly to the on-line subscription page:  
http://nh-audubon-nature-store...

From all of us at New Hampshire Bird Records-
Stay Safe – Stay Healthy!



Subject: Jaffrey Birds
Date: Fri Oct 30 2020 3:48 am
From: chris.p.heys AT gmail.com
 
Birders,
No more hummer sightings after the convincing second hand report on the 18th here. I brought the feeder in (I hear it's gonna get a little cold?) Three winter wrens have arrived along with the hordes of juncos. Many of the sizeable October sparrow flock has seemingly moved on with lower numbers of song and white throated.
Yesterday we had (and photo'd) an AMERICAN WOODCOCK here. I seem to catch them in late october quite often. Infact, in 2017 I had one in the Heald St. Orchard in Pepperell MA on this very same date. Practically in the same hour of the day, too.

Pine siskins have been ever present in the morning hours especially though I have yet to catch any on the feeders. Yesterday morning there was a flock of more than 30, very low and moving together along mountain brook. Also Red Crossbills and two days ago a noisy flock of EVENING GROSBEAKS passed over the neighborhood though I could not put eyes on them.

Happy Trails,Chris HeysJaffrey NH







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Subject: Lyme Bald Eagles Thursday
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 16:52 pm
From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
 
Two adults were observed about 3:15 p.m. perched in the Post Pond snag where I saw one adult yesterday.

Blake Allison
Lyme, NH 03768-3400



Subject: Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory (29 Oct 2020) 1 Raptor
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 16:31 pm
From: reports AT hawkcount.org
 
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory
Peterborough, New Hampshire, USA

Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 29, 2020SpeciesDay's CountMonth TotalSeason TotalBlack Vulture000
Turkey Vulture0151157
Osprey043162
Bald Eagle065165
Northern Harrier050102
Sharp-shinned Hawk16471293
Cooper's Hawk0100168
Northern Goshawk01010
Red-shouldered Hawk0163177
Broad-winged Hawk0408815
Red-tailed Hawk0128135
Rough-legged Hawk000
Golden Eagle033
American Kestrel072256
Merlin085138
Peregrine Falcon02430
Unknown Accipiter0311
Unknown Buteo01221
Unknown Falcon002
Unknown Eagle000
Unknown Raptor03879
Total:1163411724

Observation end time: 11:00:00 Total observation time: 3 hoursOfficial CounterLevi BurfordObservers:


Visitors:
1 visitor today blew through the watch not stopping as he asked if I had
seen anything today. "Yes, I avoided being skunked!"

Weather:
For the three hours it was beautiful today, despite the clouded sky. The
fog in the valley never dissipated and several of the minor peaks and hills
in the valleys were more distinct than ever as they poked above. The sleet
moved in at noon to shut things down. Temps rose to the about 40 degrees F.


Raptor Observations:
One lone Sharp-shinned popped up to much alarm from the chickadees. It
vocalized at Gina and then went on its way keeping an eye out for a
slow-moving songbird.

Non-raptor Observations:
The Boreal Chickadee made a brief appearance today. It didn't give much for
looks before disappearing into anonymity once again.
Also giving me a flyby today were 1 White-winged Crossbill and 1 Snow
Bunting (heard only).

Predictions:
Tomorrow looks like a snow day. How much of the day is countable will
depend on when the storm clears out. Right now it looks like mid-day
clearing but we will find out. Seems probable that the auto road will be
closed tomorrow.

Saturday looks nice with light wind and a lot of sun. Not very warm though.
Hopefully, the auto road will be open again by then but there is a
possibility it won't open until we get sufficiently warm temps. Maybe
Saturday afternoon or Sunday?

When the auto road does open again it will be open from 9 to 4pm now.
Please be prepared to be down for 4 or risk being locked in!

Report submitted by Levi Burford (lbburford@plymouth.edu)
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory information may be found at: www.nhaudubon.org
More information at hawkcount.org: [Site Profile] [Day Summary] [Month Summary]








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Subject: Migration
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 14:58 pm
From: rkschweik AT comcast.net
 
A flock of 40 or more Pine Siskins at our feeder in Portsmouth and first Buffleheads of the season on the Sagamore Creek. Also three large flocks of Cormorants flying south over Jenness Beach this morning.








Robin Schweikart 


Portsmouth 



Subject: Fox Sparrow in Etna today -- PHOTOS
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 13:54 pm
From: jim AT jimblockphoto.com
 
A beautiful Fox Sparrow paid a brief visit to our yard late this morning. If you are interested, you can see photos here:
https://www.jimblockphoto.com/...
 Jim Block
 



Subject: Coast
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 13:51 pm
From: raaronian AT exeter.edu
 
Rain cut short a trip to the coast. Short after seeing the Hudsonian Godwits, a Belted Kingfisher flew in.

Hampton SP
Horned Lark 20

Seabrook Harbor
Double-crested Cormorant 200-250 (!) grouped in middle of river. Neat to see.

Rich Aaronian

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: 12 Evening Grosbeaks in Exeter
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 12:39 pm
From: lenmedlock AT comcast.net
 
First time for me! Check the tops of those oaks and other seed-bearing branches.








Len


Exeter



Subject: Pine Siskins in Barrington
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 11:53 am
From: srhale20 AT gmail.com
 
Two days ago, I had two Pine Siskins at my feeders in Barrington. Yesterday, I had three ... and today I have twelve. They're here!
Steve Hale




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Subject: eBird Tip - Keep a Yard List and Find Birding Hot Spots
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 11:52 am
From: birdrecords AT nhaudubon.org
 
Hi Folks,

It appears I forgot to send this several months ago! It was an honor to remember Denny Abbott in this issue. COVID-19 has not stopped the publication on New Hampshire Bird Records, although it has created some delays. Thanks for hanging in there and supporting
the publication.

Becky Suomala

NH Audubon





You can use eBird to not only find spots to bird wherever you are going, but you can also keep your own lists for your yard or favorite local birding spot (“patch”). An article in the Summer 2019 issue
New Hampshire Bird Records will show you how. This free article is now on the website:
http://nhbirdrecords.org/our-j...
 
The issue was sponsored in memory of Denny Abbott – New Hampshire’s, and New England’s, Consummate Birder, according to a feature article by Mike Resch. Denny will be missed.
 
There are lots of other great articles in the issue. Here are the Contents:
Remembering Denny Abbott – New Hampshire’s, and New England’s, Consummate Birder by Mike Resch
2019 Goodhue-Elkins Award – Iain MacLeod
Summer Season: June 1 through July 31, 2019 by Pam Hunt
Field Notes compiled by Diana Stephens
Pied-billed Grebe Nest Update by Diana Stephens
Tree Swallow Nest in a Cannon! by Rebecca Suomala
Three Adult Mississippi Kites Seen in Durham Nest by Ed Norton
Cerulean - the Color of Frustration by Susan Wrisley
First Successful Bald Eagle’s Nest in Concord in over 100 Years by Diana Stephens
Mississippi Kites in New Hampshire by Steve Mirick
A North American Big Year Comes To New Hampshire – Part 1 by Rob Woodward
A Twist on Birding While Gardening by Marie Nickerson
Record Productivity for Purple Martins in 2019 compiled by Diana Stephens
Bird Watchers of New Hampshire on Facebook by Charlee Breen
The Ospreys are Back at the Strafford County Complex! by Dan Hubbard
Birding the Mount Washington Valley – Part 2 by Charlie Nims
The Next Ten Species Predictions – How did we do? by Iain MacLeod
NH Rare Birds Committee Report, Spring 2017 through Winter 2017-18

Photo Quiz – Back Cover; Answer will be in the next issue
 
For information on how to subscribe:
http://nhbirdrecords.org/subsc...
or go directly to the on-line subscription page:
http://nh-audubon-nature-store...



Subject: Bewick's Wrens
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 11:41 am
From: nchildress57 AT gmail.com
 
I believe I have been having flocks of Bewick's Wrens here in Gilmanton. They feed on the ground in a flock, take off when startled, then return to feed on the ground.  Has anyone else seen these? They have a white stripe around its eye.NancyNancy Childress, J.D.https://www.facebook.com/pg/NH...







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Subject: Godwits
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 11:34 am
From: raaronian AT exeter.edu
 
Hudsonian Godwit 2 - roosting at Hampton Marina now with many Black-b. Plover, a few Dunlin and Semipalmated SP. Assume the godwits are the two seen by Steve this morning on the mudflat.

Rich Aaronian

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Geese on Great Bay
Date: Thu Oct 29 2020 7:54 am
From: jsw AT jwoolfden.com
 
There are hundreds of Canada Geese on Great Bay right now, visible from Sandy Point Discovery Center.  Probably some Cackling Geese mixed in.  At least 3 species of duck too: Mallard, American Black, and at least one species that’s too far away to identify.  

— Jon Woolf
Manchester NH

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: shrike at Elm Brook Park
Date: Wed Oct 28 2020 18:45 pm
From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
 
A late day visit to Elm Brook Park in West Hopkinton turned up a Northern Shrike- first-of-season and quite rare at this site; and an always enjoyable male Northern Harrier. 







Very few water birds- a couple of Canada Geese and one possible hen Shoveler that swam into the marsh too quickly to be positively identified.







Land birds were typical- sparrows, robins, Red-winged Blackbirds, etc. and Red Crossbills seem to have left the area.







Compared to Pam and Unity's haul at Webster Lake in Franklin today I was there two days ago, with high hopes and the same kind of weather, but could only find one loon and a few distant gulls. This, of course, is what makes it...Fun with Birds!





Bob Quinn

Webster, NH






"Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons and daughters of the earth." Chief Seattle  






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Subject: Franklin/Newfound duck run
Date: Wed Oct 28 2020 17:00 pm
From: biodiva AT myfairpoint.net
 
Greetings all,
 Unity and I were planning to poke around the Newfound Lake area today – back when the weather was supposed to be sunny. Then the forecast shifted, but we thought it was supposed to at least stop raining by late morning, so we went north anyway. Since it was still raining pretty reasonably we opted to check Webster Lake in Franklin on the way up, and actually had our best birding of the day there. A full circumnavigation of the lake yielded the following (plus assorted landbirds):
 6 Canada Geese, 19 Mallards, 8 Am Black Ducks (all in a tight flock in the center of the lake trying to be scoters), 2 Ring-necked Ducks, 2 Greater Scaup, 5 White-winged Scoters, 1 Surf Scoter (all scoters were males), 14 Bufflehead (only 3 females), and 8 Common Loons. It was a classic waterfowl fallout and we were pretty psyched to see what we’d find on the big lake.
 A scan from the very south end of Newfound in Bristol added Hooded and Common Merganser to the day lit, but not much else (it was still raining), so it was on to Wellington State Park. From the boat launch there was a tight flock of 29 Greater Scaup halfway across the lake, and when scanning north I swore I saw what appeared to be a large but incredibly distant flock of scoters. We went up the west side (and eventually down the east side) but no other vantages revealed ANYTHING on the lake other than scattered loons and a single Ring-billed Gull, so I’ve started assuming the “flock” was an artifact of rain, distance, and waves.
 The only other waterfowl on Newfound were in Hebron Marsh as viewed from the NH Audubon property. Here there were several Mallards, a single black, and another bonus: 2 Gadwall. Also a GB Heron and getting-late phoebe.
 It a bit of a joke with us that someone proposed the I-93 rest stop in Sanbornton as an eBird hotspot, but they eventually made a good case for its inclusion, and since then we’ve been meaning to stop there. Despite the continued rain (it finally stopped while we were there), we ended up spending 20 minutes there, and racked up one of our better species totals for the day. They were all common woods birds, but there’s actually a little nature trail behind the rest stop, and it might just be better than we thought way back – and certainly on a better day.
 We ended the adventure at Turtle Pond in Concord, where we saw the nine American Wigeon that Becky Suomala had mentioned to us earlier in the day by text. Long Pond was empty.
 12 species of waterfowl is pretty good for a rainy day in October, and four of them were actually Merrimack County year birds for us! But why Webster Lake was hopping and Newfound wasn’t (diversity-wise, at least), will remain a mystery.
 Next up: snow.
 Pam Hunt and Unity Dienes
Concord
 “The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed the world.”
      - Alexander von Humboldt
 



Subject: Sandwich Bohemians & more
Date: Wed Oct 28 2020 13:58 pm
From: kklapper AT gmail.com
 
There were 3 Bohemian Waxwings feeding in a shrub right across from Town Hall just a little while ago... also 10 Evening Grosbeak perched nearby.  Also a few Am. Tree Sparrows in the same area, plus a Fox Sparrow in my yard at dawn. A little fire pond in Moultonborough on Sibley Rd had 22 Bufflehead. Not bad for a little trip to take care of a few errands!

Ken Klapper
Sandwich, NH

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Subject: soggy day along the coast
Date: Wed Oct 28 2020 11:35 am
From: dmp2ec AT comcast.net
 
The weather has turned and so have the cool birds...first for me a Lapland Longspur with a small group of buntings at HBSP.








https://www.flickr.com/photos/...








Other sightings, three Red-throated loons and lots of White-winged Scoter and Surf.  






Best~


Deb Powers-South Berwick Maine



Subject: Lyme Bald Eagle Wednesday
Date: Wed Oct 28 2020 11:09 am
From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
 
Adult seen about 10:45 a.m. perched atop a snag overlooking Post Pond from the NH Route 10 side.

Blake AllisonLyme, NH 03768-3400



Subject: Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory (27 Oct 2020) 96 Raptors
Date: Tue Oct 27 2020 19:45 pm
From: reports AT hawkcount.org
 
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory
Peterborough, New Hampshire, USA

Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 27, 2020SpeciesDay's CountMonth TotalSeason TotalBlack Vulture000
Turkey Vulture5151157
Osprey143162
Bald Eagle365165
Northern Harrier450102
Sharp-shinned Hawk116461292
Cooper's Hawk1100168
Northern Goshawk11010
Red-shouldered Hawk22163177
Broad-winged Hawk0408815
Red-tailed Hawk41128135
Rough-legged Hawk000
Golden Eagle233
American Kestrel072256
Merlin285138
Peregrine Falcon02430
Unknown Accipiter0311
Unknown Buteo21221
Unknown Falcon002
Unknown Eagle000
Unknown Raptor13879
Total:96163311723

Observation end time: 16:00:00 Total observation time: 8 hoursOfficial CounterJulie Brown, Phil BrownObservers: Charlie Nims, Julie Brown, Kathryn Frieden, Marie Burgess, Michael Burgess, Phil Brown, Roger Frieden


Visitors:
20 in all, many of whom spent a good chunk of the day helping us find and
sort Buteos. Thanks, in particular, to Charlie Nims for making the long
trip from Bartlett in search of a Golden (sorry such a distant bird!),
Kathryn and Roger Frieden, and Michael and Marie Burgess for all your
excellent eyes, cheer, and conversation. And hello also to Cliff Otto. What
a fine late October day!

Weather:
Light WNW/NW all day with temps 37-43 F. Clouds dominated the day, the
ceiling slowly lifting from just over North Pack to Monadnock to eventually
most of the higher White Mountains. A few very appreciated patches of blue
sky passed by the southern sun.

Raptor Observations:
Red-tailed Hawks ruled the tally board today with a season-high 41 compared
to a second-place total of 22 Red-shouldered Hawks. These Buteos tended to
move together in small groups over the summits and to the west. TWO GOLDEN
EAGLES were tallied, one just after 11 am - an adult, impossibly far and an
unsatisfying look for most; and a juvenile at 4 pm sharp, which somehow had
snuck past the counter and provided a rear-end (but distinctive!) view as
it cruised past Mt. Monadnock...a repeat performance of October 27, 2006 on
the auspicious first meeting of today's two counters. Harriers bookended
the day, as they tend to do. A late Osprey was notable, as was a migrant
Northern Goshawk directly overhead.
Local Bald Eagle (juv), Cooper's Hawk, and Turkey Vulture.

Non-raptor Observations:
Late fall's hold on the region was first suggested by a 'dirty snowball' -
a Snow Bunting - which ended up spending some time on the trail leading to
the hawk watch during midday, delighting several observers. Winter's onset
was then confirmed by a cheerful sound from above, a male PINE GROSBEAK
descending down to the ridge from the south near the day's end. A long list
of species today, 37 in all, including: 14 Canada Geese, 2 Ring-billed
Gulls, 8 Herring Gulls, 10 Gull sp., 1 Common Loon, a band of 27 Common
Ravens, 1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 1 Eastern Bluebird, 36 American Robins, 16
Red Crossbills, 47 Pine Siskins, and 2 Fox Sparrows.

Predictions:
Scattered showers and possibly low clouds during the morning hours, but a
chance for some birds in the afternoon.
Please note that the auto road now closes to vehicles at 4 pm sharp and is
scheduled to remain open 9-4 until 11/15, barring snow/ice conditions on
the road.

Report submitted by Phil Brown (pbrown@nhaudubon.org)
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory information may be found at: www.nhaudubon.org
More information at hawkcount.org: [Site Profile] [Day Summary] [Month Summary]








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Subject: Crow migration
Date: Tue Oct 27 2020 16:14 pm
From: c.null AT comcast.net
 
Thousand's passed by here in Bedford, fairly low, moving towards south west
around 2:15-2:45.
Corinne Null

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Subject: Moore Fields, Durham 10/27
Date: Tue Oct 27 2020 15:25 pm
From: Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu
 
Birders

I spent about an hour walking around the left half of Moore fields this morning, and it was quite productive.  The highlight was a flurry of 5+ snow buntings (I finally realized that waterthrushes don't migrate in the winter, they become snow buntings), mixed
with yellow-rump warblers on the main field.  Somehow I missed the pipit flock that has been there most of October, and no killdeer either.







Other songbirds included a couple of white-crowns in with a large number of white-throats, cardinals, and house finches in the brushy edge between Moore fields and Tecce fields (which are posted back in the leftmost corner).





Large flocks of crows, Canada geese (a sure sign that no hunters are present), and blackbirds provided target practice for a kestrel, harrier, cooper's hawk, two red-tails, and a peregrine.





Kurk Dorsey

Durham



Subject: Purple Finch and Wood Ducks in Londonderry
Date: Tue Oct 27 2020 15:13 pm
From: sdahlfred AT gmail.com
 
There was a male purple finch at my feeder a few minutes ago, and this morning while on my walk I spied two male wood ducks in a pond that's only become visible since the leaves have fallen.
Sandy





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Subject: busy crows
Date: Tue Oct 27 2020 14:29 pm
From: sylviasmiskoe AT gmail.com
 
The pond behind the house was quiet in the early afternoon.  The heron flew in. Then I noticed a lot of crow activity, in the field, in the oak tree next to the pond, in the horse pasture.  Something startled the heron and it flew up, startling the horses.  More crows arrived.   A mini mob.Today there is not a crow in sight.Sylvia Miskoe, Concord




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Subject: Red-breasted merganser, Grafton county
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 18:55 pm
From: elaine.faletra AT gmail.com
 
Not sure if this is a noteworthy sighting but I believe there was a Red-breasted merganser hanging out with 10 Common mergansers.  It was raw and windy on the lakes this afternoon producing white caps and they were sheltered in a cove near the boat ramp where I could spy them ‘unnoticed' from my car.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Elaine Faletra
Warren NH


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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, October 26, 2020
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 18:20 pm
From: mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com
 
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, October 26th,
2020.

During the Corona virus outbreak NH Audubon encourages you to enjoy birding
safely; please follow travel and social distance recommendations from state
and federal authorities.

A CHESTNUT-COLLARED LONGSPUR was seen at Woodmont Orchard in Hollis on
October 23rd and 24th.

A BLACK-HEADED GROSEAK was discovered at a private residence in Deerfield
on
October 14th, and was last reported from there on the 20th.

A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was seen at Woodmont Orchard in Hollis, and 1 was
seen on the coast, both on October 24th.

A DICKCISSEL continues to be seen at Goss Farm in Rye and was last reported
on October 24th, and 1 was seen in Rochester on the 25th.

A DICKCISSEL and a DUNLIN were seen at the Lancaster Wastewater Treatment
Plant on October 24th, and 2 GADWALL and an AMERICAN WIGEON were seen there
on the 22nd.

A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen in Penacook on October 25th.

2 SANDHILL CRANES continue to be seen in a cornfield along Ledge Farm Road
in Nottingham and were last reported on October 23rd, and 8 were seen
flying
over Rochester on the 24th. Up to 3 were reported from Weare during the
past
week.

A GOLDEN EAGLE was seen from Pack Monadnock in Peterborough on October 25th.

A COMMON GALLINULE was seen in Eel Pond in Rye on October 25th, and an
AMERICAN COOT was seen at Mill Pond in Durham on the 21st.

A CACKLING GOOSE was reported from Orford on October 24th.

A RED-NECKED GREBE was seen at Long Pond in Concord on October 23rd, and 7
BLACK SCOTERS, and 6 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were seen at Cherry Pond in
Jefferson on October 22nd, and a BLACK SCOTER and 6 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS
were seen at Thorne Pond in Bartlett on the 25th.

In the Upper Valley, 40 BLACK SCOTERS, a SURF SCOTER, and a WHITE-WINGED
SCOTER were seen on Mascoma Lake, a RED-NECKED GREBE was seen on Chrystal
Lake, and 3 LONG-TAILED DUCKS were seen on Goose Pond, all on October 26th.

6 SURF SCOTERS were seen on the Androscoggin River in Shelburne on October
26th.

A LEACH'S STORM-PETREL was seen off the coast of North Hampton on October
26th.

A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL continues to be seen at Odiorne Point State Park
in Rye, and 2 LAUGHING GULLS were seen at Eel Pond in Rye on October 21st.

5 RAZORBILLS were reported from coastal Rye on October 25th.

2 HUDSONIAN GODWITS were seen in Hampton Harbor on October 21st, and a
STILT
SANDPIPER was seen there on the 20th.

2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS were reported from Kingston on October 24th, 5 were
seen
in Dixville on the 21st, and 7 were seen along the coast on the 22nd.

A GREAT CORMORANT was seen at the Baker Floodwater Reservoir in Warren on
October 8th, and again on the 15th and 21st.

A GREAT EGRET was seen in Gilford on October 24th, and 1 was seen in
Hampton
on the 25th.

An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen in Center Harbor on October 21st, and 1
was seen at Odiorne Point State Park in Rye on the 25th.

A PINE GROSBEAK was seen in Errol on October 24th, and a BOHEMIAN WAXWING
was seen in Rindge on the 20th. Several COMMON REDPOLLS, EVENING GROSBEAKS
and SNOW BUNTINGS were reported from scattered locations during the past
week. Large numbers of PINE SISKINS and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES continue to
be seen.

A BOREAL CHICKADEE was reported from Pack Monadnock, 1 was reported from
North Pack Monadnock, 1 was reported from Hancock, and 1 was reported from
Penacook, all during the past week.

A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was seen at Odiorne Point State Park in Rye on
October 22nd.

Late-migrating birds reported during the past week included an OVENBIRD, a
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, a few TENNESSEE WARBLERS, a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, a
YELLOW WARBLER, a MOURNING WARBLER, 2 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLERS, 2 BLUE-
HEADED VIREOS, a BARN SWALLOW, a RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, a few
BOBOLINKS,
an ORCHARD ORIOLE, 2 VESPER SPARROWS, and an EASTERN TOWHEE.

Several FOX SPARROWS and AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS were reported during the
past week.

A WHOOPER SWAN of domestic origin continues to be seen at Eel Pond in Rye.

Southbound raptor migration for the fall-season is taking place and
observers have already counted thousands from various locations throughout
the state. Raptor totals to-date for Pack Monadnock are over 10,000! If you
want to join the hawk-watchers on Pack Monadnock, check with Miller State
Park for visitation requirements.

New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert is sponsored by Bangor Savings Bank.

This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at:
bird...@nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon
web site, www.nhaudubon.org

Thanks very much and good birding.

Subscribe to New Hampshire Bird Records – learn more about birds and birding
in New Hampshire: www.nhbirdrecords.org (read a free article in each
issue). This quarterly publication is produced by NH Audubon thanks to the
work of many volunteers.


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Subject: Evening Grosbeaks
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 17:32 pm
From: tspahr44 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Birders, below is a note on the continued irruption of Evening Grosbeaks.  I even had them in central Massachusetts last week.  Stock those feeders!
Best,
Tim Spahr

https://finchnetwork.org/irrup...




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Subject: Pheasants -Exeter Rte.27
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 15:18 pm
From: samlewis100 AT gmail.com
 
Fellow Birders,
Roadside on route 27 between the Barking Dog Co. & the high school we had three pheasants. One ring necked male, one green pheasant male (hybrid from what I understand), and one green pheasant little lady. 
All were by the roadside eating affording great looks. 
I'm guessing they must have recently released a bunch for hunting season. 

--
Samuel Lewis
Exeter, NH 




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Subject: Finally, I have seen a real American Crow migration
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 14:50 pm
From: dana.fox1939 AT gmail.com
 
Yesterday October 25th, from the Woodmont Farm parking lot in Hollis NH where I was sitting while Bob unsuccessfully was searching for Susan Wrisley's Longspur, I finally witnessed crows migrating. Over a thousand crows from 9 - 11 am they came up low from low from the NE, crossed Rt. 122 and then went up over the hill of Woodmont Farms to the SW and out of sight.  There was a steady stream of them with periodic pods of 40 or so.  A few landed in the apple trees but most just flowed over. A few flocks swirled. According to the Birds of North America, they often spend the night in existing roosts on their way north or southWayne Petersen of Mass Audbubon just alerted me that the hawk watch at Mt. Wauchusetts had 1,200 American Crows pass by.  The same crows????? Oh, how much more I would like to know.
Allan from near Waterville, Maine reported thousands of crows at Exit 130 off of Rt. 95 in Waterville on October 20th.
Please let me know if you see more migrating crows.Thanks,Dana





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Subject: NH Coast Sea Watch (Leach's SP, Scoters Loons, Mergansers, etc.)
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 14:44 pm
From: smirick AT comcast.net
 
I spent most of the morning and early afternoon sea watching off and on 
from a couple of locations.  A decent flight of scoters and mergansers
and a Leach's Storm-Petrel were highlights.

Checklist Comments:     East or ENE winds 20 knots.  Overcast. Mostly
excellent visibility.  Some light rain and some mist/fog. About 1/2 the
time at Ragged Neck and 1/2 the time at Little Boar's Head.  Some time
with Leo McKillop.  Except for the Leach's SP, this is a count for birds
MOVING SOUTH ONLY.

Brant  6
Mallard  2
American Black Duck  65
Green-winged Teal  1
Greater Scaup  1
Lesser Scaup  2
Common Eider  29
Surf Scoter  428
White-winged Scoter  125
Black Scoter  537
SCOTER SP.  1,484    Most far offshore.  Conservative estimate.
Long-tailed Duck  57
Bufflehead  6
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER  314   My 2nd highest count for State (323 on
11/9/03).
Horned Grebe  1
Red-necked Grebe  1
Razorbill  1     Black and white football flying by.  White on side of
face and relatively large bill.
Black Guillemot  1
alcid sp.  1     More distant than Razorbill.  Not 100% sure on this. 
Probably a Razorbill, but not sure.
Bonaparte's Gull  5
Laughing Gull  3     All adults.  Getting late.
Red-throated Loon  329     Nice flight.  Largest flock of 24 birds.
Still going on late in morning and afternoon when other species seem to
have slowed.
Common Loon  64
loon sp.  19
LEACH'S STORM-PETREL  1     Medium distance from Little Boar's Head. 
Nice visibility and not raining.  Watched for over 30 seconds (!) as it
flew NORTH through the waves.  Overall dark brown coloration with long
angled wings.  Did very little, if any, flapping.  Went quickly from
Manx to jaeger to Leach's in my ID.
Northern Gannet  118     Light movement of gannets.  Compare with 2,131
on 10/15/17, 1,727 on 10/20/18, 1,591 on 10/24/17 and 1,092 on 10/28/06.
Double-crested Cormorant  366     Relatively few birds moving.  One
flock of about 150 plus a few smaller skeins.
Northern Harrier  1     One of the last birds of the day.  Far offshore
and moving south with Gannets!

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: surf scoters
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 14:13 pm
From: kiedube AT outlook.com
 
6 male surf scoters, Androscoggin River, Shelburne, approx. 1.75 miles east of Gorham, route 2
 
Kathy Dube
Berlin
 
Sent from
Mail for Windows 10
 



Subject: Waterfowl moving today: Four Lake Loop in Grafton County
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 11:57 am
From: biodiva AT myfairpoint.net
 
Great story Wayne! Reminds of an epic scoter adventure I had way back in 1995. I wrote it up for my occasional column in the Valley News at the time, and “reprint” it here for any interested parties.
 Pam Hunt, Penacook
 The Day of the Scoters - by Pam Hunt As mentioned in an earlier column, October is the best month for observing fall waterfowl migration in the Upper Valley.  Although I singled out Lakes Fairlee and Morey for my earlier site description, almost any water body can produce good numbers of ducks and other water birds. However, there is always a certain element of luck involved, and you may need to check your favorite lake several times until you find something of interest.  The account which follows is an example of one of those lucky visits and the waterfowl odyssey that followed.  At the same time it serves to introduce the good waterfowl lakes on the New Hampshire side of the Connecticut River.
 On the morning of October 19, 1995, I decided to take a quick trip down to Mascoma Lake to look for lingering songbirds, a decision that was to change to course of the entire day. Arriving at the lakeshore, I noted a small flock of 7 Black Scoters out in the center of the lake.  Now, while Black Scoters are regularly seen on the ocean, inland sightings are highly unpredictable, and numbers are usually low.  Nonetheless, the scoter sighting spurred me to abandon my songbird search and circumnavigate the lake instead.  Perhaps some other ducks had chosen to land the previous night.  From Route 4A I spotted another fall rarity for the lake, a Red-necked Grebe, and started to anticipate further goodies on the rest of the lake.  I was not disappointed, for after passing the Shaker Bridge and scanning the lake near the islands, I discovered another group of Black Scoters.  This flock was little more than a distant milling-about of black dots, but it was obvious that it contained well over 100 birds.  It was also obvious that something was definitely going on, and that I would have to reinvestigate this flock from the opposite shore.
 Continuing southeast on 4A, I made the snap decision that was ultimately to end all thoughts of previously planned activities for the day:  I took a detour to Crystal Lake.  From the boat ramp on Algonquin Road I tallied 44 Ring-necked Ducks, several Mallards and Black Ducks, 2 Pied-billed Grebes, and the find of the day:  14 Cattle Egrets.  Cattle Egrets are rare spring and fall visitors to New Hampshire, although they breed as close as Lake Champlain.  In fact there have not been more than two reported in a year since 1983, when a total of 10 were seen among 4 locations.  The largest flock ever recorded in the state appears to be 5.  I could dwell longer on the egrets, but the real excitement was yet to come.
 I returned to Crystal Lake Road and followed the shore north, and in the process discovered another flock of Black Scoters, this one numbering around 200.  Also in the vicinity were 3 other species of largely oceanic ducks:  Surf Scoter, Oldsquaw, and Red-breasted Merganser, and well as a couple of the more expectable Common Loon.  Back on Mascoma Lake, the Black Scoter flock turned out to contain 250 birds, and I discovered yet another rarity.  This time it was a Great Cormorant, another ocean species which sometimes wanders to inland waters.
 After a couple of phone calls to alert some other birders to the presence of the egrets, I continued on to Canaan.  Given my experience in Enfield, Goose Pond was anti-climatic, containing only 34 scoters (as well as 2 more loons), but things picked up again at Canaan Street Lake.  Here again was a huge flock of Black Scoters, roughly 220 this time, plus 25 Surf Scoters, 4 Greater Scaup, and 2 Blue-winged Teal.  At this point I realized I was on to something big, and planned to head north and west to cover the river and several other lakes. 
 But first, now in the company of my friend Mark (who had just driven up from Concord), we went back to see the egrets.  In the process we turned up two more species on Crystal Lake, a White-winged Scoter and an American Coot.  Revisiting Mascoma also proved productive, as it turned out there were TWO Great Cormorants among the usual double-cresteds. Horned Grebe was our final bird on Mascoma as we headed toward Lebanon along Route 4A.  A quick stop at the easternmost Hanover reservoir yielded over 100 Canada Geese and another Pied-billed Grebe, but this lake was probably too shallow for scoters.  Post Pond in Lyme was deep enough, however, and contained another 75 Black Scoters.  At this point I would have headed on to Fairlee, but Mark had to be back in Concord around 5 PM, so we settled on a trip down river.  Along the way we added another 100 Black Scoters at the mouth of the Ompompanoosuc River and 25 above Wilder Dam.
 At this point my personal total (in case you haven’t been keeping track) was 911 Black Scoters, and I decided to try for 1000.  After seeing Mark on his way, I visited, in quick succession, Spectacle Pond (Enfield), Grafton Pond, and Kolelemook Lake (Springfield), but seemed to have hit a dry spell.  All I found were 7 Common Mergansers, nothing, and 5 Black Scoters, respectively.  Things picked up a little at McDaniel’s Marsh (also in Springfield), where I found 8 Surf Scoters, 8 Ring-necked Ducks, 4 Pied-billed Grebes, and a Great Horned Owl.  As sunset approached I had time for one more lake, and headed west to Eastman Pond.  As you might have guessed by now, it contained scoters, 60 blacks and 9 surfs to be exact, as well as 2 more Oldsquaw.  On the way home, there was just enough light to see 3 Wood Ducks and a Hooded Merganser on George’s Pond (Enfield) to round out the waterfowl list for the day.
 All told, I saw 21 species of waterfowl (loons, grebes, cormorants and ducks) between 8 AM and 6 PM, not to mention the Cattle Egrets, including a final total of 976 Black Scoters.  The puzzling thing about this concentration of birds, however, was that there was no apparent cause for it.  One normally finds large flocks of “grounded” ducks after a storm (such as last Saturday!), whereas this grounding came during a period of particularly uneventful weather.  And then, just to frustrate us, almost EVERY SINGLE BIRD was gone the next day.  All that remained were Mallards, Black and Ring-necked Ducks, Pied-billed Grebes, cormorants (including at least one great), loons, and on Crystal Lake, the lone White-winged Scoter and American Coot.  The rest had gone as mysteriously as they had arrived, and had I not decided to look for songbirds that morning, they might have gone completely undetected.  Actually, in all fairness to other observers, that latter point is partially untrue.  There were other large flocks of Black Scoters reported that day from Lake Morey, Lake Sunapee, and Moore Reservoir (Littleton), and only time will tell us the full geographic extent of the event.
  From: nhbirds@googlegroups.com [mailto:nhbirds@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Wayne Scott
Sent: Sunday, October 25, 2020 11:00 PM
To: NHBirds <nhbirds@googlegroups.com>
Subject: [NHBirds] Waterfowl moving today: Four Lake Loop in Grafton County
 I did a loop of four lakes here in Grafton County including Mascoma, Chrystal Lake, Canaan Street Lake and Goose Pond. On Mascoma Lake I saw 14 Bufflehead, a flock of 40-ish Black Scoters that included one male Surf Scoter. A nearby female-type White-winged Scoter and a male Common Goldeneye rounded out the list.
 At Chrystal Lake there was a Red-necked Grebe, 4 female Buffleheads, another group of Black Scoters, and a surprising Greater Yellowlegs poking along in close proximity to about 100 Canada geese, some Mallards and a new American Black Ducks.
 There was nothing except a single Common Loon at Canaan Street Lake, but down at Goose Pond, from the dam I scoped out yet another tight scrum of Black Scoters as well as 3 Long-tailed Ducks, one of which was a handsome male. My FOSeason American Tree Sparrow was present at the parking lot for the dam.
 Common Loons were in small numbers ranging 1-4 on each of he lakes.
     
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Subject: Ovenbird, Nottingham
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 11:45 am
From: rbprieto2003 AT gmail.com
 
Birding the yard in the rain today and was very surprised to see an Ovenbird sitting at the edge of the birdbath. Also had several Carolina Wrens, Red-breasted Nuthatches, and Pine Siskins continuing, as well as many more Juncos than we had this weekend.
Shaping up so far to be a very interesting fall!Robbie PrietoNottingham




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Subject: Grackles, Blackbirds, Keene
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 10:30 am
From: reillybj49 AT gmail.com
 
At 11:15 am I briefly had a mixed flock of about 30 Common Grackles and 20 Red-winged Blackbirds in my backyard.

Earlier 90 - 100 Pine Siskin.

Brian

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: first snow buntings of fall
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 10:08 am
From: hg2 AT myfairpoint.net
 
1-2 birds flying around snow covered summit of Moosilauke yesterday.

Hector Galbraith802 258 4836802 222 1916 (c)



Subject: Thorne Pond Scoters
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 9:06 am
From: charlie.nims AT gmail.com
 
Yesterday, late afternoon on my way home from dipping on the Chestnut-collared Longspur, I stopped by Thorne Pond in Bartlett.  To my surprise, among the ducks, there was a Black Scoter (which I initially mid-ID’ed as a RUDU—thanks Will B.!) was my first one not only at Thorne but also in Carroll County.  This morning, I went back to see if it were still there, no, only 3 Hooded Mergansers.   After birding for ~30 minutes and coming across my FoS American Tree Sparrows, I saw four black ducks with white speculums dropping through the fog\mist on to the pond—four White-winged Scoters!   in another 15 minutes, two more WWSC joined the first four.   The ducks were still there when I left.

eBird report with photos has been posted.

Charlie Nims
Bartlett, NH

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Subject: Thrush
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 8:35 am
From: s42yth AT comcast.net
 
Eating pokeberries in my yard ... swainson’s or hermit .... darker spots are in a V shape, light to the sides of the V and on belly.  Also imm white crowned sparrows, lots of white throated sparrows, a couple of butterbutts, all today, and late yesterday afternoon, a very cooperative ruby crowned kinglet within 3’ of me, in the lower branches of a spruce tree.    Sylvia Hartmann     Manchester NH

???????????????

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Subject: Horseshoe Pond - Vesper Sparrow, 51 species,
Date: Mon Oct 26 2020 6:38 am
From: rsuomala2 AT comcast.net
 
It was birdy at Horseshoe Pond in Concord yesterday (Sunday, 10/25/20). When I first arrived there was no wind and Yellow-rumped Warblers were feeding on the lily pads in the mud. When the cold wind kicked in I abandoned the idea of walking the RR tracks and instead walked into the fields from the north along the protected edge, joined by Mark Suomala. The 51 species was a great total for this time of year.
 Here are the highlights:
Pied-billed Grebe – 1
Blue-winged Teal – 1, lingering bird that has been present for weeks
Peregrine Falcon – 1, in the same tree with a Sharp-shinned Hawk that had been harassing crows
Merlin - 1
Hermit Thrush - 1
Pine Siskin – 5
Vesper Sparrow – 1
Evening Grosbeak – 2+, flyover
Yellow-rumped Warbler – 25
Common Yellowthroat – 1
 eBird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...
 Becky Suomala
Concord, NH
 



Subject: Waterfowl moving today: Four Lake Loop in Grafton County
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 22:00 pm
From: wsscott AT gmail.com
 
I did a loop of four lakes here in Grafton County including Mascoma,
Chrystal Lake, Canaan Street Lake and Goose Pond. On Mascoma Lake I saw 14
Bufflehead, a flock of 40-ish Black Scoters that included one male Surf
Scoter. A nearby female-type White-winged Scoter and a male Common
Goldeneye rounded out the list.

At Chrystal Lake there was a Red-necked Grebe, 4 female Buffleheads,
another group of Black Scoters, and a surprising Greater Yellowlegs poking
along in close proximity to about 100 Canada geese, some Mallards and a new
American Black Ducks.

There was nothing except a single Common Loon at Canaan Street Lake, but
down at Goose Pond, from the dam I scoped out yet another tight scrum of
Black Scoters as well as 3 Long-tailed Ducks, one of which was a handsome
male. My FOSeason American Tree Sparrow was present at the parking lot for
the dam.

Common Loons were in small numbers ranging 1-4 on each of he lakes.


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Subject: Pack Monadnock RMO (25 Oct 2020) 231 Raptors including 1 Golden Eagle
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 20:15 pm
From: reports AT hawkcount.org
 
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory
Peterborough, New Hampshire, USA

Daily Raptor Counts: Oct 25, 2020SpeciesDay's CountMonth TotalSeason TotalBlack Vulture000
Turkey Vulture22146152
Osprey042161
Bald Eagle462162
Northern Harrier54698
Sharp-shinned Hawk826351281
Cooper's Hawk1299167
Northern Goshawk199
Red-shouldered Hawk70141155
Broad-winged Hawk2408815
Red-tailed Hawk248794
Rough-legged Hawk000
Golden Eagle111
American Kestrel272256
Merlin283136
Peregrine Falcon02430
Unknown Accipiter0311
Unknown Buteo11019
Unknown Falcon002
Unknown Eagle000
Unknown Raptor33778
Total:231153711627

Observation end time: 16:15:00 Total observation time: 8.25 hoursOfficial CounterLevi BurfordObservers: Ben Davis, Bob Holt, Hillary Siener, Katrina Fenton, Mark Timmerman, Patrick Marr


Visitors:
152 visitors to the watch today including Rachel Zoffness representing the
Jenner Headlands Hawk
Migration Project. It's great to meet folks from other watches and
we're glad she stopped by! I love looking at the photos of the Ferruginous
Hawks. Can you imagine counting them?

Weather:
Partly to mostly sunny skies. Wind dying to calm. Temperature rising from
30 to 42 degrees F.

Raptor Observations:
There was a lot that happened today at the watch.

We finally got our first Golden Eagle of the season today! Not the closest
bird in the world, it came with an adult Bald Eagle for comparison. The
immature bird didn't have much of a wing stripe, but the tail was bicolored
and stood out over great distance. The bird was "Golden" in every manner,
from the proportions of head to tail, to the behavior.

We broke the Red-shouldered single-day record as well. Having tied the
previous record of 46 'Shoulders in a day back on November
4, 2017, Katrina was out for revenge, scanning and identifying like a
mad-woman! I marked down buteos feverishly, my fingers bleeding, and by 2pm
(1 EST) we had tied and then blown through the record like Godzilla through
Tokyo! The new record of 70 Red-shouldered Hawks in a day was only somewhat
satisfying to adrenaline junkies like us.

Besides a brief mention of the strong Sharp-shinned Hawk push today, this
was the latest date that we have had Broad-winged Hawks in the history of
the project. We had not one, but two juveniles come through at different
points today! Katrina got a photo of one of the birds, a nice documentation
shot for the late "bloomer."

A lot of other things happened today, like our juvenile Northern Goshawk,
more American Kestrels, and several Merlin. It would take days to recount
all of the special moments of the day.

In addition to the migrants noted today we observed 2 Red-tailed Hawks,
several Turkey Vultures, and 1 Bald Eagle acting as locals today.

Non-raptor Observations:
Migrants today:
958 Canada Geese
1 Ring-billed Gull
2 Herring Gulls
2 Gull sp.
4 Common Loon
1 Double-crested Cormorant
328 American Crow
6 Eastern Bluebird
At least 1 Common Redpoll
1 Snow Bunting

Also observed at the hawk watch were 17 Red Crossbills, and 17 Pine
Siskins. Also observed was a tight flock of about 300 birds acting like
Starlings. But no confirmation was to be had.


Predictions:
Tomorrow's weather is uncertain. Precipitation looks probable.

But Tuesday's weather was just looking better on Weather Underground's
forecast. Phil and Julie might get an alright day if it does have Partly
Cloudy skies and wind from the Northwest. That is a great forecast for
another Golden or two!

Report submitted by Levi Burford (lbburford@plymouth.edu)
Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory information may be found at: www.nhaudubon.org
More information at hawkcount.org: [Site Profile] [Day Summary] [Month Summary]








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Subject: Junket of Juncos Arrives in Hollis, along with a Snow Bunting
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 18:33 pm
From: swrisley13 AT gmail.com
 
The cold weather seems to have moved the Chestnut-collared Longspur out of Hollis (no sightings all day), and replaced it with hundreds of juncos!  There was also a single Snow Bunting flying around at Woodmont Orchard today, which provided entertainment while I wasn't seeing the longspur.
Susan WrisleyHollis NH





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Subject: Odiorne Point State Park - changes in seasons
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 17:31 pm
From: smirick AT comcast.net
 
The weather and the birds are changing.  The cold weather overnight 
brought a few migrants along the coast.  The Siskin and Red-breasted
Nuthatch invasion continues, but warblers are vanishing and Juncos are
arriving in larger numbers.  And today was a good day for geese.  In the
morning I had a flock of 32 Brant flying from the northwest over land,
crossing over Meadow Pond in Hampton.  Very odd sighting.  Later, Jane
and I took a (very) long walk around Odiorne focusing on land birds for
the most part.  There we had a spectacular late afternoon flight of
Canada Geese.

Odiorne Point State Park, Rye, Rockingham, New Hampshire, US
Oct 25, 2020 11:19 AM - 4:13 PM
Protocol: Traveling
4.73 mile(s)
56 species (+1 other taxa)

CANADA GOOSE  1,691     Migrating.  Continuous skeins of 50 to 150
birds. Most following a line that took them along the north end of the
park and continuing inland as if following the Maine coastline. Cold
snap overnight likely triggered today's movement.  Not much wind.
American Black Duck  1
Common Eider  5
Surf Scoter  3
White-winged Scoter  6
Red-breasted Merganser  17
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  3
Ring-billed Gull  12
Herring Gull  10
Lesser Black-backed Gull  1     Woody.  Again on flats.
Great Black-backed Gull  2
Red-throated Loon  1
Common Loon  6
Double-crested Cormorant  74
Great Blue Heron  1
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  4
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  6
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  12
Tufted Titmouse  4
Golden-crowned Kinglet  13
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET  22     Careful count.  Ties my 3rd highest fall
count for Ruby-crowns.  Good day for Kinglets.
Red-breasted Nuthatch  13     Big fall.
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
Brown Creeper  3
Carolina Wren  5     Careful count.
European Starling  40
Northern Mockingbird  2
Eastern Bluebird  7
SWAINSON'S THRUSH  1     Late bird.  Not great looks, but brief good
profile views.  Buffy neck and eye ring.
Hermit Thrush  4
American Robin  58
Cedar Waxwing  45
House Finch  8
Purple Finch  3
Pine Siskin  22     Big fall.
American Goldfinch  11
Chipping Sparrow  3
Dark-eyed Junco  31
White-crowned Sparrow  4
White-throated Sparrow  19
Song Sparrow  15
Lincoln's Sparrow  1     Latish.
Swamp Sparrow  3
ORCHARD ORIOLE  0     Possible sighting of this species which would be
EXTREMELY late.  Bird seen perched in afternoon lighting. Appeared very
yellow with dull wingbars and Oriole bill.  I think. Either an OROR, or
maybe a dull BAOR, or maybe a female WETA.  With robin flock.  Dropped
out of sight and could not be relocated. Frustrating.
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER  1     Near Monument Road.  So likely a different
bird than previously reported from Chat Cove area.
Common Yellowthroat  1     Adult male.
Blackpoll Warbler  2
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER  1     Female.  Late.
Palm Warbler (Western)  2
Palm Warbler (Yellow)  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  13
Northern Cardinal  1

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Durham/Newmarket this weekend
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 16:15 pm
From: Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu
 
Birders

I had two pleasant mornings this weekend, with some birding at well-known places and some at off the beaten path sites.  Siskins and Purple Finches were at every stop.







Saturday morning I stuck to Durham, starting at the state WMA on Bennett Road near Doe Farm.  The highlight of the weekend was a Goshawk that I caught just before it dipped into the old pines.  9 Red Crossbills and a huge flock of blackbirds, which took almost
4 minutes to cross overhead, were the other highlights.





At Surrey Lane, with some water again, I had my only shorebirds of the day, a pair of Killdeer.





I started to walk Moore Fields when I realized that there were goose hunters on the bluff over at Tecce's fields, so I left quickly but still picked up the Harrier that's been there the last couple of weeks.





At the old reservoir on Spinney Lane I picked up a couple of GW Teal and my only Kingfisher of the weekend.





This morning  I started with a dog walk to the local park and was rewarded with some excellent fetch (and some very poor drop) and a flyover Evening Grosbeak.  I then opted for Newmarket, starting at the town's Wiggin Farm on Grant Road.    While there wasn't
anything unusual, there were 2 Pipits in the recently mowed field and many Siskins.





Follett's Brook was, like the other spots, very birdy (26 sp in 30 minutes) but nothing unusual, although the Palm Warbler vs. GC Kinglet battle redefined bantamweight boxing.





The best stop of the weekend was Lubberland Creek.  On the bayside there were at least 60 Greater Yellowlegs, and on the pond side were my first Hooded Merg in weeks and a pair of PB Grebes.  In the air were a pair of Sharpies (birds, not markers, which are
remarkably aerodynamic themselves), a Coopers, and another Harrier, which delighted in harrying the yellowlegs.





Kurk Dorsey

Durham



Subject: global warming northern cardinal
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 15:44 pm
From: rirotberg AT gmail.com
 
Not rare, but I was very surprised to see a male Northern Cardinal as far north as the Silver Lake section of Madison, at 1 pm today.
Robert RotbergMadison

On Oct 25, 2020, at 12:20 PM, Pam Hunt <biodiva@myfairpoint.net> wrote:Now THAT’S a combo you don’t see very often in late October in NH!
 This morning’s Penacook survey was another for the record books, wrapping up with 52 species vs the 15-year high of 46 (and an average of only 38). There was a lot of activity on the radar last night, and if today’s walk is any indication a lot of it was juncos and kinglets. 
 But the highlights are in the subject line, and were all in a tiny spot of weeds and birches behind some condos that I’ve taken to calling the “magic spot” (there was a Hooded Warbler here last year!). The Grasshopper Sparrow was a new species for the survey, bringing the total to 179. In general it was a great day for sparrows, with tons of juncos (58, vs 16 last week), good numbers of White-throats and Songs, and 1-2 each of Fox, Am Tree (both first for fall), Chipping, Savannah, White-crowned, Swamp, Lincoln’s, and towhee. That’s 12 species, and the only one missing was Field.
 Right after finding the Grasshopper Sparrow I noticed a flash of white in the goldenrod – which turned out to be an exceptionally late Chestnut-sided Warbler. Based on the Birds of NH this would be a record late date. While photographing this bird I was taken aback by a slow, raspy “chick–a—dee—dee—dee” coming from the wooded edge. I never had a chance to see it, and it only called 4-5s, but a Boreal Chickadee is – amazingly enough – NOT new to the survey. The first was on 12/30/08, the same winter one showed up at a feeder in Bow.
 Meanwhile, Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Palm Warblers were almost at my feet, and siskins and goldfinches were swirling all around me. It was great 15-20 minutes of birding.
 Highlights elsewhere on the walk over the next 2 hours included 6 Rusty Blackbirds, 2 Evening Grosbeaks, 8 Red Crossbills, and 6 Hermit Thrushes (high for this late).
 It all goes to show that you just never know what you’re going to find when you step out your door on an October morning – although I suppose sometimes walking 10 km doesn’t hurt.
 Good birding!
Pam Hunt
Penacook
   “The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed the world.”
      - Alexander von Humboldt
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Subject: Sandhill Crane(s) in Weare
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 15:14 pm
From: biodiva AT myfairpoint.net
 
Given that the Hollis CC Longspur was a non-show today, we opted for a closer chase bird – following up on the cranes reported in Weare yesterday by Rosemary Conroy. It turns out someone else reported three cranes from the same area to NH Audubon a couple of days ago, so there’s clearly something going on there.
 We started by walking along South Sugar Hill Road from the intersection with Cross Road, and about half a mile down heard a crane off to the SE toward the flood control area. So we drove down to East Weare Road and walked east as far as the first view of the wetland in case the bird(s) were down there. They weren’t, and there were a lot of pheasant hunters out and about, so it’s not terribly surprising that cranes wouldn’t have been hanging around. The upside is that these same hunters presumably flushed a hen pheasant – which flew across the road directly in front of us. Probably about as “countable” as the Whooper Swan, but fun nonetheless.
 Bottom line: there are definitely Sandhill Cranes in and around the South Sugar Hill Road area of Weare. I think all reports have been of birds in flight, so I’m not sure what the best way to see them is at this point.
 Pam Hunt and Unity Dienes
Concord
 “The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed the world.”
      - Alexander von Humboldt
 



Subject: Whooper, gallinule
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 12:35 pm
From: rstephenson AT gmail.com
 
At Eel pond at 1:00. Also three  ring necked ducks and 4 hooded mergs on the north end. six bufflehead.  At 1:30 the swan was flying over the beach as I was scouting the ledges. Slow circle and looked like it was headed back to the pond.

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Subject: Penacook: Boreal Chickadee, Grasshopper Sparrow, Chestnut-sided Warbler!
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 11:20 am
From: biodiva AT myfairpoint.net
 
Now THAT’S a combo you don’t see very often in late October in NH!
 This morning’s Penacook survey was another for the record books, wrapping up with 52 species vs the 15-year high of 46 (and an average of only 38). There was a lot of activity on the radar last night, and if today’s walk is any indication a lot of it was juncos and kinglets.
 But the highlights are in the subject line, and were all in a tiny spot of weeds and birches behind some condos that I’ve taken to calling the “magic spot” (there was a Hooded Warbler here last year!). The Grasshopper Sparrow was a new species for the survey, bringing the total to 179. In general it was a great day for sparrows, with tons of juncos (58, vs 16 last week), good numbers of White-throats and Songs, and 1-2 each of Fox, Am Tree (both first for fall), Chipping, Savannah, White-crowned, Swamp, Lincoln’s, and towhee. That’s 12 species, and the only one missing was Field.
 Right after finding the Grasshopper Sparrow I noticed a flash of white in the goldenrod – which turned out to be an exceptionally late Chestnut-sided Warbler. Based on the Birds of NH this would be a record late date. While photographing this bird I was taken aback by a slow, raspy “chick–a—dee—dee—dee” coming from the wooded edge. I never had a chance to see it, and it only called 4-5s, but a Boreal Chickadee is – amazingly enough – NOT new to the survey. The first was on 12/30/08, the same winter one showed up at a feeder in Bow.
 Meanwhile, Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Palm Warblers were almost at my feet, and siskins and goldfinches were swirling all around me. It was great 15-20 minutes of birding.
 Highlights elsewhere on the walk over the next 2 hours included 6 Rusty Blackbirds, 2 Evening Grosbeaks, 8 Red Crossbills, and 6 Hermit Thrushes (high for this late).
 It all goes to show that you just never know what you’re going to find when you step out your door on an October morning – although I suppose sometimes walking 10 km doesn’t hurt.
 Good birding!
Pam Hunt
Penacook
   “The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed the world.”
      - Alexander von Humboldt
 



Subject: Chestnut-collarded Longspur - NO (11:45am) Hollis
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 11:15 am
From: swrisley13 AT gmail.com
 
A friend who was at Woodmont Orchard here in Hollis reports that there have been no sightings of the longspur as of 11:45 a.m. 
Susan WrisleyHollis, NH






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Subject: Yard birds
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 7:02 am
From: jennfrost67 AT gmail.com
 
Went outside in the cold this am to put out a new feeder and the suet.
Within a minute, a Red Breasted Nuthatch came to the suet (had one in my
bird bath a few wks ago but not at feeder). I had my first White throated
Sparrow under the feeder, what a pretty bird.
A Brown Creeper, one of my favorite birds has been on my Birch tree this
am.
Have seen many, many bears this summer most in broad daylight Including 3
different sows with babies. Including one with 3 new little ones.
Here's hoping they don't grab my new feeder today!
Bringing it in at night.

Jenn Frost, Dunbarton

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Subject: Longspur updates appreciated!
Date: Sun Oct 25 2020 5:24 am
From: biodiva AT myfairpoint.net
 
I wasn't able to make the trip to Hollis yesterday, but will head down this afternoon if the bird is still being seen. To that end, updates (yea or nay) to this list - or positive entries in eBird - would be much appreciated.



Thanks!

Pam Hunt

Penacook



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