Birding News
ABA's Birding News >> Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania bird news by date

Updated on July 29, 2016, 6:15 am

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


29 Jul: @ 06:14:35 
PSO Survey Online Link Fixed [Vernon Gauthier]
29 Jul: @ 02:25:51 
Re: Hummer Population Question [reeser]
28 Jul: @ 20:27:53 
Re: Survey for PSO Members [Chad Kauffman]
28 Jul: @ 18:57:06 
Survey for PSO Members [Vernon Gauthier]
28 Jul: @ 18:52:34 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Michael Fialkovich]
28 Jul: @ 18:05:16 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Marcy Cunkelman]
28 Jul: @ 17:55:43 
Black Vultures [Jane & Huey]
28 Jul: @ 15:43:11 
Snipe and other shorebirds - Mercer Co [Steve Sanford]
28 Jul: @ 14:59:25 
Re: Hummer Population Question [steve cottrell]
28 Jul: @ 11:41:55 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Scott Weidensaul]
28 Jul: @ 11:13:07 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Donna Collett]
28 Jul: @ 10:00:41 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Ron Rovansek]
28 Jul: @ 07:42:48 
Siskins/more Crawford County [Shawn Collins]
28 Jul: @ 07:30:32 
Washington County - Hillman State Park cuckoos and more [Ryan Tomazin]
28 Jul: @ 06:49:09 
Hummers -Plumstead twp. Bucks county [Lisa Dziuban]
27 Jul: @ 22:16:49 
Presque Isle Shorebirds [Brendyn Baptiste]
27 Jul: @ 21:14:33 
Hummers here, grosbeaks, Koch property, Northampton County [DAVID KOCH]
27 Jul: @ 19:05:46 
Re: Hummer Population [Cathy]
27 Jul: @ 18:54:42 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Rudolph Keller]
27 Jul: @ 18:48:50 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Marcy Cunkelman]
27 Jul: @ 17:32:50 
OT - screening of "The Messenger" dealing with thre demise of our song birds [Peter Burns]
27 Jul: @ 16:31:31 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Scott Weidensaul]
27 Jul: @ 16:29:01 
Re: Hummer Population Question [William Anderson]
27 Jul: @ 16:06:59 
Central PA Birdline for 7.28.2016 [Mark Mcconaughy]
27 Jul: @ 16:01:26 
Re: Hummer Population Question [steve cottrell]
27 Jul: @ 14:27:09 
Stilt Sandpiper, Monroe Co. [Bruce Johnson]
27 Jul: @ 13:44:54 
Correction re: Brown Creeper report [Robert Mulvihill]
27 Jul: @ 12:56:33 
Summer record of Brown Creeper, Allison Park (Allegheny County) [Robert Mulvihill]
27 Jul: @ 12:27:42 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Scott Weidensaul]
27 Jul: @ 12:01:38 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Ron Rovansek]
27 Jul: @ 11:40:54 
Re: Hummer Population Question [Amy Langman]
27 Jul: @ 11:27:46 
Hummer Population Question [Anne Annibali]
27 Jul: @ 10:48:58 
Wednesday Walk at Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve, 7-27-16 (Allegheny Co.) [Chris Kubiak]
27 Jul: @ 06:21:52 
Pine Siskin continues Crawford county [Pabirder1974]
27 Jul: @ 06:11:47 
Eastern Phoebe @ Middle Creek WMA [Bruce Carl]
27 Jul: @ 05:59:23 
Alder Flycatcher Lanc. Co. [Bruce Carl]
26 Jul: @ 12:46:50 
Green Lane Park--Church Rd. Bird Sanctuary, Montgomery. Jul 26, 2016 [Rudolph Keller]
26 Jul: @ 12:15:24 
Re: Great Blacked Back Gull, West Fairview, Dauphin County [Dave Kerr]
26 Jul: @ 06:30:40 
Great Blacked Back Gull, West Fairview, Dauphin County [Dave Kerr]
25 Jul: @ 16:30:50 
Black Tern Franklin Co [Bill Oyler]
25 Jul: @ 16:04:41 
Re: Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler [Mary Coomer]
25 Jul: @ 14:32:37 
Re: Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler [steve cottrell]
25 Jul: @ 12:46:38 
Canonsburg lake-Washington county [John Flannigan]
25 Jul: @ 11:53:45 
Correction in Erie County birds of note [Jerry McWilliams]
25 Jul: @ 07:50:06 
Pymatuning - Great Egret [Clare Nicolls]
24 Jul: @ 21:06:53 
Kirby Park - Luzerne County [Sandra Goodwin]
24 Jul: @ 19:03:00 
Erie County birds of note [Jerry McWilliams]
24 Jul: @ 18:59:01 
Black Terns on Lower Susquehanna, Lancaster County [Bob Schutsky]
24 Jul: @ 17:17:13 
Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler [Mary Coomer]
24 Jul: @ 15:03:02 
D.c. Cormorants - Beaver Co. [Mark Vass]





Subject: PSO Survey Online Link Fixed
Date: Fri Jul 29 2016 6:14 am
From: pabirder AT gmail.com
 
Greetings Again,
I have shortened the link so that it won't get trunkcated. If you are a PSO
member and have a Google Account click on this link and it should work
http://tinyurl.com/jyso57v
Thanks
Vern Gauthier



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Fri Jul 29 2016 2:25 am
From: reeser AT mindspring.com
 
If has seemed like every day since early May when we brought home the
salvia plants for the garden, through at least last week, we've been
visited by at least one male ruby throated hummingbird.

It never fails, a hummingbird will show up at the salvias the day we get
them.

We didn't see any female hummingbirds until early July. For many of the
prior years it's been the reverse, rarely seeing a male but having a
regular female visitor until the young ones appear.

So, nice to look out the window in the morning or evening and see that
beautiful glint of ruby red as he went from flower to flower.

Have not seen the male so far this week, but over the last few weeks one
female has been very aggressive about defending her flower patch, sits
in the locust tree and pounces on intruders including us! She can't
chase us off but she gets right in your face and makes the loudest
buzzing noise.

We've seen a number of chases during the summer so I'm sure we've had
more visitors than just the one or two we can identify at one time.
Still plenty of flowers blooming so hope to see more into the fall!

This year's favorite flower seems to be the silene regia, first stop
before visiting everything else. It's 4 feet tall with spires of star
shaped red flowers. It starts to bloom as the Jacob Cline bee balm winds
down and before the cardinal flowers start to bloom.

Ellen
Cumberland County, PA
reeser@mindspring.com



Subject: Survey for PSO Members
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 20:27 pm
From: chadkauffman AT earthlink.net
 
resending the link hoping it doesn't get truncated as it showed up in mine.

https://docs.google.com/forms/...viewform" rel="nofollow">https://docs.google.com/forms/...


On 7/28/2016 7:57 PM, Vernon Gauthier wrote:
> Greetings!
>
> The Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology (PSO) encourages all its members
> to complete a brief survey on PSO’s programs and publications. To make this
> as easy as possible, you are provided with the following options:
>
> 1. If you have a Google account you can click on this link
> https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd2-7Mvd-vCb6C_lX9WJRpesDRtGCuuHzVWCVDiwNCeLDFT3w/
> viewform and fill out the survey online.
>
> 2. Email *pso@pabirds.org* to request a Word copy of the
> survey to download, fill out and send back via email to *pso@pabirds.org*
>
>
> 3. Go to http://www.pabirds.org/survey/...
> where you will find a link to download a hard page copy (PDF) of the
> survey, fill it out, and mail it to PSO 2469 Hammertown Road Narvon, PA
> 17555-9730
>
> 4. Wait until the fall issue of the PSO Pileated is printed, fill out the
> enclosed survey and mail to PSO 2469 Hammertown Road Narvon, PA 17555-9730
>
> The input of all PSO members is valued! Please take the time to fill out
> this brief survey to have the future of PSO reflect your ideas and values.
>
> Vern Gauthier
>

--
***Check us out on facebook -
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kauffman-Insurance-Agency-LLC/137699586265352***Visit
our website www.KauffmanInsurance.Com or
http://www.MotorcycleInsurance... ***Call us 717-436-8257
or Toll free 866-588-7831 or email ChadKauffman@Earthlink.Net



Subject: Survey for PSO Members
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 18:57 pm
From: pabirder AT gmail.com
 
Greetings!

The Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology (PSO) encourages all its members
to complete a brief survey on PSO’s programs and publications. To make this
as easy as possible, you are provided with the following options:

1. If you have a Google account you can click on this link
https://docs.google.com/forms/...
viewform and fill out the survey online.

2. Email *pso@pabirds.org* to request a Word copy of the
survey to download, fill out and send back via email to *pso@pabirds.org*


3. Go to http://www.pabirds.org/survey/...
where you will find a link to download a hard page copy (PDF) of the
survey, fill it out, and mail it to PSO 2469 Hammertown Road Narvon, PA
17555-9730

4. Wait until the fall issue of the PSO Pileated is printed, fill out the
enclosed survey and mail to PSO 2469 Hammertown Road Narvon, PA 17555-9730

The input of all PSO members is valued! Please take the time to fill out
this brief survey to have the future of PSO reflect your ideas and values.

Vern Gauthier



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 18:52 pm
From: mpfial AT verizon.net
 
I use the guards and they do work very well.  I purchased them at one of the 
local stores. I also use a moat that works well, plus chickadees and Tufted
Titmice like to drink from it.

I only see two hummingbirds at my feeders (but I don't know if there are
more) and I rarely see a male in my yard.

Mike Fialkovich
Pittsburgh Area, Allegheny County



----- Original Message -----
From: "Marcy Cunkelman"
To:
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 7:05 PM
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question


Wild birds unlimited had nectar guard tips that works great. Fit right over
most holes that extend down. Helps with bees esp sweat bees and ants.

Marcy Cunkelman
Conemaugh Twp. Clarksburg, PA Indiana Co.
plant4nature@gmail.com
The whole world is made of miracles, it's just we‛re so used to
seeing them we call them ordinary things. ~Hans Christian Andersen


> On Jul 28, 2016, at 3:59 PM, steve cottrell wrote:
>
> I just discovered there are inexpensive nectar guard tips compatible with
> most feeders that can be purchased online. The claim is that they prevent
> bees and wasps from reaching and contaminating nectar, and that coupled
> with a moat makes a feeder completely insect proof.
>
>
> steve cottrell
>
> Chester Co
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania on
> behalf of Donna Collett
> Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 12:13 PM
> To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question
>
> I have males and females around , 4 to 6 as of the beginning of season ,
> and now am seeing an increase of hummer visitors in the past week here in
> Washington County. Unfortunately I can't keep the honeybees out! Anyone
> have any suggestions that worked for you?
> The ants have figured out how to make bridges with their bodies to cross
> the moat ! Currently working on a wider deeper one . Help!
> Donna Collett
> Washington Cty, Pa.
>
>> On Jul 28, 2016 11:00 AM, "Ron Rovansek" wrote:
>>
>> At my yard here's is an unusually large number of hummingbirds. I have no
>> explanation why but it is nice.
>>
>> Ron Rovansek
>> Centre County
>>
>> Commitment, Teamwork, Pride
>>
>>>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 7:54 PM, Rudolph Keller
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Usually by the last week of July, I have 5-10 hummers, mostly juvs,
>> zooming and chittering around the flowers on my deck. This is an off year
>> here at my place in eastern Berks. So far I have seen one juv and one
>> adult
>> female visit the feeder and garden one time each. Mostly I just see the
>> male who has owned this territory since May. I have the same number of
>> flowers and feeders as in previous years. I expect the first cold front
>> after the present heatwave to bring more birds, but it seems the local
>> nesters have either had a poor year or are simply not visiting. A nearby
>> hummer gardener has had the same experience.
>>> Rudy Keller
>>> Berks County
>>>
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Weidensaul" <
>> scottweidensaul@VERIZON.NET>
>>> To:
>>> Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM
>>> Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question
>>>
>>>
>>> The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where
>> are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start
>> until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious
>> migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging.
>> Most
>> folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at
>> their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in
>> late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower
>> period from May-July.
>>>
>>> (And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have
>> told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year,
>> and
>> I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect
>> the
>> peak.)
>>>
>>> Scott Weidensaul
>>> Schuylkill Haven, PA
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but
>> I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only
>> occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no
>> juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I
>> expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same
>> home
>> territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week
>> of
>> May
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having
>> problems this year?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Anne Annibali
>>>>
>>>> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County
>>>
>>> Rudy Keller
>>> Boyertown, PA
>>> Berks County
>>



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 18:05 pm
From: plant4nature AT gmail.com
 
Wild birds unlimited had nectar guard tips that works great. Fit right over most holes that extend down. Helps with bees esp sweat bees and ants. 

Marcy Cunkelman
Conemaugh Twp. Clarksburg, PA Indiana Co.
plant4nature@gmail.com
The whole world is made of miracles, it's just we‛re so used to
seeing them we call them ordinary things. ~Hans Christian Andersen


> On Jul 28, 2016, at 3:59 PM, steve cottrell wrote:
>
> I just discovered there are inexpensive nectar guard tips compatible with most feeders that can be purchased online. The claim is that they prevent bees and wasps from reaching and contaminating nectar, and that coupled with a moat makes a feeder completely insect proof.
>
>
> steve cottrell
>
> Chester Co
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania on behalf of Donna Collett
> Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 12:13 PM
> To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
> Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question
>
> I have males and females around , 4 to 6 as of the beginning of season ,
> and now am seeing an increase of hummer visitors in the past week here in
> Washington County. Unfortunately I can't keep the honeybees out! Anyone
> have any suggestions that worked for you?
> The ants have figured out how to make bridges with their bodies to cross
> the moat ! Currently working on a wider deeper one . Help!
> Donna Collett
> Washington Cty, Pa.
>
>> On Jul 28, 2016 11:00 AM, "Ron Rovansek" wrote:
>>
>> At my yard here's is an unusually large number of hummingbirds. I have no
>> explanation why but it is nice.
>>
>> Ron Rovansek
>> Centre County
>>
>> Commitment, Teamwork, Pride
>>
>>>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 7:54 PM, Rudolph Keller
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Usually by the last week of July, I have 5-10 hummers, mostly juvs,
>> zooming and chittering around the flowers on my deck. This is an off year
>> here at my place in eastern Berks. So far I have seen one juv and one adult
>> female visit the feeder and garden one time each. Mostly I just see the
>> male who has owned this territory since May. I have the same number of
>> flowers and feeders as in previous years. I expect the first cold front
>> after the present heatwave to bring more birds, but it seems the local
>> nesters have either had a poor year or are simply not visiting. A nearby
>> hummer gardener has had the same experience.
>>> Rudy Keller
>>> Berks County
>>>
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Weidensaul" <
>> scottweidensaul@VERIZON.NET>
>>> To:
>>> Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM
>>> Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question
>>>
>>>
>>> The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where
>> are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start
>> until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious
>> migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most
>> folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at
>> their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in
>> late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower
>> period from May-July.
>>>
>>> (And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have
>> told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and
>> I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the
>> peak.)
>>>
>>> Scott Weidensaul
>>> Schuylkill Haven, PA
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but
>> I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only
>> occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no
>> juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I
>> expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home
>> territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of
>> May
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having
>> problems this year?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Anne Annibali
>>>>
>>>> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County
>>>
>>> Rudy Keller
>>> Boyertown, PA
>>> Berks County
>>



Subject: Black Vultures
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 17:55 pm
From: h2ofowl AT verizon.net
 
This afternoon between 1:00 and 1:30 P.M. there were 50+ BVs on Water Street in Muhlenberg Township, Berks County.
This area is just east of Route 61 and behind the old NGK Berylco plant.
Fifteen BVs were cleaning up what was left of a road-kill deer carcass.
The others were across the road on the south side of Water Street near the creek.
I never saw this many BVs in one group this far north. Even down south, I don't think I ever saw more than 30-35 in one spot.
A number of cars stopped to see the gathering, but I'm guessing most didn't know what they were.

Huey Evangelista
Laureldale, Berks County



Subject: Snipe and other shorebirds - Mercer Co
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 15:43 pm
From: bwredbird AT gmail.com
 
This morning I saw the following shorebirds at the propagation ponds by
Shenango Lake:
Semipalmated Plover 2
Killdeer 8
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Least Sandpiper 1
Wilson's Snipe 1
At far end of flats on south island. Good long scope views.

The flats are more exposed on the north side than I can ever remember. The
south island is pretty well exposed too.

Steve Sanford
Sharon PA



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 14:59 pm
From: miami.07 AT hotmail.com
 
I just discovered there are inexpensive nectar guard tips compatible with most feeders that can be purchased online.  The claim is that they prevent bees and wasps from reaching and contaminating nectar, and that coupled with a moat makes a feeder completely insect proof.


steve cottrell

Chester Co




________________________________
From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania on behalf of Donna Collett
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 12:13 PM
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question

I have males and females around , 4 to 6 as of the beginning of season ,
and now am seeing an increase of hummer visitors in the past week here in
Washington County. Unfortunately I can't keep the honeybees out! Anyone
have any suggestions that worked for you?
The ants have figured out how to make bridges with their bodies to cross
the moat ! Currently working on a wider deeper one . Help!
Donna Collett
Washington Cty, Pa.

On Jul 28, 2016 11:00 AM, "Ron Rovansek" wrote:

> At my yard here's is an unusually large number of hummingbirds. I have no
> explanation why but it is nice.
>
> Ron Rovansek
> Centre County
>
> Commitment, Teamwork, Pride
>
> > On Jul 27, 2016, at 7:54 PM, Rudolph Keller
> wrote:
> >
> > Usually by the last week of July, I have 5-10 hummers, mostly juvs,
> zooming and chittering around the flowers on my deck. This is an off year
> here at my place in eastern Berks. So far I have seen one juv and one adult
> female visit the feeder and garden one time each. Mostly I just see the
> male who has owned this territory since May. I have the same number of
> flowers and feeders as in previous years. I expect the first cold front
> after the present heatwave to bring more birds, but it seems the local
> nesters have either had a poor year or are simply not visiting. A nearby
> hummer gardener has had the same experience.
> > Rudy Keller
> > Berks County
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Weidensaul" <
> scottweidensaul@VERIZON.NET>
> > To:
> > Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM
> > Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question
> >
> >
> > The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where
> are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start
> until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious
> migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most
> folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at
> their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in
> late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower
> period from May-July.
> >
> > (And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have
> told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and
> I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the
> peak.)
> >
> > Scott Weidensaul
> > Schuylkill Haven, PA
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
> >>
> >> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but
> I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only
> occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no
> juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I
> expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home
> territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of
> May
> >>
> >>
> >> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having
> problems this year?
> >>
> >>
> >> Anne Annibali
> >>
> >> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County
> >
> > Rudy Keller
> > Boyertown, PA
> > Berks County
>



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 11:41 am
From: scottweidensaul AT verizon.net
 
  A lot of sources suggest "painting" the ports on the feeder with vegetable oil to deter bees, but this is a genuinely awful idea, as it can badly gum up the feathers on hummingbirds when they feed and pick up the sticky, rancid oil. Many problems can be solved by replacing the feeder with one that doesn't leak or drip, like one of the saucer feeders. (If so, use a dome shield above it, or else replace the nectar every time it rains.) I also avoid the kind of feeders like Perky Pet Four Fountain that have external "bee guards," which in my experience tend to drip and actually attract bees and wasps.

If your problem really is honeybees, one thing that can work is bribing the bees away from the feeder by creating an alternate (and richer) food source some distance away. Take a small disk like an aluminum pie plate, and put an inch or so of very concentrated (2:1) sugar/water mix in it -- far sweeter than the 4:1 mix you should be using in your feeders. Put a piece of brick or a rock in the middle to weigh it down, and to provide the bees with a landing spot so they can reach the sugar water. Once the bees find the new, sweeter food, they will quickly communicate the information to the rest of the hive, and most of them will switch.

If, however, by "bees" you mean yellow jackets (which are wasps) the best bet is an old-fashioned wasp trap, hung near the hummingbird feeder and baited with fresh, raw meat, raw fish or overripe fruit. The ones I use are small, plastic jars with openings near the top on the sides; when I have a bunch of wasps inside, I just pop the trap the freezer for 15 or 20 minutes to kill the yellow jackets, dump them out and rebait.

As for ants, a now-deceased friend used to make large, aluminum ant moats about 4 inches wide, which work better than most commercial versions -- but the ants will breach even these if I get lazy and didn't keep them topped off with water. Once the ants find the sugar, they will always find away to bridge the gap. Try taking down the feeder, thoroughly washing the hook (or whatever it's hanging on) to remove the ant's pheromone trails, and move the feeder to a new spot for a day or so until the ants give up. Then rehang it and be sure not to let the water dry up.

Hope this helps,

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA




On Jul 28, 2016, at 12:13 PM, Donna Collett wrote:

> I have males and females around , 4 to 6 as of the beginning of season ,
> and now am seeing an increase of hummer visitors in the past week here in
> Washington County. Unfortunately I can't keep the honeybees out! Anyone
> have any suggestions that worked for you?
> The ants have figured out how to make bridges with their bodies to cross
> the moat ! Currently working on a wider deeper one . Help!
> Donna Collett
> Washington Cty, Pa.



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 11:13 am
From: dcollett57 AT gmail.com
 
I have males and females around , 4 to 6 as of the beginning of season ,
and now am seeing an increase of hummer visitors in the past week here in
Washington County. Unfortunately I can't keep the honeybees out! Anyone
have any suggestions that worked for you?
The ants have figured out how to make bridges with their bodies to cross
the moat ! Currently working on a wider deeper one . Help!
Donna Collett
Washington Cty, Pa.

On Jul 28, 2016 11:00 AM, "Ron Rovansek" wrote:

> At my yard here's is an unusually large number of hummingbirds. I have no
> explanation why but it is nice.
>
> Ron Rovansek
> Centre County
>
> Commitment, Teamwork, Pride
>
> > On Jul 27, 2016, at 7:54 PM, Rudolph Keller
> wrote:
> >
> > Usually by the last week of July, I have 5-10 hummers, mostly juvs,
> zooming and chittering around the flowers on my deck. This is an off year
> here at my place in eastern Berks. So far I have seen one juv and one adult
> female visit the feeder and garden one time each. Mostly I just see the
> male who has owned this territory since May. I have the same number of
> flowers and feeders as in previous years. I expect the first cold front
> after the present heatwave to bring more birds, but it seems the local
> nesters have either had a poor year or are simply not visiting. A nearby
> hummer gardener has had the same experience.
> > Rudy Keller
> > Berks County
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Weidensaul" <
> scottweidensaul@VERIZON.NET>
> > To:
> > Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM
> > Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question
> >
> >
> > The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where
> are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start
> until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious
> migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most
> folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at
> their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in
> late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower
> period from May-July.
> >
> > (And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have
> told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and
> I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the
> peak.)
> >
> > Scott Weidensaul
> > Schuylkill Haven, PA
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
> >>
> >> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but
> I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only
> occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no
> juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I
> expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home
> territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of
> May
> >>
> >>
> >> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having
> problems this year?
> >>
> >>
> >> Anne Annibali
> >>
> >> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County
> >
> > Rudy Keller
> > Boyertown, PA
> > Berks County
>



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 10:00 am
From: rrovansek AT pacewater.com
 
At my yard here's is an unusually large number of hummingbirds. I have no explanation why but it is nice. 

Ron Rovansek
Centre County

Commitment, Teamwork, Pride

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 7:54 PM, Rudolph Keller wrote:
>
> Usually by the last week of July, I have 5-10 hummers, mostly juvs, zooming and chittering around the flowers on my deck. This is an off year here at my place in eastern Berks. So far I have seen one juv and one adult female visit the feeder and garden one time each. Mostly I just see the male who has owned this territory since May. I have the same number of flowers and feeders as in previous years. I expect the first cold front after the present heatwave to bring more birds, but it seems the local nesters have either had a poor year or are simply not visiting. A nearby hummer gardener has had the same experience.
> Rudy Keller
> Berks County
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Weidensaul"
> To:
> Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM
> Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question
>
>
> The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower period from May-July.
>
> (And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the peak.)
>
> Scott Weidensaul
> Schuylkill Haven, PA
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
>>
>> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of May
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having problems this year?
>>
>>
>> Anne Annibali
>>
>> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County
>
> Rudy Keller
> Boyertown, PA
> Berks County



Subject: Siskins/more Crawford County
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 7:42 am
From: pabirder1974 AT gmail.com
 
I took a walk on our property this morning, I went down to Cussewago Creek
that borders the edge of it and found some good "yard" birds this morning
there and back up to the house.

1 Hooded Warbler
1 Am Redstart ( female/Juv male)
1 Belted Kingfisher
2 Eastern Towhees
1 Yellow Billed Cuckoo
5 plus Gray Catbirds
1 Wood Thrush ( singing)
1 Baltimore Oriole
1 Eastern Wood Pewee ( singing)
2 Common Yellowthroats
1 Yellow Warbler


At my feeders this am
1 Pine Siskin ( still here, I'm sure the other one is around. Both were
here yesterday)
4 Rose Breasted Grosbeaks
Plus all the usual feeder visitors

Good Birding

Shawn Collins
Crawford County



Subject: Washington County - Hillman State Park cuckoos and more
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 7:30 am
From: wvwarblers AT hotmail.com
 
All,



For about the 5th week in a row, I've spent part of a day at Hillman State Park. Dog days of July or not, the bird song was constant and terrific, though it was in the 80s with hardly a breath of wind. 48 species in the morning included a ridiculous number of cuckoos:



Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7, and a few were not shy about vocalizing right above me in the trees

Black-billed Cuckoo - 5, including one seen; 2 sang in opposition every time their corresponding YBCU sang

Willow Flycatcher - in an area I keep expecting to hear them in but never have, I had two singing in opposition constantly

Black-throated Green Warbler - a singing male; I don't ever remember having them here in the summer before

Red-breasted Nuthatch - 2 calling together not too far from where they are usually found here in the pine barrens

White-eyed Vireo

Hooded Warbler - mostly only chip calls today, but they were everywhere, at least 8-10 individuals

Ovenbird

Swamp Sparrow - probably the same 2 I've posted every time, like clockwork

Broad-winged Hawk

Pileated Woodpecker - 2-3

Brown Thrasher - 3

Pine Warbler

American Redstart


And a few coyotes surprised the heck out of me by yipping and yapping in the underbrush maybe 50-75 yards from me for about 10 seconds.



Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA



Subject: Hummers -Plumstead twp. Bucks county
Date: Thu Jul 28 2016 6:49 am
From: dziubanlisa AT gmail.com
 
I have been seeing many female hummers here at Gone But Not Forgotten farm. Activity started in late June. My Crocosmia flowers are a magnet and the original single plant has multiplied in the last 4 years. Also the oriental lilies are dripping with nectar. 

Lisa Dziuban



Subject: Presque Isle Shorebirds
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 22:16 pm
From: 000000c0e1e11ab7-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
Today at Gull Point at Presque Isle SP, I had 11 species of shorebirds despite the near 90 degree heat. These included:
1 Semipalmated Plover
14 Killdeer
1 Greater Yellowlegs
1 Willet (Probably the continuing bird from early this week)
1 Ruddy Turnstone
2 Sanderling
1 Baird's Sandpiper (Smaller than Killdeer and larger than Semipalmated Sandpiper. Wings extended beyond wings, tan above with white tips on wings)
3 Least Sandpiper
2 Pectoral Sandpiper
2 Semipalmated Sandpiper
1 Short-billed Dowitcher

There also were 4 Caspian Terns and 3 Common Terns as well as an American Kestrel.

Brendyn Baptiste
Slippery Rock, Butler County



Subject: Hummers here, grosbeaks, Koch property, Northampton County
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 21:14 pm
From: davilene AT verizon.net
 
Thanks, Scott.  
Hummingbird activity seemed slow until this last week when it picked up a lot and currently seems normal for late July. This morning I purposely sat for an hour watching the front yard feeders and flowers and I was able to differentiate between nine different individuals in that hour alone. And since I have feeders and lots of hummer flowers (thanks, Ron) near the kitchen door and in the back yard, there were probably a few in those spots. I'm seeing both juveniles and adults. Several times today I was able to locate one hidden inside branches or in a shrub because of an adult male's aggressive U display which in one case was directed at another adult male.Tonight after dinner I watched for another hour and hummer activity then was also good. But I was drawn a lot to look at the rose-breasted grosbeaks that continue to visit the front yard feeders. At one point there were five of them at one feeder that only has four perches, so they were constantly battling for position. And all of them were juveniles - three young males and two young females. I also continue to see many adults daily. But I have no exact explanation as to why I have so many of them all the time from late April through early August. I know some of them nest on the hillside across the road but I wonder how so many juveniles find the feeders. 
Arlene Koch Easton, PANorthampton County davilene@verizon.net   



Subject: Hummer Population
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 19:05 pm
From: 000000bdc7ba13d9-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
The only hummers at my feeder are females. I have not seen any males yet.  Last summer all I saw were males.
Cathy
Allegheny County

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 18:54 pm
From: rckeller AT dejazzd.com
 
Usually by the last week of July, I have 5-10 hummers, mostly juvs, zooming
and chittering around the flowers on my deck. This is an off year here at my
place in eastern Berks. So far I have seen one juv and one adult female
visit the feeder and garden one time each. Mostly I just see the male who
has owned this territory since May. I have the same number of flowers and
feeders as in previous years. I expect the first cold front after the
present heatwave to bring more birds, but it seems the local nesters have
either had a poor year or are simply not visiting. A nearby hummer gardener
has had the same experience.
Rudy Keller
Berks County


----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Weidensaul"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question


The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where are
all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start until
the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious migration
begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most folks,
understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at their
feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in late
summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower period
from May-July.

(And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have
told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and I
had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the
peak.)

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA




On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:

> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've
> observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only
> occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no
> juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I
> expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same
> home territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first
> week of May
>
>
> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having
> problems this year?
>
>
> Anne Annibali
>
> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County

Rudy Keller
Boyertown, PA
Berks County



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 18:48 pm
From: plant4nature AT gmail.com
 
Canada thistles are ripe now and flying all over the place, making it even more invasive.  Haven't seen any other thistles ripe for the Goldfinches.  

Seeing about 6 hummers here at a time. 2 male adults for sure at the feeders. But I have lots of native flowers and containers full of nectar plants, so there maybe more. See what gets caught on Saturday when Bob mulvihill bands birds. We caught at least 20. Trimmed one tail feather so if caught again won't be counted. Hoping for a good day!!!!

Marcy Cunkelman
Conemaugh Twp. Clarksburg, PA Indiana Co.
plant4nature@gmail.com
The whole world is made of miracles, it's just we‛re so used to
seeing them we call them ordinary things. ~Hans Christian Andersen


> On Jul 27, 2016, at 5:31 PM, Scott Weidensaul wrote:
>
> The first thing to remember about hummers is that they don't pair -- the males will mate with as many females as possible, and spend zero time helping any of them with nesting or chick-rearing.
>
> Thus, a male hummer will attempt to mate with any potential female, even if she's supremely uninterested or past the breeding season; he has nothing to lose. At this point in the season, only a female that just lost a brood would be possibly interested in breeding, and I suspect it's getting too late even for most of them. The females need to start getting into migratory condition to head south within the next month to month and a half, and re-nesting would eat up most of that time. Generally speaking, hummers this far north are single-brooded; the only places where double-brooding appears common are in latitudes like the Carolinas and Alabama.
>
> Male hummers have two flight displays, incidentally. The "shuttle" display is the one primarily (but not always) used with a female; the male zooms back and forth a relatively short distance on the horizontal. They also do a so-called dive display, making big, U-shaped dives, which can be aimed at a female but also can antagonistic toward another male or even a predator; I've seen them do one in response to a black rat snake.
>
> As for goldfinches, the normal explanation for the late nesting is that the wait until the thistles have gone to seed in late summer, since it's their major food source, but no one's really certain. But as you say, they are short-distance, nomadic migrants, and can afford to rack up an energetic deficit late in the summer.
>
> Scott Weidensaul
> Schuylkill Haven, PA
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 5:01 PM, steve cottrell wrote:
>>
>> Watched a male hummingbird do the back-and-forth display yesterday which I thought was part of the mating ritual. Since they can have 2 broods per season and can turn around a brood as quickly as 27 days after first egg, is it possible for a pair to be starting a nest this late? Although they don't migrate to the tropics, American Goldfinches are just starting to nest now.
>>
>> steve cottrell
>>
>> Chester Co
>>
>>
>> __________



Subject: OT - screening of "The Messenger" dealing with thre demise of our song birds
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 17:32 pm
From: peb2 AT case.edu
 
I apologize if this is too far off topic but the issue of this movie is
near and dear to all of us on this website. This message is from the
Wissahickon Valley Watershed Association which is sponsoring the showing.

Peter Burns

Hi all,

I'm reaching out to you all to let you know of a screening I'm organizing
for WVWA of the award-winning new documentary, *The Messenger,* on August
11th at 7PM in Warrington, at the Regal Warrington Crossing Stadium. I'm
hoping you might be willing to share this event with your friends and
family!

In case you haven't heard of the film, *The Messenger* unravels the mystery
behind the demise of the world's songbird population and leaves audiences
with a profound appreciation for the billions of birds with whom we share
our planet. You can check out the trailer here
. It's a beautiful, moving film.

Unlike traditional movie showings, this screening will only happen if we
sell 65 more tickets before our deadline of August 3rd. So, I am really
hoping to spread the word and would be very grateful for any help in
sharing this information with the birding community, and with any
organizations, clubs, or societies anyone might have connections with!

You can find out more about the event and purchase tickets through the event
page .

Thanks very much in advance, and I hope some of you might be able to make
it to the screening (if we sell enough tickets!).

Best,
Margaret



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 16:31 pm
From: scottweidensaul AT verizon.net
 
  The first thing to remember about hummers is that they don't pair -- the males will mate with as many females as possible, and spend zero time helping any of them with nesting or chick-rearing.

Thus, a male hummer will attempt to mate with any potential female, even if she's supremely uninterested or past the breeding season; he has nothing to lose. At this point in the season, only a female that just lost a brood would be possibly interested in breeding, and I suspect it's getting too late even for most of them. The females need to start getting into migratory condition to head south within the next month to month and a half, and re-nesting would eat up most of that time. Generally speaking, hummers this far north are single-brooded; the only places where double-brooding appears common are in latitudes like the Carolinas and Alabama.

Male hummers have two flight displays, incidentally. The "shuttle" display is the one primarily (but not always) used with a female; the male zooms back and forth a relatively short distance on the horizontal. They also do a so-called dive display, making big, U-shaped dives, which can be aimed at a female but also can antagonistic toward another male or even a predator; I've seen them do one in response to a black rat snake.

As for goldfinches, the normal explanation for the late nesting is that the wait until the thistles have gone to seed in late summer, since it's their major food source, but no one's really certain. But as you say, they are short-distance, nomadic migrants, and can afford to rack up an energetic deficit late in the summer.

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA





On Jul 27, 2016, at 5:01 PM, steve cottrell wrote:

> Watched a male hummingbird do the back-and-forth display yesterday which I thought was part of the mating ritual. Since they can have 2 broods per season and can turn around a brood as quickly as 27 days after first egg, is it possible for a pair to be starting a nest this late? Although they don't migrate to the tropics, American Goldfinches are just starting to nest now.
>
> steve cottrell
>
> Chester Co
>
>
> __________



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 16:29 pm
From: wanderingdoc AT me.com
 
I have had one or two hammers.  infrequently so far but I just happened to see a male a few minutes ago. Interestingly, up in northeastern  Vermont    they   will usually appear within an hour after I put out the feeder in late June.

Cheers,
Bill Anderson

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 1:27 PM, Scott Weidensaul wrote:
>
> The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower period from May-July.
>
> (And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the peak.)
>
> Scott Weidensaul
> Schuylkill Haven, PA
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
>>
>> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of May
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having problems this year?
>>
>>
>> Anne Annibali
>>
>> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County



Subject: Central PA Birdline for 7.28.2016
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 16:06 pm
From: timetraveler50 AT comcast.net
 
- RBA
* Pennsylvania
* Central Pennsylvania
* July 28, 2016
* PACE1607.28
Bird Highlights
SNOWY EGRET (Dauphin Co.)
GLOSSY IBIS (Dauphin Co.)
COMMON GALLINULE (Huntingdon Co.)
UPLAND SANDPIPER (Lancaster Co.)
DICKCISSEL (Adams Co.)
PINE SISKIN (Franklin Co.)
Hotline: Central Pennsylvania Birdline
July 28, 2016
To Report: TimeTraveler50@comcast.net
Compiler: Mark A. McConaughy
Coverage: Central Pennsylvania, Susquehanna River Drainage System
Transcriber: Mark A. McConaughy

Welcome to Pennsylvania Audubon's Birdline. This Birdline covers sightings made the week prior to Thursday, July 28, 2016.

ADAMS COUNTY:
One DICKCISSEL was seen on July 22 at the Trail-way Speedway (GS).

Two DICKCISSELS continue to be observed through July 25 along Possum Hollow Road (PK).

CENTRE COUNTY:
A leucistic NORTHERN FLICKER was seen on July 23 in Howard (BSn).

DAUPHIN COUNTY:
One PEREGRINE FALCON was seen on July 24 perched on reactor
1 at Three Mile Island (DC).

One SNOWY EGRET was observed on July 23 in the Susquehanna River from West Fairview (DH).

One GLOSSY IBIS was seen on July 24 at Calver Island (JA).

FRANKLIN COUNTY:
One PINE SISKIN continues to visit feeders along Laurel Drive through July 21 (NM).

One BLACK TERN was seen on July 25 at the Kriner Road retention ponds (BO).

HUNTINGDON COUNTY:
The COMMON GALLINULE continues to be seen through July 23 at Old Crow Wetlands (JP).

LANCASTER COUNTY:
Up to 6 UPLAND SANDPIPERS were seen between July 23 and 26 along Route 501 at the Lancaster Airport (BC, AL, FB, VP, ME, HH, CF, EF, LB).

Two BALD EAGLES,2 FORSTER'S TERNS and 2 BLACK TERNS were seen along the Susquehanna River at Peach Bottom Village (BS).

LEBANON COUNTY:
A female or immature MOURNING WARBLER was seen on July 24 at State Game Lands 145 in Colebrook (MC).

LUZERNE COUNTY:
One GREATER YELLOWLEGS was seen on July 21 at the Forty Fort Recreation Fields (JD).

One MERLIN was observed on July 23 at the restricted access Plymouth Flats (JD).

UNION COUNTY:
Three RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continue to be seen through July 23 along the Dales Ridge Trail (MH).

Three RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continue to be observed through July 25 along Wolfland Road (WS).

YORK COUNTY:
Two PEREGRINE FALCONS were seen on July 24 perched on the York Haven hydroelectric plant (DC).

CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENTS:
If you miss the usual Thursday postings of the Central PA Birdline on BIRDEAST and PABIRDS, I will also be posting it on my page web site at:
http://people.delphiforums.com...

*PORC = Pennsylvania Ornithological Record Committee. Rare bird sightings should be documented with written descriptions and photographs whenever possible and sent to PORC for review. To submit a report to PORC go to this link:
http://www.pabirds.org/records...

The following people have contributed to this report: Josh Auld (JA), Fern Bauman (FB), Larry Bernhardt (LB), Bruce Carl (BC), Dick Cleary (DC), Mary Coomer (MC), Jonathan DeBalco (JD), Mike Epler (ME), Carolina Frazer (CF), Eliza Fraser (EF), Holly Hartshorne (HH), Matthew Heintzelman (MH), Deuane Hoffman (DH), Phil Keener (PK), Amy Langman (AL), Nancy Magnusson (NM), Bill Oyler (BO), Vince Pantanella (VP), Julia Plummer (JP), Bob Schutsky (BS), Gina Sheridan (GS), Bob Snyder (BSn) and William Snyder (WS). I apologize if I have misspelled their names and I will also refrain from naming that person on request.
-End Transcript
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mark A. McConaughy TimeTraveler50@comcast.net
Bushy Run Battlefield
P.O. Box 486
Harrison City, PA 15636-0468 (724) 527-5585 x103
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 16:01 pm
From: miami.07 AT hotmail.com
 
Watched a male hummingbird do the back-and-forth display yesterday which I thought was part of the mating ritual.  Since they can have 2 broods per season and can turn around a brood as quickly as 27 days after first egg, is it possible for a pair to be starting a nest this late?  Although they don't migrate to the tropics, American Goldfinches are just starting to nest now.

steve cottrell

Chester Co


________________________________
From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania on behalf of Scott Weidensaul
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 1:27 PM
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Hummer Population Question

The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower period from May-July.

(And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the peak.)

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA




On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:

> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of May
>
>
> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having problems this year?
>
>
> Anne Annibali
>
> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County



Subject: Stilt Sandpiper, Monroe Co.
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 14:27 pm
From: 000000bcb5fcbd4d-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
Stilt Sandpiper at the J@J sewage treatment plant at 0730 this AM.  Was not there 2 hours later...

Bruce Johnson...Mt. Pocono



Subject: Correction re: Brown Creeper report
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 13:44 pm
From: robert.mulvihill AT gmail.com
 
I erred in stating that Joy Edwards, who I reported had observed a Brown
Creeper in Allison Park (Allegheny Co.) last week, had recently attended a
Master Birding class with ASWP. Joy has let me know that it was a friend
who attended that class--Joy herself has been birding for more than 30
years! Sorry, Joy!


Robert S. Mulvihill
Ornithologist
National Aviary
700 Arch Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
412-258-1148
Robert.mulvihill@aviary.org


*The National Aviary works to inspire respect for
nature through an appreciation of birds.*



Subject: Summer record of Brown Creeper, Allison Park (Allegheny County)
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 12:56 pm
From: robert.mulvihill AT gmail.com
 
At a recent Neighborhood Nestwatch visit in Allison Park, the homeowner,
Joy Edwards, reported seeing a Brown Creeper in her backyard there. When I
told her it was a highly unusual and significant sighting, she sent me
these details:

I checked my notes and I spotted the brown creeper on Friday July 22nd at
approximately 8:10 p.m...

I feel that there was no question on the brown creeper as it was in the
broad tailed hawk tree (you spotted the nest) only 15-20 feet away. I was
startled by seeing it, so I pulled the Sibley’s to be sure it wasn’t
anything else and I had at least 5 minutes of observation time.

The tree she refers to is a very large oak growing at the most 15 feet off
her second story deck. The surrounding landscape includes extensive forest
patches and two marshy ponds. Joy had very recently participated in the
Audubon Society of Western PA's Master Birding Class, under the tutelage of
Chris Kubiak and Brian Shema, so I am confident this is a bona fide
record. If so, it may be a first (or one of very few) summer record of
Brown Creeper for Allegheny County. The species was not observed in the
county during the 2nd PBBA, when it was confirmed breeding no closer to
Allison Park than northern Butler and eastern Westmoreland counties.

Bob Mulvihill
Pittsburgh (Allegheny Co.)



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 12:27 pm
From: scottweidensaul AT verizon.net
 
  The question I get every year, repeatedly and without fail, is, "Where are all the hummers?" The real frenzy of activity doesn't usually start until the end of July and beginning of August when the first serious migration begins, and when the majority of the chicks start fledging. Most folks, understandably, have a skewed memory about the hummer activity at their feeders -- we all mostly remember the busiest period of the year in late summer and the first weeks of September, and not the always-slower period from May-July.

(And yes, obviously, local conditions can play a role. Some people have told me they had remarkably high numbers of hummers in June this year, and I had far fewer than normal late last summer, when I'd normally expect the peak.)

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA




On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:

> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of May
>
>
> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having problems this year?
>
>
> Anne Annibali
>
> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 12:01 pm
From: rrovansek AT pacewater.com
 
From mid July thru early September you will see hummingbirds in your yard that are not associated with a nearby breeding territory. Adult males begin to move south early in July followed by females and immatures. So, if you are not seeing hummingbirds soon, I am not sure what the problem would be. There is always some random variability in bird numbers from year to year. 

I have lots of activity in my yard.

Ron Rovansek
Centre county.

Commitment, Teamwork, Pride

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
>
> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of May
>
>
> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having problems this year?
>
>
> Anne Annibali
>
> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 11:40 am
From: birdgyrl AT gmail.com
 
We have continued activity of the male and female. The youngster just joined them in the last week or so. All three were seen at the same time.

Amy L.
Morgantown, PA

> On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:27 PM, Anne Annibali wrote:
>
> I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've observed a big difference in activity this summer. There are only occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no juveniles so far. This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home territory every year. They did arrive right on schedule the first week of May
>
>
> Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having problems this year?
>
>
> Anne Annibali
>
> Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County



Subject: Hummer Population Question
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 11:27 am
From: anneanni AT msn.com
 
I have four hummer feeders and lots of nectar plants in my yard, but I've observed a big difference in activity this summer.  There are only occasional visits, mostly by males with maybe as few as 2 females and no juveniles so far.  This is nearly the exact opposite of other years and I expected another increase since I've read that they return to the same home territory every year.  They did arrive right on schedule the first week of May


Does anyone know if this happens occasionally or if they're having problems this year?


Anne Annibali

Mt. Gretna, Lebanon County



Subject: Wednesday Walk at Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve, 7-27-16 (Allegheny Co.)
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 10:48 am
From: ckubiak AT aswp.org
 
PA Birders,



As we approach those dog days of summer where the decline of bird song (save
a few exceptions like the constant "Drink Your Tea" of the towhees) is
readily apparent, today's free weekly walk at Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve
did reveal some nice species of birds.



Our group of intrepid birders that braved the heat and humidity were treated
to two immature Red-shouldered Hawks calling near Beechwood's pond, only to
draw in the local crows that were clearly unhappy with their presence. In
fact, one of the more interesting observations was watching the resident
Cardinals, Robins, Towhees, and Catbirds, uttering their various warning
calls in response to these two birds.



Other highlights of the walk today were two calling Indigo Buntings along
our Goldenrod Trail, with one of these sparkling, metallic blue birds
singing from an exposed branch, and giving the group some great looks. The
other highlight's include some brief "chip burs" of a male Scarlet Tanager,
a lone calling Eastern Phoebe, 5 Chimney Swifts swirling overhead with what
appeared to be recently fledged birds, and 3 Barn Swallows.



Other birds found at Beechwood today include: Turkey Vulture (1), Eastern
Towhee (4), Blue Jays (one doing a spot-on Red-shouldered Hawk call), Crows,
Carolina Wren, chickadee sp., Tufted Titmice, White-breasted Nuthatch,
Common Grackles, Red-winged Blackbird, Song Sparrows, Canada Geese, Downy
Woodpecker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, and Cedar Waxwings.



And while we're still about 3-4 weeks away from the start of fall migration,
if you're interested in enjoying late summer native wildflowers, Beechwood
filled with bright-pink blooms of Joe Pye Weed, Orange Jewelweed, and soon
will be see of yellow from the Goldenrods.





Chris Kubiak| Director of Education

Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania

614 Dorseyville Road, Pittsburgh PA 15238

412-963-6100 ext. 12 | aswp.org



Connecting People to Birds and Nature Since 1916!











Subject: Pine Siskin continues Crawford county
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 6:21 am
From: pabirder1974 AT gmail.com
 
The two Pine Siskins continue at my feeders.

Good birding

Shawn collins
Crawford county

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Eastern Phoebe @ Middle Creek WMA
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 6:11 am
From: hrdabrd AT gmail.com
 
I just had probably the neatest most unexpected thing happen to me. While standing listening to the alder Flycatcher a pair of Phoebe's were coming down the trail chasing each other. One turned away and the other landed on top of my head. It stayed there for about 2-3 minutes moving around and singing as well. Must have sang it's song about a dozen times. I wanted to try and record it but I was afraid if I moved he would fly away. He did eventually fly off and left me catching my breath. What a treat! I do not think I will ever forget this experience!

Bruce A Carl
Akron. Lanc. Co.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID



Subject: Alder Flycatcher Lanc. Co.
Date: Wed Jul 27 2016 5:59 am
From: hrdabrd AT gmail.com
 
There is currently a very vocal Alder Flycatcher singing at Middle Creek WMA in the woodlot behind the museum pond left of the bat box. Heard best from trail off visitors center parking lot.

Bruce A Carl
Akron Lanc. Co.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID



Subject: Green Lane Park--Church Rd. Bird Sanctuary, Montgomery. Jul 26, 2016
Date: Tue Jul 26 2016 12:46 pm
From: rckeller AT dejazzd.com
 
No avocet or snowy, smaller numbers of common shorebirds, but mudflats seem
to be growing with continued hot, dry weather, so will attract more birds.


> Green Lane Park--Church Rd. Bird Sanctuary, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, US
> Jul 26, 2016 6:30 AM - 9:15 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 47 species
>
> Canada Goose 45
> Wood Duck 3
> Mallard 6
> Double-crested Cormorant 2
> Great Blue Heron 5
> Great Egret 2
> Little Blue Heron 2 continuing
> Green Heron 1
> Turkey Vulture 2
> Osprey 1
> Red-tailed Hawk 1
> Semipalmated Plover 2 Colored like Killdeer but size of peeps. Single
> breast band, yellow legs, yellow bill tipped black, black mask with white
> forehead.
> Killdeer 45
> Spotted Sandpiper 3
> Solitary Sandpiper 5
> Lesser Yellowlegs 6
> Least Sandpiper 95
> Pectoral Sandpiper 1 Chunky brown shorebird larger than peeps having
> yellow legs, yellow on bill, dense brown streaking on breast.
> Semipalmated Sandpiper 6
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 4
> Mourning Dove 4
> Chimney Swift 2
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1
> American Kestrel 1
> Willow Flycatcher 2
> Eastern Kingbird 2
> Blue Jay 2
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
> Purple Martin 3
> Tree Swallow 3
> Bank Swallow 3
> Barn Swallow 65
> Carolina Wren 1
> Eastern Bluebird 1
> American Robin 2
> Gray Catbird 1
> Brown Thrasher 1
> Common Yellowthroat 2
> Field Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 6
> Northern Cardinal 1
> Bobolink 3
> Red-winged Blackbird 35
> House Finch 4
> American Goldfinch 6
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/pa))
>
Rudy Keller
Boyertown, PA
Berks County



Subject: Great Blacked Back Gull, West Fairview, Dauphin County
Date: Tue Jul 26 2016 12:15 pm
From: dsktc AT comcast.net
 
According to eBird, this is only the ninth record of a Great Black-backed Gull in Dauphin County in July.  The last previous July sighting was 11 July 2011.


Dave



Subject: Great Blacked Back Gull, West Fairview, Dauphin County
Date: Tue Jul 26 2016 6:30 am
From: dsktc AT comcast.net
 
At 0721 this morning, I found a GBB Gull
standing on a rock in the foggy Susquehanna River.

Dave Kerr
Carlisle



Subject: Black Tern Franklin Co
Date: Mon Jul 25 2016 16:30 pm
From: oylerbill AT gmail.com
 
Just now at Kriner Rd retention ponds just south of Chambersburg...

Bill Oyler

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler
Date: Mon Jul 25 2016 16:04 pm
From: 000000afc163611c-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
Thanks Steve for taking the time to reply, and all the info.  I think that description really fits this warbler.  The photos have had quite a few views but surprisingly only a few other replies.  Those were from birders that thought the ID was correct however, your reply was the most detailed.  
Thanks also for replying to the list.  I have learned so much from reading PABIRDS over the years.  I'm sure others will appreciate it too.  PABIRDS, and the birding community in general, is such a wealth of knowledge.  I am always amazed at how everyone is willing to share their knowledge and help others learn.  I would be interested to know if anyone thinks that this Mourning warbler is already migrating south.
Thanks to all who have checked out my photos and the nice comments I have received.  These little surprises are what keeps birding so interesting.  You never know what you will find out there.Good birding!Mary CoomerLebanon Co

From: steve cottrell
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2016 3:32 PM
Subject: Re: [PABIRDS] Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler

Using The Warbler Guide by Stephenson and Whittle as a reference, he bird matches the description for a drab Mourning Warbler.


- Drab olive above, bright yellow below

- Thin eyering, usually complete at least at one end

- Yellow from breast sometimes continues into paler throat


Last summer a drab Mourning Warbler was caught in a mist net near here, but because it couldn't be positively identified it was released without being banded.  After obtaining The Warbler Guide, photos positively identified the bird as a Mourning Warbler.


steve cottrell

Chester Co






________________________________
From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania on behalf of Mary Coomer
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2016 6:17 PM
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
Subject: [PABIRDS] Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler

I was at PA State Game Lands #145 in Colebrook this morning and saw a warbler that I believe is a female or immature Mourning Warbler.  It was very active in the trees/shrubbery but did not sing or call. I've posted a few photos on Flickr and would appreciate if someone could confirm this ID.
Here is the link.  You can click on the individual photos to view larger.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
If anyone is interested in trying for the warbler it was just to the south of the pond.  It stayed about eye level or just a bit higher but as I said was very active.
Thank you,Mary CoomerLebanon Co





Subject: Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler
Date: Mon Jul 25 2016 14:32 pm
From: miami.07 AT hotmail.com
 
Using The Warbler Guide by Stephenson and Whittle as a reference, he bird matches the description for a drab Mourning Warbler.


- Drab olive above, bright yellow below

- Thin eyering, usually complete at least at one end

- Yellow from breast sometimes continues into paler throat


Last summer a drab Mourning Warbler was caught in a mist net near here, but because it couldn't be positively identified it was released without being banded. After obtaining The Warbler Guide, photos positively identified the bird as a Mourning Warbler.


steve cottrell

Chester Co






________________________________
From: Bird discussion list for Pennsylvania on behalf of Mary Coomer
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2016 6:17 PM
To: PABIRDS AT LIST.AUDUBON.ORG
Subject: [PABIRDS] Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler

I was at PA State Game Lands #145 in Colebrook this morning and saw a warbler that I believe is a female or immature Mourning Warbler. It was very active in the trees/shrubbery but did not sing or call. I've posted a few photos on Flickr and would appreciate if someone could confirm this ID.
Here is the link. You can click on the individual photos to view larger.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
If anyone is interested in trying for the warbler it was just to the south of the pond. It stayed about eye level or just a bit higher but as I said was very active.
Thank you,Mary CoomerLebanon Co



Subject: Canonsburg lake-Washington county
Date: Mon Jul 25 2016 12:46 pm
From: rublzrme AT comcast.net
 
At Canonsburg Lake behind Drs offices on a hot summer day were the following birds of note: Great Egret-Green Heron-Spotted and Solitary sandpipers.
Enjoy your birding
John Flannigan Allegheny County



Subject: Correction in Erie County birds of note
Date: Mon Jul 25 2016 11:53 am
From: 0000001b5c226889-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
Most of you probably have already figured out my error in the latest Birds of Note.  It should be July, not August, for the Stilt Sandpiper and Wilson's Phalarope report.

Jerry McWilliams
Erie, Erie County, Pa.
jerrymcw@aol.com


-----Original Message-----
From: jerrymcw
To: zapple123 ; anax_longipes ; LindaMcW ; Jrplkm ; mcrotsley ; elanmassey ; jmjerie ; judydave ; winterberger ; NBAKER ; presqueislesp ; jewelpaint ; patrickmckinstry ; ssbirding ; psubis ; PAH20 ; casahowlett ; mmat08 ; revaschmann ; atroyer ; kellyink2 ; magreg0ry ; ppeters ; mary.birdsong ; maggie.macpherson ; sam2414 ; jgrindle ; dr.dbs ; shontza ; efmf2 ; davidsublette ; larryrosche ; bginader ; EdKwater ; dells1970 ; allen01 ; issy.lawrie ; jfidorra ; keithzook ; recrog13 ; lightnin ; mlethaby ; rus803 ; jotdyt ; rkfarver ; twoshark2 ; stoneylanefarm ; timothyrozic ; jmoore31636 ; dbid1966 ; joesusimd ; sdearment ; tgraziano ; xt54 ; KevinParsons71 ; jeanettegirosky ; nancymks ; jpogacnik ; chuckg58 ; birdboy008 ; pabirds ; jim.flynn ; trackleftatc
Sent: Sun, Jul 24, 2016 8:02 pm
Subject: Erie County birds of note



The following birds of note were reported this past week from Gull Point at Presque Isle S.P., Pa. unless noted otherwise.


Willet; 1; July 18 & 19

Whimbrel; 1; July 18

Stilt Sandpiper; 1; Aug. 18

Wilson's Phalarope; 1; Aug 18 & 23

Merlin; a family group of five; July 17; Fairview Twp. & two young in a nest; July 18; Edinboro

Pine Siskin; 1; July 23; at a feeder in Edinboro


Jerry McWilliams
Erie, Erie County, Pa.
jerrymcw@aol.com



Subject: Pymatuning - Great Egret
Date: Mon Jul 25 2016 7:50 am
From: tcnicolls AT windstream.net
 
I did a drive through Pymatuning yesterday (7/24/2016) afternoon. The
following are some of the birds observed.

Hatchery:

Great Blue Heron (8)

Great Egret

Caspian Terns

Cliff Swallows

Killdeer



Spillway:

Double-crested Cormorants

Ruddy Duck (2)



Miller's Pond:

Killdeer

Sandhill Crane (4)



Hartstown Project:

Sandhill Crane (13)

Shorebirds (too far away for my eyes)

Meadowlarks



Clare Nicolls

Springboro, PA Crawford County







Subject: Kirby Park - Luzerne County
Date: Sun Jul 24 2016 21:06 pm
From: chickadd AT ptd.net
 
> Reported by Bob Wasilewski

> 07/24/16
>
> Heres the list. Nothing surprising other than the low waterfowl
> numbers and an almost complete absence of shore birds other than the
> great blue herons. The river is very low. I joked that by the time
> you reach to shoreline, youre almost on the other side. Today was
> one of our hotter walks, but not bad in the shade of the riparian
> forest. The bugs werent bad either -- probably too hot for them.
> We had a fair amount of bird activity in spite of the heat, and some
> (song sparrow, wood thrush, cardinal, red-eyed vireo) continue to
> sing.
>
> 1) Great Blue Heron 4
> 2) Mallard 4
> 4) Feral Pigeon 14
> 5) Mourning Dove 1
> 6) Chimney Swift 5
> 7) Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
> 8) Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
> 9) Downy Woodpecker 6
> 10) Northern Flicker 2
> 11) Great Crested Flycatcher 1
> 12) Red-eyed Vireo 14
> 13) Blue Jay 9
> 14) American Crow 1
> 15) Fish Crow 3
> 16) Black-capped Chickadee 6
> 17) Tufted Titmouse 5
> 18) White-breasted Nuthatch 4
> 19) Carolina Wren 8
> 20) Wood Thrush 2
> 21) American Robin 30
> 22) Gray Catbird 24
> 23) Cedar Waxwing 4
> 24) Yellow Warbler 2
> 25) American Redstart 3
> 26) Song Sparrow 27
> 27) Northern Cardinal 10
> 28) Indigo Bunting 5
> 29) Common Grackle 1
> 30) House Finch 3
> 31) American Goldfinch 15
> 32) House Sparrow 2
>
> Cabbage White Butterfly: 10
> Tiger Swallowtail: 1
> Cicadas: Some, but not overpoweringly noisy
> Green Frog: 9
> Duckweed-covered Turtle: 1
> Eastern Cottontail: 1
> Gray Squirrel: 6
> Woodchuck: 1
> Total Avian Species: 32
> Observers: 2
> Hours: 4.0
> Weather: Sunny and hot; 70-90 F



Subject: Erie County birds of note
Date: Sun Jul 24 2016 19:03 pm
From: 0000001b5c226889-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
The following birds of note were reported this past week from Gull Point at Presque Isle S.P., Pa. unless noted otherwise.


Willet; 1; July 18 & 19

Whimbrel; 1; July 18

Stilt Sandpiper; 1; Aug. 18

Wilson's Phalarope; 1; Aug 18 & 23

Merlin; a family group of five; July 17; Fairview Twp. & two young in a nest; July 18; Edinboro

Pine Siskin; 1; July 23; at a feeder in Edinboro


Jerry McWilliams
Erie, Erie County, Pa.
jerrymcw@aol.com



Subject: Black Terns on Lower Susquehanna, Lancaster County
Date: Sun Jul 24 2016 18:59 pm
From: info AT birdtreks.com
 
Dear PABirders,

Early this evening in front of our home there was a large log floating
on the Susquehanna River (Conowingo Pond). On it were two Black Terns
in full breeding plumage, two Forster's Terns also in full breeding
plumage, and a single Ring-billed Gull. Several Ospreys and two Bald
Eagles were soaring in the same area. An Orchard Oriole was singing and
a Pileated Woodpecker was calling and drumming.

Nice birds from our deck during happy hour!

Sincerely,
BOB

BOB SCHUTSKY
Web Site www.birdtreks.com
--
BIRD TREKS--Quality Worldwide Birding Tours
216 Spring Lane
Peach Bottom, PA USA 17563-4008
VOICE 717-548-3303 CELL 717-572-0771 FAX 717-548-3327
E-MAIL info@birdtreks.com



Subject: Lebanon Co ID confirmation request Mourning Warbler
Date: Sun Jul 24 2016 17:17 pm
From: 000000afc163611c-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
 I was at PA State Game Lands #145 in Colebrook this morning and saw a warbler that I believe is a female or immature Mourning Warbler.  It was very active in the trees/shrubbery but did not sing or call. I've posted a few photos on Flickr and would appreciate if someone could confirm this ID.  
Here is the link.  You can click on the individual photos to view larger.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
If anyone is interested in trying for the warbler it was just to the south of the pond.  It stayed about eye level or just a bit higher but as I said was very active.
Thank you,Mary CoomerLebanon Co



Subject: D.c. Cormorants - Beaver Co.
Date: Sun Jul 24 2016 15:03 pm
From: hawk5571 AT gmail.com
 
This afternoon I stopped at the Townsend Dam(Beaver R.) in New Brighton and
perched on top of the dam were four D.c. Cormorants

Three Common Mergansers continue there

Mark Vass
Beaver Co.



Contact us.

  • 93 Clinton Street Suite ABA
  • Delaware City, DE 19706
  • Email: member@aba.org
  • Toll Free: (800) 850-2473
  • Phone: (302) 838-3660
  • Fax: (302) 838-3651