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Updated on June 25, 2019, 6:05 pm

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25 Jun: @ 17:57:29 
Gull-billed and Roseate Terns, Nickerson beach 6:54pm [kevin rogers]
25 Jun: @ 09:02:41 
500+ Bald Eagle nests in NY minus one [Bill Evans]
25 Jun: @ 08:39:28 
Re: Pelagic South Shore Report [peter paul]
25 Jun: @ 08:34:50 
Re: Pelagic South Shore Report [John Gluth]
24 Jun: @ 20:39:52 
New Michigan State Forest Today 6/24/2019 vs 2016 and 2013 [David Nicosia]
24 Jun: @ 18:33:05 
Fw: eBird Report - New Michigan SF--North Rd., Jun 24, 2019 [david nicosia]
24 Jun: @ 17:01:40 
Re: Gull-billed Tern- lido preserve ,nassau county [Willy Becker]
24 Jun: @ 16:22:10 
Pelagic South Shore Report [Long Island Birding .]
24 Jun: @ 16:19:39 
Central Park NYC - Sun., June 23, 2019: Amer. Kestrel, Wood Duck, Gadwall, Tree & Northern Rough-winged Swallows [Deborah Allen]
24 Jun: @ 15:17:21 
Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin]
24 Jun: @ 14:54:43 
Gull-billed Tern- lido preserve ,nassau county [kevin rogers]
23 Jun: @ 11:47:08 
Bridled Tern continues on Great Gull Island, Suffolk Co. [Joseph DiCostanzo]
23 Jun: @ 07:14:39 
Dryden, NY - Hammond Hill State Forest Birding: Few Birds [Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes]
22 Jun: @ 20:01:16 
Dryden, NY - Hammond Hill State Forest Birding: Few Birds [Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes]
22 Jun: @ 19:21:30 
Jamaica Bay Sat. June 22, 2019: Yellow- and Black-billed Cuckoos, White-eyed Vireo, Barn Owl [Deborah Allen]
22 Jun: @ 14:34:13 
Hudson Yards [Alan Drogin]
22 Jun: @ 11:52:19 
Washington County Sedge Wren [zach schwartz-weinstein]
22 Jun: @ 03:05:32 
NYC Area RBA: 21 June 2019 [Ben Cacace]
21 Jun: @ 13:24:53 
Nickerson Beach: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks + Stilt Sandpiper [=?UTF-8?Q?Jos=C3=A9_R._Ram=C3=ADrez-Garofalo?=]
21 Jun: @ 09:54:33 
Manhattan, NYC 6/16-21 (ongoing Mourning Warbler into summer, & 7 other warbler spp., etc.) [Thomas Fiore]
20 Jun: @ 18:54:30 
Re: Stilt Sandpiper, Nickerson Beach, Nassau county-yes [matt klein]
20 Jun: @ 15:44:22 
Stilt Sandpiper, Nickerson Beach, Nassau county-yes [kevin rogers]
20 Jun: @ 08:55:48 
Re: Stilt Sandpiper - Nickerson Beach, Nassau County [Robert Lewis]
20 Jun: @ 08:36:50 
Stilt Sandpiper - Nickerson Beach, Nassau County [Timothy Healy]
19 Jun: @ 07:39:26 
Green winged teals [patrickhoran]
19 Jun: @ 07:23:03 
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Nickerson Beach, Nassau [Mike Scheibel]
17 Jun: @ 18:59:38 
"Capturing the Spirit of Birds" - Marie Read - a Queens County Bird Club presentation this Wednesday, June 19 [Nancy Tognan]
17 Jun: @ 18:16:25 
NNYBirds: Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Clayton, Jefferson County [Jeff Bolsinger jsbolsinger@yahoo.com [Northern_NY_Birds]]
17 Jun: @ 18:16:06 
Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Clayton, Jefferson County [Jeff Bolsinger]
17 Jun: @ 14:04:03 
Syracuse RBA [Joseph Brin]
17 Jun: @ 09:44:12 
Sandwich Tern flyover Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co. [Patricia Lindsay]
17 Jun: @ 07:33:34 
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Nickerson Beach, Nassau County [Long Island Birding .]
16 Jun: @ 16:48:41 
Central Park NYC - Sun., June 16, 2019 Scarlet Tanager, Tree Swallow, Wood Thrush, Great Crested Flycatcher [Deborah Allen]
16 Jun: @ 09:00:27 
Westchester- Rockefeller State Park Preserve [Lyn Dominguez]
16 Jun: @ 08:54:08 
Update Re: Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks — yes 6/16 Nassau County [Karen Fung]
16 Jun: @ 08:50:05 
Black bellied whistling ducks [patrickhoran]
16 Jun: @ 08:36:50 
Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks — yes 6/16 Nassau County [Karen Fung]
15 Jun: @ 16:33:56 
New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Nesting: Orchard & Baltimore Orioles, E. Phoebe, Yellow Warbler, Wood Ducks [Deborah Allen]
15 Jun: @ 09:13:54 
Bridled Tern continues on Great Gull Island, Suffolk Co. [Joseph DiCostanzo]
15 Jun: @ 04:28:25 
NYC Area RBA: 14 June 2019 [Ben Cacace]
14 Jun: @ 17:08:46 
Central Park NYC - Fri., June 14, 2019 - Five Species of Wood Warblers [Deborah Allen]
14 Jun: @ 16:35:39 
Black- bellied whistling ducks, nickerson beach -yes [kevin rogers]
14 Jun: @ 15:56:06 
Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks [Robert Berlingeri]
14 Jun: @ 08:47:31 
Manhattan, NYC (8 warbler spp., lingering & nesting species, & etc.) [Thomas Fiore]
13 Jun: @ 17:10:55 
Black-bellied whistling ducks, nickerson beach,nassau county -yes [kevin rogers]
13 Jun: @ 15:47:47 
Captree Island Marsh (Suffolk) White-faced Ibis [Gail Benson]
12 Jun: @ 16:30:41 
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, nickerson beach, nassau county-yes [kevin rogers]
12 Jun: @ 15:26:22 
Re: Bridled Tern not seen today on Great Gull Island, Suffolk County [Joseph DiCostanzo]
12 Jun: @ 12:50:38 
Captree June Count 2019 [Shaibal Mitra]
12 Jun: @ 12:48:45 
Bridled Tern not seen today on Great Gull Island, Suffolk County [jdicost]





Subject: Gull-billed and Roseate Terns, Nickerson beach 6:54pm
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 17:57 pm
From: kev31317 AT yahoo.com
 
Watching two Gull Billed Terns sitting together with a Roseate Tern nearby, I lost track but there had been two Roseate that I think we're second and third birds moments ago. All this on the west Colony puddle at Nickerson Beach.-Kev
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Subject: 500+ Bald Eagle nests in NY minus one
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 9:02 am
From: wrevans AT clarityconnect.com
 
How an Eagles Nest Shows the Challenges of
New Yorks Climate Plan
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/0...

A generous article for the wind developer
(APEX) considering the substantial evidence of their willful cover-up of a Bald
Eagle nest and unnecessary low helicopter flights over an active nest. But
the suppression of avian impacts by APEX regarding their proposed Galloo Island
Wind Project goes well beyond this eagle incident. Their Wyoming consulting firm
(WEST Inc.) whitewashed the projects avian risk assessment, giving little
mention of the adjacent colonial seabird colony on Little Galloo Island and the
half a million plus feeding flights of the colonys residents across Galloo
Island annually. Certainly one fact that should have been highlighted is that
the project would inevitably kill more Caspian Terns annually than all other
wind projects in North America combined have ever killed. Another is that, based
on data gathered in pre-construction surveys, the Galloo Island Wind Project
would impact far more NYS listed species and wintering raptors than any of the
existing 20+ wind energy projects in NY.

Bill
Evans

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Subject: Pelagic South Shore Report
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 8:39 am
From: pepaul AT gmail.com
 
On this note - a sea watch from RMSP this morning (6:50-9:25) produced two Black Terns, one Wilsons Storm Petrel, and one distant probable jaeger, but nothing else of note. There are currently over 40 Lesser Black-backed Gulls in the field two parking lot. 

Tripper

> On Jun 25, 2019, at 09:34, John Gluth wrote:
>
> Now all we need are some consistent southerly winds (preferably S or SE) to bring some of those birds within sight of land for us shorebound birders. Its been a really poor year for sea watching thus far.
>
> John Gluth, sent from my iPhone
>
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Subject: Pelagic South Shore Report
Date: Tue Jun 25 2019 8:34 am
From: jgluth AT optonline.net
 
Now all we need are some consistent southerly winds (preferably S or SE) to bring some of those birds within sight of land for us shorebound birders. Its been a really poor year for sea watching thus far.

John Gluth, sent from my iPhone

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Subject: New Michigan State Forest Today 6/24/2019 vs 2016 and 2013
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 20:39 pm
From: daven102468 AT gmail.com
 
I spent over 4 hours and a total of 9.3 miles driving the roads in New Michigan State Forest counting singing male birds like I do every few years or so. This year was excellent. However, they are lumbering some of the big spruces in "stripcuts" to help regenerate young spruce. Apparently, the spruce needlecast fungus is seriously affecting the young norway spruces and they want to make sure there are plenty for regeneration in the future. I did speak with folks the NYDEC who are involved in this effort. In any event, there are areas where there was once closed canopy norway spruce that is now in strips. Plus, the 2011 tornado took out I would say about 25% of the norway spruces too. So this unique habitat is declining. I did not find any swainson's thrushes. I also dipped on the red crossbills. Fortunately, Jeremy Collinson reported both species a couple days ago.
As for numbers: 90 ovenbirds! Exact count. 61 Red-eyed vireos, 58 Blackburnian warblers, 24 Magnolia Warblers, 8 Mourning Warblers and several Canada and 15 Black throated blue warblers. Good numbers. I have noticed that birds that like openings in the forest are increasing.
Here is my 2019 listhttps://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Here is my list in late June 2016https://ebird.org/view/checkli... comparison.
Here is a list from 2013:https://ebird.org/view/checkli... (covered less area this year 5 miles instead of 9).
Seems like there is still a lot of songbirds here....
Best,Dave



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Subject: Fw: eBird Report - New Michigan SF--North Rd., Jun 24, 2019
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 18:33 pm
From: daven1024 AT yahoo.com
 
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
----- Forwarded Message ----- From: "ebird-checklist@cornell.edu" <ebird-checklist@cornell.edu> To: "daven1024@yahoo.com" <daven1024@yahoo.com> Cc: Sent: Mon, Jun 24, 2019 at 2:59 PM Subject: eBird Report - New Michigan SF--North Rd., Jun 24, 2019 New Michigan SF--North Rd., Chenango, New York, US
Jun 24, 2019 8:41 AM - 12:56 PM
Protocol: Traveling
9.33 mile(s)
51 species

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) 1 North rd
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica) 1 By rte 23 and center rd
Red-shouldered Hawk (lineatus Group) (Buteo lineatus [lineatus Group]) 1 Calling
Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus) 1 Calling
Barred Owl (Northern) (Strix varia [varia Group]) 1 Calling
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) 9
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus) 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) 4 Exact count singing males
Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) 1
Blue-headed Vireo (Vireo solitarius) 18 Exact count singing males
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 61 Exact count singing males
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 13 Exact count
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 2
Common Raven (Corvus corax) 4
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 13
Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) 6 Exact count
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) 7
House Wren (Northern) (Troglodytes aedon [aedon Group]) 1
Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) 10 Exact count singing males
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa) 16 Exact count singing males
Veery (Catharus fuscescens) 16 Exact count singing males
Hermit Thrush (faxoni/crymophilus) (Catharus guttatus faxoni/crymophilus) 9 Exact count singing males
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) 6 Exact count singing males
American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 11
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 6
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 2
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 8
Purple Finch (Eastern) (Haemorhous purpureus purpureus) 1
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 2
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) 1
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis hyemalis/carolinensis) 23 Exact count singing males
White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) 8 Exact count singing males
Song Sparrow (melodia/atlantica) (Melospiza melodia melodia/atlantica) 2
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) 1
Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) 5
Red-winged Blackbird (Red-winged) (Agelaius phoeniceus [phoeniceus Group]) 3
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) 1
Common Grackle (Bronzed) (Quiscalus quiscula versicolor) 1
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) 90 Exact count singing males
Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) 2
Nashville Warbler (Oreothlypis ruficapilla) 1
Mourning Warbler (Geothlypis philadelphia) 8 Exact count singing males
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 17 Exact count singing males
Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) 24 Exact count singing males
Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca) 58 Exact count singing males
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) 31 Exact count singing males
Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens) 15 Exact count singing males
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata) 3 Exact count singing males
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens) 5 Exact count singing males
Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis) 6 Exact count singing males
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


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Subject: Gull-billed Tern- lido preserve ,nassau county
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 17:01 pm
From: w.becker AT rbfassociates.com
 
The Gull Billed Terns are still there! Thanks

Sent from my iPhone
On Jun 24, 2019, at 3:54 PM, kevin rogers <kev31317@yahoo.com> wrote:

There are at least two Gull-billed Terns that are giving great looks actively looking for food and resting in the puddles at the lido preserve passive nature center area. I've been spoiled by great looks by them the last 3 times I've been here, usually from around 2pm in the few hours I'll bird here before heading to nickerson beach at 4pm. These Gull-billed Terns seem pretty reliable here, figured I'd get the word out so others can enjoy too!! They can be seen at nickerson too, especially in flight when harrassing the common terns to steal their food, but these looks, and this setting seems favorable!! -Kev

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Subject: Pelagic South Shore Report
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 16:22 pm
From: michaelzito AT gmail.com
 
I was offshore Sunday and Monday doing some incidental birding and had good numbers of shearwaters. In the area of the Bacardi Wreck on Sunday there were huge rafts of Great Shearwaters on the water and many flying about. Conservatively I would estimate there were close to 1000+ birds in the area. There were also some Cory's mixed in. Interestingly enough I saw hardly any storm petrels or much other life.
On Monday in the area of the Coimbra Wreck I had at least half a dozen Leach's Storm Petrels before/as the sun was rising. There were huge numbers of Wilson's Storm Petrels (conservatively 100+), Great Shearwaters (nowhere near the number by the Bacardi though), and some Cory's Shearwaters mixed in. Other marine life included dozens of pilot whales, hundreds of porpoise in the area, a few sea turtles, ocean sunfish, and of course Bluefin Tuna!
Mike Z.


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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sun., June 23, 2019: Amer. Kestrel, Wood Duck, Gadwall, Tree & Northern Rough-winged Swallows
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 16:19 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park NYC
Sunday, June 23, 2019
OBS:Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.


Highlights: Amer. Kestrel. Wood Duck, Gadwall, Tree & Northern Rough-winged Swallows.

Canada Goose - around 30
Wood Duck - male 59th Street Pond (Sandra Critelli - after lunch)
Gadwall - 3 (male Reservoir, male & female Turtle Pond)
Mallard - around 20
Mourning Dove - 8
Chimney Swift - at least 2
Herring Gull - 5 Reservoir
Great Black-backed Gull - 2 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant - 20+
Great Egret - 3 or 4
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3
Red-tailed Hawk - flyover adult
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4
Downy Woodpecker - 3
Northern Flicker - 2 to 4
American Kestrel - male flyover Maintenance Field
Great Crested Flycatcher - Mugger's Woods (Bob & Deb after lunch)
Eastern Kingbird - pair at nest Turtle Pond (eggs have hatched)
Warbling Vireo - north end of Maintenance Field (Sandra Critelli)
Blue Jay - adult feeding juvenile e. of Upper Lobe*
Tree Swallow - 1 Turtle Pond (after lunch) not seen at probable nest
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2 Turtle Pond (after lunch)
White-breasted Nuthatch - Shakespeare Garden
Wood Thrush - singing east side of Upper Lobe Lawn
American Robin - many, including nests with young
Gray Catbird - many
Cedar Waxwing - at least 4
House Finch - n. Maintenance Field (Karen Evans)
Song Sparrow - singing 59th Street Pond mudflat (Andrea Hessel after lunch)
White-throated Sparrow - 4 Mugger's Woods (Bob after lunch), 2 there in the a.m.
Baltimore Oriole - 4
Red-winged Blackbird - 4 (2 males Oven, pair with nest Turtle Pond**)
Brown-headed Cowbird - heard Shakespeare Garden
Common Grackle - at least 6
Northern Cardinal - pair, male feeding juvenile Hallett Sanctuary (Sandra Critelli, Andrea Hessel & Deb - after lunch)

*Carine Mitchell reported an adult Blue Jay feeding a fledgling Saturday June 22 at the Locust Grove.

**Sandra Critelli reported the Red-winged Blackbird nest at Turtle Pond Saturday June 22.


Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 15:17 pm
From: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
 
RBA


*New York
Syracuse
June 24 2019
NYSY 06. 24. 19
Hotline: Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert
Dates: June 17 - June 24, 2019
To report by email: brinjoseph AT yahoo DOT com
Reporting upstate counties: Onondaga, Oswego, Madison, Oneida, Herkimer, Cayuga, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge and Montezuma Wetlands complex
compiled: June 17 AT 3:00 p.m. EDT
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondgaaudubon.org




Greetings: This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week on June 17, 2019


Highlights:


LEAST BITTERN
GREAT EGRET
SORA
PIPING PLOVER
BLACK-NECKED STILT
COMMON TERN
WHIP-POOR-WILL
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
ACADIAN FLYCATCHER
SWAINSONS THRUSH
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
ORCHARD ORIOLE
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
PINE SISKIN




Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------


PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS continue on the forested area on Armitage Road. There was definite evidence of successful breeding also.
6/22: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on VanDyne Spoor Road.
6/23: The BLACK-NECKED STILT was still seen up to this day in the Main Pool. There was no report yet for today. A BLACK TERN was seen in the Main Pool.




Onondaga County
------------


6/17: ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was seen at Whiskey Hollow west of Baldwinsville.
6/18: A LEAST BITTERN was found at the Dewitt Marsh near the landfill.
6/22: A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was found at Green Lakes State Park.




Oswego County
------------


6/18: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was found at Bernhards Bay on the north shore of Oneida Lake. A PINE SISKIN was still at a feeder on Hinman Road north of Port Ontario.
6/19: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues at Derby Hill.
6/22: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at 3 Mile Bay at the east end of Oneida Lake. 2 adult and 3 young PIPING PLOVERS were seen at Sandy Island State Park. They were seen in an area where they have bred in past years.




Madison County
------------


6/18: A SORA was found at the Madison Street Impoundment in Hamilton. It has been found through today.
6/21: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on Ditchbank Road north of Canastota.




Oneida County
-------------


6/17: A GREAT EGRET was seen at Utica Marsh. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was again seen on Lakeshore Road at the west end of Oneida Lake.
6/19: A COMMON LOON was seen on Oneida Lake from Lakeshore Road. A WHIP-POOR-WILL was found on Preston Hill Road north of Oneida Lake.




Herkimer County
------------


6/17: A GREAT EGRET was seen at the Mckoons Road pond.
6/22: A PINE SISKIN was at a feeder on Military Road north of Dolgeville.
6/23: A SWAINSONS THRUSH was found near Mckeever in the Adirondack Park.
6/24: SWAINSONS THRUSHES were found in 2 locations on the Moose River Plains in the Adirondack Park.





---- End Transcript




----


Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, NY, 13027, USA



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Subject: Gull-billed Tern- lido preserve ,nassau county
Date: Mon Jun 24 2019 14:54 pm
From: kev31317 AT yahoo.com
 
There are at least two Gull-billed Terns that are giving great looks actively looking for food and resting in the puddles at the lido preserve passive nature center area. I've been spoiled by great looks by them the last 3 times I've been here, usually from around 2pm in the few hours I'll bird here before heading to nickerson beach at 4pm. These Gull-billed Terns seem pretty reliable here, figured I'd get the word out so others can enjoy too!! They can be seen at nickerson too, especially in flight when harrassing the common terns to steal their food, but these looks, and this setting seems favorable!! -Kev
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Subject: Bridled Tern continues on Great Gull Island, Suffolk Co.
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 11:47 am
From: jdicost AT nyc.rr.com
 
The unsettled weather of the last week prevented us from checking for the Bridled Tern, but we were finally able to look today. Around 11:00 am it was in its usual location on the northeast corner of the island.

My usual reminder: landing on Great Gull Island is prohibited, but the Bridled has been seen from small boats offshore. Anyone trying that should beware of rocks.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Dryden, NY - Hammond Hill State Forest Birding: Few Birds
Date: Sun Jun 23 2019 7:14 am
From: cth4 AT cornell.edu
 
I am sending this again as a separate message to NYSbirds-L. It appears that by sending a message to multiple simultaneous eLists, some messages dont reach the various online archives.

==============

Good evening,

This morning I was joined by Bartels Science Illustrator, Jessica French, for a birding trip to Hammond Hill State Forest. It was disconcertingly quiet up there. I probably should not have had such high expectations, given how quiet this spring has been (a handful of very quiet trips to the Hawthorn Orchard) and how few night flight calls were recorded over our house in Etna. Im still analyzing my night flight call data, but those data from May 3 through May 24 are concerning, to say the least. I have also read postings from VINS and notable Bicknells Thrush researcher, Chris Rimmer, making similar observations about his Mount Mansfield, VT, field site this spring (disquietingly low vocal activity and mist net captures).

Here are two checklists completed from our two, approximate four-mile, bushwhack walks this morning. Nice habitat. Few insects. Few birds. No ticks (but not complaining).

Loop to SE of Star Stanton and Canaan Rd Intersection:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
Barred Owl
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
Winter Wren
Wood Thrush
Baltimore Oriole
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Loop between Hammond Hill and Canaan Rd:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
Barred Owl
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
Winter Wren
Wood Thrush
Baltimore Oriole
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Concerned,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740





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Subject: Dryden, NY - Hammond Hill State Forest Birding: Few Birds
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 20:01 pm
From: cth4 AT cornell.edu
 
Good evening,

This morning I was joined by Bartels Science Illustrator, Jessica French, for a birding trip to Hammond Hill State Forest. It was disconcertingly quiet up there. I probably should not have had such high expectations, given how quiet this spring has been (a handful of very quiet trips to the Hawthorn Orchard) and how few night flight calls were recorded over our house in Etna. Im still analyzing my night flight call data, but those data from May 3 through May 24 are concerning, to say the least. I have also read postings from VINS and notable Bicknells Thrush researcher, Chris Rimmer, making similar observations about his Mount Mansfield, VT, field site this spring (disquietingly low vocal activity and mist net captures).

Here are two checklists completed from our two, approximate four-mile, bushwhack walks this morning. Nice habitat. Few insects. Few birds. No ticks (but not complaining).

Loop to SE of Star Stanton and Canaan Rd Intersection:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
Barred Owl
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
Winter Wren
Wood Thrush
Baltimore Oriole
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Loop between Hammond Hill and Canaan Rd:

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
Barred Owl
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
Winter Wren
Wood Thrush
Baltimore Oriole
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Concerned,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


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Subject: Jamaica Bay Sat. June 22, 2019: Yellow- and Black-billed Cuckoos, White-eyed Vireo, Barn Owl
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 19:21 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Jamaica Bay
Saturday June 22, 2019
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.


Highlights: Yellow- and Black-billed Cuckoos, White-eyed Vireo, Barn Owl


Canada Goose - 2 family groups West Pond Trail, many on opposite shore
Mute Swan - many
Gadwall - flyover flock of 4
Mallard
Mourning Dove - a few
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1 Garden Area north of Visitors' Center
Black-billed Cuckoo - 2 seen together Garden Area north Visitors' Center
Clapper Rail - heard West Pond Trail (C.K.)
Willet - 2 West Pond Trail near repaired breach
Laughing Gull - 50+
Herring Gull - not many
Forster's Tern - 2 fishing near repaired breach on West Pond Trail (Ryan Serio)
Double-crested Cormorant - a few flyovers
Great Egret - 1 seen from West Pond Trail
Snowy Egret - flyover
Green Heron - 2 Big John's Pond
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3 Big John's Pond
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 4 or 5 (Ryan Serio) seen from West Pond Trail
Glossy Ibis - flyover West Pond Trail (C. K.)
Osprey - 2 active nests with adults & young
Barn Owl - visible in nest box at Big John's Pond (Ryan Serio)
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair near crossing for Big John's Pond
Willow Flycatcher - 3
White-eyed Vireo - near blind at Big John's Pond
Crow - silent flyover
Tree Swallow - many
Barn Swallow - near repaired breach on West Pond Trail
House Wren - 4 or 5 (3 pairs occupying nest boxes)
Carolina Wren - pair in Garden
American Robin - several
Gray Catbird - many
Brown Thrasher - 1 West Pond Trail
Northern Mockingbird - 2 or 3
Cedar Waxwing - 6
House Finch - male & female near Visitors' Center
American Goldfinch - male & female
Eastern Towhee - 3 (pair & singing male)
Song Sparrow - 3
Red-winged Blackbird - many
Brown-headed Cowbird - 3 (2 males, 1 female)
Common Grackle - 2
Boat-tailed Grackle - 4 to 6 (including 1 male close to Visitors' Center)
Common Yellowthroat - 3 or 4
American Redstart - 3 to 5 including first-summer male collecting food for young
Yellow Warbler - many
Northern Cardinal - 2 males near Visitors' Center

Butterflies: Monarch laying eggs on milkweed, Snout.

Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC





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Subject: Hudson Yards
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 14:34 pm
From: drogin AT earthlink.net
 
Not a court, school, stock, grave, or back, but a rail yard  30 train tracks wrapped by the High Line Spur and flanked truck lots - six ground-level blocks abutting a heliport and the Hudson River.    The city covered the ground-level access tunnels with streets propped two stories high, and the developers built a vertical empire on top of that to keep everyone looking up and away from its namesake.

In early Spring, I was one of the first wave of employees to occupy its flagship skyscraper #30. One stairway, three escalators, and two elevator banks - a two-way vertigo-inducing commute from super-subterranean subway to birds-eye view down at the vessel and Yard.

So how was Spring birding at the Yards? Well, the human garbage scavenging immigrant House Sparrow and European Starling, joined by the Feral Pigeon and occasional Grey Catbird occupy the wafer-thin, jet-engine cooled, smart islands of highly manicured flora scattered among a sea of pedestrian pavement. From my cubicle aerie, I always see a couple of hundred Ring-billed and Herring Gulls hang out on the two high-tech green rooftops of Jacob K. Javits Convention Center and the lesser-known US Parcel Post Building. A flock of Barn Swallows briefly joined the gulls a few evenings in early May to dive-bomb Eleventh Avenue.

But with few exceptions, the rest of the migrating fauna mostly seek out the abandoned garbage-strewn tangles of below-street-level weeds around the train yard access tracks which run diagonally northward and are exposed intermittently until finally disappearing under the Midtown Tunnel ramp. The first exposure is an inaccessible plot of grass at the northeast corner of 35th Street and Eleventh Avenue unfortunately the largest grass plot outside of the green roofs - and home to a pair of American Robins and my only sighting of a Song Sparrow in April.

The next exposure emerges north of the Bella Abzug Park. Protected by a chain link fence is a luscious bank of wild trees and weeds steeply sloping up from the tracks to a broken concrete lot belonging to a vine covered shuttered auto body shop. Looking in at this wild inaccessible mess through the chain fence underneath a sidewalk shade tree containing an abandoned bird feeder, this simple acre, of all places, is now my favorite birding spot. I have even seen a skunk twice, and a raccoon scramble under the broken concrete slabs at dusk.

So far 29 bird species (6 warblers).

Happy City Birding,
Alan Drogin
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Subject: Washington County Sedge Wren
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 11:52 am
From: zachsw AT gmail.com
 
For the second consecutive year, a sedge wren has been singing along Mahaffey Road in the Fort Edward grasslands (just over the town line in argyle. The approximate address of this bird is 1088 Mahaffey road, between county route 42 and Hinds Rd. There may be additional birds around, as there were last July. This years bird was first (re?)located last weekend by John McKay.-- 
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 21 June 2019
Date: Sat Jun 22 2019 3:05 am
From: bcacace AT gmail.com
 
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 21, 2019
* NYNY1906.21

- Birds mentioned
SANDWICH TERN+
ARCTIC TERN+
BRIDLED TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Gull-billed Tern
Royal Tern
Cory's Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK
SANDHILL CRANE
Stilt Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Grasshopper Sparrow
BLUE GROSBEAK
Northern Parula
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
KENTUCKY WARBLER
MOURNING WARBLER
Common Yellowthroat

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/...

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44 (at) nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 21st 2019 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, BRIDLED TERN, SANDWICH TERN, ARCTIC TERN, SANDHILL CRANE, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, KENTUCKY WARBLER, MOURNING WARBLER, BLUE GROSBEAK, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and more.

Nickerson Beach continues to provide several of our regions most unusual birds including up to 10 BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS that have spent the week at or near this park. The ducks are often seen on the grassy lawn towards the western end of the park just beyond the main parking lot and adjacent to the south side of Lido Boulevard. At other times from 2 to 10 ducks have been around the ponds in the dunes just west of the beach entrance from the southwest corner of the lot. It is these ponds that also attracted an either rather late or somewhat early STILT SANDPIPER yesterday. The STILT joined there by a WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER this morning.

Also at Nickerson this week were reports from around the Common and Least Tern and Black Skimmer colonies included, besides a couple of GULL-BILLED TERNS, a flyby SANDWICH TERN Monday morning. This individual moving southwest and an adult ARCTIC TERN on the beach Wednesday. The entrance to Nickerson Beach is off Lido Boulevard just west of Malibu Beach in Point Lookout and a substantial fee is collected there roughly between the hours of 9am to 4pm.

The adult BRIDLED TERN visiting Great Gull Island recently was last reported there last Saturday but may still be in the area.

Continuing out at Napeague on eastern Long Island is the SANDHILL CRANE still present yesterday along Cranberry Hill Road near the old fish factory.

With weather conditions not really cooperating in a helpful way sightings of pelagic birds from Long Island's south shore have been somewhat spotty but a few SOOTY, GREAT and CORY'S SHEARWATERS and WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS have occurred off traditional viewing sites like Robert Moses State Park field 2 and along Dune Road to Shinnecock Inlet. It's helpful for the wind to have a southerly component and historically the stronger flights have been from Moses and east though some can also be seen from westerly sites like Nickerson and Breezy Point.

Increasing numbers of ROYAL TERNS this week have included 2 each at Smith Point County Park Wednesday and at Cupsogue County Park today.

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were seen together along the Paumanok Trail off Schultz Road in Manorville and another continues at Muscoot Farm Preserve in northern Westchester County. Also along the Paumanok Trail a YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER was still present Monday. The KENTUCKY WARBLER was still heard singing near the Ecology Village at Floyd Bennett Field yesterday and even more unexpected is a female MOURNING WARBLER still in Bryant Park in Manhattan today but its presence there might be the result of an unfriendly encounter with one of the surrounding buildings. A couple of COMMON YELLOWTHROATS also remain there. Other late warblers reported this week included NORTHERN PARULA, MAGNOLIA, BLACK-THROATED BLUE and BLACKPOLL.

Paired up BLUE GROSBEAKS and some GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS are among the highlight birds breeding around the Calverton Grasslands at the former Grumman airport.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript



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Subject: Nickerson Beach: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks + Stilt Sandpiper
Date: Fri Jun 21 2019 13:24 pm
From: jose.ramirez.garofalo AT gmail.com
 
2 BB Whistlers out on the field across from the Nickerson Beach parking lot. Stilt Sand on the beach foraging in puddle.
Jos Ramirez & Shannon Curley

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Subject: Manhattan, NYC 6/16-21 (ongoing Mourning Warbler into summer, & 7 other warbler spp., etc.)
Date: Fri Jun 21 2019 9:54 am
From: tomfi2 AT earthlink.net
 
Manhattan, N.Y. City - Sunday to Friday, 16 thru 21 June, 2019

The least-expected creature I saw at Bryant Park Thursday, around mid-day, with some breaks of sun & the sight of a patch of blue sky, was (an adult male) BAR-WINGED SKIMMER - no, thats not some exotic 'long-winged Larid' from another land, its a fairly large odonate -a dragonfly in the genus Libellula- the species name is L. axilena, & it is a mostly-southern & mid-Atlantic lower-elevations bug, which however has made some appearances into the northern parts of its known range this spring, & possibly beyond to points farther north. It certainly is my first-record of the species for Bryant Park or in mid-town Manhattan. We do have records of Bar-winged Skimmer for Manhattan from Central Park, that thanks to Nicholas Wageriks fine efforts some years ago there as well as from other observers. The species is also being found in places scattered in the (mainly but not exclusively coastal plains) north & east of N.Y. City, once spring finally was sprung.

An update to add that the female Mourning Warbler at Bryant Park in midtown Manhattan will now officially be a summer occurence, as its remained there to Friday, 21 June. It is also joined by the species noted below for Thursday, 6/20. This is an unusual lingerer for this county and Im not sure if there are any precedents here for that species at the start of summer. I did not spend extensive time in the park for Friday early a.m. It is best to get a close look at the warblers on the ground here if wanting to view the drab-ish female Mourning, so as not to mistake one of the 2 Common Yellowthroats there for it.

At Bryant Park in midtown Manhattan (located between Fifth Ave. & Sixth Ave., & 42nd to 40th Streets), a female Mourning Warbler has lingered thru the very last full day of spring. There are also at least 2 female Common Yellowthroats lingering in this park, and at times, either of these may be confused for the shyer female Mourning. Also still in Bryant Park (thru Thursday 6/20) were Gray Catbirds, E. Towhee, Song & Swamp Sparrow, & White-throated Sparrows (at least 5 in all of the park, including the Fifth Ave. library-side). Ill add that at least 2 hours were spent in the park, finding the preceding species, & as for all, but esp. the female Mourning, one may seek it esp. at the far n.-w. corner (42nd St. side, off Sixth) or in the southwest quadrant, where it can often be rather hidden at times, including under various dense flower & shrub plantings.

In Central Park on Sunday (6/16), 7 warbler species were still present - Blackpoll (at least 2 females), N. Parula (at least 2 males), Black-and-white (female), Ovenbird, American Redstart (at least 3 females), Yellow Warbler (male), & Common Yellowthroat (at least 3 males, & 1 apparent female). Some of these warblers, including Blackpoll and Black-and-white, were in the north end of that park.

(As a side-note on late-running or lingering warblers, thereve been a number of species detected in N.Y. City that were a lot later than expected; one example might be a male Black-throated Blue found by A. & K. Mirth at the ecology-village section of Floyd Bennett Field in Kings County (Brooklyn, N.Y. City) on 6/15. In contrast, & also in coastal N.Y. City, the American Redstart[s] seen (now annual) at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, in the woodland areas, may well be breeding birds, as the latter species is very likely breeding in most -if not all- of the 5 counties of N.Y. City; at the least, it is regular in multiple locations in early summer in that city. It also is of course among the species which may begin to return south by early mid-summer.

A Marsh Wren has been seen singing (at least to Wed. 6/19) in northern Manhattans Inwood Hill Park area; there is a slight possibility of breeding (although this could be just a single bird for the area). Perhaps a bit less likely as a breeder for Manhattan, there also had been Scarlet Tanager (male) in the old-growth woods at Inwood Hill Park, and this species ought be watched for signs of possible breeding in N.Y. City. It is a regular & has been for years in the west Bronx (county) location of Van Cortlandt Park, in extensive old-growth woods there, in summer months: this refers mostly to singing males observed, however a few of us have seen females as well as, in the past decade, young birds in mid-summer. This also applies to Rose-breasted Grosbeak, which may be more likely as a potential Manhattan nesting species, if a very scarce one - the species nests annually in the west-Bronx woods, N.Y. City, just a few miles away from Manhattan.

As noted multiple times to this list, White-throated Sparrow (a common wintering & migrant species in Manhattan), is also an uncommon summering species there, & has been seen thru June in multiple locations this year, including in the southern end & also northern end of Manhattan and in some of the larger & smaller parks in-between, including in Central Park. There is no evidence of any breeding. In some Manhattan places, multiple White-throateds are in very small groups thru the summer.

Other species being seen this week in Manhattan include Wood Duck (at Central Park, & far less-regular also at Inwood Hill Park on Friday), Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Snowy Egret (mainly as fly-overs, often from the n. end of Central Park, & seen with the preceding species also, late Thurs. eve. as flyovers moving east across the Hudson river, departing the New Jersey meadowlands for points east, as they do daily in late spring & summer; many of the early-morning fly-overs will be heading west, in contrast, but also in either an east or west flight-path), Green Heron (nests), Black-crowned Night-Heron (late evenings & very early mornings, with flight-paths as for the 2 egret spp.), Canada Goose (nests), Gadwall (nested in N.Y. County, downy young observeed), American Black Duck (scarce now), Mallard (nests), Osprey (more regularly in recent years into summer), Bald Eagle (fly-over sightings from far n. end of Manhattan), Red-tailed Hawk (nests, & many nest-attempts), American Kestrel (nests), Peregrine Falcon (nests), Killdeer (nests in N.Y. County), Laughing Gull (uncommon now, but some from lower Manhattan), Ring-billed Gull (very scarce now, but a few, mainly tattered-looking individuals not breeding), [American] Herring Gull (nests on Manhattan), Great Black-backed Gull, Common Tern (nests in N.Y. County - Governors Island), Black Skimmer (at least a few skimming past Hudson River from mid & lower Manhattan), ['feral'] Rock Pigeon (nests), Mourning Dove (nests), E. Screech-owl (scarce natural nester), Chimney Swift (presumed still nesting sparsely, compared with decades ago), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (status of nesting uncertain-2019, but has nested), Red-bellied Woodpecker (nests), Downy Woodpecker (nests), Hairy Woodpecker (nests, sparsely), Yellow-shafted Flicker (nests), Eastern Wood-Pewee (nests), Eastern Phoebe (now-rare nester), Great Crested Flycatcher (nests), Eastern Kingbird (nests), Warbling Vireo (nests), Red-eyed Vireo (nesting, less-common in Manhattan than preceding species as a breeder), Blue Jay (nests), American Crow (nests), Fish Crow (nests), Tree Swallow (nests), Northern Rough-winged Swallow (relatively scant nester), Barn Swallow (nests), Black-capped Chickadee (nests), Tufted Titmouse (nests), White-breasted Nuthatch (nests), Carolina Wren (nests), House Wren (nests), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (scarce & intermittent nester), Wood Thrush (nests but with nest-failures regular as well at some locations), American Robin (nests), Gray Catbird (nests), Northern Mockingbird (nests), Brown Thrasher (scarce & shy nester), European Starling (nests), Cedar Waxwing (nests, but also can be quite late to migrate on in spring), Yellow Warbler (has nested), Common Yellowthroat (has nested), Scarlet Tanager (worth watching for poss. evidence of any breeding attempts), Eastern Towhee (very scarce as a nesting species), Chipping Sparrow (nests), Song Sparrow (nests), Swamp Sparrow (scarce in summer and most likely just summering), Northern Cardinal (nests), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (should be watched for potential nesting in larger older-growth wooded area), Red-winged Blackbird (nests), Common Grackle (nests), Orchard Oriole (scarce nester), Baltimore Oriole (nests), House Finch (nests), American Goldfinch (may be watched for nesting, but also is a notoriously-late-season nester and can be moving about into summer), House Sparrow (nests & can be a pest-species to native birds nesting attempts).

Many butterflies, dragonflies, damselflies and multitudinous other insects and arthropods have been out flying, crawling and creeping as spring drew to a close. Many summer flowers have already been in bloom with more coming along, a good many of these providing nectar & pollen for some of the insects, as well as cover and other forms of feeding & various deep co-dependencies and complexities.

---
"Once upon a time, when women were birds, there was the simple understanding that to sing at dawn and to sing at dusk was to heal the world through joy. The birds still remember what we have forgotten, that the world is meant to be celebrated. - Terry Tempest Williams (contemporary activist, and author of many books)

Happy Summer Solstice; good birding,

Tom Fiore
manhattan









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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper, Nickerson Beach, Nassau county-yes
Date: Thu Jun 20 2019 18:54 pm
From: matt.klein AT hotmail.com
 
Stilt sandpiper continues now

... to be continued.

On Jun 20, 2019, at 4:44 PM, kevin rogers > wrote:

As of 4:43 PM Tim Healy's Stilt Sandpiper is very content feeding in the west colony puddle, the big puddle, not the little marshy one west and north of it. The Black-bellied whistling ducks continue as well..they were in the parking lot puddle pond when I drove in a few minutes ago before checking for the Stilt but now they have left the puddle it seems! -Kev
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper, Nickerson Beach, Nassau county-yes
Date: Thu Jun 20 2019 15:44 pm
From: kev31317 AT yahoo.com
 
As of 4:43 PM Tim Healy's Stilt Sandpiper is very content feeding in the west colony puddle, the big puddle, not the little marshy one west and north of it. The Black-bellied whistling ducks continue as well..they were in the parking lot puddle pond when I drove in a few minutes ago before checking for the Stilt but now they have left the puddle it seems! -Kev
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper - Nickerson Beach, Nassau County
Date: Thu Jun 20 2019 8:55 am
From: rfermat AT yahoo.com
 
Thanks for the info. 

They start collecting parking fees between 8:30 - 9:00. I'm not sure of the precise time; it may vary slightly from day to day. If you get there by 8:15 you should be fine. The fee is $37 for nonresidents.

Bob LewisSleepy Hollow NY







On Thursday, June 20, 2019, 9:36:11 AM EDT, Timothy Healy <tph56@cornell.edu> wrote:





Theres a handsome breeding plumage Stilt Sandpiper feeding in the puddles at Nickerson Beachs western colony. Good views at an uncommon spring migrant in nice plumage if anyone is interested. Theyve started collecting fees, though, so I recommend parking nearby and walking in.

Cheers!
-Tim H
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper - Nickerson Beach, Nassau County
Date: Thu Jun 20 2019 8:36 am
From: tph56 AT cornell.edu
 
Theres a handsome breeding plumage Stilt Sandpiper feeding in the puddles at Nickerson Beachs western colony. Good views at an uncommon spring migrant in nice plumage if anyone is interested. Theyve started collecting fees, though, so I recommend parking nearby and walking in. 

Cheers!
-Tim H
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Subject: Green winged teals
Date: Wed Jun 19 2019 7:39 am
From: patrickhoran AT optonline.net
 
While attempting to locate one of the least bitterns in the marsh at pehlam bay park early this morning I saw a pairgreen-winged teals flying around the marsh.that is all.


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Nickerson Beach, Nassau
Date: Wed Jun 19 2019 7:23 am
From: mscheibel49 AT gmail.com
 
Two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks continue this morning along west side of the grassy field which runs parallel to Lido Blvd @ Nickerson Beach Park.
Mike Scheibel
Brookhaven

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: "Capturing the Spirit of Birds" - Marie Read - a Queens County Bird Club presentation this Wednesday, June 19
Date: Mon Jun 17 2019 18:59 pm
From: nancy.tognan AT gmail.com
 
TheQueens County Bird Clubwill be meeting at the Alley Pond Environmental Center, 228-06 NorthernBlvd, Douglaston, NY 11362 >Map of location< at 8:00 pm this Wednesday, June 19, 2019. Freeadmission.  Refreshments served.

Our guest speaker will be Marie Read, presenting Capturing the Spirit of Birds:
What does it take to createphotographs that reveal the essential spirit ofbirds? For wildlifephotographer Marie Read it means understanding andthen capturing their behavior,and in this presentation shell show you howits done.
Marie will share thebackstories to her compelling images of birds, manyof which appear in herlatest bookMastering Bird Photography:the Art, Craftand Technique of Photographing Birds and their Behavior,published byRocky Nook earlier this year. Whether youre a bird watcher or anexperienced photographer, you'll gain a wealth of tips to help you improveyourown images. Youll learn that being observant, understanding birdsbodylanguage, and taking your time contribute far more to getting great birdshotsthan having the newest camera and the biggest lens.
Wildlife photographer and author Marie Read hasforged a career outof capturing special moments in birds lives, creatingimages that combinebeauty with impactful storytelling. Maries award-winningimages have beenfeatured nationally and internationally in magazines, books,and calendars.
Her articles and photo essays about birdbehavior and bird photography haveappeared inLiving Bird, Bird Watching, Natures Best,andWild Planet,amongothers. She has authored or co-authored fivebooks.
Copies of Maries book will be available forsale after the meeting, cash or check only,please.
Hope to see you Wednesday!

Nancy Tognan
nancy.tognan@gmail.com
Vice President, Queens County Bird Club

Seehttp://www.qcbirdclub.orgfor more information on trips, speakers, and other events.

See our 'Birding Maps & Locations' page for directions to and info about many local birding hotspots

* QCBC is a tax exempt, charitable organization {501c3}. *

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Subject: NNYBirds: Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Clayton, Jefferson County
Date: Mon Jun 17 2019 18:16 pm
From: Northern_NY_Birds AT yahoogroups.com
 
Somebody whose name I didn't get told one of my coworkers that he saw a Black-bellied Whistling Duck at the French Creek marina in Clayton this morning. I told Nick Leone about it and he went out and confirmed that there is a Black-bellied Whistling Duck at the marina. He saw it from Highway 12E at the bridge over French Creek.

Jeff Bolsinger
Canton, NY


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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Duck in Clayton, Jefferson County
Date: Mon Jun 17 2019 18:16 pm
From: jsbolsinger AT yahoo.com
 
Somebody whose name I didn't get told one of my coworkers that he saw a Black-bellied Whistling Duck at the French Creek marina in Clayton this morning. I told Nick Leone about it and he went out and confirmed that there is a Black-bellied Whistling Duck at the marina. He saw it from Highway 12E at the bridge over French Creek.

Jeff Bolsinger
Canton, NY

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Subject: Syracuse RBA
Date: Mon Jun 17 2019 14:04 pm
From: brinjoseph AT yahoo.com
 
RBA


*New York
Syracuse
Jume 17 2019
NYSY 06. 17. 19
Hotline: Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert
Dates: June 11 - June 17, 2019
To report by email: brinjoseph AT yahoo DOT com
Reporting upstate counties: Onondaga, Oswego, Madison, Oneida, Herkimer, Cayuga, Montezuma Wildlife Refuge and Montezuma Wetlands complex
compiled: June 17 AT 2:00 p.m. EDT
compiler: Joseph Brin
Onondaga Audubon Homepage: www.onondgaaudubon.org




Greetings: This is the Syracuse Area Rare Bird Alert for the week on June 11, 2019


Highlights:


LEAST BITTERN
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON
SANDHILL CRANE
BLACK-NECKED STILT
COMMON TERN
WHIP-POOR-WILL
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER
ACADIAN FLYCATCHER
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
ORCHARD ORIOLE








Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) and and Montezuma Wetlands Complex (MWC)
------------


PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS continue at the forested area on Armitage Road. There was signs of fledglings in the box this week.
6/12: A BLACK-NECKED STILT was reported through 6/16 this week along the Wildlife Trail.
6/14: A rare for June pair of COMMON TERNS were seen along the Wildlife Trail. They were seen again on the 16th. 2 SANDHILL CRANED were seen at the south end of Howland Island.
6/15: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen on the Wildlife trail.
6/16: A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was spotted in Tschache Pool.. 2 SANDHILL CRANED were seen at Martens Tract.




Cayuga County
------------


6/11: A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen at Fair Haven State Park.
6/16: An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was reported at Sterling Nature Center.




Onondaga County
------------


6/12: 3 ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS were found at Whiskey Hollow west of Baldwinsville. 2 were also seen on the14th.
6/15: An ORCHARD ORIOLE was seen at Green Lakes State Park.




Oswego County
------------


6/12: An apparent mating pair of RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continue near the north lookout of Derby Hill. Another was again seen on Lakeshore Drive at the northeast end of Oneida Lake.
6/15: A LEAST BITTERN was seen Deer Creek Marsh north of Port Ontario.




Herkimer County
------------


6/11: A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER was seen near Sunday Lake north of Old Forge.




---- End Transcript




----


Joseph Brin
Region 5
Baldwinsville, NY, 13027, USA



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Subject: Sandwich Tern flyover Nickerson Beach, Nassau Co.
Date: Mon Jun 17 2019 9:44 am
From: pjlindsay AT optonline.net
 
Shai Mitra, Pat Martin and I just had a Sandwich Tern fly over as we were getting into our cars. It came from the east or northeast heading southwest. Shai is running back down to the beach to see if it lands or hangs around.

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - Nickerson Beach, Nassau County
Date: Mon Jun 17 2019 7:33 am
From: michaelzito AT gmail.com
 
The ten Black-bellied Whistling ducks continue on the field at Nickerson
Beach.
Mike Z.

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Subject: Central Park NYC - Sun., June 16, 2019 Scarlet Tanager, Tree Swallow, Wood Thrush, Great Crested Flycatcher
Date: Sun Jun 16 2019 16:48 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park NYC
Sunday June 16, 2019
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.


Highlights: Scarlet Tanager, Tree Swallow, Wood Thrush, Great Crested Flycatcher.

Canada Goose - 11 (5 adults 6 goslings) Reservoir
Wood Duck - male Turtle Pond
Gadwall - male Reservoir
Mallard - 10 (all male)
Mourning Dove - 2 Shakespeare Garden
Herring Gull - 8 Reservoir (one with red color band)
Double-crested Cormorant - 7 reservoir
Great Egret - 2 Reservoir
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 flyovers
Red-tailed Hawk - adult overhead seen from Shakespeare Garden
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
Downy Woodpecker - 2 (female Shakespeare Garden, heard Evodia Field)
Northern Flicker - pair Warbler Rock
Great Crested Flycatcher - pair near Summer House
Eastern Kingbird - 3 (1 Turtle Pond, pair Warbler Rock)
Warbling Vireo - pair Maintenance Field near nest
Blue Jay - 6
Tree Swallow - adult near poss. nest Turtle Pond (5 starlings on & around stub)*
Tufted Titmouse - heard north of the Oven
White-breasted Nuthatch - worn adult Shakespeare Garden (Barbara Green)
Wood Thrush - 3 singing males (Evodia Field, Azalea Pond, Upper Lobe Lawn)
American Robin - many
Gray Catbird - 8 to 10
Cedar Waxwing - 6 including pair nesting at Maintenance Field
Baltimore Oriole - 4 or 5 including nest at Maintenance Field
Red-winged Blackbird - 3 males (2 Turtle Pond, 1 top of Oven)
Common Grackle - 9, also begging calls of juveniles several locations
Scarlet Tanager - male Gill Overlook (late spring migrant)
Northern Cardinal - 5

*We saw only the male Tree Swallow at Turtle Pond today, perched near a hole originally excavated by a Downy Woodpecker. The contour feather of a duck or goose was visible at the entrance indicating that the Tree Swallows are bringing nesting material inside. Troublesome is the presence of a handful of juvenile European Starlings that are showing an interest in the location.


Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC



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Subject: Westchester- Rockefeller State Park Preserve
Date: Sun Jun 16 2019 9:00 am
From: lyndominguez AT verizon.net
 
Saturday, June 15
Pileated woodpecker, male, near RSPP headquarters
Wood duck, female, and three ducklings, Swan Lake
Bluebirds
Orchard oriole
Baltimore oriole, female
Lyn Dominguez
NYC


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Subject: Update Re: Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks — yes 6/16 Nassau County
Date: Sun Jun 16 2019 8:54 am
From: easternbluebird AT gmail.com
 
At 9:51 they took off, circled around, and landed in the grassy field next to the entrance booth. 

----

Karen Fung

Sent from my iPhone


> On Jun 16, 2019, at 9:36 AM, Karen Fung wrote:
>
> In the pond next to the Nickerson Beach parking lot all ten present and accounted for as of 9:35am
> ----
>
> Karen Fung
> NYC
> http://BIRDSiVIEWS.com
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

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Subject: Black bellied whistling ducks
Date: Sun Jun 16 2019 8:50 am
From: patrickhoran AT optonline.net
 
All ten black bellied whistling ducks currently in the fresh water pond off the nickerson beach parking lot now


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks — yes 6/16 Nassau County
Date: Sun Jun 16 2019 8:36 am
From: easternbluebird AT gmail.com
 
In the pond next to the Nickerson Beach parking lot  all ten present and accounted for as of 9:35am
----

Karen Fung
NYC
http://BIRDSiVIEWS.com

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx - Nesting: Orchard & Baltimore Orioles, E. Phoebe, Yellow Warbler, Wood Ducks
Date: Sat Jun 15 2019 16:33 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
New York Botanical Garden, Bronx
Saturday June 15, 2019
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, Deborah Allen, m.ob.

Highlights: Nesting Birds: Orchard & Baltimore Orioles, Eastern Phoebe, Yellow Warbler, Wood Duck, Red-tailed Hawk.

Canada Goose - 2 flyovers
Wood Duck - female Twin Lakes (Gail Persky reported 6 (ad. & young) on the Bronx River Friday)
Mallard - 1 flyover, 1 Bronx River
Mourning Dove - 11 (10 adults, 1 juvenile)
Chimney Swift - 3 or 4
Osprey - flyover above Conservatory
Red-tailed Hawk - adult left small prey item for juvenile near Boulder Bridge
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2 or 3
Downy Woodpecker - 2
Hairy Woodpecker - male near bridge over Bronx River close to Snuff "Stone" Mill
Northern Flicker - 4
Great Crested Flycatcher - along Bronx River
Eastern Kingbird 3 (pair near Snuff "Stone" Mill, 1 Boulder Bridge)
Eastern Phoebe - 4 (2 pairs nesting under Boulder Bridge)
Warbling Vireo - 4 (pair Boulder Bridge, pair bridge near Snuff "Stone" Mill)
Blue Jay - 6 or 7
Barn Swallow - 2 flyovers
Tufted Titmouse - sing in Forest
White-breasted Nuthatch - family group of 5 in Forest
Wood Thrush - singing in Forest
American Robin - around 20
Gray Catbird - 6 to 8
Northern Mockingbird - 2 (one singing) near Fordham Road Entrance
Cedar Waxwing - 5 or 6
American Goldfinch - male near Conservatory
Chipping Sparrow - near Conservatory
Song Sparrow - 5
Orchard Oriole - pair with nest in White Pine near Conservatory
Baltimore Oriole - 2 active nests
Red-winged Blackbird - 5 or 6 (most at the Swale)
Brown-headed Cowbird - 4 flyovers
Yellow Warbler - pair Boulder Bridge (Gail Persky reported a nest on Friday)
Northern Cardinal - male


Andrea Hessel reported a Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the Forest.


Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC
For Bronx County alerts see @BirdBronx on twitter maintained by David Barrett

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Subject: Bridled Tern continues on Great Gull Island, Suffolk Co.
Date: Sat Jun 15 2019 9:13 am
From: jdicost AT nyc.rr.com
 
The adult Bridled Tern continues in its usual location on the northeast corner of Great Gull Island. 

Landing on the island is prohibited, but the bird has often been seen from a boat off-shore.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: NYC Area RBA: 14 June 2019
Date: Sat Jun 15 2019 4:28 am
From: bcacace AT gmail.com
 
- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jun. 14, 2019
* NYNY1906.14

- Birds mentioned
ARCTIC TERN+
BRIDLED TERN+
BROWN PELICAN+
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Lesser Black-backed Gull
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
Roseate Tern
Black Skimmer
Cory's Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Hooded Merganser
BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK
Glossy Ibis
Least Bittern
SANDHILL CRANE
Bald Eagle
Northern Saw-whet Owl
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Alder Flycatcher
Pine Siskin
BLUE GROSBEAK
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
KENTUCKY WARBLER
Red-breasted Nuthatch

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/...

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44 (at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, June 14th 2019 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, BRIDLED TERN, BROWN PELICAN, SANDHILL CRANE, WHITE-FACED IBIS, ARCTIC and other terns, YELLOW-THROATED and KENTUCKY WARBLERS, BLUE GROSBEAK, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, pelagics from shore and more.

At least 10 BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS continue in the area this group lately spending much of its time at Nickerson Beach where from Monday afternoon through today they have been loafing on the grassy lawn next to Lido Boulevard a little west of the main Nickerson parking lot. Last Saturday at least 8 were still in the cloverleaf pond at the Jones Beach West End and Meadowbrook Parkway intersection but for now Nickerson seems to be the best place to look for them. At least until the weekend crowds start to gather.

An adult BRIDLED TERN has returned for a 4th summer to Great Gull Island where it roosts on the northeastern end of the island with some of the nesting Common and Roseate Terns. Great Gull, located between Plum Island and Fisher's Island in Long Island Sound, is a tern research island with no shore landings permitted but boating near the island can provide views of the tern.

Last Saturday 2 BROWN PELICANS were spotted flying east over the bay off Heckscher State Park. There has been no further report of the pelican in the Northport area. The SANDHILL CRANE was still along Cranberry Hole Road in the Napeague area last Monday. An adult WHITE-FACED IBIS was present in the marsh north of Captree Island Thursday afternoon.

An immature ARCTIC TERN at Nickerson Beach Sunday was followed by 2 reported there Wednesday this site also continuing to provide GULL-BILLED and ROSEATE TERNS around the tern and Black Skimmer colonies. An adult ARCTIC was also found Saturday at Democrat Point at the western end of Fire Island. Other terns this week featured 2 CASPIAN at Heckscher Monday and a ROYAL TERN at Crab Meadow Beach in Fort Salonga Tuesday. Decent numbers of LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS also continue at certain sites like Robert Moses State Park and Jones Beach West End.

Various pelagic species began showing up along Long Island's south shore recently especially when winds feature an easterly component though southeast and southwest can both be favorable. Seen yesterday off Robert Moses State Park field 2 were small numbers of SOOTY, GREAT and CORY'S SHEARWATERS and WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS and there were also a few off Shinnecock Inlet.

Both RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER were noted this week along the Paumanok Trail off Schultz Road in Manorville. Another RED-HEADED continues at Connetquot River State Park and the YELLOW-THROATED remains at Bayard Cutting Arboretum and KENTUCKY WARBLER was still singing at Floyd Bennett Field today. Two BLUE GROSBEAKS were still around the Calverton Grasslands this week and another was found at Connetquot also good habitat for them.

The Captree Summer Bird Count last weekend netted 130 species besides several species noted above like BROWN PELICAN and ARCTIC TERN the count also featured a LEAST BITTERN, 3 NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS and a NELSON'S SPARROW.

The Greenwich-Stanford Summer Bird Count including much of Westchester County recorded 122 species including GLOSSY IBIS, HOODED MERGANSER with 5 young, several BALD EAGLE nests, BLACK SKIMMER, a few YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS, ALDER FLYCATCHER, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and 2 PINE SISKINS in Bedford.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript



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Subject: Central Park NYC - Fri., June 14, 2019 - Five Species of Wood Warblers
Date: Fri Jun 14 2019 17:08 pm
From: dallenyc AT earthlink.net
 
Central Park NYC
Friday June 14, 2019
OBS: Robert DeCandido, PhD, m.ob.

Highlights: Ovenbird, Common Yellowthroat, American Redstart, Northern Parula & Blackpoll Warbler.

Canada Goose - 2 Harlem Meer
Mallard - 8 (Reservoir & Harlem Meer)
Mourning Dove - 5
Chimney Swift - 8 together over the Pool
Herring Gull - 3 Reservoir
Double-crested Cormorant - 1 Harlem Meer
Great Egret - 1 Harlem Meer
Snowy Egret - 4 flyovers
Downy Woodpecker - male at the Pool
Northern Flicker - 2 west side of Wildflower Meadow
American Kestrel - male conservatory Garden 9am
Warbling Vireo - 2 pairs
Blue Jay - 2
Crow Species - flyover flock of 9
Barn Swallow - 4 North Meadow Ball Fields
American Robin - many
Gray Catbird - around 6
Cedar Waxwing - starting to nest, male feeding female at NE Reservoir
House Finch - male Fort Clinton
Song Sparrow - 1 Conservatory Garden
White-throated Sparrow - 1 west end of Loch
Baltimore Oriole - males carrying food, nest in elm over path uphill from Conservatory Garden
Red-winged Blackbird - 6 (2 male, 4 female)
Common Grackle - 6 along the Loch
Ovenbird - NE Great Hill
Common Yellowthroat - male Meer island
American Redstart - female NE side of the Pool
Northern Parula - 1 or 2 west side of Wildflower Meadow
Blackpoll Warlber - female Blockhouse
Northern Cardinal - 4 including pair at Conservatory Garden


Deb Allen
Follow us on twitter @BirdingBobNYC & @DAllenNYC


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Subject: Black- bellied whistling ducks, nickerson beach -yes
Date: Fri Jun 14 2019 16:35 pm
From: kev31317 AT yahoo.com
 
At 5:35pm friday the 10 black bellied whistling ducks continue feeding and right now mostly resting in the grass, they are north of the parking lot maybe 100 yards from the parking fee booths-kev
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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
Date: Fri Jun 14 2019 15:56 pm
From: rjberlingeri AT gmail.com
 
On Jun 14, 2019 4:52 PM, "Robert Berlingeri" <rjberlingeri@gmail.com> wrote:
Continue at Nickerson Beach grassy field. Still present, resting. 10 birds. Same area where larks gather in winter. Bobby Berlingeri



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Subject: Manhattan, NYC (8 warbler spp., lingering & nesting species, & etc.)
Date: Fri Jun 14 2019 8:47 am
From: tomfi2 AT earthlink.net
 
Manhattan, N.Y. City - week of June 9th thru 14th, 2019 (Sunday- Friday/14th)

Still hanging in at Bryant Park, in midtown Manhattan, were at least 3 warblers - Mourning (female), Ovenbird, and Common Yellowthroats (2), along with Hermit Thrush, Gray Catbird (at least 3), Eastern Towhee, Swamp Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and at least 5 White-throated Sparrows. There may have been a few other lingering migrants. All of these birds likely there for some time, & have been seen over the past week by multiple observers including me. There were at least several people watching on Thurs. 6/13. These birds can be in scattered areas, but the warblers, esp. the female Mourning, have often been either in the SW or the NW parts of this park, & the area on the extreme NW corner (42nd St. side) where bee-hives are located is a spot they have congregated in at times when not seen elsewhere. A few of the above-noted birds also have been on the Fifth Ave. side near the main N.Y. public library, in the minimal shrubberies there. This small-ish park is interesting for how migrants here may be held for very long periods, while in other very nearby parks (such as Central, & others) the same species of migrants tend to move on much more readily; this at least suggests that this park truly can be a migrant-trap, in a nearly literal sense of the phrase. (And yet, multiple migrants do come - & also move on - at this location, each year. It may be that some effects are simply magnified here - or at least apparently, to we who watch.) Most common here are the 3 typical inner-urban establsihed feral species: Rock Pigeon, European Starling, & House Sparrow.

At some of Manhattans larger parks, such species as Great Crested Flycatcher, E. Kingbird, E. Wood-Pewee, Wood Thrush, & White-throated Sparrow continue, all in the multiple. For example there have been at least 6 Wood Thrushes in Central Park, 3 of which were calling & singing thru Thursday in separate locations. Riverside Park & at least a few other parks also have had that species continue. A drake Wood Duck is ongoing in Central Park - fairly typical for at least 1 to be around in summer. Regulars around Manhattan (mainly larger parks &/or in northern sections) include Warbling & Red-eyed Vireos, Baltimore Orioles, & (much less commonly) Chipping Sparrow, Orchard Oriole, & Yellow Warbler which (as does Common Yellowthroat) manages to nest - scantly - on Manhattan. Again, re: White-throated Sparrows - the species is common in colder months in Manhattans greenspaces, & at least a few are typically found summering there as well, with no evidence of any breeding attempts.

A Yellow-billed Cuckoo was still present, or rather late to move thru, at the north end of Central Park on Thursday 6/13. A male Scarlet Tanager was still around in Central Park to at least Sunday, 6/9 & was seen as well as heard by several observers. A Northern Waterthrush was still present through at least Wed., 6/12 in Central Park. Some of these very late individuals may not get to breeding sites this year and that situation is not too uncommon. Soon enough, there is a chance of finding species such as L. Waterthrush moving away from breeding areas.

At least one Blackpoll Warbler (male) was also still present in Central Parks north woods to Thursday, 6/13 and despite that species tendency to be among the late-movers of the spring migration, this is rather late for one there. It is actually more usual to find such warbler species (besides those that have nested in Manhattan) as N. Parula, Black-and-white, and even Blackburnian Warbler into the summer season in Manhattan parks than it is to see the late-movers such as Blackpoll, Bay-breasted, or a few others. And indeed, exactly those 3 species of warblers were present in Central Park early Fri. (6/14) morning: N. Parula (at least 2 males), Black-and-white (female) & Blackburnian (female).

Other species that continue to be seen in & over Manhattan include - Double-crested Cormorant, Green Herons, Snowy & Great Egrets, Black-crowned Night-herons, Chimney Swifts, Downy, Hairy (scarce) & Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Yellow-shafted Flickers, Carolina & House Wrens, White-breasted Nuthatches, Fish & American Crows, Blue Jay, N. Rough-winged, Tree, and Barn Swallows, Northern Mockingbirds, Brown Thrasher (shy & scarce now), Cedar Waxwings, N. Cardinals, House Finches, Red-winged Blackbirds & Common Grackles, & assorted & sundry other regular summer / nesting species.

--
There have been ongoing movements of Red Admirals, Question-marks, Lady (both American & Painted) species, & harder to quantify but certainly moving as well, American Snout, and Monarch butterflies, in addition to the dozen or so additional butterfly species that (are regular in season &) have been seen recently in Manhattan. Also showing a lot more vigor have been various odonate species (dragonflies & damselflies), some in good numbers lately, & with the chance of some less-expected species showing up, for those watching out for them. Many insects & other arthropods have been showing up & emerging increasingly in the past few weeks. Many summer plants are coming into bloom, one example being dogbanes.

---
"Once upon a time, when women were birds, there was the simple understanding that to sing at dawn and to sing at dusk was to heal the world through joy. The birds still remember what we have forgotten, that the world is meant to be celebrated. - Terry Tempest Williams (contemporary activist, and author of many books)

good birding,

Tom Fiore
manhattan










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Subject: Black-bellied whistling ducks, nickerson beach,nassau county -yes
Date: Thu Jun 13 2019 17:10 pm
From: kev31317 AT yahoo.com
 
They went from a puddle near the parking fee booths, to a spot a little west, and then the flock picked up and whistled to the northwest corner of the grass field...just a bit west from where the black necked stilt spot was. 10 birds, present at 6:09pm as I hit send on this email-Kev
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Subject: Captree Island Marsh (Suffolk) White-faced Ibis
Date: Thu Jun 13 2019 15:47 pm
From: gbensonny AT gmail.com
 
Pat Martin, Tom and I were just watching an adult White-faced Ibis in the Captree Island marsh with Glossy Ibis etc.


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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, nickerson beach, nassau county-yes
Date: Wed Jun 12 2019 16:30 pm
From: kev31317 AT yahoo.com
 
Popped in as we noticed them while driving by. Group of 10 was feeding ,then began resting low in grass north of the parking lot. Still there as of 5:27 as I hit send on this email! -Kev
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Subject: Bridled Tern not seen today on Great Gull Island, Suffolk County
Date: Wed Jun 12 2019 15:26 pm
From: jdicost AT nyc.rr.com
 
John Kent and Tom Fiore have both sent me word that a boat out of CT saw the Bridled in its usual location on the northeast corner of Great Gull Island this morning between 10 and 11 am and reported it on the CT list.

Joe DiCostanzo

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 12, 2019, at 1:48 PM, wrote:
>
> I was on the eastern end of Great Gull Island this morning and was able to spend a few minutes looking for the Bridled Tern. At least at 11:45 am I did not see it. This does not necessarily mean anything. Obviously, the bird must go out and feed sometime and I have no idea what its feeding schedule might be. I will check for it when I can and post updates (positive or negative) as I have them.
>
> Again, my usual caveat that there is no unauthorized landing on the island. The area the Bridled frequents is easily visible from a boat, but please remember there are rocks just offshore, so a safe distance must be maintained. I posted a map of the island on my Inwood Birder blog.
>
> Joe DiCostanzo
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Subject: Captree June Count 2019
Date: Wed Jun 12 2019 12:50 pm
From: Shaibal.Mitra AT csi.cuny.edu
 
The Captree June count, in its fifth year since being reinstated in 2015, was conducted in southwestern Suffolk County by 31 participants on 8 June, a near-perfect weather day, 53-75 with a few clouds in a mostly sunny sky. A northeast breeze picked up as the morning progressed, keeping it comfortably cool. One area was covered on Friday and some extra species were picked up on Sunday, both also excellent weather days. Bob and Michelle Grover once again hosted our compilation party at their beautiful home and garden, always a highlight of the day.

We tallied a total of 130 species, equaling the recent record from 2017. New to the count were Common Eider, Long-tailed Duck, Arctic Tern, Northern Saw-whet Owl, Eastern Bluebird, Nelsons Sparrow, and Blue Grosbeak, and the cumulative list now stands at 170 for 2015-19. Evidence of breeding was documented for at least 88 species.

In terms of negatives, seawatching was dismal, and we barely eked out Northern Gannet, Common Loon and a few scoters despite intense effort, missing shearwaters and other oceanic birds that are almost expected with a concerted effort in June. Apart from pelagic species, bad misses were few, the most notable being Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, Black-billed Cuckoo, and Great Horned Owl. Common species that showed poorly included Yellow-billed Cuckoo (3 vs. a five-year average of 12); Brown Thrasher (5 vs. 11); Black-capped Chickadee (34 vs. 48); and Blue-winged Warbler (6 vs. 9)especially given that most other species co-occurring with these were counted in robust numbers, reflective of strong effort.

Many species were recorded in very large numbers this year. To some extent this was probably a function of good weather, strong effort, and observer skill continuing to improve in this relatively new endeavor. But in other cases the data appear to be capturing population increases, for instance in a number of species that have shown consistent upward trends. An interesting example involves Lesser Black-backed Gull, which has progressed as follows over the five years of this study: 1, 4, 15, 22, and 39. Ospreys also have increased in each successive year and leaped to a stupendous total of 172 this year, from 111 last year. Carolina Wrens shrugged off their latest bout with the Polar Vortex and decisively bested the previous max of 81 with a total of 130 this year. Least Terns have a thriving colony at Democrat Point this year and leaped more than 300% above their five-year average.

The inscrutable Northern Rough-winged Swallow surged to 11 this year, up from 5 last year and 2 in in 2017the first year it was recorded at all. This species shares ecological associations in the northeastern United States with Warbling Vireo, and it appears to be following that species at a lag in filling in one of the last remaining gaps in its breeding distribution in this region, namely the coastal plain of southwestern Long Island. These species (and also Orchard Oriole), despite thriving together in some of the most horrible-looking habitat imaginable, remained inexplicably localized as breeders on Long Island until very recently.

Among the many other positives, Bald Eagles and Red-shouldered Hawks had young in their nests, and Yellow-throated Warbler was tallied for the fifth consecutive year. Brown Pelican was recorded for the second time; Least Bittern was found again after being missed last year; and Arctic Tern returned to the Captree June Count 20 years after the one that started it all in 1999, at a time when the original phase of the count was winding down. But in terms of regional significance, three Northern Saw-whet Owls are surely the most astoundingand deserving of the Bird of the Count award!

Thanks again to Bob and Michelle, all the observers, and especially the six people new to the count.

Shai & Pat
Bay Shore

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Subject: Bridled Tern not seen today on Great Gull Island, Suffolk County
Date: Wed Jun 12 2019 12:48 pm
From: jdicost AT nyc.rr.com
 
I was on the eastern end of Great Gull Island this morning and was able to spend a few minutes looking for the Bridled Tern. At least at 11:45 am I did not see it. This does not necessarily mean anything. Obviously, the bird must go out and feed sometime and I have no idea what its feeding schedule might be. I will check for it when I can and post updates (positive or negative) as I have them.
Again, my usual caveat that there is no unauthorized landing on the island. The area the Bridled frequents is easily visible from a boat, but please remember there are rocks just offshore, so a safe distance must be maintained. I posted a map of the island on my Inwood Birder blog.
Joe DiCostanzo


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