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Updated on July 23, 2018, 5:15 am

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23 Jul: @ 05:14:35 
Preliminary Morning Seawatch Results, Robert Moses, Suffolk County [Timothy Healy]
22 Jul: @ 18:30:33 
Afternoon seawatch at Robert Moses, Suffolk County [Timothy Healy]
22 Jul: @ 12:01:26 
Croton point [Larry Trachtenberg]
22 Jul: @ 08:40:09 
Sea-watching this morning is good .. [Anthony Collerton]
21 Jul: @ 21:25:11 
eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists [Ben Cacace]
21 Jul: @ 06:46:06 
NYC Area RBA: 20 July 2018 [Shaibal Mitra]
20 Jul: @ 14:52:12 
Manhattan, NYC 7/18-19-20 (migration & recent nesting) [Thomas Fiore]
20 Jul: @ 06:07:38 
RMSP Sea Watch/ Suffolk County [Sean Sime]
19 Jul: @ 15:12:45 
5th Annual Seatuck Birding Challenge [Patricia Lindsay]
19 Jul: @ 13:59:48 
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, East Pond [Sy Schiff]
18 Jul: @ 11:12:58 
Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside [Sy Schiff]
17 Jul: @ 12:31:30 
Re: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co... [Andrew Baksh]
17 Jul: @ 11:13:29 
Re: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co... [Shaibal Mitra]
17 Jul: @ 10:09:34 
RE: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co... [Larry Trachtenberg]
17 Jul: @ 10:09:01 
Re: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co... [Joshua Malbin]
17 Jul: @ 10:03:43 
East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co... [Andrew Baksh]
16 Jul: @ 21:37:13 
Breezy Point Queens - Brown Pelicans + [peter paul]
16 Jul: @ 20:03:35 
Reminder BBC Evening Presentation Tomorrow 7/16/18 [Dennis Hrehowsik]
16 Jul: @ 14:01:22 
Jamaica Bay East Pond [Colleen Veltri]
16 Jul: @ 12:26:59 
SyracuseRBA [Joseph Brin]
16 Jul: @ 07:57:31 
Re: [Vinny Pellegrino]
15 Jul: @ 08:46:56 
Robert Moses Sea Watch (Suffolk Co.) [Ken Feustel]
14 Jul: @ 20:02:52 
Little Bue Heron [Paul Maldonado]
14 Jul: @ 07:10:40 
White-faced Ibis and Brown Pelicans Fire Island Inlet, Suffolk [Patricia Lindsay]
13 Jul: @ 22:43:13 
NYC Area RBA: 13 July 2018 [Gail Benson]
13 Jul: @ 16:16:17 
Your own backyard “drip” [Richard Guthrie]
13 Jul: @ 11:36:57 
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Shorebirds [Andrew Baksh]
11 Jul: @ 14:30:46 
Cupsogue Beach Brown Pelicans [David Barrett]
11 Jul: @ 09:17:01 
Royal Tern at Great Gull Island, Suffolk Co., July 10 & 11 [Joseph DiCostanzo]
11 Jul: @ 07:27:02 
Radar this morning [Gus Keri]
11 Jul: @ 06:39:58 
Manhattan, NYC 7/2-10 (& migration to 7/11) [Thomas Fiore]
11 Jul: @ 05:38:16 
eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists [Ben Cacace]
10 Jul: @ 14:36:55 
Washington County sedge wrens [zach schwartz-weinstein]
10 Jul: @ 12:48:57 
Fwd: FW: [VTBIRD] Lake Champlain pelagic trips are full - other options? (Please DO NOT reply to the listserv) [Richard Guthrie]
10 Jul: @ 08:53:25 
Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation: Film Screening: Young of the Year [Dennis Hrehowsik]
10 Jul: @ 07:20:24 
Breezy Point, Queens [peter paul]
10 Jul: @ 00:05:43 
Henslow's Sparrow...finally ! [robert adamo]
09 Jul: @ 14:51:23 
Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin]
08 Jul: @ 19:41:29 
Re: great shearwaters: Gardiners Bay/Block Island area [Joseph DiCostanzo]
08 Jul: @ 16:52:19 
Central Park NYC - Sun. July 8, 2018 - Red-breasted Nuthatch (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Breeding Birds [Deborah Allen]
08 Jul: @ 16:39:38 
Re: Storm Barrier meetings. Impact on water quality for Hudson River and Jamaica Bay. July 9, 10, 11. [Joshua Malbin]
08 Jul: @ 16:17:26 
Storm Barrier meetings. Impact on water quality for Hudson River and Jamaica Bay. July 9, 10, 11. [Nancy Tognan]
08 Jul: @ 13:36:18 
FDR Park eagles [Andrew Block]
08 Jul: @ 12:20:46 
great shearwaters: Gardiners Bay/Block Island area [Bruce Horwith]
08 Jul: @ 09:42:22 
Van Cortland Park, Bronx [Jack Rothman]
07 Jul: @ 21:00:09 
SGNWR (2 singing HESP) [Michael Britt]
07 Jul: @ 16:30:57 
Central Park NYC - Sat. July 7, 2018 - Red-breasted Nuthatch, American Redstart & Magnolia Warbler [Deborah Allen]
07 Jul: @ 06:40:07 
NYC Area RBA: 6 July 2018 [Gail Benson]
07 Jul: @ 04:24:08 
First southbound migrants Broome Co. [David Nicosia]
06 Jul: @ 08:01:36 
Breezy Point - Sooty Shearwater 7-5 [Andrew Baksh]





Subject: Preliminary Morning Seawatch Results, Robert Moses, Suffolk County
Date: Mon Jul 23 2018 5:14 am
From: tph56 AT cornell.edu
 
Been seawatching for 20 minutes and already had Manx, Great, Corys, and Sooty Shearwater off Field 2. Manx was just beyond breakers within 5 minutes of setting up the scope. Get out to the coast if you can! 

Cheers!
-Tim H
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Subject: Afternoon seawatch at Robert Moses, Suffolk County
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 18:30 pm
From: tph56 AT cornell.edu
 
I wasnt on the island until this afternoon, but 2 hours seawatching from Field 2 at Robert Moses State Park turned up the following:

43 Corys Shearwaters
3 Great Shearwaters
20+ unidentified shearwaters
2 Parasitic Jaegers
1 Northern Gannet
Hundreds of teens and gulls, including a young Lesser Black-back among the loafing flocks in the eastern section of the lot

Although the numbers and diversity were not as impressive as reports from earlier and further east, there was still more or less constant action and most of the birds were quite close to shore. Indeed, the wave action probably obscured many more distant birds offshore. This strong southeast wind, though not as powerful as the conditions last night, is projected to continue all through tomorrow and beyond. I, for one, plan to be seawatching at dawn as well.

Cheers!
-Tim H
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Subject: Croton point
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 12:01 pm
From: Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com
 
Adult and young foresters tern at Croton Train station now at Jetty. (uncommon on river side.)

Thanks to K. Lamb

L. Trachtenberg

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Sea-watching this morning is good ..
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 8:40 am
From: icollerton AT gmail.com
 
2 hours at Amagansett, Suffolk County, this morning netted:

Corys Shearwater (418)
Great Shearwater (9)
Sooty Shearwater (78)
Manx Shearwater (2)
Wilsons Storm-Petrel (9)
Leachs Storm-Petrel (1)
Northern Gannet (1)
Parasitic Jaeger (5)

All very close to shore. More stuff further out. Hope folks are out ...

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 21:25 pm
From: bcacace AT gmail.com
 
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar chart list of species with the current one picking up any additions or deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the date the species was added by county. Some are from newly submitted checklists from many months / years ago.

It isn't possible to spot these additions from old checklists. On the 'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species wasn't added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.
For each county on the NYS eBird Hotspots site click the 'Overview' link on the 'Explore a Location' line: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces...
Since last update: 10 days
Yellow highlights a species added for the first time over the past few weeks.
Chemung County:Red-headed Woodpecker (15-Jul-1976)Olive-sided Flycatcher (19-May-2017)
Orleans County:Barn Owl (14-May-1975)Yellow-headed Blackbird (20-May-1997)
Schuyler County:Clay-colored Sparrow (20-May-2001)
Steuben County:Upland Sandpiper (13-Jul-2018)
Franklin County:Louisiana Waterthrush (Removed)--
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYCWiki for NYS eBird HotspotsFacebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots: Q & A


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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 20 July 2018
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 6:46 am
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
 
NYC Area-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* July 20, 2018
* LINY 1807.20

- BIRDS Mentioned

BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Cory's Shearwater
Great Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
LEACH'S STORM-PETREL
BROWN PELICAN
Tricolored Heron
Lesser Yellowlegs
WHIMBREL
Least Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
POMARINE JAEGER
Parasitic Jaeger
LONG-TAILED JAEGER
Black Tern
Red-breasted Nuthatch

Greetings, this is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 20th, at 9:00 p.m.

The highlights of this week's tape are Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, White-faced Ibis, an incursion of Brown Pelicans, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Pomarine and Long-tailed Jaegers, and the ongoing shorebird migration.

The Black-bellied Whistling-Duck at Nissequogue River SP was last reported on Saturday the 14th but may very well still be present. Reports would be welcome, as we try to determine whether the second bird that has gone missing might be nesting.

Brown Pelican reports continue from all along the outer coast, including 2 at Old Inlet on several dates; 3 at Robert Moses SP on Saturday, plus singles there on Sunday, Tuesday, and today; and 8 at
Breezy Point on Monday.

An adult White-faced Ibis in fading breeding plumage was seen at Captree Island on Saturday but has not been reported since. A Tricolored Heron was seen there on Sunday.

Seawatching has been generally slow with a few Cory's Shearwaters being regularly reported, as well as a few Great and Sooty Shearwaters. A three-hour effort at Robert Moses State Park today produced 16 Cory's and one Sooty Shearwater, as well as a Parasitic Jaeger.

Other reports from Robert Moses include a single Wilson's Storm-Petrel on Sunday, very scarce from land this summer.

A trip offshore on Saturday yielded Leach's Storm-Petrel and Pomarine and Long-tailed Jaegers.

Southbound shorebird migration is underway, with adults of all the regular early species being seen in many places. Whimbrels were widely reported in small numbers all along the outer coast during rainy weather on Sunday morning, as was a breeding-plumaged Black Tern, at Cupsogue County Park. A count of 12 Stilt Sandpipers at Jamaica Bay on Tuesday was lower than last week but still notable. Further east, at Heckscher State Park 3 Pectoral and 3 Stilt Sandpipers dropped in after Tuesday's heavy rainfall, along with the more numerous Lesser Yellowlegs and Least Sandpipers.

Passerine migration has commenced, with a nice swallow flight on Wednesday, following a cold front, and Red-breasted Nuthatches appearing early at several sites, perhaps portending a good fall flight.

To send in reports this week, while Tom Burke is away, email Shai Mitra or call him at 631-666-7624.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.


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Subject: Manhattan, NYC 7/18-19-20 (migration & recent nesting)
Date: Fri Jul 20 2018 14:52 pm
From: tomfi2 AT earthlink.net
 
Wednesday-Thursday-Friday, 18-19-20 July, 2018 -Manhattan island sites including (esp.) Central Park (N.Y. City)
Thanks to some dedicated summer observers; this is a part of the season when not just waders (a.k.a. shorebirds) are on the move. There was a fair amount of widely dispersed southbound migration on the cool front of late Tuesday night into Wed. and far more so with Wednesday nights crisper air delivered on winds from the northerly direction & still more arrivals, passage, & drop-ins for Friday, 7/20 a very chilly night in the far north for Thursday.
Ten days after the first sightings of a (Louisiana) Waterthrush in Central Park, both waterthrush species have appeared and in the multiple, as have Yellow Warbler, American Redstart, and Black-and-White Warbler. One dozen species of Warbler have now appeared, which is neither unusual or at all surprising for this time period, & given the recent cool front over several days.
Some sightings this week also included the same lingering-summering species of warblers, such as Magnolia, while some may/do represent freshly arrived southbound migrant drop-ins. The latter is so of some of the Swallow species, perhaps of (some of) all including greater numbers of Barn. Most unexpected migrant, Veery - but that perhaps from a relatively nearby breeding area, &/or an individual that did not breed. It is still not widely understod how early many species (besides waders / shorebirds) return south, and that: it is not in fact early at all for many, but about the norm. This includes mid-summer movements of icterids of several species. A so-far modest (and continent-wide) incursion or irruption of Red-breasted Nuthatch continues.
a very lightly-annotated list:
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron (migrants)
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Green Heron (nested)
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Turkey Vulture
Canada Goose (nested)Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard (nested)
Northern Shoveler
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk (nested)
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
[American] Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
['feral'] Rock Pigeon (superabundant city resident-breeder)
Mourning Dove (nested)American Kestrel (nested)
Peregrine Falcon (nested)
Black-billed Cuckoo
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chimney Swift (uncommon nester)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-bellied Woodpecker (nested)
Downy Woodpecker (nested)
Hairy Woodpecker (nested)
Yellow-shafted Flicker (nested)
Eastern Wood-Pewee (nested)
Empidonax [genus] Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher (nested)
Eastern Kingbird (nested)
Warbling Vireo (nested)
Red-eyed Vireo (nested)
Blue Jay (nested)
American Crow (nested)
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Barn Swallow (nested)
Black-capped Chickadee (nested)
Tufted Titmouse (nested)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (additional to some that may also be lingering in past 6 weeks)
White-breasted Nuthatch (nested)
Carolina Wren (nested)
House Wren (nested)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (nested)Veery (unusual here in July)
Wood Thrush (nested)
American Robin (nested)
Gray Catbird (nested)
Northern Mockingbird (nested)
Brown Thrasher (nested)
European Starling (superabundant city resident)
Cedar Waxwing (nested)-
Blue-winged Warbler (northern Manhattan)
Northern Parula (2 locations)
Yellow Warbler (nested - northern Manhattan, as is typical)
Magnolia Warbler (summering male, Central Park)
Blackburnian Warbler (male)
Prairie Warbler (Thurs., 7/19)
Black-and-white Warbler (several)
American Redstart (multiple)
Worm-eating Warbler (2 locations)
Northern Waterthrush (multiple)
Louisiana Waterthrush (several)
Common Yellowthroat (nested - multiple areas, as is typical)-
Eastern Towhee (nested)
Chipping Sparrow (nested, including several pairs in Central Park)
Song Sparrow (nested)
Swamp Sparrow (lingering non-breeding bird at Central Park)
White-throated Sparrow(lingering & non-breeding birds)
Northern Cardinal (nested)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (northern Manhattan - breeding likely)
Bobolink (morning fly-bys)
Red-winged Blackbird (additional to modest nos. of breeders)
Common Grackle (nested, and likely some that were moving)
Brown-headed Cowbird (prob. parasite activity, multiple areas)
Orchard Oriole (nested)
Baltimore Oriole (nested, and some males probably moving as well)
House Finch (nested)
American Goldfinch (scarce, nested)
House Sparrow (superabundant city resident)
- - - - - -"I became convinced that noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good." Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Good -and ethical, quiet- birding to all,
Tom Fiore[New York]

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Subject: RMSP Sea Watch/ Suffolk County
Date: Fri Jul 20 2018 6:07 am
From: sean AT seansime.com
 
Since dawn there have been 4 Corys Shearwater, 1 Parasitic Jaeger, 1 Brown Pelican and a Lesser Black-backed Gull.

There is also a deceased 5-6ft Long shark on the beach just west of the concession area.

Good birding,

Sean Sime and Tripper Paul


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: 5th Annual Seatuck Birding Challenge
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 15:12 pm
From: pjlindsay AT optonline.net
 
Join Long Islands only island-wide birding competition to help promote 
bird

watching, wildlife conservation and open space preservation across the
region. The

event is open to all levels of experience, from expert birders to
complete novices. Fall

migration promises large numbers of birds and a great diversity of
species.

The Birding Challenge generates funding for Seatucks conservation and

education work, including efforts to protect bird habitat and important
bird areas.

Saturday, September 15, 2018 5 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Teams may bird anywhere on Long Island (including Brooklyn & Queens),
but checklists

must be submitted by 5 p.m., either electronically or in person at the
Suffolk County

Environmental Center - Scully Estate, 550 South Bay Avenue in Islip

Teams of 3 or more people - register as a team or join one of ours!

Special Family category - build a team and compete against other
families

Special Student category - organize a team from your school!

(No fee for adult chaperone/coach)

Dinner for all participants at the historic Scully Estate - 5 p.m. to
8 p.m.

Entry Fee: $50/person, $20/student

More information and registration at www.seatuck.org or

contact Lisa Smith at (631) 581-6908 or [email protected]

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Subject: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, East Pond
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 13:59 pm
From: icterus AT optonline.net
 
Joe Giunta and I went to check out the North and South ends. The most common bird was SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER at both ends (~100). Peep were in lesser numbers, mostly SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS with a few LEAST mixed in. Most birds were at the south end where we added a SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 5 KILLDEER and 4 STILT SANDPIPERS. Both YELLOWLEGS were present in small numbers. Also at the South end were 15 GLOSSY IBIS, both NIGHT-HERONS, a GREAT BLUE HERON and GREAT EGRET.The water level is down, almost, but not quite where needed. You can walk out onto a mud flat (real mud, 2 inches gooey thick) at the North end. Passable, but difficult footing. Joe went and I passed (boots, no knee highs). At the South end, we walked out on an extended dry flat with excellent views at birds in the corners right and left and an extensive group of shorebirds directly in front at the end of the dry area looking north. We did not go to Big Johns Pond area. If all continues, the place should be in good shape for the peak August shorebird movement.Sy SchiffSent from Mail for Windows 10

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Subject: Marine Nature Study Area, Oceanside
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 11:12 am
From: icterus AT optonline.net
 
CLAPPER RAIL, WILLET and GREEN HERON adults feeding with young . Also noted, a young YELLOW WARBLE. So, There has been nesting success. Two pairs of SALTMARSH SPARROWS bouncing around in the marshdidnt notice any young yet.Other birds of note, a CEDAR WAXWING and a WILLOW FLYCATCHER.Sy SchiffSent from Mail for Windows 10

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Subject: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 12:31 pm
From: birdingdude AT gmail.com
 
The presence of nesting Bank Swallows were noted last year and shared with NPS (Tony Luscombe) but not publicized. eBird field notes were suppressed for good reasons.
My own empirical observations throughout the year thus far indicates they are doing well with little disturbance. Lets hope it stays that way.

--------"Iprefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
Swift as the windQuiet as the forestConquer like the fireSteady as the mountainSun TzuThe Art of War
(\__/)
(= '.'=) (") _ (") Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
Andrew Bakshwww.birdingdude.blogspot.com
On Jul 17, 2018, at 12:12 PM, Shaibal Mitra <[email protected]> wrote:

As Jose notes, Bank Swallows are pretty versatile breeders and will take advantage of vertical scarps along the ocean beaches, when these form from time to time (they nested in such a setting at Cupsogue back in 2007). But apart from these occasional occurrences, they tend to be completely absent from the sandy outer beaches during the breeding season. This absence, in conjunction with their great overall abundance and mobility, makes them an excellent indicator species of diurnal landbird migration in late spring and early "fall." Thus, in late May, they prove even more convincingly than the similarly late-migrating Barn Swallows that northbound migration* continues long past the dates when local breeders are already far along in their schedules. And in July, they illustrate the early start to southbound migration. During our birding this weekend at places like Fire Island Inlet, Cupsogue, and Shinnecock, we repeatedly observed migrating Bank Swallows. I would predict that tomorrow's northwesterly winds should produce flights of hundreds or thousands of Bank and Barn Swallows, as well as locally good numbers of Cliff Swallows, along Long Island's outer beaches. Purple Martins and even a few Rough-winged Swallows might also be on the move, but note that the last species is quite scarce on the barrier beach, even in big swallow flights, and is perennially one of the most misidentified species in this context. Depending on when the front passes, we might also see nocturnal migrants, such as warblers, gnatcatchers, RB Nuthatches, and icterids tomorrow as well.

An example from this date four years ago:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

*Curiously, in spring, northbound swallows are almost always observed flying east to west here!

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: [email protected] [[email protected]] on behalf of Jose Ramirez-Garofalo [[email protected]]
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 11:14 AM
To: Joshua Malbin
Cc: Andrew Baksh; nysbirds-l
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...

Hi all-

Bank Swallows have been nesting on the Bayside beach in some numbers since at least last year. I think we may band them before the summer is over-

Jose

On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 11:09 Joshua Malbin <[email protected]<mailto:[email protected]>> wrote:
I think Bank Swallows are nesting at Breezy Point. I saw a few going into burrows on the bay side about halfway back from the jetty a couple of weeks ago.

On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 11:03 AM Andrew Baksh <[email protected]<mailto:[email protected]>> wrote:
Yesterday morning, I hiked the East Pond doing a complete shorebird survey. Overall, the number of shorebirds were down. Especially the Yellowlegs and Short-billed Dowitchers.

12 Stilt Sandpipers were mostly up around the north end along with my first observation of Semipalmated Plovers on the pond for the season. American Oystercatchers continue to show up on the pond in good numbers. 27 were loafing on the Raunt before taking off as I made my way north.

The duckage continue to hold a few Summer surprises. Green-winged Teal, American Wigeon and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were all observed.

Two continuing BONAPARTEs GULLS were also seen comfortably feeding on the pond edges.

On Sunday 7-15) at Breezy Point the highlights were two storm driven WHIMBRELS (put down in the rain & left just as the rain paused), two 2CY Lesser Black-backed Gulls, 1 Banded Adult Herring Gull and two BANK SWALLOWS.

Also notable was a juvenile Ring-billed Gull (RBGU). I have not seen too many juvenile RBGU at Breezy so that was a treat. This one I would deem to be the brown-type. Where the general appearance is of a brown chocolate color showing the distinctive feature of large scapulars with solidly dark centers.

About 1,000 Sanderlings dotted the shoreline along with Semipalmated Sandpipers, Least Sandpipers and Semipalmated Plovers. Some Piping Plovers were also active with a few juveniles indicating successful nesting.

A decent number of Terns (few hundred) were offshore but nothing outside of the expected Common, Forsters and Leasts in various age classes.

A link to Phone scoped images of the Lesser Black-backed Gulls. https://twitter.com/birdingdud...

Cheers,


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

Swift as the wind
Quiet as the forest
Conquer like the fire
Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu<http://refspace.com/quotes/Sun... The Art of War<http://refspace.com/quotes/The...

(\__/)
(= '.'=)
(") _ (")
Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
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Subject: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 11:13 am
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
 
As Jose notes, Bank Swallows are pretty versatile breeders and will take advantage of vertical scarps along the ocean beaches, when these form from time to time (they nested in such a setting at Cupsogue back in 2007). But apart from these occasional occurrences, they tend to be completely absent from the sandy outer beaches during the breeding season. This absence, in conjunction with their great overall abundance and mobility, makes them an excellent indicator species of diurnal landbird migration in late spring and early "fall." Thus, in late May, they prove even more convincingly than the similarly late-migrating Barn Swallows that northbound migration* continues long past the dates when local breeders are already far along in their schedules. And in July, they illustrate the early start to southbound migration. During our birding this weekend at places like Fire Island Inlet, Cupsogue, and Shinnecock, we repeatedly observed migrating Bank Swallows. I would predict that tomorrow's northwesterly winds should produce flights of hundreds or thousands of Bank and Barn Swallows, as well as locally good numbers of Cliff Swallows, along Long Island's outer beaches. Purple Martins and even a few Rough-winged Swallows might also be on the move, but note that the last species is quite scarce on the barrier beach, even in big swallow flights, and is perennially one of the most misidentified species in this context. Depending on when the front passes, we might also see nocturnal migrants, such as warblers, gnatcatchers, RB Nuthatches, and icterids tomorrow as well.

An example from this date four years ago:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

*Curiously, in spring, northbound swallows are almost always observed flying east to west here!

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: [email protected] [[email protected]] on behalf of Jose Ramirez-Garofalo [[email protected]]
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 11:14 AM
To: Joshua Malbin
Cc: Andrew Baksh; nysbirds-l
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...

Hi all-

Bank Swallows have been nesting on the Bayside beach in some numbers since at least last year. I think we may band them before the summer is over-

Jose

On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 11:09 Joshua Malbin > wrote:
I think Bank Swallows are nesting at Breezy Point. I saw a few going into burrows on the bay side about halfway back from the jetty a couple of weeks ago.

On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 11:03 AM Andrew Baksh > wrote:
Yesterday morning, I hiked the East Pond doing a complete shorebird survey. Overall, the number of shorebirds were down. Especially the Yellowlegs and Short-billed Dowitchers.

12 Stilt Sandpipers were mostly up around the north end along with my first observation of Semipalmated Plovers on the pond for the season. American Oystercatchers continue to show up on the pond in good numbers. 27 were loafing on the Raunt before taking off as I made my way north.

The duckage continue to hold a few Summer surprises. Green-winged Teal, American Wigeon and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were all observed.

Two continuing BONAPARTEs GULLS were also seen comfortably feeding on the pond edges.

On Sunday 7-15) at Breezy Point the highlights were two storm driven WHIMBRELS (put down in the rain & left just as the rain paused), two 2CY Lesser Black-backed Gulls, 1 Banded Adult Herring Gull and two BANK SWALLOWS.

Also notable was a juvenile Ring-billed Gull (RBGU). I have not seen too many juvenile RBGU at Breezy so that was a treat. This one I would deem to be the brown-type. Where the general appearance is of a brown chocolate color showing the distinctive feature of large scapulars with solidly dark centers.

About 1,000 Sanderlings dotted the shoreline along with Semipalmated Sandpipers, Least Sandpipers and Semipalmated Plovers. Some Piping Plovers were also active with a few juveniles indicating successful nesting.

A decent number of Terns (few hundred) were offshore but nothing outside of the expected Common, Forsters and Leasts in various age classes.

A link to Phone scoped images of the Lesser Black-backed Gulls. https://twitter.com/birdingdud...

Cheers,


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

Swift as the wind
Quiet as the forest
onquer like the fire
Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

(\__/)
(= '.'=)
(") _ (")
Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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College of Staten Island
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Subject: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 10:09 am
From: Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com
 
Kudos to Andrew for all hes done at JBNWR to try and get it back to what it once was as well as his regular reportage of all the shorebirds I cant ID.  Perhaps I will take the drive down on a (cooler) summer day from Ossining as its been a long while.
(As an aside, I did have my first southward migratory peep (a single bird) yesterday morning (a bit of a distance so leave it at that) at Croton Point Park feeding briefly on swimming beach 6:50 a.m.)

L. Trachtenberg
Ossining


From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Andrew Baksh
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 11:03 AM
To: nysbirds-l
Cc: Nyc ebirds
Subject: [nysbirds-l] East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...

Yesterday morning, I hiked the East Pond doing a complete shorebird survey. Overall, the number of shorebirds were down. Especially the Yellowlegs and Short-billed Dowitchers.

12 Stilt Sandpipers were mostly up around the north end along with my first observation of Semipalmated Plovers on the pond for the season. American Oystercatchers continue to show up on the pond in good numbers. 27 were loafing on the Raunt before taking off as I made my way north.

The duckage continue to hold a few Summer surprises. Green-winged Teal, American Wigeon and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were all observed.

Two continuing BONAPARTEs GULLS were also seen comfortably feeding on the pond edges.

On Sunday 7-15) at Breezy Point the highlights were two storm driven WHIMBRELS (put down in the rain & left just as the rain paused), two 2CY Lesser Black-backed Gulls, 1 Banded Adult Herring Gull and two BANK SWALLOWS.

Also notable was a juvenile Ring-billed Gull (RBGU). I have not seen too many juvenile RBGU at Breezy so that was a treat. This one I would deem to be the brown-type. Where the general appearance is of a brown chocolate color showing the distinctive feature of large scapulars with solidly dark centers.

About 1,000 Sanderlings dotted the shoreline along with Semipalmated Sandpipers, Least Sandpipers and Semipalmated Plovers. Some Piping Plovers were also active with a few juveniles indicating successful nesting.

A decent number of Terns (few hundred) were offshore but nothing outside of the expected Common, Forsters and Leasts in various age classes.

A link to Phone scoped images of the Lesser Black-backed Gulls. https://twitter.com/birdingdud...

Cheers,


--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass


Swift as the wind
Quiet as the forest
Conquer like the fire
Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

(\__/)
(= '.'=)
(") _ (")
Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
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Subject: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 10:09 am
From: joshuamalbin AT gmail.com
 
I think Bank Swallows are nesting at Breezy Point. I saw a few going into burrows on the bay side about halfway back from the jetty a couple of weeks ago.
On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 11:03 AM Andrew Baksh <[email protected]> wrote:
Yesterday morning, I hiked the East Pond doing a complete shorebird survey. Overall, the number of shorebirds were down. Especially the Yellowlegs and Short-billed Dowitchers.
12 Stilt Sandpipers were mostly up around the north end along with my first observation of Semipalmated Plovers on the pond for the season. American Oystercatchers continue to show up on the pond in good numbers. 27 were loafing on the Raunt before taking off as I made my way north.
The duckage continue to hold a few Summer surprises. Green-winged Teal, American Wigeon and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were all observed.
Two continuing BONAPARTEs GULLS were also seen comfortably feeding on the pond edges.
On Sunday 7-15) at Breezy Point the highlights were two storm driven WHIMBRELS (put down in the rain & left just as the rain paused), two2CY Lesser Black-backed Gulls, 1 Banded Adult Herring Gull and two BANK SWALLOWS.
Also notable was a juvenile Ring-billed Gull (RBGU). I have not seen too many juvenile RBGU at Breezy so that was a treat. This one I would deem to be the brown-type. Where the general appearance is of a brown chocolate color showing the distinctive feature of large scapulars with solidly dark centers.
About 1,000 Sanderlings dotted the shoreline along with Semipalmated Sandpipers, Least Sandpipers and Semipalmated Plovers. Some Piping Plovers were also active with a few juveniles indicating successful nesting.
A decent number of Terns (few hundred) were offshore but nothing outside of the expected Common, Forsters and Leasts in various age classes.
A link to Phone scoped images of the Lesser Black-backed Gulls.https://twitter.com/birdingdud...
Cheers,

--------"Iprefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
Swift as the windQuiet as the forestConquer like the fireSteady as the mountainSun TzuThe Art of War
(\__/)
(= '.'=) (") _ (") Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
Andrew Bakshwww.birdingdude.blogspot.com

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Subject: East Pond ( & Breezy Point Queens Co...
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 10:03 am
From: birdingdude AT gmail.com
 
Yesterday morning, I hiked the East Pond doing a complete shorebird survey. Overall, the number of shorebirds were down. Especially the Yellowlegs and Short-billed Dowitchers.
12 Stilt Sandpipers were mostly up around the north end along with my first observation of Semipalmated Plovers on the pond for the season. American Oystercatchers continue to show up on the pond in good numbers. 27 were loafing on the Raunt before taking off as I made my way north.
The duckage continue to hold a few Summer surprises. Green-winged Teal, American Wigeon and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were all observed.
Two continuing BONAPARTEs GULLS were also seen comfortably feeding on the pond edges.
On Sunday 7-15) at Breezy Point the highlights were two storm driven WHIMBRELS (put down in the rain & left just as the rain paused), two2CY Lesser Black-backed Gulls, 1 Banded Adult Herring Gull and two BANK SWALLOWS.
Also notable was a juvenile Ring-billed Gull (RBGU). I have not seen too many juvenile RBGU at Breezy so that was a treat. This one I would deem to be the brown-type. Where the general appearance is of a brown chocolate color showing the distinctive feature of large scapulars with solidly dark centers.
About 1,000 Sanderlings dotted the shoreline along with Semipalmated Sandpipers, Least Sandpipers and Semipalmated Plovers. Some Piping Plovers were also active with a few juveniles indicating successful nesting.
A decent number of Terns (few hundred) were offshore but nothing outside of the expected Common, Forsters and Leasts in various age classes.
A link to Phone scoped images of the Lesser Black-backed Gulls.https://twitter.com/birdingdud...
Cheers,

--------"Iprefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
Swift as the windQuiet as the forestConquer like the fireSteady as the mountainSun TzuThe Art of War
(\__/)
(= '.'=) (") _ (") Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
Andrew Bakshwww.birdingdude.blogspot.com

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Subject: Breezy Point Queens - Brown Pelicans +
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 21:37 pm
From: pepaul AT gmail.com
 
It's time for a Breezy Point check in! Late this afternoon, Breezy had an east to west (and eventually south) fly-by of 8 BROWN PELICANS. Also there was a (presumably) continuing first summer LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL near the entrance to the beach from the 4 x 4 path, as well as a similarly aged friend within the group of GBBGs closer to the jetty.
A BONAPARTE'S GULL made a couple of appearances loafing with Common Terns near the jetty, along with a few portlandica type Common Terns, and a couple of recently fledged Common Terns.
Finally, there were many shorebirds around - mostly Sanderlings, but a few Semipalmated Sandpipers and Semipalmated Plovers (and of course, Piping Plovers) as well.
Ebird list here:https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
Good birding,Tripper




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Subject: Reminder BBC Evening Presentation Tomorrow 7/16/18
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 20:03 pm
From: deepseagangster AT gmail.com
 
Tuesday July 17th @ 7PM
BBC Evening Presentation:

Film Screening: Young of the Year followed by Q & A with Kristin Holodak


BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, CENTRAL BRANCH AT GRAND ARMY PLAZA
Between the predators, the tourists, and the long migration ahead, life is a challenge for the roseate tern, especially during the first summer of life.This documentary follows the first summer of life for a cohort of terns as they prepare for their first long migration from the coast of Massachusetts to the beaches of Brazil.Presented by filmmaker Kris Holodak, a screening of the film will be followed by a Q&A with Kris about her experiences in creating this film.http://brooklynbirdclub.org/ev...
Dennis HrehowsikPresident Brooklyn Bird Club



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Subject: Jamaica Bay East Pond
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 14:01 pm
From: cfinneganv AT gmail.com
 
All trails leading to the east pond of Jamaica Bay are in great shape (thanks to Andrew Baskh). It made for a very enjoyable morning of birding albeit hot. Stilted sandpipers and a solitary spotted sandpiper among the dowitchers and yellowlegs. 

May the birds be with you.

Bob and Colleen Veltri

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Subject: SyracuseRBA
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 12:26 pm
From: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
 
RBA


*New York
Syracuse
July 16, 2018
NYSY 07.16.18


Hotline: Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert
Dates: July 09 - July 16 2018
To report by email: brinjoseph AT yahoo DOT com
Reporting upstate counties: Onondaga, Oswego, Madison, Oneida, Herkimer, Cayuga, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge and Montezuma Wetlands complex
compiled: July 16 AT 1:30 p.m. EDT
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondgaaudubon.org




Greetings: This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week on July 09, 2018


Highlights:


LEAST BITTERN
GREAT EGRET
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON
SANDHILL CRANE
WILSONS PHALAROPE
BLACK TERN
LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH
CERULEAN WARBLER
PRAIRIE WARBLER
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
WESTERN MEADOWLARK
ORCHARD ORIOLE








Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------


13 species of Shorebirds were reported from the complex this week. A WILSONS PHALAROPE made a one day showing on 7/12 at Knox-Marsellus Pool but was not seen again.
7/9: The WESTERN MEADOWLARK continues on the east end of
Armitage Road.
7/14: A rare for the area LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH was seen and heard flying over East Road. Also seen there were 3 SANDHILL CRANES along with 7 species of shorebirds . A CERULEAN WARBLER was seen on Mays Point Road.168 BLACK TERNS were counted at VanDyne Spoor Road after an eagle flew over. 3 CERULEAN WARBLERS were seen on Armitage Road in the wooded area.




Onondaga County
------------


7/10: A juvenile BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was seen along the creek walk at Hiawatha Boulevard in Syracuse.
7/12: A LEAST BITTERN was seen at the Dewitt Landfill near Fisher Road.
7/13: 11 ORCHARD ORIOLES were seen in the fields above Green Lakes State Park.




Oswego County
------------


7/10: an adult YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was reported on the Oneida River near Joshua Lane in Brewerton. No subsequent sightings were made.
7/15: A CERULEAN WARBLER was reported from Toad Harbor Road in West Monroe.




Madison County
------------


7/11: A CERULEAN WARBLER was reported from a wooded area west of Georgetown.
7/13: A PRAIRIE WARBLER was reported and nicely photographed at the east end of Muller Hill Road.




Oneida County
------------


7/10: A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW continues at Spring Farm Nature Sanctuary south of Clinton.






-end transcript


Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027 USA


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Subject:
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 7:57 am
From: pellegrinov AT ymail.com
 
http://six.abindustrialsupply....ny Pellegrino


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Subject: Robert Moses Sea Watch (Suffolk Co.)
Date: Sun Jul 15 2018 8:46 am
From: feustel AT optonline.net
 
Sea watch this morning at RMSP Field 2 yielded Brown Pelican (1), Wilsons Storm Petrel (1), Whimbrel (3), and Royal Tern (1).

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Little Bue Heron
Date: Sat Jul 14 2018 20:02 pm
From: maldonadop24 AT gmail.com
 
Went for a quick look see at Cupsogue 2nite,  had the usual Gulls,Osprey, Song Sparrows, Least Sandpipers, a Salt Marsh sparrow, E Kingbirds(imm & adult), and a beautiful Little Blue Heron. Spotted him wading in the small inlet that you can see from first rv campsite on the right(looking east). As you head towards moriches inlet. Nice treat. 

Paul Maldonado
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Subject: White-faced Ibis and Brown Pelicans Fire Island Inlet, Suffolk
Date: Sat Jul 14 2018 7:10 am
From: pjlindsay AT optonline.net
 
An adult White-faced Ibis was among many waders and shorebirds at the Captree Marsh, and three Brown Pelicans flew west to east along the ocean beach at nearby Robert Moses SP. The first pelican, a juv, passed at 7:35 and appeared to cross the barrier near the bridge, as though heading toward Captree. Ten minutes later an adult an older imm passed to east as far as we could see. Otherwise just 5 Cory's Shearwaters so far.
Pat & Shai

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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 13 July 2018
Date: Fri Jul 13 2018 22:43 pm
From: gbensonny AT gmail.com
 
-RBA* New York* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County* July 13, 2018* NYNY1807.13
- BIRDS Mentioned
BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+ARCTIC TERN+(+ Details requested by NYSARC)
Snow GooseKING EIDERCommon EiderGreat ShearwaterBROWN PELICANCATTLE EGRETGreater YellowlegsLesser YellowlegsWHIMBRELStilt SandpiperLeast SandpiperSemipalmated SandpiperShort-billed DowitcherLesser Black-backed GullGull-billed TernRoseate TernRoyal TernBlack SkimmerRED-HEADED WOODPECKERWorm-eating WarblerBlack-and-white WarblerMagnolia WarblerPrairie WarblerBLUE GROSBEAK
Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 13, 2018 at 7 pm.
The highlights of today's tape are BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, BROWN PELICAN, ARCTIC TERN, KING EIDER, CATTLE EGRET, WHIMBREL and other shorebirds, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and BLUE GROSBEAK.
The single BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK was still present today on the pond at Nissequogue River State Park. The pond entrance is off St. Johnland Road on the continuation of Kings Park Boulevard, and the pond is on the left by a small parking lot just before the Administration building circle.
A group of five BROWN PELICANS was reported on a sandbar at Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes late Wednesday afternoon; these were followed by three today in Bellport Bay off Old Inlet on Fire Island, west of Cupsogue, these perhaps part of the original group. Pelicans should be looked for anywhere along Long Islands south shore or around any inlets.
A first-summer ARCTIC TERN visited the flats at Cupsogue last Sunday, and among the slowly increasing numbers of southbound shorebirds there was a STILT SANDPIPER on Wednesday.
Also in that region, the two male KING EIDERS of different ages were still with some COMMON EIDERS Tuesday, the flock usually along the rocks on the east side of the inner part of Shinnecock Inlet.
A CATTLE EGRET was noted from Great Kills Park on Staten Island last Saturday.
Pelagic reports were few this week, but some GREAT SHEARWATERS were spotted out east near Gardiners Island last Sunday. Also in that area, a ROYAL TERN made it out to Great Gull Island Tuesday and Wednesday, while others are slowly improving in numbers along Long Islands south shore.
The good news from Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge is that the East Pond is rounding into prime condition for shorebirds. A visit there this morning produced 13 STILT SANDPIPERS and 579 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS as well as other anticipated earlier migrants, including GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS and LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. A GULL-BILLED TERN and two BLACK SKIMMERS also visited the East Pond. Earlier last Saturday at Jamaica Bay a WHIMBREL was spotted in the bay west of the West Pond, where a lone SNOW GOOSE continues.
At Breezy Point Monday afternoon single ROSEATE TERN and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were present, the gull continuing the next day. A few other LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS also remain at various gull gathering locations.
A male BLUE GROSBEAK, perhaps a continuing bird, was seen at Brooklyns Calvert Vaux Park Wednesday and today.
It appears that RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS nested successfully at Connetquot River State Park, with an immature accompanied by an adult seen there today. Another adult was also noted at a different location in Connetquot.
And this is the time to watch for floaters in our area, as birds not fully involved in breeding activities increasingly move about this week city and other local parks have produced such WARBLERS as WORM-EATING, PRAIRIE, MAGNOLIA, and BLACK-AND-WHITE, and other similar wanderers are possible.
To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.
This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.
- End transcript



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Subject: Your own backyard “drip”
Date: Fri Jul 13 2018 16:16 pm
From: richardpguthrie AT gmail.com
 
Water is a big summertime bird attraction, moving water even more so. 

Solar fountain at Walmart Clearance $15 Free shipping. It comes with a spritzer attachment but that plugs up easily and shuts the fountain off.

Even though I live right by The River, songbirds like a quiet place to drink and cool off.

Rich Guthrie
NewBaltimore
The Greene County


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Subject: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge East Pond Shorebirds
Date: Fri Jul 13 2018 11:36 am
From: birdingdude AT gmail.com
 
I did an early AM schelp on the East Pond. Not a lot of changes overall in terms of arriving shorebirds. Although, I did note that overall numbers have increased slightly. I had a total of 579 Short-billed Dowitchers this AM. Additionally, the Stilt Sandpiper numbers I had was 13, up from the two that were noted a few days ago.
A very small number of Least and Semipalmated Sandpipers have arrived and the Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs numbers have increased.
Other notables include a few American Wigeons, Green-winged Teal, Bonapartes Gull, Gull-billed Tern, 29 American Oystercatchers and 2 Black Skimmers.
As far as the pond itself. The water level looks very good. Please note, the North end is always more mucky and requires careful navigation. I am working on trying to widen the area around Dead Mans Cove to aid those who have trouble navigating the sticky mud. Remember, knee high boots are always better on the pond.
As we enter the Shorebird season, Ill try and get back to writing more about ID nuances. In the meantime, here are a few images to help getting your juices flowing for the Shorebird season.
https://twitter.com/birdingdud...
Cheers,
--------"Iprefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
Swift as the windQuiet as the forestConquer like the fireSteady as the mountainSun TzuThe Art of War
(\__/)
(= '.'=) (") _ (") Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
Andrew Bakshwww.birdingdude.blogspot.com

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Subject: Cupsogue Beach Brown Pelicans
Date: Wed Jul 11 2018 14:30 pm
From: miler6 AT gmail.com
 
Just posted this report to @BirdQueens on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/BirdQueens...

Five BROWN PELICANS on a sandbar at Cupsogue Beach this afternoon, found and reported by Eric Zawatski on eBird. Given that the pelicans were on the sand and not flying, they might still be around -- I don't know.
One ROSEATE and two ROYAL TERNS also reported, along with Little Blue Heron and Clapper Rail with chicks.
Just passing this along.
David Barrettwww.bigmanhattanyear.com



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Subject: Royal Tern at Great Gull Island, Suffolk Co., July 10 & 11
Date: Wed Jul 11 2018 9:17 am
From: jdicost AT nyc.rr.com
 
Last night around sunset a calling Royal Tern was flying over the tern colony on Great Gull Island. This morning it was roosting with Commons and Roseates on our dock.

Joe DiCostanzo

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Subject: Radar this morning
Date: Wed Jul 11 2018 7:27 am
From: guskeri AT zoho.com
 
After fairly quite night, a large amount of radar activities seen over NYC and western LI this morning (and even larger amount in NJ, eastern PA and Delaware). Most of the activities were after sunrise: between 5:30 am and 7:30 am)
Does this mean a lot of shorebirds started their migration south?
Here is the map:
www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/2018-7-10/

Unfortunately for me, It is the world cup semifinals today.
Gus

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Subject: Manhattan, NYC 7/2-10 (& migration to 7/11)
Date: Wed Jul 11 2018 6:39 am
From: tomfi2 AT earthlink.net
 
Manhattan, N.Y. City - including Central, Riverside, & multiple other Parks
Monday, 2 July, thru Tuesday, 10 July, 2018 - and -

Update for Wed., July 11th, a Louisiana Waterthrush has come back, a southbound migrant, in Central Parks n. end Loch; silent & seen at 5:50 a.m.) It is resaonable to assume that some other / additional migrants may be around; certainly some more will with any further cool fronts.

While many nesting birds have had either / both nestlings & fledglings in the city parks, there also have been a modest passage of southbound migrants - which at this time of year, are part of a subtle-enough passage that not all that many are noted. Its reasonable to assume there are more than have been or are now being reported, in this half of July, especially for a lot of land bird migrants, in areas where (now) few are looking much.

Some of the migrants that have passed thru or are still being seen include[d]: Spotted Sandpiper, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Tree Swallow, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Barn Swallow, Red-breasted Nuthatch, & the following Warblers - Prairie (as of 7/9, Monday), Worm-eating (as of 7/10, Tuesday), & also multiple Yellow Warblers (besides those lingering) and at least a half-dozen more American Redstarts (beisdes a few that may have been lingering since mid June), plus Common Yellowthroat and Black-and-white, the latter at least a single female staying in the same area, & the male Magnolia Warbler which just never left since late spring these 7 warbler spp. all just in Central Park, while at least a few Yellow Warblers & Common Yellowthroat (the 2 regularly-breeding species of warbler in parts of Manhattan) have been noted in some other parks, including Riversides less-frequented areas, & also farther to the north on the island of Manhattan.

Lightly annotated list of species seen over 10 days:

Double-crested Cormorant (rather common)
Great Egret (common as fly-overs, in east-west & west-east movements, also a few stopping in to feed in Central Park)
Snowy Egret (flyovers, mainly east-west & west-east as is customary on the local summer flyway)
Green Heron (multiple nests and some successful now)
Black-crowned Night-Heron (common if sought in eves. or very very early a.m., including multiple fly-overs those hours)
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (East River, n. of 104th St.)
Turkey Vulture (several sightings of fly-overs)
Canada Goose
Wood Duck (ongoing in Central Park)
Gadwall (2, Hudson River)
American Black Duck (few, river edge)
Mallard
Northern Shoveler (2, drop-ins at Meer, Mon. 7/9, not seen 7/10)
Green-winged Teal (1, as above)
Osprey (several sightings on several dates)
Red-tailed Hawk (near-common city resident; 15+ in & near Central Park alone; w/ far more thru all of Manhattan island)
Spotted Sandpiper (Tues., 7/10, Central Park)
Laughing Gull (few)
Ring-billed Gull (rather few)
[American] Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
['feral'] Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove (common nester, many young around)
American Kestrel (fairly common city residents, many fledged young out now)
Peregrine Falcon (uncommon city resident, multiple fledges recently)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo (northern Manhattan, early July)
Chimney Swift (ongoing)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (several sightings, with 2 on 7/9 at Central Park)
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Yellow-shafted Flicker
Eastern Wood-Pewee (nesting, in several parks including Central Park)
Great Crested Flycatcher (as above)
Eastern Kingbird (as above)
Warbling Vireo (as above)
Red-eyed Vireo (as above)
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow (modest nos of migrants, mostly higher flying & headed S.)
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (few)
Barn Swallow (fairly common, esp. in past 5 days, some also nested and fledged young)
Black-capped Chickadee (few)
Tufted Titmouse (few)
Red-breasted Nuthatch (modest movement, up to 5 one day; part of a continent-wide, but so-far modest irruption)
White-breasted Nuthatch (nesting in multiple parks, including Central Park)
Carolina Wren (as above)
House Wren (as above)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (2, nesting; but have not seen young)
Wood Thrush (some nesting - and some young now fledged)
American Robin
Gray Catbird (common nester)
Northern Mockingbird (fairly common nester)
Brown Thrasher (few, but already fledged young, including in Central Park)
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing (multiple nesting & some young also out; and more will be)
-
Yellow Warbler (multiple, including small nos. nested in northern Manhattan)
Prairie Warbler (male, Central Park - Ramble; Mon., 7/9)
Magnolia Warbler (male, lingering / summering / non-breeding, Central Park)
Black-and-white Warbler (females, Central Park, poss. all just lingering from spring migration; non-breeders)
American Redstart (multiple, but not many yet; these are migrants and have been in several parks including Central)
Worm-eating Warbler (Monday, 7/9; not esp. unusual as a July migrant, this species also breeds within 10 miles; Central Parks north end)
Common Yellowthroat (several, including 2 males lingering at Central Park, plus some breeders in other parks)
-
Scarlet Tanager (northern Manhattan; ongoing male)
Eastern Towhee (several breeding pairs and now with fledged young)
Chipping Sparrow (more than a few pairs bred, & at least 2 successful nestings in Central Park)
Song Sparrow (fairly common nester)
Swamp Sparrow (1 lingering in Central Park, non-breeding)
White-throated Sparrow (several lingering in a few places, summering non-breeders)
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Inwood Hill Park, nested and has young now)
Indigo Bunting (northern Manhattan; nesting possible, but not determined)
Red-winged Blackbird (small movements already going s.)
Common Grackle (some probably migrating and massing, as well as local nesters)
Brown-headed Cowbird (relatively few)
American Goldfinch (as above; & also nesting)
House Finch (scattered & many nesting lately)
House Sparrow (very ubiquitous pest species)

..
A GULF Fritillary (butterfly) was found in Central Parks Conservatory Garden (which is near E. 103-106th Streets, just west of Fifth Ave.) on July 4th, photographed there by Mike Freeman, and this regional rarity (an individual of this species was found & photod by Steve Walter, at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge in Queens County, about ten years ago) has persisted at the garden, most often being seen at & near pink blossoms, within the South garden, at that site. There has been plenty of other insect and arthropod life noted in the last 2 weeks, but none noted that are as rarely-seen as this fritillary, which is not so uncommon in Florida, but rarer as one gets much north of that state, in the east. To make it clear, the unexpected fritillary was still around as of late Tues. p.m. 7/10; it has shown some interest in other-color blooms in the garden, but seems a bit partial to pinks-n-purples.

. . . .
Out in Queens Co. after a visit to the many-times-mentioned shores with those many Terns (& Piping Plovers, Black Skimmers, & other nesting species), on return through parts of mid-Queens, I encountered a loud pair of Monk Parakeets, not far from the junction of Woodhaven & Rockaway Boulevards; just a little more of that species getting to be further established in a variety of areas in the city; Ive seen & heard them in parts of all 5 boroughs (counties) of New York City in the last 2 years. This Queens sighting was on July 3rd.

-----
"O! had I the ability, and could reach the nation's ear, I would, to-day, pour out a fiery stream of biting ridicule, blasting reproach, withering sarcasm, and stern rebuke. For it is not light that is needed, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake." - Frederick Douglass, American orator - writer - abolitionist - July 5th, 1852.

good -quiet & ethical- birding to all.

Tom Fiore
manhattan
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Subject: eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
Date: Wed Jul 11 2018 5:38 am
From: bcacace AT gmail.com
 
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar chart list of species with the current one picking up any additions or deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the date the species was added by county. Some are from newly submitted checklists from many months / years ago.

It isn't possible to spot these additions from old checklists. On the 'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species wasn't added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.
For each county on the NYS eBird Hotspots site click the 'Overview' link on the 'Explore a Location' line: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces...
Since last update: 10 days
Yellow highlights a species added for the first time over the past few weeks.

Cayuga County:Kentucky Warbler (23-May-2018)
Columbia County:Glossy Ibis (28-Apr-2017)
Dutchess County:Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (30-Apr-1993)Whimbrel (23-Jul-2004)
Orange County:Tricolored Heron (12-Sep-1982)
Rockland County:Franklin's Gull (23-Oct-1999)--
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYCWiki for NYS eBird HotspotsFacebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots: Q & A


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Subject: Washington County sedge wrens
Date: Tue Jul 10 2018 14:36 pm
From: zachsw AT gmail.com
 
Three, possibly four sedge wrens are currently being seen/heard in the grasslands of Washington County. One was seen yesterday by Thom McLenahan and Scott Robinson and heard today by David Harrison from Mahaffy Road in Argyle, about half a mile east of County Route 42. This may be the same bird that Bruce Hoover recorded on July 7th from the nearby Alfred Z. Solomon viewing platform on County Route 42. Another was found this morning by David Harrison on Dowmont Road, just before the sharp curve that goes to the farmhouse. Another bird was found on New Swamp Road (town of Hudson Falls, I think) by Stacy Robinson, also this morning. This seems like a very good year for this species in Upstate NY.
Zach Schwartz-WeinsteinAlbany--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


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Subject: Lake Champlain pelagic trips are full - other options? (Please DO NOT reply to the listserv)
Date: Tue Jul 10 2018 12:48 pm
From: richardpguthrie AT gmail.com
 
For the benefit of interested birders in New York, I am forwarding (with Alan's permission) this announcement about a "pelagic" trip into Lake Champlain. It's out of Burlington, Vermont, but adjacent to northern New York waters. I don't know if the boat will actually enter NY waters, but some of the birds might.

Lake Champlain has been seriously understudied in New York and has had a long history of producing some very interesting rare species such as Long-tailed Jaegers, Sabine's Gulls, and who knows what else might show up.
And how bad could a trip to Vermont be - anytime.

Contact Alan Strong at: -------->>>> [email protected] <--------- to get on board.

Rich Guthrie






-----Original Message-----

From: Vermont Birds On Behalf Of Allan Strong


Hi VT Birders,


Both of the pelagic trips are full, but there is a lot of demand and I'm trying to determine if we can run some additional trips.


If you are still interested and haven't contacted me already, please fill out this doodle poll so I can gauge additional interest.
https://doodle.com/poll/mespiz...


All the best,

Allan



Hi VT Birders,


I've got UVM's research vessel, the Melosira, reserved for another Lake Champlain "pelagic trip" on 8 (Sat) and 9 (Sun) September.


The trips will be about 4 hours (7:30-11:30) and the cost will be $50.00.


As we've found in past years, there are no guarantees about how the birding might be, but we will be right at the "peak" for jaeger migration, as well as the time of year for that annual Sabine's Gull, and we'll be in season for other ducks, shorebirds (phalaropes?), terns, and, well, who knows what else? We'll also be chumming on both trips with the goal of bringing birds close to the boat. Last year we had great luck with a couple of jaegers (Parasitic and Long-tailed) and an immature Sabine's Gull. But, we've also had some lackluster days as well.


A note about the Melosira. It is a steady boat, but if the water is choppy, viewing can be challenging as you are watching from a moving platform. Additionally, the boat is designed to chase fish and the things fish eat (like zooplankton), so it is not designed to get anywhere in a hurry. If an unusual bird comes whizzing by the boat, we probably won't have much luck in trying to outrun it for a better look.


But, this is a totally different perspective on birding, and we might just find some really cool birds!


If you are interested, please send me an email to reserve a place, let me know which day is of interest, and I'll send you further instructions on making a final reservation.
[email protected]


I hope you can make it!


Allan Strong


--
Richard Guthrie




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Subject: Brooklyn Bird Club Evening Presentation: Film Screening: Young of the Year
Date: Tue Jul 10 2018 8:53 am
From: deepseagangster AT gmail.com
 
Tuesday July 17th @ 7PM
BBC Evening Presentation:

Film Screening: Young of the Year followed by Q & A with Kristin Holodak


BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, CENTRAL BRANCH AT GRAND ARMY PLAZA
Between
the predators, the tourists, and the long migration ahead, life is a
challenge for the roseate tern, especially during the first summer of
life.This documentary follows the first summer of life for a cohort of
terns as they prepare for their first long migration from the coast of
Massachusetts to the beaches of Brazil.
Presented
by filmmaker Kris Holodak, a screening of the film will be followed by a
Q&A with Kris about her experiences in creating this film.
http://brooklynbirdclub.org/ev...
Dennis HrehowsikPresident Brooklyn Bird Club





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Subject: Breezy Point, Queens
Date: Tue Jul 10 2018 7:20 am
From: pepaul AT gmail.com
 
In case anyone was missing all that tern talk - never fear, I got you covered!
Breezy was very busy yesterday in the late afternoon. There were hundreds of gulls (mostly Herring and Great Black-backed), and hundreds of terns (mostly Common, and Least). But highlights included one ROSEATE TERN and one LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. The LBBG seems to be the same one that has been there since late June, and in my experience, has always been in the same place - directly in front of you, or just to the left as the 4 x 4 path opens out onto the beach.
The terns were mostly feeding on the ocean, making sorting through them difficult. There was one group that was usually around 30 birds or so loafing around the point. This group did not seem to have much turn around, as I kept finding the same first summer bird and second summer type in it. There was a second group loafing near the base of the jetty, on the bay side, which seemed to rotate more.
Below are my ebird report, and pictures on Flickr. I tried to include the variation in age and appearance of the birds that were there. There were at least 6 first summer COTEs, and about as many second summer types. That said, I didn't discover the bay side loafers until about an hour before I was going to leave, and I feel fairly confident that with more scrutiny, that group could have produced even more interesting birds. The numbers were certainly high enough that I would expect some more surprises could have been there with more examination.
Ebird:https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Photos:https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

As always, happy terning,Tripper


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Subject: Henslow's Sparrow...finally !
Date: Tue Jul 10 2018 0:05 am
From: radamo4691 AT gmail.com
 
Today, 7/9, after being sufficiently buoyed by Mike Britt's post of 7/7, and Karen Fung's up to date information on the "Star(s) of Shawangunk", Patrice Domeischel and I arrived at the Grasslands at 0740, whereupon Patrice, while stepping out of the car, announced "I hear it" ! Before hearing the Henslow's song again, we heard and saw Grasshopper Sparrows and Bobolinks...what a wonderful welcome ! In fact, the handrails of the boardwalk which leads you up to the platform, held a few Grasshoppers that looked and acted like centuries as we approached, albeit, leaving their posts when we got to close !
Once on the platform, we continued to hear the Henslow's vocalize, but did not see it right away. As we scanned the "ridgeline" to the south for the bird's favored perch (a small, but prominent shrub) we noticed a similar described shrub, somewhat closer to the platform, but picked up in the same "field" as you worked the "ridgeline". In short order, the Henslow's appeared on it, and proceeded to sing. It was neat to be able to see it vocalize through the scope, and hear it's song a millisecond afterward ! During our stay (till ~ noon time) the bird left and returned to sing from this shrub at least 6-7 times ! Among these stays, it twice shared this perch with a Savannah Sparrow.
In addition to the blessings of the bird, the fine weather, the number of other species, we met some fine folks ! The highly respected, Ralph Tabor visited us, and provided us with much appreciated information re: the Grasslands ! Toward the end of our stay, a couple from Brooklyn (Linda & Eric Ewing) arrived in pursuit of the Henslow's. Since they didn't have a scope, we left ours with them, while we checked out the nearby waterhole, in hopes of seeing/hearing a family of Virginia Rails Ralph had told us about. Although we dipped on the rails, we did hear some unusual vocalizations coming from the nearby, well occupied Purple Martin house ! Upon returning to the platform, we were gladdened to hear of the Ewing's success !
This specie was quite special for me - in addition to being my first in Ulster Co. and first in N.Y.S., it is the very first I've ever seen/heard anywhere ! The closest I've ever come to gettingAmmodramus henslowii,was a day late for the bird which stopped by Eric & Lorna Salzman's beautiful woods/marsh property in E.Quogue a few years ago. Sadly, Eric is no longer with us, but his memory is !
Cheers,Bob


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Subject: Syracuse RBA
Date: Mon Jul 9 2018 14:51 pm
From: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
 
RBA


*New York
Syracuse
July 09, 2018
NYSY 07.09.18


Hotline: Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert
Dates: July 02 - July 09
To report by email: brinjoseph AT yahoo DOT com
Reporting upstate counties: Onondaga, Oswego, Madison, Oneida, Herkimer, Cayuga, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge and Montezuma Wetlands complex
compiled: July 02 AT 3:30 p.m. EDT
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondgaaudubon.org




Greetings: This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week on July 02, 2018


Highlights:


GREAT EGRET
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON
TUNDRA SWAN
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER
LEAST TERN (EXTRALIMITAL)
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
GRAY JAY
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
WESTERN MEADOWLARK
ORCHARD ORIOLE
RED CROSSBILL






Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------


Shorebird season is upon us. 10 species including SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER were reported from the complex this week.


7/3: A TUNDRA SWAN is still lingering along the Wildlife Drive.
7/4: A PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was seen along Towpath Road. The WESTERN MEADOWLARK is still being seen and heard on the eastern end of Armitage Road. 14 GREAT EGRETS were seen there also. An ORCHARD ORIOLE was found at the Visitors Center.
7/6: A SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER was seen at the Morgan Road Marsh
7/8: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at the Visitors Center. A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON and 8 GREAT EGRETS were seen along the Wildlife Drive. 2 ORCHARD ORIOLES and 5 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS were seen at VanDyne Spoor Road.




Cayuga County
------------


7/7: Up to 8 RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were seen at Fair Haven State Park.




Onondaga County
------------


7/2: 2 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS were seen at the Liverpool Marina on Onondaga Lake.
7/7: 2 ORCHARD ORIOLES were seen at Green Lakes State Park.




Madison County
------------


7/5: A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was found at the Tioghnioga WMA east of New Woodstock.




Oneida County
------------


7/5: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at Verona Beach State Park.
7/6: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at Blossvale.
7/8: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen east of Cleveland.




Herkimer County
------------


7/5: 2 RED CROSSBILLS were seen near the Moose River on Independence Road.
7/8: A GRAY JAY was seen near Limekiln Lake south of Inlet.




Extralimital
------------


7/8; A very rare for the area LEAST TERN was spotted at the east spit of Braddock Bay on Lake Ontario in Monroe County. There has been no report of the bird today.






-end transcript


Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, N.Y. 13027 USA


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Subject: great shearwaters: Gardiners Bay/Block Island area
Date: Sun Jul 8 2018 19:41 pm
From: jdicost AT nyc.rr.com
 
We have had seals staying around Great Gull Island all summer for probably the last five years or so.
Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad
On Jul 8, 2018, at 1:20 PM, Bruce Horwith <[email protected]> wrote:

I fished yesterday behind Gardiners Island (south of the Gull islands) among hundreds of terns (common, roseate and a few least) and gulls (mostly herring and great black backed), but there also were several great shearwater present. This is only the second time in the last 20 years (last year being the first) that I have seen shearwaters in this area this time of year. That plus the presence of a seal in July (not sure whether it is a late stayer or an early arrival), suggest changing conditions in this part of the world.
Bruce Horwith16 Salt Marsh PathEast Hampton, NY 11937(631) 599-0040 cell phone



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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sun. July 8, 2018 - Red-breasted Nuthatch (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Breeding Birds
Date: Sun Jul 8 2018 16:52 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park NYC
Sunday July 8, 2018
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Red-breasted Nuthatch (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Great Crested Flycatcher & Breeding Birds.

Canada Goose - 14
Mallard - 10
Mourning Dove - 5
Chimney Swift - 3 or 4 (flyovers & collecting twigs around Turtle Pond & Tupelo Field)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - female/hatch-year Tupelo Field (Marianne Sutton & Deb)
Herring Gull - a few flyovers
Double-crested Cormorant - 8 (Mark Siegeltuch)
Black-crowned Night-Heron - almost invisible at Upper Lobe (Barbara Green)
Red-bellied Woodpecker - Azalea Pond, drumming at Oven
Downy Woodpecker - family group of 4 at Balancing Rock, female Swampy Pin Oak
Northern Flicker - Mugger's Woods
Great Crested Flycatcher - slope with persimmons s. of Maintenance Field
Eastern Kingbird - adults tending nest & fledgling perched above nest Turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - 5 locations
Blue Jay - 4 juveniles between Oven & Azalea Pond still soliciting food
Barn Swallow - 4 (Turtle Pond, Great Lawn & flyover at Tupelo Field)
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 3 seen together at Pinetum
White-breasted Nuthatch - heard near Boathouse and at Swampy Pin Oak (same bird?)
American Robin - many incl. flightless fledgling on the ground at Maint. Field
Gray Catbird - singing in several locations
Cedar Waxwing - Shakespeare Garden 2 nestlings, streaked underparts visible
House Finch - 5 together at Bow Bridge
American Goldfinch - male Tupelo Field
White-throated Sparrow - Gill Overlook
Baltimore Oriole - 7 (4 Mugger's Woods, juv./female Swampy Pin Oak, juv. at Oven)
Red-winged Blackbird - Turtle Pond & Oven
Common Grackle - several juveniles doggedly pursuing their parents
Northern Cardinal - adult males feeding juveniles at the Oven & Upper Lobe

Helleborine (Epipactis helleborine), a non-native orchid, in bloom in the Ramble.

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Subject: Storm Barrier meetings. Impact on water quality for Hudson River and Jamaica Bay. July 9, 10, 11.
Date: Sun Jul 8 2018 16:39 pm
From: joshuamalbin AT gmail.com
 
Thank you for sharing, Nancy! I will certainly be at one of the meetings tomorrow and I strongly urge others to be at one of them too. Speaking only for myself, this seems like exactly the kind of massive, misguided, environmentally destructive project that the Army Corps of Engineers loves to build and has a long track record of building. And once projects like this get started they are hard to stop. There is a less destructive alternative included among the options, and those of us who care about preserving our coastal areas need to show up to advocate for it.
On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 5:16 PM Nancy Tognan <[email protected]> wrote:
I am forwarding an email below from NYC H2O regarding scoping meetings for US Army Corps of Engineers proposals for storm barriers. These barriers may have a negative impact on water quality throughout New York harbor, Jamaica Bay, and the Hudson River.Please try to attend.
The US Army Corps of Engineers notice on this meeting is on websitehttp://www.nan.usace.army.mil/... 18-06-29-091903-337
Nancy [email protected]
From NYC H2O:
The Army Corps is fast tracking one of six off-shore storm barrier plans without a thorough review of the environmental impacts of each alternative and without meaningful public input and participation.Several of these plans specifically, the ones including giant in-water barriers throughout New York Harbor would threaten the very existence of the Hudson as a living river.If you live anywhere near the shorelines of New York City, New YorkHarbor, northern New Jersey, western Connecticut or the Hudson up to Troy, your community will be affected by this decision.Please read more about theproposals,shareand attend:Monday, July 9, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., NYC:Borough of Manhattan Community Center in Tribeca, enter at199 Chambers St, Manhattan.Tuesday, July 10, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., Newark:Rutgers University-Newark Campus, Paul Robeson Campus Center, 2nd floor, Essex Room, 350 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Newark, N.J.Wednesday, July 11, 6 p.m., Poughkeepsie:Hudson Valley Community Center,110 Grand Avenue, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.


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Subject: Storm Barrier meetings. Impact on water quality for Hudson River and Jamaica Bay. July 9, 10, 11.
Date: Sun Jul 8 2018 16:17 pm
From: nancy.tognan AT gmail.com
 
I am forwarding an email below from NYC H2O regarding scoping meetings for US Army Corps of Engineers proposals for storm barriers. These barriers may have a negative impact on water quality throughout New York harbor, Jamaica Bay, and the Hudson River.Please try to attend.
The US Army Corps of Engineers notice on this meeting is on websitehttp://www.nan.usace.army.mil/... 18-06-29-091903-337
Nancy [email protected]
From NYC H2O:
The Army Corps is fast tracking one of six off-shore storm barrier plans without a thorough review of the environmental impacts of each alternative and without meaningful public input and participation.Several of these plans specifically, the ones including giant in-water barriers throughout New York Harbor would threaten the very existence of the Hudson as a living river.If you live anywhere near the shorelines of New York City, New YorkHarbor, northern New Jersey, western Connecticut or the Hudson up to Troy, your community will be affected by this decision.Please read more about theproposals,shareand attend:Monday, July 9, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., NYC:Borough of Manhattan Community Center in Tribeca, enter at199 Chambers St, Manhattan.Tuesday, July 10, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., Newark:Rutgers University-Newark Campus, Paul Robeson Campus Center, 2nd floor, Essex Room, 350 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Newark, N.J.Wednesday, July 11, 6 p.m., Poughkeepsie:Hudson Valley Community Center,110 Grand Avenue, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.


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Subject: FDR Park eagles
Date: Sun Jul 8 2018 13:36 pm
From: ablock22168 AT yahoo.com
 
Went by FDR S.P. in Yorktown yesterday and saw that the eagles there seem to have fledged at least one young one. It was sitting on top of the nest tree.
Andrew
Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629
www.flickr.com/photos/conuropsis/albums
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Subject: great shearwaters: Gardiners Bay/Block Island area
Date: Sun Jul 8 2018 12:20 pm
From: bruce.horwith AT gmail.com
 
I fished yesterday behind Gardiners Island (south of the Gull islands) among hundreds of terns (common, roseate and a few least) and gulls (mostly herring and great black backed), but there also were several great shearwater present. This is only the second time in the last 20 years (last year being the first) that I have seen shearwaters in this area this time of year. That plus the presence of a seal in July (not sure whether it is a late stayer or an early arrival), suggest changing conditions in this part of the world.
Bruce Horwith16 Salt Marsh PathEast Hampton, NY 11937(631) 599-0040 cell phone



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Subject: Van Cortland Park, Bronx
Date: Sun Jul 8 2018 9:42 am
From: jacroth1 AT gmail.com
 
A beautiful and cool Saturday in the park, with a friendly bunch of birders, as always. 

This was the usual Saturday morning walk. Two more Saturdays and the walks will end for the summer.

Looking forward to Puddle Birding at Orchard Beach, as soon as shorebirds start arriving. The broken underground pipe at the oval has not been repaired and should make for a great freshwater source.

Mourning Dove
Red-winged Blackbirds
Barn Swallow
Tree Swallow
Common Grackle
Song Sparrow
American Goldfinch
Common Yellowthroat
House Finch
Gray Catbird
Yellow Warbler
Cedar Waxwing
Canada Goose
Mallard
Blue Jay
Northern Cardinal (H)
Mute Swan
Warbling Vireo
Great-blue Heron
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Great Egret
Wood Duck
Red-tailed Hawk
empidonax flycatcher sp. (likely a Willow)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
House Sparrow

Jack Rothman
www.cityislandbirds.com





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Subject: SGNWR (2 singing HESP)
Date: Sat Jul 7 2018 21:00 pm
From: sootyshear AT gmail.com
 
Good evening. We went to visit my wife's sister in New Paltz last night, so of course I made an early morning visit to the Shawangunk Grasslands (20 minute ride instead of the usual 110 minutes!). See the eBird list pasted below and check out the GRASSHOPPER SPARROW video, which has HENSLOW'S and SAVANNAH singing in the background. As always, it was great to see my buddy Ralph Tabor bright and early;)
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Mike BrittBayonne, NJ


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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sat. July 7, 2018 - Red-breasted Nuthatch, American Redstart & Magnolia Warbler
Date: Sat Jul 7 2018 16:30 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park NYC
Saturday July 7, 2018
Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Red-breasted Nuthatch, American Redstart & Magnolia Warbler.

Canada Goose - 6 Lake
Mallard - 13 (hen with 6 ducklings Upper Lobe, 6 Turtle Pond)
Mourning Dove - 4
Chimney Swift - flyovers of lone birds in several locations
Herring Gull - 5 (3 flyovers, 2 Reservoir)
Great Black-backed Gull - 3 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant - 2 Reservoir, at least 2 flyovers
Red-bellied Woodpecker - Azalea Pond & Mugger's Woods
Downy Woodpecker - Shakespeare Garden & Tupelo Field
Northern Flicker - pair gill Overlook, lone bird at Summer House
Great Crested Flycatcher - slope with persimmons south of Maint. Field
Eastern Kingbird - pair at nest with young turtle Pond
Warbling Vireo - singing at Oak Bridge, Maintenance Field & Warbler Rock
Blue Jay - 4
Barn Swallow - at least 8
Red-breasted Nuthatch - molting adult Pinetum (Ryan Serio)
White-breasted Nuthatch - east Mugger's Woods (Peter Haskel & Ryan Serio)
American Robin - many, newly fledged bird perched low at Swampy Pin Oak
Gray Catbird - several singing, adult carrying food near nest Swampy Pin Oak
Cedar Waxwing - adult & nestlings Shakespeare Garden
White-throated Sparrow - 2 in Ramble
Baltimore Oriole - family of 3 Swampy Pin Oak (Ryan Serio), ad. male Warbler Rock
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 (2 males & female Turtle Pond)
Common Grackle - 14 including 2 at Turtle Pond nest
American Redstart - 2 females (Tupelo field & Iphigene's Walk)
Magnolia Warbler - molting ad. male with inch-long tail feathers Iphigene's Walk
Northern Cardinal - 7 including male feeding fledgling Upper Lobe

As we were leaving the park we saw Anne Shanahan, who told us the young Red-tailed Hawks have been perching on 5th Avenue buildings in the mid-70s.

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC





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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 6 July 2018
Date: Sat Jul 7 2018 6:40 am
From: gbensonny AT gmail.com
 
-RBA* New York* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County* July 6, 2018* NYNY1807.06
- BIRDS Mentioned
BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+SANDWICH TERN+(+ Details requested by NYSARC)
KING EIDERCommon EiderCorys ShearwaterSooty ShearwaterGreat ShearwaterMANX SHEARWATERWilsons Storm-PetrelBROWN PELICANGreater YellowlegsWilletLesser YellowlegsWhimbrelRuddy TurnstoneLeast SandpiperWhite-rumped SandpiperPectoral SandpiperShort-billed DowitcherParasitic JaegerLesser Black-backed GullGull-billed TernBlack TernRoyal TernYellow-billed CuckooSNOWY OWLRed-headed WoodpeckerRed-breasted NuthatchMagnolia WarblerYELLOW-THROATED WARBLERBLUE GROSBEAK
Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 6, 2018 at 11 pm.
The highlights of today's tape are BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, BROWN PELICAN, SANDWICH TERN, SNOWY OWL, KING EIDER, MANX SHEARWATER, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, BLUE GROSBEAK and more.
A BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK reappeared last Saturday at Nissequogue River State Park in Kings Park, though without its mate, last noted on Thursday June 28. The duck was still feeding on the pond yesterday. The park entrance is off Johnland Road on the continuation of Kings Park Boulevard, and the pond is on the left by a small parking lot just before the administration building circle.
This week's BROWN PELICANS featured two moving east off Fire Island last Saturday and four the next morning headed west off Robert Moses State Park field 2.
A SANDWICH TERN was seen very briefly last Saturday afternoon at Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes. Other terns at Cupsogue included three Royal Terns Saturday and one Thursday along with a BLACK TERN, and the beginnings of the southbound shorebird migration have also been in evidence there, with appearances of some SHORT BILLED DOWITCHERS, both GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, three WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS last Saturday and a PECTORAL SANDPIPER Thursday, LEAST SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, four WESTERN WILLETS, and three WHIMBRELS Thursday. Other WHIMBRELS were noted Friday at Jones Beach West End and off Robert Moses State Park field 2.
Pelagic species have also produced some decent numbers late this week off Long Islands south shore - at Cupsogue Thursday combined counts netted 3 MANX, 140 CORYS, 9 GREAT and 3 SOOTY SHEARWATERS and a dozen WILSONS STORM-PETRELS, while totals off Moses Park field 2 Friday included about 190 CORYS, 3 GREAT and 4 SOOTY SHEARWATERS plus 8 WILSONS STORM-PETRELS and a PARASITIC JAEGER.
A few LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS this week included five at Jones Beach West End Friday, and GULL-BILLED TERNS featured one at Brooklyns Plumb Beach last Saturday and four at Nickerson Beach today. Two BLACK TERNS were at Moses Park Tuesday.
Very odd and unexpected was a SNOWY OWL found Sunday on Rikers Island. The emaciated bird was turned over to rehabilitators for assistance.
At Shinnecock two male KING EIDERS continue with some COMMON EIDER, the flock usually seen along rocks on the east side of the inlet.
A YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER continues singing on territory at the Bayard Cutting Arboretum in Great River, and a male BLUE GROSBEAK was still present Thursday around the Calverton Grasslands in the Preston Ponds complex.
Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were continuing at Connetquot River State Park as of last Sunday, with another still at Muscoot Farm in Westchester County Monday.
Some presumably non-breeding floaters recently have included YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and a few species of mostly regionally breeding warblers, including MAGNOLIA.
The RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH incursion also continues.
To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.
This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.
- End transcript



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Subject: First southbound migrants Broome Co.
Date: Sat Jul 7 2018 4:24 am
From: daven102468 AT gmail.com
 
Had my first "fall" LESSER YELLOWLEGS at Upper Lisle County Park last evening Broome Co. The bird was an adult in what appeared to me as worn breeding plumage. I also had a small group of RING-BILLED GULLS (13) loafing at Dorchester Park. This is the first group of these birds I have seen since Spring migration. To my knowledge these birds don't breed in Broome Co. Most of these birds were still in breeding plumage with a couple 2nd cycle birds. Nothing unusual, but interesting how quickly birds turn to fall migration. Yesterday there was a strong cold front and northwest winds that likely kicked this off. I also have seen reports from Montezuma that there is a trickle of LESSER YELLOWLEGS and a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. Dave Nicosia

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Subject: Breezy Point - Sooty Shearwater 7-5
Date: Fri Jul 6 2018 8:01 am
From: birdingdude AT gmail.com
 
A single Sooty Shearwater and 1 2CY Lesser Black-backed Gull (LBBG) were the highlights from a few hours at Breezy Point. Based on field notes and photos, the LBBG, appears to be a different bird than the 2CY one I had on the 24th of June.
9 Piping Plovers, including a few immature birds, indicating some successful nesting.
Some Tern activity way offshore but I could not pull out anything notable from the mess.
A phonescoped image of the LBBG can be seen here.
https://twitter.com/birdingdud...
--------"Iprefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
Swift as the windQuiet as the forestConquer like the fireSteady as the mountainSun TzuThe Art of War
(\__/)
(= '.'=) (") _ (") Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
Andrew Bakshwww.birdingdude.blogspot.com

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