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Updated on December 11, 2017, 12:15 am

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11 Dec: @ 00:13:55 
Pacific Loon, Fort Tilden, Queens (12/10/17) [Matthieu]
10 Dec: @ 20:56:31 
Linnaean Society meetings Tuesday 12/12 [Anders Peltomaa]
10 Dec: @ 19:31:27 
Queens Chat, Tanager Current Locations [Steve Walter]
10 Dec: @ 16:48:57 
Central Park, NYC - Sun., Dec. 10, 2017 - Hammond's Flycatcher, Wilson's Warbler, Red-shouldered Hawk, Co. Ravens [Deborah Allen]
10 Dec: @ 11:58:07 
RE: Western Tanager in Queens [Steven Schellenger]
10 Dec: @ 11:25:55 
Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES. Sunday [Anders Peltomaa]
10 Dec: @ 09:06:55 
Re: nysbirds-l digest: December 10, 2017 [Robert Taylor]
10 Dec: @ 05:34:50 
Re: nysbirds-l digest: December 10, 2017 [Jay D]
09 Dec: @ 16:22:56 
New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues, 5 Pine Warblers [Deborah Allen]
09 Dec: @ 15:07:59 
Western tanager and YB chat-yes [kevin rogers]
09 Dec: @ 13:58:24 
RE: Western Tanager in Queens [Shaibal Mitra]
09 Dec: @ 09:01:58 
Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - No so far, Saturday [Anders Peltomaa]
09 Dec: @ 08:05:39 
Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond [mpro7419 .]
08 Dec: @ 20:47:48 
NYC Area RBA: 8 December 2017 [Ben Cacace]
08 Dec: @ 14:30:50 
RE: Queens - Crocheron and Alley Ponds [Larry Trachtenberg]
08 Dec: @ 14:21:38 
Queens - Crocheron and Alley Ponds [Steve Walter]
08 Dec: @ 11:16:06 
Queens Western Tanager continues [d Futuyma]
08 Dec: @ 08:27:48 
Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES. THURSDAY 12/7 [Anders Peltomaa]
07 Dec: @ 20:02:50 
eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists [Ben Cacace]
07 Dec: @ 17:46:29 
RE: Queens Western Tanager and Y.B. Chat [Steve Walter]
07 Dec: @ 15:41:01 
Western Tanager, Crocheron Park, Queens County [Peter Reisfeld]
07 Dec: @ 11:04:12 
Re: Queens Western Tanager [Andrew Baksh]
07 Dec: @ 09:43:50 
HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES. THURSDAY 12/7 [Anders Peltomaa]
07 Dec: @ 07:59:00 
Queens Western Tanager [Jeffrey Ritter]
06 Dec: @ 21:17:44 
Pink-footed Goose - Coxsackie, The Greene County [Richard Guthrie richardpguthrie@gmail.com [hmbirds]]
06 Dec: @ 16:33:34 
NYC Audubon lecture, Thursday Dec. 7, Victor Emanuel of VENT bird tours! [Lynne Hertzog]
06 Dec: @ 15:00:24 
Western Tanager in Queens [Steve Walter]
06 Dec: @ 13:05:05 
Fwd: [ebirdsnyc] Hammond's flycatcher - Central Park [Anders Peltomaa]
06 Dec: @ 10:37:14 
2 Snowy owls along Dune Rd in Hampton Bays [Rich Gostic]
06 Dec: @ 07:04:17 
Hammond's Flyc. rep'td. 12/5, Central Park NYC [Thomas Fiore]
05 Dec: @ 13:28:33 
Re: [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No [brian.whipple]
05 Dec: @ 08:59:23 
re: Central Park, NYC - dates corrected to Sun. Dec. 3rd, Dec. Monday 4th! (with ten warbler spp. on Sunday) [Thomas Fiore]
04 Dec: @ 21:32:14 
RE: [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No [Rick]
04 Dec: @ 21:22:11 
RE: [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No [Shaibal Mitra]
04 Dec: @ 17:04:13 
Re: [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No [Tim Dunn]
04 Dec: @ 15:58:57 
[NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No [Frederick Kedenburg]
04 Dec: @ 13:15:05 
Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin]
04 Dec: @ 11:48:26 
American Woodcock, Bryant Park [joew701]
04 Dec: @ 10:53:51 
Central Park, NYC - Sun., Dec. 3, 2017 - Boat-tailed Grackle, Nashville & Wilson's Warbs., N. Parula, Hammond's Fl. [Deborah Allen]
04 Dec: @ 08:02:53 
HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES [Anders Peltomaa]
04 Dec: @ 04:51:04 
Re: Neotropical birds in the far north [Mike]
03 Dec: @ 18:34:11 
Central Park, NYC 12/3 - Sunday, & warblers [Thomas Fiore]
03 Dec: @ 18:14:23 
“Rarity Round Up” - Personal Results and Musings [Timothy Healy]
03 Dec: @ 08:51:46 
Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES [Anders Peltomaa]
03 Dec: @ 07:35:33 
The New York Botanical Garden [Debbie Becker]
02 Dec: @ 22:07:44 
Pelham Bay Park, Bronx - Sat. Dec. 2, 2017 - Merlin, Horned & Red-necked Grebes, Long-tailed Ducks [Deborah Allen]
02 Dec: @ 19:41:45 
Bronx/Westchester CBC 2017 [Andrew Baksh]
02 Dec: @ 19:40:25 
AUDUBON’S WARBLER - Napeague SP (Suffolk) [Derek Rogers]
02 Dec: @ 17:27:17 
New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Dec. 2, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues [Deborah Allen]
02 Dec: @ 15:13:04 
Kings and Queens Counties: Barrow's Goldeneye, Little Gull [Sean Sime]





Subject: Pacific Loon, Fort Tilden, Queens (12/10/17)
Date: Mon Dec 11 2017 0:13 am
From: matthieu.benoit76 AT orange.fr
 
I spent the afternoon birding at Fort Tilden. The highlight was a Pacific Loon. The Loon appeared stationary at position 40 33' 31.5108'' N 73 53' 12.6852'' W, which is between Battery Harris and Battery 220 on the Atlantic side of Fort Tilden. It was still there when I left this area during the late afternoon. I confirmed the ID just after dark by checking the pictures I took.

There was also a good flight of Gannets (1750, almost all passed between 2 pm and 3:30 pm).

Illustrated checklist with pictures of the Loon and most bird seen:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Matthieu



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Subject: Linnaean Society meetings Tuesday 12/12
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 20:56 pm
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
6:00 pm  Americas Snake: The Rise and Fall of the Timber Rattlesnake  Ted LevinEastern Timber Rattlesnake, 2009 (Digital Art)  Barbara SaundersHaving spent more than seven years studying both the Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) and snake advocates, former Bronx zoologist and nature writer Ted Levin will present a portrait of the snake, its place in Americas historyand of the heroic efforts to protect it against habitat loss, climate change, and the human tendency to kill whatever we fear. Reading from his new book Americas Snake: The Rise and Fall of the Timber Rattlesnake, Levin discusses the joys and frustrations of befriending a venomous reptile. He takes us from labs where the secrets of the snakes evolutionary history are being unlocked to far-flung habitats in locations that are fiercely protected by biologists and dedicated amateur herpetologists.7:30 pm  My Life with Cranes  George ArchibaldSandhill Cranes in Flight, 2006 (Digital Art)  Barbara SaundersHear Dr. George Archibald, Co-founder of the International Crane Foundation, tell his story beginning with the early years, when dreaming big depended on taking risks and the audacity to follow his visionary path. Over the past 50 years, George Archibalds life has been dedicated to the study and conservation of endangered cranes, and has led him to some of the most remote areas on five continents and to meetings with Indira Ghandi, the Emperor of Japan, and other world leaders. George Archibalds message of hope and encouragement helps others live their own versions of dream and action. The beauty and charisma of cranes, time and again, have brought people together because they are symbolic ambassadors of harmony and peace, flying free across many borders and inspiring people around the world to work together to protect our natural treasures



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Subject: Queens Chat, Tanager Current Locations
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 19:31 pm
From: swalter15 AT verizon.net
 
Still Crocheron Park, but the specific spots have changed a bit.
The Yellow-breasted Chat was being seen today by the southeast corner of the pond, but not at the waters edge. In that area, there is a series of benches, divided into three groups. About even with the middle group, there is a roundish, scraggly tree (about 40 feet tall) with berries. This on the side of the path toward the parkway. The chat was feeding on the berries periodically, then dropping down behind bushes to the right (where mostly not visible).
The Western Tanager was being seen about mid-way along the pond, on the north side of the road. It ranged from up on the hill down to the edge, where it provided killer looks and photo ops. At one point, it flew to the ponds edge, probably to get a drink.
Ill give the Wilsons Warbler the rarity treatment too, as I noted that a number of people needed it for their year list or had never photographed one (not that thats going to come easy). It made two passes (that I know of) through the area that the tanager frequented.
Steve Walter
From: Steve Walter [mailto:swalter15@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:00 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L@list.cornell.edu
Subject: Western Tanager in Queens
Eric Miller again found Western Tanager this afternoon. I dont know whether to refer to it as the Western Tanager or a Western Tanager. The location is about a mile and a half drive from Alley Pond Environmental Center, or whatever that comes out to as the tanager might fly. The site is Crocheron Park in Bayside (also shown on Google Maps as John Golden Park). The specific location was on the back (south) side of Crocheron Pond (also called Golden Pond).
From the Cross Island Parkway, go west on Northern Blvd. to 221st Street (second light after the parkway). Turn right and continue northward until the end of 221st , then make a left onto Corbett Road. When you hit 35th Avenue, make a sharp right and go down the hill to the pond. Parking here is ample.
Hopefully, this will be a more reliable situation than the one in Alley especially as were heading toward CBC time.
Steve Walter
Bayside, NY


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Subject: Central Park, NYC - Sun., Dec. 10, 2017 - Hammond's Flycatcher, Wilson's Warbler, Red-shouldered Hawk, Co. Ravens
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 16:48 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park, NYC
Sunday, December 10, 2017
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Hammond's Flycatcher, Wilson's Warbler, Red-shouldered Hawk, & Common Ravens. Note: Reservoir birds seen from south end.

Canada Goose - low numbers on Reservoir
Wood Duck - 2 males Reservoir
Northern Shoveler - 18 Reservoir
Gadwall - 4 Reservoir
Mallard - 146 Reservoir, a few on Turtle Pond
Mallard x American Black Duck - 1 Reservoir
American Black Duck - 3 Reservoir
Bufflehead - 4 Reservoir
Hooded Merganser - 9 (4 Reservoir, 5 Turtle Pond)
Ruddy Duck - 119 Reservoir
Pied-billed Grebe - Reservoir (2 others reported at north end of Reservoir - Enrico Leonardi)
Mourning Dove - around a dozen in Ramble
Ring-billed Gull & Herring Gull - around 500 Reservoir, mostly Herring Gulls
Great Black-backed Gull - 9 Reservoir
Great Blue Heron - immature Balcony Bridge (Sandra Critelli)
Red-shouldered Hawk - immature circling overhead just north of Boathouse & heading north (Christine Youngblood)
Red-tailed Hawk - 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 8
Downy Woodpecker - 2 (1 at the Evodia Field feeders)
Northern Flicker - Pinetum
Hammond's Flycatcher - continues near Gill Overlook (spotted by Enrico Leonardi)
Blue Jay - at least 4
Common Raven - 2 flying low near Central Park West seen from Shakespeare Garden
Tufted Titmouse - 2 or 3
White-breasted Nuthatch - 3 or 4
Brown Creeper - 2 (Stone Wall & Gill Overlook (Sandra Critelli))
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 2 (Azalea Pond & Summer House)
Hermit Thrush - 3 Hallett Sanctuary (Bob - early)
American Robin - not many, some in hollies & crab apples at Sparrow Rock
Gray Catbird - Hallett (Bob - early)
House Finch - several together in sweetgum near Turtle Pond
American Goldfinch - 2 at the Gill (Ginny de Liagre)
Fox Sparrow - 4 on path along Rock Wall
Song Sparrow - Hallett (Bob - early)
White-throated Sparrow - 50
Dark-eyed Junco - few
Common Grackle - 50
Wilson's Warbler - in holly at Azalea Pond (spotted by Enrico Leonardi)
Northern Cardinal - half a dozen
--

Stephan Passlick (@Stefan Passlick) tweeted a Northern Parula south of the Blockhouse at the north end of the park. See @BirdCentralPark maintained by David Barrett for New York County tweets.

Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

Hammie lives,

Deb Allen
www.birdingbob.com

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Subject: Western Tanager in Queens
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 11:58 am
From: sws6752 AT gmail.com
 
Chat, Tanager and Wilson's all seen on Sunday.
On Dec 9, 2017 2:58 PM, "Shaibal Mitra" <Shaibal.Mitra@csi.cuny.edu> wrote:
A Western Tanager continued at Crocheron Park this morning.


I had not until today looked at any photos of the bird(s) present recently at the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area (ca. 1.5 miles away), but Corey Finger's photos from 25 Nov clearly show a bird with uniformly juvenal greater coverts on its right wing:

https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...


The bird we saw this morning at Crocheron Park clearly showed a mix of juvenal (small, worn, grayish-brown, restricted whitish tips) and formative (large, fresh, black, extensive whitish tips) greater coverts on this wing:

https://flic.kr/p/22k7Kfv


The number of feathers replaced, as well as the slightly eccentric manner in which the replacement skipped one juv feather) argue against a single bird molting over a two week period.


Other photos from the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area show a Western Tanager that appears brighter than the one in Corey's photos (perhaps more similar to the Crocheron bird), but the photos I found do not show the wing feathers in sufficient detail for comparison with Corey's bird, or with the Crocheron bird.


Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

________________________________________

From: bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu [bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Steve Walter [swalter15@verizon.net]

Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 4:00 PM

To: NYSBIRDS-L@list.cornell.edu

Subject: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager in Queens


Eric Miller again found Western Tanager this afternoon. I dont know whether to refer to it as the Western Tanager or a Western Tanager. The location is about a mile and a half drive from Alley Pond Environmental Center, or whatever that comes out to as the tanager might fly. The site is Crocheron Park in Bayside (also shown on Google Maps as John Golden Park). The specific location was on the back (south) side of Crocheron Pond (also called Golden Pond).


From the Cross Island Parkway, go west on Northern Blvd. to 221st Street (second light after the parkway). Turn right and continue northward until the end of 221st , then make a left onto Corbett Road. When you hit 35th Avenue, make a sharp right and go down the hill to the pond. Parking here is ample.


Hopefully, this will be a more reliable situation than the one in Alley especially as were heading toward CBC time.



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY

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Subject: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES. Sunday
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 11:25 am
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
Hammonds Flycatcher just reported near Holly tree near Gill overlook, Muggers woods. Found by Bob and his group.
Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan

On Dec 7, 2017 10:43 AM, "Anders Peltomaa" <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com> wrote:
I just saw the Flycatcher at Swampy Pin Oak. It moved through the shrubs from South to North, as I sat on a bench enjoying a cup of coffee. The bird may have continued towards Azalea.
Hoping it hangs around a few more days. CBC count week begins next Thursday...
good birding,

Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan



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Subject: nysbirds-l digest: December 10, 2017
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 9:06 am
From: rmtaylo516 AT gmail.com
 
centerport, suffolk co long island
Rob in Massapequa

On Sunday, December 10, 2017, Jay D <naturephotography7@gmail.com> wrote:
Re: "Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond"What town is this ?
On Sun, Dec 10, 2017 at 12:07 AM, & [NYSBIRDS] digest <nysbirds-l@list.cornell.edu> wrote:
NYSBIRDS-L Digest for Sunday, December 10, 2017.


1. Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond

2. Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - No so far, Saturday

3. RE: Western Tanager in Queens

4. Western tanager and YB chat-yes

5. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues, 5 Pine Warblers


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond

From: "mpro7419 ." <mpro74@gmail.com>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 09:05:24 -0500

X-Message-Number: 1


Good Morning,


Just a word of caution in regards to this site. I have been given

information that the property owner has become displeased with the use of

his property for viewing the wildlife. (GWFG & Bald Eagle sightings). I

have confirmed this is private property including the land under water

(pond). If you use this site be aware that you will be subject to

trespassing.


Alternatively, there is a small town owned park "Heron Park" where you can

view the Bald Eagles as they frequently hunt from the trees surrounding the

old "Mill Dam".



Matt Scharkopf

Huntington, New York.


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - No so far, Saturday

From: Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 10:01:42 -0500

X-Message-Number: 2


I've been out for 1.5 hour and not yet seen either Wilson's Warbler or

Hammond's Flycatcher.


Anders Peltomaa


On Dec 7, 2017 10:43 AM, "Anders Peltomaa" <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com>

wrote:


I just saw the Flycatcher at Swampy Pin Oak. It moved through the shrubs

from South to North, as I sat on a bench enjoying a cup of coffee. The bird

may have continued towards Azalea.


Hoping it hangs around a few more days. CBC count week begins next

Thursday...


good birding,


Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: RE: Western Tanager in Queens

From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra@csi.cuny.edu>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 19:58:05 +0000

X-Message-Number: 3


A Western Tanager continued at Crocheron Park this morning.


I had not until today looked at any photos of the bird(s) present recently at the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area (ca. 1.5 miles away), but Corey Finger's photos from 25 Nov clearly show a bird with uniformly juvenal greater coverts on its right wing:

https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...


The bird we saw this morning at Crocheron Park clearly showed a mix of juvenal (small, worn, grayish-brown, restricted whitish tips) and formative (large, fresh, black, extensive whitish tips) greater coverts on this wing:

https://flic.kr/p/22k7Kfv


The number of feathers replaced, as well as the slightly eccentric manner in which the replacement skipped one juv feather) argue against a single bird molting over a two week period.


Other photos from the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area show a Western Tanager that appears brighter than the one in Corey's photos (perhaps more similar to the Crocheron bird), but the photos I found do not show the wing feathers in sufficient detail for comparison with Corey's bird, or with the Crocheron bird.


Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

________________________________________

From: bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu [bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Steve Walter [swalter15@verizon.net]

Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 4:00 PM

To: NYSBIRDS-L@list.cornell.edu

Subject: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager in Queens


Eric Miller again found Western Tanager this afternoon. I dont know whether to refer to it as the Western Tanager or a Western Tanager. The location is about a mile and a half drive from Alley Pond Environmental Center, or whatever that comes out to as the tanager might fly. The site is Crocheron Park in Bayside (also shown on Google Maps as John Golden Park). The specific location was on the back (south) side of Crocheron Pond (also called Golden Pond).


From the Cross Island Parkway, go west on Northern Blvd. to 221st Street (second light after the parkway). Turn right and continue northward until the end of 221st , then make a left onto Corbett Road. When you hit 35th Avenue, make a sharp right and go down the hill to the pond. Parking here is ample.


Hopefully, this will be a more reliable situation than the one in Alley especially as were heading toward CBC time.



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY

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----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Western tanager and YB chat-yes

From: kevin rogers <kev31317@yahoo.com>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 21:07:42 +0000 (UTC)

X-Message-Number: 4


East side of pond near dead end by long line of benches just saw the chat and tanager, the chat showed for a moment then I couldn't refind, the western tanager was in w the flock of white-throated sparrows, and was enjoying all the red berries, the tanager and sparrows kept working the area towards the south of the pond, had looked for a hour or two w no luck and then saw the chat midway up a tree, and while trying to stay w it noticed the western tanager, beautiful yellow in such contrast w the snow. But as of 4pm Saturday, both birds around, a good sign if your there now,or going tomorrow! -kev


Thank you to everyone that was involved in finding,tracking and the help to find these great birds..its truly appreciated so much!


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues, 5 Pine Warblers

From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc@earthlink.net>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 17:22:42 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

X-Message-Number: 5


New York Botanical Garden, Bronx

Saturday, December 9, 2017

OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.



Highlights: Snow made viewing conditions difficult, but we found 5 Pine Warblers, a male Rusty Blackbird and the continuing Least Flycatcher.


Canada Goose - low flyover of around 20

Mourning Dove - 30 to 40

Herring Gull - flyover

Great Blue Heron - Twin Lakes (Richard Aracil)

Red-tailed Hawk - 1 or 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Least Flycatcher - photographed at 8:42am in Chinese Prickly Ash high path along Native Plant Garden (Deb)

Blue Jay - at least 6

Black-capped Chickadee - at least 4

Tufted Titmouse - 2 (Enrico Leonardi visiting from Indonesia)

White-breasted Nuthatch - 2 (1 heard only) (Andrea Hessel)

Kinglet species - 2 in forest one of them flicking wings like Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Matthieu Benoit)

American Robin - flock of 16 (Andrea Hessel)

House Finch - 2 (Enrico Leonardi)

American Goldfinch - around 20

Fox Sparrow - 4 Forest (Matthieu Benoit & Richard Aracil)

Song Sparrow - Native Plant Garden

Swamp Sparrow - 2 Swale (a.k.a. Mitsubishi Wetlands)

White-throated Sparrow - 50+

Dark-eyed Junco - 20-25

Rusty Blackbird - male at the Swale

Pine Warbler - 5 in pines above Gingerbread Cafe

Northern Cardinal - several


Richard Aracil reported an Orange-crowned Warbler after lunch @AracilRichard on Bronx Bird Alert @BirdBronx.


At around 8am Bob spotted a Peregrine Falcon chasing a Merlin on Bronxdale Avenue. The Peregrine then perched on a telephone pole at Morris Park & Bronxdale Avenues. This was followed by a fly by Cooper's Hawk.


Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC and @DAllenNYC


Deb Allen
www.birdingbob.com




---


END OF DIGEST





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Subject: nysbirds-l digest: December 10, 2017
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 5:34 am
From: naturephotography7 AT gmail.com
 
Re: "Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond"What town is this ?
On Sun, Dec 10, 2017 at 12:07 AM, & [NYSBIRDS] digest <nysbirds-l@list.cornell.edu> wrote:
NYSBIRDS-L Digest for Sunday, December 10, 2017.


1. Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond

2. Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - No so far, Saturday

3. RE: Western Tanager in Queens

4. Western tanager and YB chat-yes

5. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues, 5 Pine Warblers


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond

From: "mpro7419 ." <mpro74@gmail.com>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 09:05:24 -0500

X-Message-Number: 1


Good Morning,


Just a word of caution in regards to this site. I have been given

information that the property owner has become displeased with the use of

his property for viewing the wildlife. (GWFG & Bald Eagle sightings). I

have confirmed this is private property including the land under water

(pond). If you use this site be aware that you will be subject to

trespassing.


Alternatively, there is a small town owned park "Heron Park" where you can

view the Bald Eagles as they frequently hunt from the trees surrounding the

old "Mill Dam".



Matt Scharkopf

Huntington, New York.


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Re: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - No so far, Saturday

From: Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 10:01:42 -0500

X-Message-Number: 2


I've been out for 1.5 hour and not yet seen either Wilson's Warbler or

Hammond's Flycatcher.


Anders Peltomaa


On Dec 7, 2017 10:43 AM, "Anders Peltomaa" <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com>

wrote:


I just saw the Flycatcher at Swampy Pin Oak. It moved through the shrubs

from South to North, as I sat on a bench enjoying a cup of coffee. The bird

may have continued towards Azalea.


Hoping it hangs around a few more days. CBC count week begins next

Thursday...


good birding,


Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: RE: Western Tanager in Queens

From: Shaibal Mitra <Shaibal.Mitra@csi.cuny.edu>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 19:58:05 +0000

X-Message-Number: 3


A Western Tanager continued at Crocheron Park this morning.


I had not until today looked at any photos of the bird(s) present recently at the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area (ca. 1.5 miles away), but Corey Finger's photos from 25 Nov clearly show a bird with uniformly juvenal greater coverts on its right wing:

https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...


The bird we saw this morning at Crocheron Park clearly showed a mix of juvenal (small, worn, grayish-brown, restricted whitish tips) and formative (large, fresh, black, extensive whitish tips) greater coverts on this wing:

https://flic.kr/p/22k7Kfv


The number of feathers replaced, as well as the slightly eccentric manner in which the replacement skipped one juv feather) argue against a single bird molting over a two week period.


Other photos from the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area show a Western Tanager that appears brighter than the one in Corey's photos (perhaps more similar to the Crocheron bird), but the photos I found do not show the wing feathers in sufficient detail for comparison with Corey's bird, or with the Crocheron bird.


Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

________________________________________

From: bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu [bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Steve Walter [swalter15@verizon.net]

Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 4:00 PM

To: NYSBIRDS-L@list.cornell.edu

Subject: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager in Queens


Eric Miller again found Western Tanager this afternoon. I dont know whether to refer to it as the Western Tanager or a Western Tanager. The location is about a mile and a half drive from Alley Pond Environmental Center, or whatever that comes out to as the tanager might fly. The site is Crocheron Park in Bayside (also shown on Google Maps as John Golden Park). The specific location was on the back (south) side of Crocheron Pond (also called Golden Pond).


From the Cross Island Parkway, go west on Northern Blvd. to 221st Street (second light after the parkway). Turn right and continue northward until the end of 221st , then make a left onto Corbett Road. When you hit 35th Avenue, make a sharp right and go down the hill to the pond. Parking here is ample.


Hopefully, this will be a more reliable situation than the one in Alley especially as were heading toward CBC time.



Steve Walter

Bayside, NY

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----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: Western tanager and YB chat-yes

From: kevin rogers <kev31317@yahoo.com>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 21:07:42 +0000 (UTC)

X-Message-Number: 4


East side of pond near dead end by long line of benches just saw the chat and tanager, the chat showed for a moment then I couldn't refind, the western tanager was in w the flock of white-throated sparrows, and was enjoying all the red berries, the tanager and sparrows kept working the area towards the south of the pond, had looked for a hour or two w no luck and then saw the chat midway up a tree, and while trying to stay w it noticed the western tanager, beautiful yellow in such contrast w the snow. But as of 4pm Saturday, both birds around, a good sign if your there now,or going tomorrow! -kev


Thank you to everyone that was involved in finding,tracking and the help to find these great birds..its truly appreciated so much!


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Subject: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues, 5 Pine Warblers

From: Deborah Allen <dallenyc@earthlink.net>

Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 17:22:42 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

X-Message-Number: 5


New York Botanical Garden, Bronx

Saturday, December 9, 2017

OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.



Highlights: Snow made viewing conditions difficult, but we found 5 Pine Warblers, a male Rusty Blackbird and the continuing Least Flycatcher.


Canada Goose - low flyover of around 20

Mourning Dove - 30 to 40

Herring Gull - flyover

Great Blue Heron - Twin Lakes (Richard Aracil)

Red-tailed Hawk - 1 or 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Least Flycatcher - photographed at 8:42am in Chinese Prickly Ash high path along Native Plant Garden (Deb)

Blue Jay - at least 6

Black-capped Chickadee - at least 4

Tufted Titmouse - 2 (Enrico Leonardi visiting from Indonesia)

White-breasted Nuthatch - 2 (1 heard only) (Andrea Hessel)

Kinglet species - 2 in forest one of them flicking wings like Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Matthieu Benoit)

American Robin - flock of 16 (Andrea Hessel)

House Finch - 2 (Enrico Leonardi)

American Goldfinch - around 20

Fox Sparrow - 4 Forest (Matthieu Benoit & Richard Aracil)

Song Sparrow - Native Plant Garden

Swamp Sparrow - 2 Swale (a.k.a. Mitsubishi Wetlands)

White-throated Sparrow - 50+

Dark-eyed Junco - 20-25

Rusty Blackbird - male at the Swale

Pine Warbler - 5 in pines above Gingerbread Cafe

Northern Cardinal - several


Richard Aracil reported an Orange-crowned Warbler after lunch @AracilRichard on Bronx Bird Alert @BirdBronx.


At around 8am Bob spotted a Peregrine Falcon chasing a Merlin on Bronxdale Avenue. The Peregrine then perched on a telephone pole at Morris Park & Bronxdale Avenues. This was followed by a fly by Cooper's Hawk.


Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC and @DAllenNYC


Deb Allen
www.birdingbob.com




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END OF DIGEST





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Subject: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues, 5 Pine Warblers
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 16:22 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
New York Botanical Garden, Bronx
Saturday, December 9, 2017
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.


Highlights: Snow made viewing conditions difficult, but we found 5 Pine Warblers, a male Rusty Blackbird and the continuing Least Flycatcher.

Canada Goose - low flyover of around 20
Mourning Dove - 30 to 40
Herring Gull - flyover
Great Blue Heron - Twin Lakes (Richard Aracil)
Red-tailed Hawk - 1 or 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2
Least Flycatcher - photographed at 8:42am in Chinese Prickly Ash high path along Native Plant Garden (Deb)
Blue Jay - at least 6
Black-capped Chickadee - at least 4
Tufted Titmouse - 2 (Enrico Leonardi visiting from Indonesia)
White-breasted Nuthatch - 2 (1 heard only) (Andrea Hessel)
Kinglet species - 2 in forest one of them flicking wings like Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Matthieu Benoit)
American Robin - flock of 16 (Andrea Hessel)
House Finch - 2 (Enrico Leonardi)
American Goldfinch - around 20
Fox Sparrow - 4 Forest (Matthieu Benoit & Richard Aracil)
Song Sparrow - Native Plant Garden
Swamp Sparrow - 2 Swale (a.k.a. Mitsubishi Wetlands)
White-throated Sparrow - 50+
Dark-eyed Junco - 20-25
Rusty Blackbird - male at the Swale
Pine Warbler - 5 in pines above Gingerbread Cafe
Northern Cardinal - several

Richard Aracil reported an Orange-crowned Warbler after lunch @AracilRichard on Bronx Bird Alert @BirdBronx.

At around 8am Bob spotted a Peregrine Falcon chasing a Merlin on Bronxdale Avenue. The Peregrine then perched on a telephone pole at Morris Park & Bronxdale Avenues. This was followed by a fly by Cooper's Hawk.

Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC and @DAllenNYC

Deb Allen
www.birdingbob.com

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Subject: Western tanager and YB chat-yes
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 15:07 pm
From: kev31317 AT yahoo.com
 
East side of pond near dead end by long line of benches just saw the chat and tanager, the chat showed for a moment then I couldn't refind, the western tanager was in w the flock of white-throated sparrows, and was enjoying all the red berries, the tanager and sparrows kept working the area towards the south of the pond, had looked for a hour or two w no luck and then saw the chat midway up a tree, and while trying to stay w it noticed the western tanager, beautiful yellow in such contrast w the snow. But as of 4pm Saturday, both birds around, a good sign if your there now,or going tomorrow! -kev

Thank you to everyone that was involved in finding,tracking and the help to find these great birds..its truly appreciated so much!

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Subject: Western Tanager in Queens
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 13:58 pm
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
 
A Western Tanager continued at Crocheron Park this morning.

I had not until today looked at any photos of the bird(s) present recently at the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area (ca. 1.5 miles away), but Corey Finger's photos from 25 Nov clearly show a bird with uniformly juvenal greater coverts on its right wing:

https://ebird.org/ebird/view/c...

The bird we saw this morning at Crocheron Park clearly showed a mix of juvenal (small, worn, grayish-brown, restricted whitish tips) and formative (large, fresh, black, extensive whitish tips) greater coverts on this wing:

https://flic.kr/p/22k7Kfv

The number of feathers replaced, as well as the slightly eccentric manner in which the replacement skipped one juv feather) argue against a single bird molting over a two week period.

Other photos from the Alley Pond Environmental Center/Restoration Area show a Western Tanager that appears brighter than the one in Corey's photos (perhaps more similar to the Crocheron bird), but the photos I found do not show the wing feathers in sufficient detail for comparison with Corey's bird, or with the Crocheron bird.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu [bounce-122109878-11143133@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Steve Walter [swalter15@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 4:00 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L@list.cornell.edu
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Western Tanager in Queens

Eric Miller again found Western Tanager this afternoon. I dont know whether to refer to it as the Western Tanager or a Western Tanager. The location is about a mile and a half drive from Alley Pond Environmental Center, or whatever that comes out to as the tanager might fly. The site is Crocheron Park in Bayside (also shown on Google Maps as John Golden Park). The specific location was on the back (south) side of Crocheron Pond (also called Golden Pond).

From the Cross Island Parkway, go west on Northern Blvd. to 221st Street (second light after the parkway). Turn right and continue northward until the end of 221st , then make a left onto Corbett Road. When you hit 35th Avenue, make a sharp right and go down the hill to the pond. Parking here is ample.

Hopefully, this will be a more reliable situation than the one in Alley especially as were heading toward CBC time.


Steve Walter
Bayside, NY
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Subject: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - No so far, Saturday
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 9:01 am
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
I've been out for 1.5 hour and not yet seen either Wilson's Warbler or Hammond's Flycatcher.
Anders Peltomaa

On Dec 7, 2017 10:43 AM, "Anders Peltomaa" <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com> wrote:
I just saw the Flycatcher at Swampy Pin Oak. It moved through the shrubs from South to North, as I sat on a bench enjoying a cup of coffee. The bird may have continued towards Azalea.
Hoping it hangs around a few more days. CBC count week begins next Thursday...
good birding,

Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan




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Subject: Info Mill Pond Motel AKA Tung Ting Pond
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 8:05 am
From: mpro74 AT gmail.com
 
Good Morning,
Just a word of caution in regards to this site. I have been given information that the property owner has become displeased with the use of his property for viewing the wildlife. (GWFG & Bald Eagle sightings). I have confirmed this is private property including the land under water (pond). If you use this site be aware that you will be subject to trespassing.
Alternatively, there is a small town owned park "Heron Park" where you can view the Bald Eagles as they frequently hunt from the trees surrounding the old "Mill Dam".

Matt ScharkopfHuntington, New York.


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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 8 December 2017
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 20:47 pm
From: bcacace AT gmail.com
 
- RBA
* New York* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County* Dec. 8, 2017* NYNY1712.08
- Birds mentionedHAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER+ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER+WESTERN TANAGER+(+ Details requested by NYSARC)
Greater White-fronted GooseEurasian WigeonKING EIDERCommon EiderHARLEQUIN DUCKBARROW'S GOLDENEYEEARED GREBEWillet (subspecies "Western Willet")Red KnotParasitic JaegerRazorbillBlack-legged KittiwakeBLACK-HEADED GULLLITTLE GULLLesser Black-backed GullRoyal TernSnowy OwlRed-headed WoodpeckerLapland LongspurOvenbirdNorthern WaterthrushPROTHONOTARY WARBLEROrange-crowned WarblerNashville WarblerCommon YellowthroatAmerican RedstartNorthern ParulaMagnolia WarblerPine WarblerYELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (western subspecies "Audubon's" form)Wilson's WarblerYellow-breasted ChatClay-colored SparrowBoat-tailed GracklePine Siskin
- Transcript
If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/...
You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.
If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:
Gary Chapin - Secretary NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC) 125 Pine Springs Drive Ticonderoga, NY 12883
Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird AlertNumber: (212) 979-3070
Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony LauroCoverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
Transcriber: Ben Cacace
BEGIN TAPE
Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, December 8th 2017 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER, WESTERN TANAGER, ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER, EARED GREBE, BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, KING EIDER, HARLEQUIN DUCK, LITTLE GULL, BLACK-HEADED GULL, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, "Audubon's" YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER and more.
Present today for its 13th day the unexpectedly long staying HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER will now face its toughest test yet as snow is predicted for Saturday. The flycatcher has been seen daily mostly in Central Park's Ramble and although wandering a bit has usually returned to sections of the Ramble near Azalea Pond with such local names as the Swampy Pin Oak, the Humming Tombstone and the Oven. Hopefully it will be seen at these sites as the snow moves on.
With folks now hoping some of the late lingering passerines will hang around for the local Christmas Counts. Another bird high on that list is the WESTERN TANAGER found Wednesday at Crocheron Park in Queens and still present today. This bird, most likely the same WESTERN present recently at the Alley Pond Environmental Center about a mile away, has generally been seen around the pond at the south end of the park just south of 35th Avenue. This park is on some maps also called John Golden Park. Also in that park yesterday were YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT and WILSON'S WARBLER.
Also notable but not apparently lingering was an ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER visiting a private residence in Brooklyn Monday.
AN EARED GREBE has been present since last Saturday at Oak Beach returning to the area in Fire Island Inlet just west of the Fisherman's parking lot off Oak Beach Road the same site one frequented late last Winter.
'Tis the season for waterfowl and among the more unusual was a drake BARROW'S GOLDENEYE seen last Saturday out in Jamaica Bay northeast of the Fisherman's parking lot at Floyd Bennett Field. HARLEQUIN DUCKS have returned to Jones inlet as of last Sunday with 3 seen on the Jones Beach West End side of the inlet and 2 along the Point Lookout jetties. A male KING EIDER was also seen again in Jones Inlet on Monday. Other notable species around Jones Beach West End this week have included some COMMON EIDERS, a "Western" WILLET, 6 RED KNOTS, LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, a PARASITIC JAEGER Sunday, a RAZORBILL Sunday and a LAPLAND LONGSPUR traveling with some Horned Larks. Drake EURASIAN WIGEON continue on the Sayville Mill Pond and Eastport Pond and GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE include one at Elda Lake in Babylon Friday, one still at Tung Ting Pond in Centerport and one off Reeves Avenue north of Riverhead Sunday.
A recent large influx of Bonaparte's Gulls along Long Island's south shore provided an accompanying adult LITTLE GULL off Riis Park last Saturday. A BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE was also off Robert Moses State Park Saturday morning along with a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL and a PARASITIC JAEGER. A BLACK-HEADED GULL has been present at Five Islands Park in New Rochelle this week and a ROYAL TERN was still at Orient Beach State Park last Sunday.
Very unusual has been the male PROTHONOTARY WARBLER lingering around the Suffolk County Farm and Education Center off Yaphank Ave in Yaphank still present at least to Thursday this site also featuring a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW.
In Central Park a collection of late warblers this week has included MAGNOLIA, NASHVILLE, NORTHERN PARULA, ORANGE-CROWNED, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, PINE, AMERICAN REDSTART, OVENBIRD, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and WILSON'S. A PINE SISKIN has been around the Ramble while a female type BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE also continues in the Common Grackle flock.
Another great bird was a well marked "Audubon's" YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER found west of Napeague Harbor last Saturday.
A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues in Brooklyn's Green-wood Cemetery and 7 RAZORBILLS were spotted Monday from a boat in eastern Long Island Sound.
Please remember to keep a suitable distance from and do not stress SNOWY OWLS now arriving in our area.
To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.
This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.
- End transcript



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Subject: Queens - Crocheron and Alley Ponds
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 14:30 pm
From: Trachtenberg AT amsllp.com
 
As to warblers around, a very reliable report this morning from 2 excellent birders was of a
Northern Parula at Mariandale Conference Center on Hudson River in Ossining -- along with an estimated 200
Canvasback and other waterfowl


L Trachtenberg

Ossining





From: bounce-122116018-26736881@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-122116018-26736881@list.cornell.edu]
On Behalf Of Steve Walter
Sent: Friday, December 08, 2017 3:21 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L@list.cornell.edu
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Queens - Crocheron and Alley Ponds




I did a quick run to check on things at two spots here in northeastern Queens. At Crocheron Park, only the
Western Tanager of yesterdays terrific trio had been seen as of 2:00. At the restored Alley Pond (at the LIE Cross Island Pkwy intersection), I did not see the Lesser Yellowlegs that has been lingering at least through Dec. 4, but a lot of the shoreline
is not visible. However, I did have a surprising and bizarre few moments while there. I spished to try and see what passerine I was hearing up in a tree along the shore. The next thing I knew, I was counting warblers. At least 10 of them, all
Pine Warblers that I could see at that point. I dont know that Ive seen that many Pines together ever, even in breeding areas of the pine barrens or Florida pine woods, where they winter. There are a bunch of pine trees at this location, to which they
quickly flew off. Getting an accurate count at that point was not doable, but I did add an
Orange-crowned Warbler while trying to see exactly where the Pine Warblers had relocated to. It could be an interesting count season although here comes the snow tomorrow and a 25 degree high on Wednesday.



Steve Walter


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Subject: Queens - Crocheron and Alley Ponds
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 14:21 pm
From: swalter15 AT verizon.net
 
I did a quick run to check on things at two spots here in northeastern Queens. At Crocheron Park, only the Western Tanager of yesterdays terrific trio had been seen as of 2:00. At the restored Alley Pond (at the LIE  Cross Island Pkwy intersection), I did not see the Lesser Yellowlegs that has been lingering at least through Dec. 4, but a lot of the shoreline is not visible. However, I did have a surprising and bizarre few moments while there. I spished to try and see what passerine I was hearing up in a tree along the shore. The next thing I knew, I was counting warblers. At least 10 of them, all Pine Warblers that I could see at that point. I dont know that Ive seen that many Pines together ever, even in breeding areas of the pine barrens or Florida pine woods, where they winter. There are a bunch of pine trees at this location, to which they quickly flew off. Getting an accurate count at that point was not doable, but I did add an Orange-crowned Warbler while trying to see exactly where the Pine Warblers had relocated to. It could be an interesting count season  although here comes the snow tomorrow and a 25 degree high on Wednesday.
Steve Walter


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Subject: Queens Western Tanager continues
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 11:16 am
From: dfutuyma AT gmail.com
 
At eastern end of Pond in Crocheron Park, at about 11:30, seen with Ed Becher and Ernst Muchmore. The Chat was not seen (yet).
Doug Futuyma

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES. THURSDAY 12/7
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 8:27 am
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
Hammonds fly along stream from azalea pond to oven at 0845
Also wilsons warb, 2 yb sapsuckers
Friday am.
Report from Dick Veit.
Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan

On Dec 7, 2017 10:43 AM, "Anders Peltomaa" <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com> wrote:
I just saw the Flycatcher at Swampy Pin Oak. It moved through the shrubs from South to North, as I sat on a bench enjoying a cup of coffee. The bird may have continued towards Azalea.
Hoping it hangs around a few more days. CBC count week begins next Thursday...
good birding,

Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan



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Subject: eBird.org: Recent Additions to County Checklists
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 20:02 pm
From: bcacace AT gmail.com
 
When working on the NYS eBird Hotspots wiki I'll compare the previous bar chart list of species with the current one picking up any additions or deletions. By going to each county's 'Overview' page you can determine the date the species was added by county. Some are from newly submitted checklists from many months / years ago.

It isn't possible to spot these additions from old checklists. On the 'Overview' page you can sort on 'First Seen' but if the species wasn't added recently it won't appear at the top of the list.
For each county on the NYS eBird Hotspots site click the 'Overview' link on the 'Explore a Location' line: http://ebirding-nys.wikispaces...
Since last update: 7 days
Yellow highlights a species added for the first time over the past few weeks.
Albany County:Cattle Egret (30-May-1981)
Allegany County:Boreal Chickadee (1-Dec-1975)
Bronx County:Ash-throated Flycatcher (18-Nov-1993)Black-headed Grosbeak (14-Mar-1976)
Chautauqua County:Boreal Chickadee (13-Dec-1975)
Chenango County:Greater White-fronted Goose (9-Nov-2017)
Columbia County:Connecticut Warbler (22-Sep-1989)
Schenectady County:Golden Eagle (26-Nov-2017)
Tompkins County:Boreal Chickadee (6-Dec-1975)
--
Ben Cacace
Manhattan, NYCWiki for NYS eBird HotspotsFacebook Discussion for NYS eBird Hotspots: Q & A



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Subject: Queens Western Tanager and Y.B. Chat
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 17:46 pm
From: swalter15 AT verizon.net
 
I dont think its been mentioned that the Yellow-breasted Chat has stayed right around the perimeter of the pond (as far as I can tell). Mostly, its been on the north side toward the west end, but its best seen looking across from the south side. It has also ranged to the south side and the west corner. 
Ive posted some pictures of the interesting birds (and more) on my web site http://stevewalternature.com/ (click Birds, Recent Work).
Steve Walter
Bayside, NY
From: Steve Walter [mailto:swalter15@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:00 PM
To: NYSBIRDS-L@list.cornell.edu
Subject: Western Tanager in Queens
Eric Miller again found Western Tanager this afternoon. I dont know whether to refer to it as the Western Tanager or a Western Tanager. The location is about a mile and a half drive from Alley Pond Environmental Center, or whatever that comes out to as the tanager might fly. The site is Crocheron Park in Bayside (also shown on Google Maps as John Golden Park). The specific location was on the back (south) side of Crocheron Pond (also called Golden Pond).
From the Cross Island Parkway, go west on Northern Blvd. to 221st Street (second light after the parkway). Turn right and continue northward until the end of 221st , then make a left onto Corbett Road. When you hit 35th Avenue, make a sharp right and go down the hill to the pond. Parking here is ample.
Hopefully, this will be a more reliable situation than the one in Alley especially as were heading toward CBC time.
Steve Walter
Bayside, NY


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Subject: Western Tanager, Crocheron Park, Queens County
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 15:41 pm
From: drpinky AT yahoo.com
 
The Western Tanager found by Eric Miller yesterday ranged a bit today, from the willow at the pond to the shrubby area south and even to the vegetation on the north side of 35th avenue (where the Wilsons was foraging). While not always easy to find, when present, she put on quite a show.  Heres a link to a video: 

https://vimeo.com/246339824

Wishing you good birds,

Peter
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Subject: Queens Western Tanager
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 11:04 am
From: birdingdude AT gmail.com
 
Both Western Tanager and Yellow-breasted Chat continue. Add a female Wilson's Warbler to the list of goodies.
Cheers,

--------"Iprefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
Swift as the windQuiet as the forestConquer like the fireSteady as the mountainSun TzuThe Art of War
(\__/)
(= '.'=) (") _ (") Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!
Andrew Bakshwww.birdingdude.blogspot.com
On Dec 7, 2017, at 8:58 AM, Jeffrey Ritter <jffrritter@gmail.com> wrote:


Western Tanager and Yellow-breasted.Chat both seen on south side of pond in Crocheron Park this morning. Tanager very cooperative.

Jeff Ritter

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES. THURSDAY 12/7
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 9:43 am
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
I just saw the Flycatcher at Swampy Pin Oak. It moved through the shrubs
from South to North, as I sat on a bench enjoying a cup of coffee. The bird
may have continued towards Azalea.

Hoping it hangs around a few more days. CBC count week begins next
Thursday...

good birding,

Anders Peltomaa
Manhattan

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Subject: Queens Western Tanager
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 7:59 am
From: jffrritter AT gmail.com
 
Western Tanager and Yellow-breasted.Chat both seen on south side of pond in Crocheron Park this morning. Tanager very cooperative.

Jeff Ritter

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Pink-footed Goose - Coxsackie, The Greene County
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 21:17 pm
From: hmbirds-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
 
At around 4 o'clock this evening, while manning my station for the Winter
Raptor Survey at the Coxsackie Flats I scanned through a large group (1,200
- 1,500 birds) of Canada Geese in a harvested cornfield on a short dead-end
road: Barrus Road - which begins at the southern end of Bronk (same family
as The Bronx) Mill Road and Old Plank Road (County Rt 9).

I spotted a mid-sized uniformly dark sooty-brown goose with a pale
horizontal stripe along the flanks and silvery edges to the folded wing
feathers. It had no white features on the head or neck and a smallish dark
bill - a Pink-footed Goose.

The goose was about 360 ft. (110m) to the east of the road, actively
feeding on scattered corn cobs along with the Canada Geese and one Cackling
Goose. I watched it for about 15-20 minutes, easily picking it out again
anytime after I had lost track of.

There is a small group of mobile homes along a short spur off Barrus Road
and two other houses along the road. The house directly across (west) from
the cornfield has a high fence around it, presumably to keep the two large
dogs in. The dogs are very noisy if anyone is walking along the road but
otherwise very friendly (at least when the homeowner is present). When I've
met the homeowner in the past, I've found him to be very friendly and
interested in my bird work that I've been doing. But those dogs....

I remained in my car as I was observing the geese since the nearest Canada
Geese were very agitated. I was afraid that if I got out the whole bunch
would lift off taking the Pink-footed Goose along with them. Because of
roadside shrubbery, I could not get a clear photo of the goose. All the
geese were still there when I went up the road to turn around and leave.

I suspect that the geese come into that cornfield to feed and roost for the
night. I don't know for sure, but I believe they all go over to the nearby
correctional facility grounds where there are some - restricted access -
fields and ponds. A large group of geese flew in at around 4 o'clock. I
can't say whether the Pink-footed Goose was already in the field by then or
if it came in with that bunch.

In winters past, large groups of Canada Geese would first go from the
correctional complex fields down to the Hudson River at the Coxsackie Boat
Launch Park to hang out for a while before going to their night roost. This
has not been happening this season so far, perhaps because hunting season
is still open.

Bottom Line: I suspect that it will be difficult to see this goose, if it
does return to that field, unless you stay in your car and hope that none
of the few neighbors inadvertently disturbs the larger flock of Canada
Geese. But I also believe that if everyone stays in their cars, all will be
good. Let's just hope that the Pink-footed Goose returns.

Rich Guthrie
New Baltimore
--
Richard Guthrie



Subject: NYC Audubon lecture, Thursday Dec. 7, Victor Emanuel of VENT bird tours!
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 16:33 pm
From: lynnehertzog AT gmail.com
 
Dear Birders,Join us!"ONE MORE WARBLER"
Victor Emanuel
Thursday, December 7, 7pmReidy Hall at the Unitarian Church of All Souls, Lexington Avenue between 79th and 80th Streets in ManhattanVictor Emanuel, the founder of VENT, the largest avian ecotourism company on earth, shares his journey from inspired youth to worlds top birder in his recently released book,One More Warbler. For our lecture series, this master raconteur will share some of his biggest adventures, rarest finds, and the people who mentored and encouraged his passion along the way.This Lecture are free and open to the public. This series has been made possible by the support of Claude and Lucienne Bloch.
Hope to see you there!


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Subject: Western Tanager in Queens
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 15:00 pm
From: swalter15 AT verizon.net
 
Eric Miller again found Western Tanager this afternoon. I dont know whether to refer to it as the Western Tanager or a Western Tanager. The location is about a mile and a half drive from Alley Pond Environmental Center, or whatever that comes out to as the tanager might fly. The site is Crocheron Park in Bayside (also shown on Google Maps as John Golden Park). The specific location was on the back (south) side of Crocheron Pond (also called Golden Pond). 
From the Cross Island Parkway, go west on Northern Blvd. to 221st Street (second light after the parkway). Turn right and continue northward until the end of 221st , then make a left onto Corbett Road. When you hit 35th Avenue, make a sharp right and go down the hill to the pond. Parking here is ample.
Hopefully, this will be a more reliable situation than the one in Alley especially as were heading toward CBC time.
Steve Walter
Bayside, NY


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Subject: Hammond's flycatcher - Central Park
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 13:05 pm
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
Its still here. If you havent seen it yet, you still have the chance, but dont wait much longer.Its gonna get freezing cold a few days.
Anders PeltomaaManhattan
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: David Spawn davidspawn1@gmail.com [ebirdsnyc] <ebirdsnyc-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 1:52 PM
Subject: [ebirdsnyc] Hammond's flycatcher - Central Park
To: ebirds NYC <ebirdsnyc@yahoogroups.com>

























Seeing it now at swampy pin oak.
Foraging mostly closer to ground & within ground cover near path on east side of clearing.







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Posted by: David Spawn <davidspawn1@gmail.com>



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Subject: 2 Snowy owls along Dune Rd in Hampton Bays
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 10:37 am
From: rgostic AT optonline.net
 
A drive down Dune Rd produced 2 Snowy Owls. One bird was sitting in the bayside marsh immediately east of Tiana Beach near the wash over. The second bird was a half mile further east perched on a duck blind. A female Harrier was also in the area.

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Hammond's Flyc. rep'td. 12/5, Central Park NYC
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 7:04 am
From: tomfi2 AT earthlink.net
 
Just as a potential heads-up, since no reports appeared forthcoming to this list for Tuesday, an anonymouse eBird report, with photo, was submitted with Hammonds Flycatcher listed as showing in the Central Park (Manhattan, N.Y. City) Ramble, specifically south of Maintenance Field and for the before-noon hour, on Tuesday, 5th December, 2017.

This bird is still being sought by multiple birders, and it may be presumed to be a 'desired-to-see' bird for essentially as long as it remains.

In addition a male Wilsons Warbler has been seen again (Tues., 5th) in the vicinity with that Empidonax flycatcher, and it is possible that the presence of the Wilsons Warbler is (as observed on multiple days & varied locations within the Ramble) or at least may be an indicator for the potential presence of the Empidoax hammondii, perhaps loosely associating in their feeding forays.

It may also be somewhat useful to pay closer attention should any insectivorous bird be noted in searching for the flycatcher, kinglets being an example of birds to stay aware of, in that their presence could again be an indicator for the possibility of rarer winter insectivores about.

good further-flyctacher luck, if seeking.

Tom Fiore
manhattan
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Subject: Snowy Owl, No
Date: Tue Dec 5 2017 13:28 pm
From: brian.whipple AT gmail.com
 
Im not sure that Chris would have to intervene here. This discussion is one of the reasons this list exists. Though its primary purpose is dissemination of sightings, take a look at this paragraph from the listserve rules:
Questions and limited discussion on topics such as bird behavior, identification, conservation, and distribution, especially as these subjects relate to wild birds in and around New York State, are welcomed and encouraged.
Encouraged! Thanks for the thoughtful discussion, everyone. I felt one way at the beginning and another way by the end. Good stuff.
Brian
On Mon, Dec 4, 2017 at 10:32 PM Rick <rcech@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Quick agreement with Shai -- by "non-migratory" I didn't mean "feral", just

populations that in the past may have been migratory but have now become

sedentary / local, in some or all seasons.


-----Original Message-----

From: bounce-122103624-3714678@list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-122103624-3714678@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Shaibal

Mitra

Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 10:22 PM

To: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu) <NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu>

Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No


As everyone so far has contributed in good faith, and given that this

listserv is devoted to NYS birds of all kinds, not just rare, why not

discuss?


My perception is that waterfowl are thriving above and beyond all other

ecological guilds. The explosion in Canada Goose numbers is not attributable

to the feral component; it is the northern, natural populations that are

expanding under climate change. In general, we have been finding ducks and

geese in tremendous abundance and diversity throughout NYS in recent years.

If Mute Swans are a problem, it is a very small one compared to many other

threats to our environment. And, as Rick points out, our environment has

been abused so badly for so long that a lot of what is still here is in a

co-dependent relationship with past abuse.


For example, there are legitimate (mostly non-avian) rationales undergirding

the recent fascination with undoing Long Island's ubiquitous, centuries-old

dams. While possibly restoring fish runs, this policy would also drain

innumerable South Shore ponds, probably removing many thousands of ducks

from Long Island--more than Mute Swans ever displaced. Arguably these would

be ducks that "shouldn't have been here anyway," but what if the fish

populations don't recover either? But this is just one example. Should we

invest in the Sisyphean eradication of multiflora rose? Honeysuckle?

Phragmites? The answers to these various massive-scale questions range from

"probably not" to "maybe."


In contrast, I think the expenditure of time and money on eradicating Mute

Swans is entirely misplaced. The potential benefits are demonstrably small,

and the public relations costs are likely significant--and this is not to

mention the logistical costs. Why not use those resources and whatever

public good will remains in this dark age to buy xxx hectares of

scabby-looking oak woods? If we don't, all we'll have are sterile

creaks--without dams but also without ponds--built up to the edges, and

without any woods either.


Shai Mitra

Bay Shore

________________________________________

From: bounce-122103568-3714944@list.cornell.edu

[bounce-122103568-3714944@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Rick

[rcech@nyc.rr.com]

Sent: Monday, December 4, 2017 9:22 PM

To: 'Tim Dunn'; 'Frederick Kedenburg'

Cc: 'Michael Cooper'; 'NYS BIRDS'

Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No


First, kudos to Chris T-H for keeping order in our rangy group. A laudable

task, not simple.


Second, the fact that one invasive (Mute Swans) may be more of less

destructive than another (non-migratory "barnyard" Canada Geese) is a

sensible question for discussion (maybe or maybe not on a rare bird

list-serve, but leave that aside for the moment).


Like many birders, I abhor human intrusions into natural bird habitats and

behavior (such as introduction of invasives, even though they admittedly may

have the odd beneficial effect, such as some popular garden plants that

provide sustenance for native butterfly species, my specialty), and I

likewise abhor anthromorpic "cuddling" of cute species that cause massive

harm (feral cats). I also recognize the "PR" value of engaging public

sentiment with salient "nature hooks," while being aware of the double-edged

sword nature of such appeals.


Maybe our list serve is not the right place to hold these discussions, esp.

when they become vitriolic. But what is the right forum? I'm interested in

having a well-thought-through set of conservation propositions being widely

discussed and endorsed in the community.


Suggestions?


Rick


From: bounce-122103507-3714678@list.cornell.edu

[mailto:bounce-122103507-3714678@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Tim Dunn

Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 8:37 PM

To: Frederick Kedenburg <kedenbird@optonline.net>

Cc: Michael Cooper <mike5719@icloud.com>; NYS BIRDS <NYSbirds-L@cornell.edu>

Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No


I agree Fred, as to the context of the conversation. It's not an easy issue

for birders and reasonable minds can differ on these issues.


I also have no problem with dealing with the "immigrant" swan population as

humanely as possible. To me, the most palatable solution would probably be

to prevent more cygnets and let the existing population live out their

lives, though I also suspect that would be the most expensive way to deal

with or solve the problem, with the DEC oiling and pricking eggs for

decades.


Frankly, I don't know how the swan overpopulation on my local pond should be

addressed, but I'd only be in favor of a dealing with it through a method

that is decent and humane. I would like to see a return of some native

waterfowl that I blame the swans for driving out. Certainly, it's not

necessary to eliminate every mute swan, but my opinion is that there needs

to be some control of populations in certain places like Argyle Lake.

Argyle still holds the occasional birding surprise, but native waterfowl

numbers seem clearly to be down due to the proliferation of swans there.

Hardly any waterfowl breed there now, besides the swans.


Thanks,

Tim Dunn

Babylon, NY

Sent from my iPhone


On Dec 4, 2017, at 7:54 PM, Frederick Kedenburg

<kedenbird@optonline.net<mailto:kedenbird@optonline.net>> wrote:

I don't think Chris T-H needs to weigh in on this as it is a polite

conversation of an issue that we all know about.

Many of us have opinions that will not be changed. That is everyones right.


I have simply this one thing to say:

I know many out there wish to eliminate the Swans for what they believe are

scientific reasons.

I think the Mute Swan, now that they have been here for over a century, have

as much a right to live as any immigrant does today.

Their numbers and the damage they do is really negligible compared to other

species.


Are not Swans now to be considered naturalized and a beauty for all to

behold? I think they need this protection.

rk



On Dec 4, 2017, at 6:21 PM, Michael Cooper

<mike5719@icloud.com<mailto:mike5719@icloud.com>> wrote:


Well said Tim, but I think I hear the footsteps of Chris T-H on the way, so

I'm going to mention a bird in this post and "duck" out of the way of the

ban hammer!


Mike Cooper

Ridge LI NY

Sent from my iPhone


On Dec 4, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Tim Dunn

<timdunn@optonline.net<mailto:timdunn@optonline.net>> wrote:

Fred and any others interested,


Two mute swans by you is no problem. Up to 65 can be seen on any given day

on Argyle Lake in Babylon. It is a pond that is less than 1/4 mile in

circumference. All other breeding waterfowl here have been eradicated by

these swans. Some migrant waterfowl use the pond but less than in the past.

Few dabbling ducks use it as swans have eaten all vegetation on the bottom

of the pond to as far as their long necks can reach.


Geese come and go in migration here, but the mute swans are a constant. So

I would expect that the reason that DEC wants to control them is that they

are an invasive species that is destroying the local ecosystem and driving

out native species. Maybe not happening by you, but definitely happening

here in western Suffolk.



Non-birders are aware of this issue because it appeared in the newspapers

when the DEC came out and said they would start removing the swans. That

typically means shooting, trapping, poisoning, etc. Hardly anyone likes the

idea of culling these birds through cruel and inhumane ways (including me),

so the subject comes up for a debate that has reached beyond birders and

wildlife people from time to time. My understanding is that egg oiling and

similar tactics are being used, or at least are up for discussion, to

control the population.



Since they are an invasive and destructive species, any connection that an

observer feels to wildlife by viewing feral mute swans is based entirely on

a lack of understanding of the natural world around them. You might have

done more for the guy you ran into today if you had told him that if it

weren't for those swans, he might be seeing ten different species of

waterfowl that they have driven away. Beauty is obviously in the eye of the

beholder, but I'd prefer green-wing teal and pintails to those swans.



(And sociologically speaking, to me those swans represent the escaped stock

of early successful Americans anxious to imitate the "Lords of the Manor" in

Europe, who are the same folks that my Irish ancestors fled to America to

get away from.)



While stepping around goose droppings and occasionally having to hit the

brakes to allow a goose flock to cross the street is an inconvenience, I

don't think it has nearly the adverse effect on the local environment that

the swans have had in my part of Long Island.



Thanks,

Tim Dunn

Sent from my iPhone


On Dec 4, 2017, at 4:58 PM, Frederick Kedenburg

<kedenbird@optonline.net<mailto:kedenbird@optonline.net>> wrote:

Although yes, I do know this issue was posted locally on the NF, yet it

still has many repercussions to birders throughout NYS therefore I am

posting.

If you wish to eradicate Mute Swan I am sorry.

rk


North Fork LI NY: I went looking for the reported Snowy at the Mattituck

Inlet Breakwater today but although I looked along the Beach, east & west

and patrolled the DEC conservation and boat ramp area I could not find it.

I'll try again as once the species shows up it can be persistent. The

predominant waterfowl there today was Long-tailed Duck. It was good to hear

their call once again this season.


After some coffee and a late breakfast in Mattituck I went to Laurel Lake.

There were plentiful numbers of Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck and American

Coot. Also seen were one Great Blue Heron, one Pied Billed Grebe and a

Gadwall.


As an aside:

There were two Mute Swan in the Laurel Lake compared to hundreds of Canada

Geese there today.

Why does the NYS-DEC seem so preoccupied with extirpating all the Mute Swan

and is doing next to nothing in addressing the vast numbers of Canada Geese

in NYS. The geese cause so much damage to wetlands and to water quality due

to the hugh amount of poop they produce. Loading nitrogen into our bays and

wetlands is only part of the problem. Maneuvering about many parking lots

and commercial businesses with grass without encountering poop is

problematic.

I understand from DEC records that the Mute Swan population in NYS is

somewhere between 2800 and 3500. Please correct me if I am wrong.


As I was looking through my scope this morning at Laurel Lake a fellow came

along walking his dog and asked me what I was looking at. I gave him a brief

description of the species there and he said to me. "Why do they want to

kill all the swans? He continued to say "I love the Swans, they are so

beautiful and my kids love to see them as well". I wondered how an average

person had come to know about this issue.


My point here is that I believe the Mute Swan, although yes it is an

'invasive species', does more good than harm as it helps connect people with

a world around them they did not know before. The Swans in effect connect

people to nature and help create a culture of conservation that helps us

all.


As for Canada Geese I have nothing against them; however, to put thing into

perspective when I do the DEC Winter Waterfowl Census in January I

frequently find about 3,000 Canada Geese in the fields along Oregon Road

Mattituck NY alone. Imagine how many statewide.


In my opinion the DEC needs to get their priorities in the correct order and

concern themselves with a gradual reduction in the population of Canada

Geese. Whether it be through addling of eggs or a more lenient view when it

comes to hunting and or donation of the take to food banks something must be

done.

rk




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Subject: Central Park, NYC - dates corrected to Sun. Dec. 3rd, Dec. Monday 4th! (with ten warbler spp. on Sunday)
Date: Tue Dec 5 2017 8:59 am
From: tomfi2 AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City(Sunday) & Monday - (3rd) & 4th of December, 2017
To add some details for a report already given, on Sunday in Central Park (besides the Empidonax flycatcher originally found by Linda LaBella, to whom hundreds of NY & other states birders are thankful to for that find, and present to at least Monday 12/4 there in the parks Ramble areas as previously), the park also had at least ten species of warblers on the Sunday (12/3), a very notable diversity, for that late in a year here -
these warblers included:
the Magnolia Warbler which I had first found, photod, & originally reported to this list, as now seen by dozens of other birders & which is the least-regular of all of these late-moving warbler species thatve been definitively seen, documented, & noted in recent days in Central Park (with a few other species also being quite unexpected so late in the season); & these other warblers, some of them having lingered for perhaps many weeks while some may have pushed through just on the day or past few days, as late migratory movement continues:
Orange-crowned Warbler - to Monday, 4th, this last at the Meer again, beingh seen at various times & several days from a number of points on the west, east, & south sides of the Meer & adjacent trees and also a few times at the island in the Meer (& again assuming just one of this species there, although hardly unthinkable there are or were more than one);
Nashville Warbler - at least to Sunday, 3rd when a minimum of 5 individuals appear to have pushed in, although at least 2 were present since late November, as some of us had seen & reported, at the SE part of the park; on Sunday additional Nashvilles were spread across a mile-long strip of the east side of the park, from what I could find & am not aware of any from farther north in the park - however the northern parts of Central have been nearly vacated or little-visited by birders on the days when a much-watched, &/or sought, Empidonax has been present in the Ramble area (which is a distance of roughly one mile+, from much of the better bird habitat in the north sections of the park); N.B. - there has been a not-too-untypical late push of Nashville thru the NYC area & vicinity in the last few days or so;
Northern Parula - at least to Sunday 3rd, & with a minimum of 3 individuals found, all in the southern portion of the park below 72nd St., & with one or possibly 2 of this species also present a few days or more prior as well; N.B. - this species would normally be seen as quite late in a year at this point, & yet as with the Nashvilles seen just lately in the area [and which are far more standard as low-density very late-moving stragglers or, whatever is really going on with that & certain other insectivore spp.; the possibility of non-eastern origins for some of these ought be seen as a possibility], there were at least several, or more than several N. Parula being found in this region in recent days, thus a pattern & not aunique Central Park phenom. by any means - just as the flycatcher known as Hammonds was/is not a unique phenomenon in the East this season (one is being seen regularly in Massachusetts concurrent with the celeb. C.P. individual, for just one easily-verified example), there have been a LOT of other warblers moving across the east in the past week[s], some of them a bit uncommonly-late, at least by 20th-century standard & records (while also, for many, not being out-of-ordinary possibility, either in terms of total records for the region, rather than some Central Park-specific record dates, & even then!);
Pine Warbler - at least to Sunday, 3rd, a fairly bright individual showing well right by Turtle Pond, but ignored or un-watched anyhow by throngs running after Empidonax hammondii - this not an unusual date at all for the species, but in most years is actually more uncommon IN Central Park than other warblers noted here now - thisfeels like may have been, as with some of the other individual warblers, getting pushed to a coastal, or more southern location on a small wave of freshly-arrived late migrants over this past weekend;
American Redstart - lingering into al least Sunday, 3rd; this individual had been present at the Loch & vicinity for some day, & was still for Sunday - muchignored by the folks all gathered in the areas where E. hammondii was, & that was not the n. parts of Central N.B. - this is a fairly late date for the species but in more-recent years, this species has begun to turn up even on some CBCs & in December sightings a bit more generally, even while hardlyexpected so late in the region;
Ovenbird - to Monday, 4th, and this species has become almostexpected in very low density in Manhattan, in December, & sometimes into a new year; the individual I found in Central on Monday was at the CP Zoo, but needed no entry as it was near the outdoor cafe area, where one has been in recent days; its at least possible there are some others, or were, lingering in various areas of the park - and definitely in various other Manhattan locations (some reported, some likely not yet);
Northern Waterthrush - at least to Sunday, 3rd. at The Pond; this individual which had lingered for weeks if not loinger at that location, may have finally moved on, but still just might be lurking about the shorelines of The Pond (SE part of park) where I have, over many days now, found it in virtually every stretch of that waterbodys shoreline, at varioustimes of various days; this is pretty late for either C.P. or the region for the species, but of course does not furnish anything like a late record for the state nor the region (see, overwintered N. Waterthrush for Long Island, NY as expounded on by S. Mitra in prior reporting!);
Common Yellowthroat - to at least Sunday, 3rd; these have, as with Ovenbird, been among the most-regular of manhattan (NY County, that is) warbler species which can & do attempt to winter, sometimes like ovenbird in odd patches of urban habitat, indeed possibly much more so in such odd patches rather than larger parks as Central is; the Sunday individual was in the southern part of the park, but could easily be in any other section and there well might be a lingerer still of this species, almost certainly in some of the lower-Manhattan parks or green-spaces at this moment;
Wilson's Warbler - through Monday, 4th, this is the most-watched warbler of Central Park of late, simply because it, perhaps associatively is regularly being seen in the general vicinity of the Empidonx hammondii, and birders are still aware of bright yellow (this individual Wilsons appears to be an adult male) birds in the same view, or flitting through, their sugar-plum vision of dancing Empidonax (or sit-still-for-a-photo empie.)
and there have even been some other native & wild birds in Central Park over the past days - one ongoing to Monday, 4th has been a female Boat-tailed Grackle, which was first reported & photo-documented by Anders Peltomaa, and on the day after Anders report with photos was again photo-documented by other observers in the park, then on subsequent days after that, seen by more & more observers, this Monday Boat-tailed sighting in mid-morning at Sheep Meadows SW corner, & amongst a very large Common Grackle flock (hundreds), & that sighting shared with two other observers including Peter Post.
On Monday (12/4), I am aware of just 4 warbler species being seen, in Central & these included the lingering Magnolia Id first found & reported on (photod each day seen), the now long-lingering male Wilsons in the Ramble, the lingering Orange-crowned at the Meer, & an Ovenbird also lingering a bit, near the C.P. Zoo. There may easily have been some of the other noted warbler spp. or others, still about. One highlight for me on Monday was catching up with a number of fine observers from around the city, and the state, including Willie DAnna who has so often given reports of all manner of birds to this list; also Carl Howard who is fighting the good fight on our environmental front, and as well Kathy Drake, also a world-birder & who offered me a lot of wonderful anecdotes on her birding expeditions of late. A last note, in any December day thats not CBC scouting or participating, one sees an excited tweeting (of a certain Empidonax) from Central park by Christian Cooper, a.k.a. Mr. Blackburnian, one knows there is a bird of some note within the park. And so there is. Good luck to further seekers after the E. hammondii...
Respectful & ethical birding to all which is always a very good way,
Tom Fioremanhattan

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Subject: Snowy Owl, No
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 21:32 pm
From: rcech AT nyc.rr.com
 
Quick agreement with Shai -- by "non-migratory" I didn't mean "feral", just
populations that in the past may have been migratory but have now become
sedentary / local, in some or all seasons.

-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-122103624-3714678@list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-122103624-3714678@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Shaibal
Mitra
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 10:22 PM
To: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu)
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No

As everyone so far has contributed in good faith, and given that this
listserv is devoted to NYS birds of all kinds, not just rare, why not
discuss?

My perception is that waterfowl are thriving above and beyond all other
ecological guilds. The explosion in Canada Goose numbers is not attributable
to the feral component; it is the northern, natural populations that are
expanding under climate change. In general, we have been finding ducks and
geese in tremendous abundance and diversity throughout NYS in recent years.
If Mute Swans are a problem, it is a very small one compared to many other
threats to our environment. And, as Rick points out, our environment has
been abused so badly for so long that a lot of what is still here is in a
co-dependent relationship with past abuse.

For example, there are legitimate (mostly non-avian) rationales undergirding
the recent fascination with undoing Long Island's ubiquitous, centuries-old
dams. While possibly restoring fish runs, this policy would also drain
innumerable South Shore ponds, probably removing many thousands of ducks
from Long Island--more than Mute Swans ever displaced. Arguably these would
be ducks that "shouldn't have been here anyway," but what if the fish
populations don't recover either? But this is just one example. Should we
invest in the Sisyphean eradication of multiflora rose? Honeysuckle?
Phragmites? The answers to these various massive-scale questions range from
"probably not" to "maybe."

In contrast, I think the expenditure of time and money on eradicating Mute
Swans is entirely misplaced. The potential benefits are demonstrably small,
and the public relations costs are likely significant--and this is not to
mention the logistical costs. Why not use those resources and whatever
public good will remains in this dark age to buy xxx hectares of
scabby-looking oak woods? If we don't, all we'll have are sterile
creaks--without dams but also without ponds--built up to the edges, and
without any woods either.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: bounce-122103568-3714944@list.cornell.edu
[bounce-122103568-3714944@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Rick
[rcech@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, December 4, 2017 9:22 PM
To: 'Tim Dunn'; 'Frederick Kedenburg'
Cc: 'Michael Cooper'; 'NYS BIRDS'
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No

First, kudos to Chris T-H for keeping order in our rangy group. A laudable
task, not simple.

Second, the fact that one invasive (Mute Swans) may be more of less
destructive than another (non-migratory "barnyard" Canada Geese) is a
sensible question for discussion (maybe or maybe not on a rare bird
list-serve, but leave that aside for the moment).

Like many birders, I abhor human intrusions into natural bird habitats and
behavior (such as introduction of invasives, even though they admittedly may
have the odd beneficial effect, such as some popular garden plants that
provide sustenance for native butterfly species, my specialty), and I
likewise abhor anthromorpic "cuddling" of cute species that cause massive
harm (feral cats). I also recognize the "PR" value of engaging public
sentiment with salient "nature hooks," while being aware of the double-edged
sword nature of such appeals.

Maybe our list serve is not the right place to hold these discussions, esp.
when they become vitriolic. But what is the right forum? I'm interested in
having a well-thought-through set of conservation propositions being widely
discussed and endorsed in the community.

Suggestions?

Rick

From: bounce-122103507-3714678@list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-122103507-3714678@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Tim Dunn
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 8:37 PM
To: Frederick Kedenburg
Cc: Michael Cooper ; NYS BIRDS
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No

I agree Fred, as to the context of the conversation. It's not an easy issue
for birders and reasonable minds can differ on these issues.

I also have no problem with dealing with the "immigrant" swan population as
humanely as possible. To me, the most palatable solution would probably be
to prevent more cygnets and let the existing population live out their
lives, though I also suspect that would be the most expensive way to deal
with or solve the problem, with the DEC oiling and pricking eggs for
decades.

Frankly, I don't know how the swan overpopulation on my local pond should be
addressed, but I'd only be in favor of a dealing with it through a method
that is decent and humane. I would like to see a return of some native
waterfowl that I blame the swans for driving out. Certainly, it's not
necessary to eliminate every mute swan, but my opinion is that there needs
to be some control of populations in certain places like Argyle Lake.
Argyle still holds the occasional birding surprise, but native waterfowl
numbers seem clearly to be down due to the proliferation of swans there.
Hardly any waterfowl breed there now, besides the swans.

Thanks,
Tim Dunn
Babylon, NY
Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 4, 2017, at 7:54 PM, Frederick Kedenburg
> wrote:
I don't think Chris T-H needs to weigh in on this as it is a polite
conversation of an issue that we all know about.
Many of us have opinions that will not be changed. That is everyones right.

I have simply this one thing to say:
I know many out there wish to eliminate the Swans for what they believe are
scientific reasons.
I think the Mute Swan, now that they have been here for over a century, have
as much a right to live as any immigrant does today.
Their numbers and the damage they do is really negligible compared to other
species.

Are not Swans now to be considered naturalized and a beauty for all to
behold? I think they need this protection.
rk


On Dec 4, 2017, at 6:21 PM, Michael Cooper
> wrote:

Well said Tim, but I think I hear the footsteps of Chris T-H on the way, so
I'm going to mention a bird in this post and "duck" out of the way of the
ban hammer!

Mike Cooper
Ridge LI NY
Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 4, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Tim Dunn
> wrote:
Fred and any others interested,

Two mute swans by you is no problem. Up to 65 can be seen on any given day
on Argyle Lake in Babylon. It is a pond that is less than 1/4 mile in
circumference. All other breeding waterfowl here have been eradicated by
these swans. Some migrant waterfowl use the pond but less than in the past.
Few dabbling ducks use it as swans have eaten all vegetation on the bottom
of the pond to as far as their long necks can reach.

Geese come and go in migration here, but the mute swans are a constant. So
I would expect that the reason that DEC wants to control them is that they
are an invasive species that is destroying the local ecosystem and driving
out native species. Maybe not happening by you, but definitely happening
here in western Suffolk.


Non-birders are aware of this issue because it appeared in the newspapers
when the DEC came out and said they would start removing the swans. That
typically means shooting, trapping, poisoning, etc. Hardly anyone likes the
idea of culling these birds through cruel and inhumane ways (including me),
so the subject comes up for a debate that has reached beyond birders and
wildlife people from time to time. My understanding is that egg oiling and
similar tactics are being used, or at least are up for discussion, to
control the population.


Since they are an invasive and destructive species, any connection that an
observer feels to wildlife by viewing feral mute swans is based entirely on
a lack of understanding of the natural world around them. You might have
done more for the guy you ran into today if you had told him that if it
weren't for those swans, he might be seeing ten different species of
waterfowl that they have driven away. Beauty is obviously in the eye of the
beholder, but I'd prefer green-wing teal and pintails to those swans.


(And sociologically speaking, to me those swans represent the escaped stock
of early successful Americans anxious to imitate the "Lords of the Manor" in
Europe, who are the same folks that my Irish ancestors fled to America to
get away from.)


While stepping around goose droppings and occasionally having to hit the
brakes to allow a goose flock to cross the street is an inconvenience, I
don't think it has nearly the adverse effect on the local environment that
the swans have had in my part of Long Island.


Thanks,
Tim Dunn
Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 4, 2017, at 4:58 PM, Frederick Kedenburg
> wrote:
Although yes, I do know this issue was posted locally on the NF, yet it
still has many repercussions to birders throughout NYS therefore I am
posting.
If you wish to eradicate Mute Swan I am sorry.
rk

North Fork LI NY: I went looking for the reported Snowy at the Mattituck
Inlet Breakwater today but although I looked along the Beach, east & west
and patrolled the DEC conservation and boat ramp area I could not find it.
I'll try again as once the species shows up it can be persistent. The
predominant waterfowl there today was Long-tailed Duck. It was good to hear
their call once again this season.

After some coffee and a late breakfast in Mattituck I went to Laurel Lake.
There were plentiful numbers of Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck and American
Coot. Also seen were one Great Blue Heron, one Pied Billed Grebe and a
Gadwall.

As an aside:
There were two Mute Swan in the Laurel Lake compared to hundreds of Canada
Geese there today.
Why does the NYS-DEC seem so preoccupied with extirpating all the Mute Swan
and is doing next to nothing in addressing the vast numbers of Canada Geese
in NYS. The geese cause so much damage to wetlands and to water quality due
to the hugh amount of poop they produce. Loading nitrogen into our bays and
wetlands is only part of the problem. Maneuvering about many parking lots
and commercial businesses with grass without encountering poop is
problematic.
I understand from DEC records that the Mute Swan population in NYS is
somewhere between 2800 and 3500. Please correct me if I am wrong.

As I was looking through my scope this morning at Laurel Lake a fellow came
along walking his dog and asked me what I was looking at. I gave him a brief
description of the species there and he said to me. "Why do they want to
kill all the swans? He continued to say "I love the Swans, they are so
beautiful and my kids love to see them as well". I wondered how an average
person had come to know about this issue.

My point here is that I believe the Mute Swan, although yes it is an
'invasive species', does more good than harm as it helps connect people with
a world around them they did not know before. The Swans in effect connect
people to nature and help create a culture of conservation that helps us
all.

As for Canada Geese I have nothing against them; however, to put thing into
perspective when I do the DEC Winter Waterfowl Census in January I
frequently find about 3,000 Canada Geese in the fields along Oregon Road
Mattituck NY alone. Imagine how many statewide.

In my opinion the DEC needs to get their priorities in the correct order and
concern themselves with a gradual reduction in the population of Canada
Geese. Whether it be through addling of eggs or a more lenient view when it
comes to hunting and or donation of the take to food banks something must be
done.
rk



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Subject: Snowy Owl, No
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 21:22 pm
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
 
As everyone so far has contributed in good faith, and given that this listserv is devoted to NYS birds of all kinds, not just rare, why not discuss?

My perception is that waterfowl are thriving above and beyond all other ecological guilds. The explosion in Canada Goose numbers is not attributable to the feral component; it is the northern, natural populations that are expanding under climate change. In general, we have been finding ducks and geese in tremendous abundance and diversity throughout NYS in recent years. If Mute Swans are a problem, it is a very small one compared to many other threats to our environment. And, as Rick points out, our environment has been abused so badly for so long that a lot of what is still here is in a co-dependent relationship with past abuse.

For example, there are legitimate (mostly non-avian) rationales undergirding the recent fascination with undoing Long Island's ubiquitous, centuries-old dams. While possibly restoring fish runs, this policy would also drain innumerable South Shore ponds, probably removing many thousands of ducks from Long Island--more than Mute Swans ever displaced. Arguably these would be ducks that "shouldn't have been here anyway," but what if the fish populations don't recover either? But this is just one example. Should we invest in the Sisyphean eradication of multiflora rose? Honeysuckle? Phragmites? The answers to these various massive-scale questions range from "probably not" to "maybe."

In contrast, I think the expenditure of time and money on eradicating Mute Swans is entirely misplaced. The potential benefits are demonstrably small, and the public relations costs are likely significant--and this is not to mention the logistical costs. Why not use those resources and whatever public good will remains in this dark age to buy xxx hectares of scabby-looking oak woods? If we don't, all we'll have are sterile creaks--without dams but also without ponds--built up to the edges, and without any woods either.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore
________________________________________
From: bounce-122103568-3714944@list.cornell.edu [bounce-122103568-3714944@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Rick [rcech@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, December 4, 2017 9:22 PM
To: 'Tim Dunn'; 'Frederick Kedenburg'
Cc: 'Michael Cooper'; 'NYS BIRDS'
Subject: RE: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No

First, kudos to Chris T-H for keeping order in our rangy group. A laudable task, not simple.

Second, the fact that one invasive (Mute Swans) may be more of less destructive than another (non-migratory barnyard Canada Geese) is a sensible question for discussion (maybe or maybe not on a rare bird list-serve, but leave that aside for the moment).

Like many birders, I abhor human intrusions into natural bird habitats and behavior (such as introduction of invasives, even though they admittedly may have the odd beneficial effect, such as some popular garden plants that provide sustenance for native butterfly species, my specialty), and I likewise abhor anthromorpic cuddling of cute species that cause massive harm (feral cats). I also recognize the PR value of engaging public sentiment with salient nature hooks, while being aware of the double-edged sword nature of such appeals.

Maybe our list serve is not the right place to hold these discussions, esp. when they become vitriolic. But what is the right forum? Im interested in having a well-thought-through set of conservation propositions being widely discussed and endorsed in the community.

Suggestions?

Rick

From: bounce-122103507-3714678@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-122103507-3714678@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Tim Dunn
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 8:37 PM
To: Frederick Kedenburg
Cc: Michael Cooper ; NYS BIRDS
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] [NFBirds Report 3221] Snowy Owl, No

I agree Fred, as to the context of the conversation. Its not an easy issue for birders and reasonable minds can differ on these issues.

I also have no problem with dealing with the immigrant swan population as humanely as possible. To me, the most palatable solution would probably be to prevent more cygnets and let the existing population live out their lives, though I also suspect that would be the most expensive way to deal with or solve the problem, with the DEC oiling and pricking eggs for decades.

Frankly, I dont know how the swan overpopulation on my local pond should be addressed, but Id only be in favor of a dealing with it through a method that is decent and humane. I would like to see a return of some native waterfowl that I blame the swans for driving out. Certainly, its not necessary to eliminate every mute swan, but my opinion is that there needs to be some control of populations in certain places like Argyle Lake. Argyle still holds the occasional birding surprise, but native waterfowl numbers seem clearly to be down due to the proliferation of swans there. Hardly any waterfowl breed there now, besides the swans.

Thanks,
Tim Dunn
Babylon, NY
Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 4, 2017, at 7:54 PM, Frederick Kedenburg > wrote:
I dont think Chris T-H needs to weigh in on this as it is a polite conversation of an issue that we all know about.
Many of us have opinions that will not be changed. That is everyones right.

I have simply this one thing to say:
I know many out there wish to eliminate the Swans for what they believe are scientific reasons.
I think the Mute Swan, now that they have been here for over a century, have as much a right to live as any immigrant does today.
Their numbers and the damage they do is really negligible compared to other species.

Are not Swans now to be considered naturalized and a beauty for all to behold? I think they need this protection.
rk


On Dec 4, 2017, at 6:21 PM, Michael Cooper > wrote:

Well said Tim, but I think I hear the footsteps of
Chris T-H on the way, so Im going to mention a bird in this post and duck out of the way of the ban hammer!

Mike Cooper
Ridge LI NY
Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 4, 2017, at 6:03 PM, Tim Dunn > wrote:
Fred and any others interested,

Two mute swans by you is no problem. Up to 65 can be seen on any given day on Argyle Lake in Babylon. It is a pond that is less than 1/4 mile in circumference. All other breeding waterfowl here have been eradicated by these swans. Some migrant waterfowl use the pond but less than in the past. Few dabbling ducks use it as swans have eaten all vegetation on the bottom of the pond to as far as their long necks can reach.

Geese come and go in migration here, but the mute swans are a constant. So I would expect that the reason that DEC wants to control them is that they are an invasive species that is destroying the local ecosystem and driving out native species. Maybe not happening by you, but definitely happening here in western Suffolk.


Non-birders are aware of this issue because it appeared in the newspapers when the DEC came out and said they would start removing the swans. That typically means shooting, trapping, poisoning, etc. Hardly anyone likes the idea of culling these birds through cruel and inhumane ways (including me), so the subject comes up for a debate that has reached beyond birders and wildlife people from time to time. My understanding is that egg oiling and similar tactics are being used, or at least are up for discussion, to control the population.


Since they are an invasive and destructive species, any connection that an observer feels to wildlife by viewing feral mute swans is based entirely on a lack of understanding of the natural world around them. You might have done more for the guy you ran into today if you had told him that if it werent for those swans, he might be seeing ten different species of waterfowl that they have driven away. Beauty is obviously in the eye of the beholder, but Id prefer green-wing teal and pintails to those swans.


(And sociologically speaking, to me those swans represent the escaped stock of early successful Americans anxious to imitate the Lords of the Manor in Europe, who are the same folks that my Irish ancestors fled to America to get away from.)


While stepping around goose droppings and occasionally having to hit the brakes to allow a goose flock to cross the street is an inconvenience, I dont think it has nearly the adverse effect on the local environment that the swans have had in my part of Long Island.


Thanks,
Tim Dunn
Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 4, 2017, at 4:58 PM, Frederick Kedenburg > wrote:
Although yes, I do know this issue was posted locally on the NF, yet it still has many repercussions to birders throughout NYS therefore I am posting.
If you wish to eradicate Mute Swan I am sorry.
rk

North Fork LI NY: I went looking for the reported Snowy at the Mattituck Inlet Breakwater today but although I looked along the Beach, east & west and patrolled the DEC conservation and boat ramp area I could not find it. Ill try again as once the species shows up it can be persistent. The predominant waterfowl there today was Long-tailed Duck. It was good to hear their call once again this season.

After some coffee and a late breakfast in Mattituck I went to Laurel Lake.
There were plentiful numbers of Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck and American Coot. Also seen were one Great Blue Heron, one Pied Billed Grebe and a Gadwall.

As an aside:
There were two Mute Swan in the Laurel Lake compared to hundreds of Canada Geese there today.
Why does the NYS-DEC seem so preoccupied with extirpating all the Mute Swan and is doing next to nothing in addressing the vast numbers of Canada Geese in NYS. The geese cause so much damage to wetlands and to water quality due to the hugh amount of poop they produce. Loading nitrogen into our bays and wetlands is only part of the problem. Maneuvering about many parking lots and commercial businesses with grass without encountering poop is problematic.
I understand from DEC records that the Mute Swan population in NYS is somewhere between 2800 and 3500. Please correct me if I am wrong.

As I was looking through my scope this morning at Laurel Lake a fellow came along walking his dog and asked me what I was looking at. I gave him a brief description of the species there and he said to me. Why do they want to kill all the swans? He continued to say I love the Swans, they are so beautiful and my kids love to see them as well. I wondered how an average person had come to know about this issue.

My point here is that I believe the Mute Swan, although yes it is an invasive species, does more good than harm as it helps connect people with a world around them they did not know before. The Swans in effect connect people to nature and help create a culture of conservation that helps us all.

As for Canada Geese I have nothing against them; however, to put thing into perspective when I do the DEC Winter Waterfowl Census in January I frequently find about 3,000 Canada Geese in the fields along Oregon Road Mattituck NY alone. Imagine how many statewide.

In my opinion the DEC needs to get their priorities in the correct order and concern themselves with a gradual reduction in the population of Canada Geese. Whether it be through addling of eggs or a more lenient view when it comes to hunting and or donation of the take to food banks something must be done.
rk



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Subject: Snowy Owl, No
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 17:04 pm
From: timdunn AT optonline.net
 
Fred and any others interested,
Two mute swans by you is no problem. Up to 65 can be seen on any given day on Argyle Lake in Babylon. It is a pond that is less than 1/4 mile in circumference. All other breeding waterfowl here have been eradicated by these swans. Some migrant waterfowl use the pond but less than in the past. Few dabbling ducks use it as swans have eaten all vegetation on the bottom of the pond to as far as their long necks can reach.
Geese come and go in migration here, but the mute swans are a constant. So I would expect that the reason that DEC wants to control them is that they are an invasive species that is destroying the local ecosystem and driving out native species. Maybe not happening by you, but definitely happening here in western Suffolk.
Non-birders are aware of this issue because it appeared in the newspapers when the DEC came out and said they would start removing the swans. That typically means shooting, trapping, poisoning, etc. Hardly anyone likes the idea of culling these birds through cruel and inhumane ways (including me), so the subject comes up for a debate that has reached beyond birders and wildlife people from time to time. My understanding is that egg oiling and similar tactics are being used, or at least are up for discussion, to control the population.
Since they are an invasive and destructive species, any connection that an observer feels to wildlife by viewing feral mute swans is based entirely on a lack of understanding of the natural world around them. You might have done more for the guy you ran into today if you had told him that if it werent for those swans, he might be seeing ten different species of waterfowl that they have driven away. Beauty is obviously in the eye of the beholder, but Id prefer green-wing teal and pintails to those swans.
(And sociologically speaking, to me those swans represent the escaped stock of early successful Americans anxious to imitate the Lords of the Manor in Europe, who are the same folks that my Irish ancestors fled to America to get away from.)
While stepping around goose droppings and occasionally having to hit the brakes to allow a goose flock to cross the street is an inconvenience, I dont think it has nearly the adverse effect on the local environment that the swans have had in my part of Long Island.

Thanks,Tim DunnSent from my iPhone
On Dec 4, 2017, at 4:58 PM, Frederick Kedenburg <kedenbird@optonline.net> wrote:

Although yes, I do know this issue was posted locally on the NF, yet it still has many repercussions to birders throughout NYS therefore I am posting.If you wish toeradicateMute Swan I am sorry.rk
North Fork LI NY: I went looking for the reported Snowy at the Mattituck Inlet Breakwater today but although I looked along the Beach, east & west and patrolled the DEC conservation and boat ramp area I could not find it. Ill try again as once the species shows up it can be persistent. The predominant waterfowl there today was Long-tailed Duck. It was good to hear their call once again this season.
After some coffee and a late breakfast in Mattituck I went to Laurel Lake.There were plentiful numbers of Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck and American Coot. Also seen were one Great Blue Heron, one Pied Billed Grebe and a Gadwall.
As an aside:There were two Mute Swan in the Laurel Lake compared to hundreds of Canada Geese there today.Why does the NYS-DEC seem so preoccupied with extirpating all the Mute Swan and is doing next to nothing in addressing the vast numbers of Canada Geese in NYS. The geese cause so much damage to wetlands and to water quality due to the hugh amount of poop they produce. Loading nitrogen into our bays and wetlands is only part of the problem. Maneuvering about many parking lots and commercial businesses with grass without encountering poop is problematic.I understand from DEC records that the Mute Swan population in NYS is somewhere between 2800 and 3500. Please correct me if I am wrong.
As I was looking through my scope this morning at Laurel Lake a fellow came along walking his dog and asked me what I was looking at. I gave him a brief description of the species there and he said to me. Why do they want to kill all the swans? He continued to say I love the Swans, they are so beautiful and my kids love to see them as well. I wondered how an average person had come to know about this issue.
My point here is that I believe the Mute Swan, although yes it is an invasive species, does more good than harm as it helps connect people with a world around them they did not know before. The Swans in effect connect people to nature and help create a culture of conservation that helps us all.
As for Canada Geese I have nothing against them; however, to put thing into perspective when I do the DEC Winter Waterfowl Census in January I frequently find about 3,000 Canada Geese in the fields along Oregon Road Mattituck NY alone. Imagine how many statewide.
In my opinion the DEC needs to get their priorities in the correct order and concern themselves with a gradual reduction in the population of Canada Geese. Whether it be through addling of eggs or a more lenient view when it comes to hunting and or donation of the take to food banks something must be done.rk



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Subject: Snowy Owl, No
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 15:58 pm
From: kedenbird AT optonline.net
 
Although yes, I do know this issue was posted locally on the NF, yet it still has many repercussions to birders throughout NYS therefore I am posting.If you wish toeradicateMute Swan I am sorry.rk
North Fork LI NY: I went looking for the reported Snowy at the Mattituck Inlet Breakwater today but although I looked along the Beach, east & west and patrolled the DEC conservation and boat ramp area I could not find it. Ill try again as once the species shows up it can be persistent. The predominant waterfowl there today was Long-tailed Duck. It was good to hear their call once again this season.
After some coffee and a late breakfast in Mattituck I went to Laurel Lake.There were plentiful numbers of Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck and American Coot. Also seen were one Great Blue Heron, one Pied Billed Grebe and a Gadwall.
As an aside:There were two Mute Swan in the Laurel Lake compared to hundreds of Canada Geese there today.Why does the NYS-DEC seem so preoccupied with extirpating all the Mute Swan and is doing next to nothing in addressing the vast numbers of Canada Geese in NYS. The geese cause so much damage to wetlands and to water quality due to the hugh amount of poop they produce. Loading nitrogen into our bays and wetlands is only part of the problem. Maneuvering about many parking lots and commercial businesses with grass without encountering poop is problematic.I understand from DEC records that the Mute Swan population in NYS is somewhere between 2800 and 3500. Please correct me if I am wrong.
As I was looking through my scope this morning at Laurel Lake a fellow came along walking his dog and asked me what I was looking at. I gave him a brief description of the species there and he said to me. Why do they want to kill all the swans? He continued to say I love the Swans, they are so beautiful and my kids love to see them as well. I wondered how an average person had come to know about this issue.
My point here is that I believe the Mute Swan, although yes it is an invasive species, does more good than harm as it helps connect people with a world around them they did not know before. The Swans in effect connect people to nature and help create a culture of conservation that helps us all.
As for Canada Geese I have nothing against them; however, to put thing into perspective when I do the DEC Winter Waterfowl Census in January I frequently find about 3,000 Canada Geese in the fields along Oregon Road Mattituck NY alone. Imagine how many statewide.
In my opinion the DEC needs to get their priorities in the correct order and concern themselves with a gradual reduction in the population of Canada Geese. Whether it be through addling of eggs or a more lenient view when it comes to hunting and or donation of the take to food banks something must be done.rk



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Subject: Syracuse RBA
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 13:15 pm
From: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
 
* New York* SyracuseDecember 04, 2017
* NYSY 12.04.17Hotline: Syracuse Rare bird AlertDates(s):November 27, 2017 - December 04, 2017to report by e-mail: brinjoseph AT yahoo.comcovering upstate NY counties: Cayuga, Montezuma National Wildlife Refugeand Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC) (just outside Cayuga County),Onondaga, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Oneida, Herkimer, Madison & Cortlandcompiled: December 04 AT 2:00 p.m. (EST)compiler: Joseph BrinOnondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondagaaudubon.orgGreetings: This is the Syracuse Rare Bird Alert for the week of November 27, 2017.
Highlights--------------
RED-THROATED LOONCATTLE EGRETROSSS GOOSECACKLING GOOSEGREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSEGOLDEN EAGLEBLACK VULTURESANDHILL CRANESNOWY OWLSHORT-EARED OWLMARSH WRENPINE SISKIN


Montezuma National Wildlife Complex (MNWC) and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)----------------
1/29: A late MARSH WREN was seen from VanDyne Spoor Road. A ROSSS GOOSE was seen in the mucklands along Rt. 31 west of the Seneca River. A SHORT-EARED OWL was seen at Martens Tract. 12/2: A late MARSH WREN was heard from the tower at the Visitors Center. 12/3: A GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen at the Visitors Center. 112 SANDHILL CRANES were seen at Knox-Marsellus Marsh. A CATTLE EGRET has continues through the week at Wilgoose fields along Rt. 89.

Onondaga county------------
11/28: A GOLDEN EAGLE was seen in flight along Rt. 370 at Hayes Road east of Baldwinsville. 12/1: A SHORT-EARED OWL was seen at Three Rivers WMA north of Baldwinsville.A SNOWY OWL was seen at the Davidson Auto sales area on Rt. 31 east of Baldwinsville. It was seen again on the 2nd. just east at the Fucillo auto sales area. 12/3: A CACKLING GOOSE was seen on Church Road near Marietta south of Rt. 20. 12/4: A BLACK VULTURE was seen near the Town Center shopping area on Rt. 5 in Fayetteville.

Madison County------------
12/2: A SNOWY OWL was seen at the Sky High Sod Farm north of Chittenango. A CACKLING GOOSE was seen at Woodman Pond north of Hamilton.

Oneida county------------
12/1: 4 PINE SISKINS were seen at Spring Farm Nature Center south of Clinton.
---end transcript
---Joseph BrinRegion 5Baldwinsville, NY 13027 USA











































































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Subject: American Woodcock, Bryant Park
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 11:48 am
From: joew701 AT gmail.com
 
I'm so new to small-park birding in NYC that I don't know what's special, but a quick noontime walk among the Bryant Park hordes revealed an Orange-Crowned Warbler (northeast plantings), Common Yellowthroat, Hermit Thrush, and a tame, feeding Woodcock. First spotted from Sixth Avenue probing the ground near the 42nd Street edge, it then moved to the northwestern edge along 42nd. My interest drew a small crowd of fascinated tourists wondering what on earth it was. 

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Central Park, NYC - Sun., Dec. 3, 2017 - Boat-tailed Grackle, Nashville & Wilson's Warbs., N. Parula, Hammond's Fl.
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 10:53 am
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park, NYC - Ramble & points south
Sunday, December. 3, 2017
OBS: Robert DeCandido, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Boat-tailed Grackle, Nashville Warbler (3), Wilson's Warbler, Northern Parula, & Hammond's Flycatcher. Water is high at the mudflat between the Pond and Wollman Rink, but the area continues to attract birds, notable Sunday for not one, but two Nashville Warblers.

Canada Goose - 6 at the Pond (59th Street)
Wood Duck - 2 males at the Pond
Mallard - around 40 at the Pond
American Black Duck - the Pond
Northern Pintail - male at the Pond
Mourning Dove
American Coot - the Pond
Herring Gull - flyovers
Great Blue Heron - adult at the Pond
Cooper's Hawk - adult near Evodia Field
Red-tailed Hawk - 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker - north end of Evodia Field
Yellow-belied Sapsucker - 3
Downy Woodpecker - 2 or 3 (Evodia Field, Maintenance Field, & Azalea Pond)
Northern Flicker - male Maintenance Field
Hammond's Flycatcher - Mugger's Woods (3rd NY State Record & 1st Central Park Record pending NYSARC review)
Blue Jay
American Crow - 2 (Andrea Hessel)
White-breasted Nuthatch - Mugger's Woods
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 5 the Mall
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 9
Hermit Thrush - 2 (Mugger's Woods & Hallett Sanctuary)
American Robin - not many
Gray Catbird - mudlat north of the Pond
Northern Mockingbird - mudflat north of the Pond
House Finch - around a dozen (mostly Evodia Field & sweetgum near Gill Overlook)
Fox Sparrow - 6
Song Sparrow - 2
White-throated Sparrow - 30
Dark-eyed Junco - at least 4 at the Dene Slope
Red-winged Blackbird - 2 (The Point & Gill Overlook)
Common Grackle - at least 200 in flock on Sheep Meadow
Boat-tailed Grackle - hatch-year Sheep Meadow with Co. Grackles (Vicki Seabrook), later in Hallett Sanctuary (continues from Nov. 25 report of Anders Peltomaa)
Nashville Warbler - 3 (2 the Pond & Hallett Sanctuary, 1 the Mall west of Bandshell)
Northern Parula - the Pond
Wilson's Warbler - Mugger's Woods
Northern Cardinal - residents

Drew Stadlin told us about a Magnolia Warbler in Hallett Sanctuary, which he tweeted moments later. Gus Keri posted a series of photos of the Magnolia Warbler on the New York Birders Facebook group.

For real-time twitter alerts on NY County birds see @BirdCentralPark. For Bronx County alerts see @BirdBronx. Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

Deb Allen
www.birdingbob.com

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Subject: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 8:02 am
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
I just found it. Near Swampy Pin Oak, towards the Oven.

Anders Peltomaa
Manhattan

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Subject: Neotropical birds in the far north
Date: Mon Dec 4 2017 4:51 am
From: mikec02 AT optonline.net
 
I dont know if this is part of the crazy outbreak were seeing here in the northeast, but yesterday a Hepatic Tanager was photod at a feeder in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan!
Mike CooperRidge, LI, NY

Sent from my iPhone
On Dec 3, 2017, at 9:51 AM, Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com> wrote:

HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER South of Humming Tombstone #birdcp via @NYNYbirder
Sunday, today. Now!
Anders Peltomaa

Mannen

On Dec 2, 2017 10:14 AM, "Anders Peltomaa" <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com> wrote:
The Flycatcher was found again at 9:45 and seen will by many for about 20 minutes. Now MIA again.
Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan



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Subject: Central Park, NYC 12/3 - Sunday, & warblers
Date: Sun Dec 3 2017 18:34 pm
From: tomfi2 AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park, Manhattan, N.Y. City
Sunday, 3rd December, 2017

In addition to the lingering celebrity Empidonax flycatcher being seen again in the Ramble this day, (a minimum of) ten species of warblers were already being found as of the noon hour, and of these (that I am aware of) the least-common for Deember is the lingering 1st-fall Magnolia Warbler, which was again photographed in the Hallett Sanctuary (& has now been seen & photographed by others there as well). Also of potential interest (as a report) is that for a possible Canada Warbler recently reported, but the report lacking in details as to location within the park or for the birds markings that may have been noted (or any photos); this latter warbler species would be far more uncommon so late in the year than even a Magnolia in December. Of the (at least) ten warbler species in the park, 8 of them have been found in the areas south of 72nd Street, or roughly, the southern 1/3 of Central. However the greater habitat in parts of the northern portion of the park could yet yield some additional species &/or numbers to this remarkable movement and pile-up of December warblers.

Additional notable species of Sunday & Saturday include[d] a female Boat-tailed Grackle again seen in the roving grackle flock in the parks southern third, and (on at least Saturday) a Pine Siskin seen by a dozen or more observers around & at the Evodia Field (Ramble) feeders and vicinity.

Much more to be added, the above are just a few highlights. Good ongoing luck in flycatcher-observing,

Tom Fiore
manhattan
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Subject: “Rarity Round Up” - Personal Results and Musings
Date: Sun Dec 3 2017 18:14 pm
From: tph56 AT cornell.edu
 
Inspired by Shais Friday post about doing a rarity round up, I covered a lot of ground along the south shore this weekend. Though I failed to locate any Hammonds-tier vagrants, there were some nice seasonal irregularities and uncommon species to be found these past few days. Im not going to steal anyone elses highlights for this write-up, just posting notes as potential CBC intel or for the sake of county/year/month(?) listers. Apologies for length and formatting. 

-single Northern Parulas at JFK Memorial Wildlife Sanctuary and Cow Meadow Park
-drake Blue-winged Teal also at JFK, associating with Green-wings and other ducks
-American Bittern in the marshes north of Gilgo Beach
-Parasitic Jaeger, young Common Tern, Iceland Gull, and close, sizable congregations of Bonapartes Gulls at the Jones West End jetty. No sign of rarer associates in several hours of searching
-at least one continuing Cackling Goose at Hendrickson Park

The parulas represent the only Nassau records past the first week of November according to eBird, though I wonder if other archival data to the contrary exists. Along with a few additional individuals between Brooklyn and Montauk, and a smattering of other lingering wood-warblers from Prothonotary to Wilsons, we have a number of potential new late regional records in progress or approaching.

One hopes that the conspicuous presence of Bonapartes Gulls will continue after too many years of near absence in our area, potentially sticking for the count and drawing in some goodies in the process. In the more immediate future, strong winds with a southeasterly component on Tuesday could produce interesting sightings for those who can watch.

As an aside, early predictions about a certain irruption seem to be on very much point. This is an event worth documenting and admiring respectfully, even if the specific details are not to be shared here. Its always a spectacle, at any rate.

Cheers!
-Tim H
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Subject: HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - YES
Date: Sun Dec 3 2017 8:51 am
From: anders.peltomaa AT gmail.com
 
HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER South of Humming Tombstone #birdcp via @NYNYbirder
Sunday, today. Now!
Anders Peltomaa

Mannen

On Dec 2, 2017 10:14 AM, "Anders Peltomaa" <anders.peltomaa@gmail.com> wrote:
The Flycatcher was found again at 9:45 and seen will by many for about 20 minutes. Now MIA again.
Anders Peltomaa

Manhattan



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Subject: The New York Botanical Garden
Date: Sun Dec 3 2017 7:35 am
From: editconsul AT aol.com
 
On my Free Saturday morning birdwalk @NYBG we observed/heard the following:

Empidonax - Late Emp is rarely Least yet this bird does have some characteristic field markings of Least with the exception of a pinkish lower mandible and rather short primaries. No evidence of downward tail flick nor vocalization heard. Bird is in the Native Plant Garden by the water feature. Those interested in viewing a photo please contact me off the lists.
Hairy woodpecker
Downy woodpecker
Yellow bellied sapsucker
Chipping sparrows
White throated sparrows
Song sparrow
House finch
A Goldfinch
Hermit Thrush
Mallards
Wood ducks
Red tailed hawk
White breasted nuthatch
American Crow
Juncos
American Robins
Tufted titmouse
Chickadee
Great blue heron
Gray Catbird- Late
Blue jay
Mourning doves
Cardinal
Mockingbird

Good Birding,
Debbie Becker
NYBG Bird Guide
BirdingAroundNYC.com





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Subject: Pelham Bay Park, Bronx - Sat. Dec. 2, 2017 - Merlin, Horned & Red-necked Grebes, Long-tailed Ducks
Date: Sat Dec 2 2017 22:07 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
Saturday, December 2, 2017
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Merlin, Horned & Red-necked Grebes, Red-throated & Common Loons, Long-tailed Ducks, good numbers of Red-breasted Mergansers.

Brant - around 250
Canada Goose
Mallard - not many
American Black Duck
Long-tailed Duck - 2 off Twin Island
Bufflehead - at least 30
Red-breasted Merganser - 51 (most of these off Twin Island)
Pied-billed Grebe - 3
Horned Grebe - near Landfill (Jeff Ward)
Red-necked Grebe - off Twin Island distant (Richard Aracil)
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull - few
Red-throated Loon - 3
Common Loon
Cormorant - unidentified, several on distant rocks
Great Blue Heron - 2 (one of these in Westchester Co. spotted by Jeff Ward)
Red-tailed Hawk - flyover
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
American Kestrel - on Landfill (Jeff Ward)
Merlin - female (by size) in puddle in Orchard Beach parking lot
Monk Parakeet - flyover Rice Stadium
Blue Jay
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch - Southern Zone (Jeff Ward)
Carolina Wren - 2 near Landfill
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - near Landfill
American Robin - a few around Rice Stadium parking lot
Northern Mockingbird - near Landfill
American Goldfinch - 12
Chipping Sparrow - Southern Zone (Jeff Ward)
Field sparrow - Twin Island (Richard Aracil)
Song Sparrow - 6
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco - around 20 Southern Zone
Red-winged Blackbird & Common Grackle - mixed flock of around 20 birds in sweetgums in Southern Zone
Northern Cardinal

Non-avian: Garter Snake - Hunter Island, several Harbor Seals off Twin Island.
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Jared Cole & Richard Aracil reported Purple Sandpipers, a Surf Scoter, and White-winged Scoters.

Deb Allen
www.birdingbob.com

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Subject: Bronx/Westchester CBC 2017
Date: Sat Dec 2 2017 19:41 pm
From: birdingdude AT gmail.com
 
I am always on the lookout toadd to the teams covering the West Bronx. If you are interested, please drop me a note. The count is scheduled for the 23rd of December and teams are currently being assembled.
Cheers,
--

"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

Swift as the wind
Quiet as the forest Conquer like the fire Steady as the mountainSun TzuThe Art of War


(\__/)
(= '.'=) (") _ (")


Andrew Bakshwww.birdingdude.blogspot.com



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Subject: AUDUBON’S WARBLER - Napeague SP (Suffolk)
Date: Sat Dec 2 2017 19:40 pm
From: drogers0031 AT gmail.com
 
I took advantage of todays beautiful weather and decided to do some CBC scouting, focusing my efforts in the Napeague area. 

I began the day at Walking Dunes, Goff Point and Hicks Island where I spent several hours and encountered a good variety of birds which was highlighted by a late BALTIMORE ORIOLE. An Orange-crowned Warbler was among a flock of Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warblers. Additional nice, yet expected, species were three Eastern Meadowlarks, a single Razorbill and my first of season Horned Grebes. Snow Bunting and Horned Lark numbers were surprisingly low with one and two, respectively.

Next, I headed to Napeague Meadow Road and parked at the foot of North Road where I hiked east slowly detailing the pitch pines and bayberry groves with hopes of digging up some lingering, warmer season migrants. No such luck but three Pine Warblers associating with a flock of chickadees and kinglets were a nice addition to the day. I was near the end of my hike, very close to where the marsh meets Napeague Harbor, and began to focus my attention on an upland Island patch of vegetation (41.0038, -72.0634) where I encountered an adult male YELLOW-RUMPED (AUDUBONS) WARBLER. Unfortunately my cell phone battery had expired so I could not get the location specifics out as timely as I wouldve liked to. I spent the next 1.5 hours trying to relocate the bird and in that timeframe only saw it for a cumulative 10 seconds. It would be great to relocate this bird during the Montauk CBC on 16 December. Folks interested in trying to refind this bird may also want to try the east end of Crassen Boulevard which is just north of the above coordinates and is holding nice numbers of Myrtles. An additional species of interest, this far east on the south fork, was a Common Raven calling from the distant cell tower to the south.

Record photos of the Audubons Warbler can be viewed here in my eBird checklist.http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Best,

Derek Rogers
Sayville







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Subject: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Dec. 2, 2017 - Least Flycatcher Continues
Date: Sat Dec 2 2017 17:27 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
According to a report on the new Bronx Bird Alert @BirdBronx from Noa & Mayra Cruz @rubythroated18 the Least Flycatcher we saw last Saturday (11/25) at the Native Plant Garden was seen there again today Dec.2, 2017.

Deb Allen

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Subject: Kings and Queens Counties: Barrow's Goldeneye, Little Gull
Date: Sat Dec 2 2017 15:13 pm
From: sean AT seansime.com
 
I just spoke with Doug Gochfeld who asked me to post as he is having issues getting a post through to the state list via cell phone.
A drake Barrow's Goldeneye was present off the Fisherman's Lot and Raptor Point at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn earlier this afternoon and there is currently a large flight of Bonaparte's Gulls heading west off Riis Park in Queens which just had an adult Little Gull move west with them.
Good birding!
Sean SimeBrooklyn, NY


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