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Updated on January 16, 2018, 1:55 pm

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16 Jan: @ 13:43:56 
WRS Lebanon/Dauphin Route (443 to 325 to Gold Mine Road) [David McNaughton]
16 Jan: @ 12:41:01 
Re: Thank you [Ann Pettigrew]
16 Jan: @ 05:29:46 
Thank you [Erin Ranson]
15 Jan: @ 18:06:30 
Sparrows, etc., Koch property, Northampton County [DAVID KOCH]
15 Jan: @ 16:17:08 
Long-tailed Duck, Southern Lancaster County [Bob Schutsky]
15 Jan: @ 16:14:53 
Rough-legged Hawk continues, Church Rd, Green Lane Reservoir, Montgomery Co. [Heveran .]
15 Jan: @ 16:07:49 
Peregrine Falcon, Hulton Bridge, Harmar Township, Allegheny County [Amy Henrici]
15 Jan: @ 15:20:32 
Re: CBC question [Glenn Koppel]
15 Jan: @ 14:48:58 
CBC question [Russ States]
15 Jan: @ 12:31:40 
Bald Eagle (Lehigh Co. - Haafsville) [David Neimeyer]
15 Jan: @ 12:05:42 
Mourning Doves Galore - Allegheny County [Robert VanNewkirk]
15 Jan: @ 11:51:20 
Re: Sharpsburg Marina--destroyed [Michael Fialkovich]
15 Jan: @ 11:21:56 
Last Call For 2017 List Numbers, Bird of the Year Vote, Comments [Peter Robinson]
15 Jan: @ 10:33:31 
Sharpsburg Marina--destroyed [Sameer Apte]
15 Jan: @ 08:36:11 
Greater White-fronted Goose, Lehigh Co [michael schall]
14 Jan: @ 14:51:54 
Rusty blackbird, Schenley, Pittsburgh, Allegheny [Kate StJohn]
14 Jan: @ 14:46:07 
Monroe county WRS [[email protected]]
14 Jan: @ 12:15:15 
Rough-legged Hawk- Armstrong Co [Dave Brooke]
14 Jan: @ 12:14:13 
Ash-throated refound at Green Lane Montgomery [[email protected]]
14 Jan: @ 11:45:52 
Peace Valley Park (IBA) - (1/7 -1/13), etc. [August Mirabella]
14 Jan: @ 05:26:48 
RFI - Banded Ross's Goose [Rich Rehrig]
13 Jan: @ 20:27:00 
Eastern PA Birdline: 1/13/2018 [Dave DeReamus]
13 Jan: @ 16:53:48 
Re: on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco [Dave Kruel]
13 Jan: @ 16:31:37 
Am. Goldfinch increase in numbers Wayne TWP. Schuylkill Co. PA [A. Liebner]
13 Jan: @ 15:26:49 
birds [Herbert Flavell]
13 Jan: @ 14:16:29 
Purple finches [Nanette Talbot]
13 Jan: @ 14:00:25 
Pine Warbler Montour County [Moses Martin]
13 Jan: @ 13:45:35 
pine siskin, Beaver County [Cheryl Abel]
13 Jan: @ 13:35:30 
Allegheny Co. Ring-billed Gull [Ryan Tomazin]
13 Jan: @ 13:21:26 
Feeders [Sam Gutherie]
13 Jan: @ 11:42:23 
Pine Siskin & RW Blackbird - Clearfield County [Rick & Marianne Atkinson]
13 Jan: @ 11:12:56 
Siskins and purple finches - Forest County [John & Brenda Weyant]
13 Jan: @ 09:51:42 
Berks county snowy owl [Erin Ranson]
13 Jan: @ 09:08:00 
Siskins! Cameron County [Mark Johnson]
13 Jan: @ 03:47:45 
continuing the legal thread: Scott is right [Grant Stevenson]
12 Jan: @ 22:59:55 
Re: on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco [Herbert Flavell]
12 Jan: @ 21:23:03 
Re: on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco [Scott Weidensaul]
12 Jan: @ 20:52:30 
on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco [Grant Stevenson]
12 Jan: @ 16:35:29 
Com. Goldeneyes - Beaver Co. [Mark Vass]
12 Jan: @ 12:34:11 
Peregrine Allegheny Co [Dave Brooke]
12 Jan: @ 10:03:37 
Big Day definition clarification [PSO]
12 Jan: @ 08:08:52 
RFI: Big Day Totals [Franklin Haas]
11 Jan: @ 18:27:33 
Sixteen Harriers at Pennsylvania Furnace Rd. (Huntingdon Co.) [Gregory William Grove]
11 Jan: @ 11:47:06 
Hermit Thrush Beaver cty [Donna Collett]
11 Jan: @ 10:45:12 
Northern Shrike, Rough-legged Hawks, Northern Harrier, Clearfield Co. [Dan Richards]
11 Jan: @ 09:44:06 
Winter Roost Boxes. [Chris Grecco]
11 Jan: @ 09:13:17 
Re: winter bird boxes question [J Pat Valentik]
11 Jan: @ 08:00:34 
Re: winter bird boxes question [Michael Barcaskey]
11 Jan: @ 00:35:32 
winter bird boxes question [Grant Stevenson]
10 Jan: @ 20:40:05 
Re: Snow Geese, Berks/Lehigh Co. [Amy Langman]





Subject: WRS Lebanon/Dauphin Route (443 to 325 to Gold Mine Road)
Date: Tue Jan 16 2018 13:43 pm
From: dkmcnaughton AT gmail.com
 
We ran our normal route for 2018 covering Lebanon and Dauphin Counties. Our
old highlight used to be high numbers of Red-shouldered Hawks along Fishing
Creek Valley. We did see one there as well as a few Buteos on 325 in all
new places. The river was dull as grey skies, temperatures in the teens,
and shores racked by flooding and ice ruled out most of the area. You will
see the results broken between counties (appearing repeated) below. It was
fairly slow birding but good times for the crew. I wish the forecast had
lived up to the hype.


County - Lebanon

Date - 15 JAN 2018

Observers- Barb Ritzheimer, Jane Fennelly, David McNaughton

Total time *actually surveying* Hours:Minutes- 1:24

Start time/End time 0905/1253

Miles on route 23.2



TVs- 1

BVs- 0



Harriers- 0



Red-tails- 3 (1 Ad./2 Imm./0 ND)



Rough-legs- 0



Kestrels- 0



Sharp-shins- 0



Cooper's - 0



Red-shoulders- 0



Bald Eagles- 0 (pair still working nests on route per other observations
but not seen during count)



Other raptors 0



Shrikes 0



Avg Temp.- 17

Sky- Cloudy

Wind - Medium

Avg Snow cover depth - 0 in.



County - Dauphin

Date - 15 JAN 2018

Observers-

Total time *actually surveying* Hours:Minutes- 2:07

Start time/End time 1019-1242

Miles on route 29.5



TVs 7

BVs- 0



Harriers- 0



Red-tails- 4 (2 Ad./0 Imm./2 ND )



Rough-legs- 0



Kestrels- M/F/ND- 0



Sharp-shins- 0



Cooper's - 0



Red-shoulders- 2 Ad/0 Imm/0 ND



Bald Eagles- 0 (2 adults just below count area on a bathroom break but
hidden by Rockville Bridge from the route)



Other raptors 1 Unknown (brief glimpse ahead of crow mob as it dove into
houses in Perry Co., probably an Accipiter but not clearly identified)



Shrikes? 0


Other birds of note - 6 Wild Turkey under the last Red-shoulder, 6 Common
Mergansers, 3 Common Ravens



Avg Temp.- 20

Sky- Cloudy, some light snow on route (not forecasted)

Wind - Light

Avg Snow cover depth - 0.1" (0-.25" on route)

Big thanks to Barb and Jane for their help!

David McNaughton
Lebanon/Dauphin Counties



Subject: Thank you
Date: Tue Jan 16 2018 12:41 pm
From: rook185 AT comcast.net
 
I couldn™t agree more with your statement at the end about this group, Erin.  No matter what the question, I will invariably have answers from several members sometimes within minutes!  The collective knowledge of this group on birds is phenomenal.  So glad you were able to find the snowy for your friends.

Best regards,
Ann

Ann C. Pettigrew, V.M.D.
York, PA
[email protected]

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 16, 2018, at 6:29 AM, Erin Ranson wrote:
>
> Thank you to everyone who took the time to give me good directions to the
> area of the Berks County snowy owl. I was able to go there yesterday and
> found the lighter phased owl rather quickly upon arriving in the area. This
> was a life bird for my friend and his son and I was happy to share this
> with them.
>
> You all are a great group!
>
> Erin Ranson, CPC
> 717.468.8312 (cell)



Subject: Thank you
Date: Tue Jan 16 2018 5:29 am
From: erin.ranson AT gmail.com
 
Thank you to everyone who took the time to give me good directions to the
area of the Berks County snowy owl. I was able to go there yesterday and
found the lighter phased owl rather quickly upon arriving in the area. This
was a life bird for my friend and his son and I was happy to share this
with them.

You all are a great group!

Erin Ranson, CPC
717.468.8312 (cell)



Subject: Sparrows, etc., Koch property, Northampton County
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 18:06 pm
From: davilene AT verizon.net
 
Nothing unusual here but currently there's a lot of bird activity. I spread white millet on the ground at several places in the yard, so during the cold weather there are birds all over it. I haven't seen anything really unusual, but among the 50+ juncos there's now what appears to be an adult female Oregon. Unless I missed it prior to today, it just showed up, as has a partially leucisticadult male slate-colored with small white blotches on its head and neck. The Gambel;s subspecies white-crowned sparrow continues to visit the yard daily, mostly but not alwaysin the afternoons. There are about 10 others that do the same and I've seen pnes down in the lower fields. Tree sparrows are certainly not plentiful here this year, but a few come into the yard daily and others are in the fields. There's also a lone field sparrow in the field, but song sparrow and white-throated numbers are normal. Grackles, cowbirds, and red-winged blackbirds are daily visitors, as are downy, hairy, and red-belliedwoodpeckers and ayellow-bellied sapsucker that come to suet on the deck.Both a sharpie and a Cooper's hawk show up in the yard, occasionally a male kestrel hovers over the fields,and one late afternoon an adult male northern harrier coursed between the feeders and the deck, sending about 25 whitethroats flying.Goldfinch numbers are really low. I did, however, havea flock of siskins on the local CBC but I only saw them because I was in the fields when they flew over, landed in a tree, and then quickly flew away.Robins are visible daily, sometimes in big flocks flying over, and waxwings are also around in low numbers. And while both black and turkey vultures are around, their numbers this winter are also low. The body of a coyote that was shot here during deer season laid in the upper field for more than 6 weeks before anything touched it and that happened overnight. I was hoping a bald eagle would come down for it but so far I haven't even seen a vulture on it.
Arlene Koch Easton, PA Northampton County [email protected]



Subject: Long-tailed Duck, Southern Lancaster County
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 16:17 pm
From: info AT birdtreks.com
 
Dear PABirders,

The Susquehanna River in front of our house is mostly frozen, but there
is a big strip of open water that is clearly visible from our dining
room window. I scoped the gulls and ducks that were there late this
afternoon.

Long-tailed Duck - 1 hen (nice yard bird!)
Common Goldeneye - 10 (9 drakes, 1 hen)
Common Merganser - 11 hens
Bufflehead - 26
Among the 500 Ring-billed Gulls were 15 Herring Gulls and 1 Great
Black-backed Gull.

Nice comfortable birding from the comfort of my house! I can watch my
feeders at the same time.

Take care,
BOB

BOB SCHUTSKY
Web Site www.birdtreks.com
--
BIRD TREKS--Quality Worldwide Birding Tours
216 Spring Lane
Peach Bottom, PA USA 17563-4008
VOICE 717-548-3303 CELL 717-572-0771 FAX 717-548-3327
E-MAIL [email protected]



Subject: Rough-legged Hawk continues, Church Rd, Green Lane Reservoir, Montgomery Co.
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 16:14 pm
From: hheveran AT hotmail.com
 
Hello PA Birders,

The dark morph Rough-legged Hawk found several days ago (not by me) continues at Church Rd today. I saw it briefly from the parking area. I think it settled somewhere between the main parking lot and the fly-fishing area just down the road.

Here is my eBird checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

A light morph has also been reported here in the past few days. I did not see this bird.

On another note, I did not see the Ash-throated Flycatcher that was re-found along Knight Rd.

Good birding,
Paul Heveran



Subject: Peregrine Falcon, Hulton Bridge, Harmar Township, Allegheny County
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 16:07 pm
From: henriciac AT gmail.com
 
For the past month or two I've seen a bird perched on a dead tree
downstream of the Hulton Bridge that sure looked like a Peregrine Falcon.
Because of traffic, I was never able to get a really good look at it. When
Pat and I crossed the bridge on our way home from a pleasant day birding in
Lawrence County, the bird was there. We parked the car and walked across
the bridge to get a better look. It is indeed a Peregrine Falcon. I took
some photographs, but the bird was out-of-range for my camera, and the auto
focus on my camera focused on the building behind the bird. It looks like
leg bands are present. Someone with a better camera (and photographer) will
need to take images.

The tree the peregrine perches on is on the Hamar bank of the river and
just downstream of the bridge. Sometimes an eagle or two perch in this tree.

Images are posted on my ebird list:
http://ebird.org/ebird/pa/view...

Amy Henrici
Pat McShea



Subject: CBC question
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 15:20 pm
From: macatilly AT gmail.com
 
I think I would count it but add a comment that there is a question as to whether it is wild or not.  They are still considered countable but I think qualifying the entry makes sense now.
Glenn Koppel
Butler CBC compiler



> On Jan 15, 2018, at 3:48 PM, Russ States wrote:
>
> I have a question for other CBC compilers.
> I had a report of a N. Bobwhite from one of my feeder watchers.
> Question is .. How do you handle this?
> Obviously there is no longer a breeding population of these in most of the
> state (if anywhere).
> But then, Ring-necked Pheasant is counted, and I think the same could be
> said of them (and they aren't even a native bird).
>
> ???
> Any thoughts.
>
> Thanks
> Russ States
> Compiler, Pleasantville CBC



Subject: CBC question
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 14:48 pm
From: pelagics202 AT gmail.com
 
I have a question for other CBC compilers.
I had a report of a N. Bobwhite from one of my feeder watchers.
Question is .. How do you handle this?
Obviously there is no longer a breeding population of these in most of the
state (if anywhere).
But then, Ring-necked Pheasant is counted, and I think the same could be
said of them (and they aren't even a native bird).

???
Any thoughts.

Thanks
Russ States
Compiler, Pleasantville CBC



Subject: Bald Eagle (Lehigh Co. - Haafsville)
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 12:31 pm
From: neimeyer AT us.net
 
At noon today there was a Bald Eagle on a deer carcass about 40 yards off
the side of Haaf Road, about 1/2 mile from where Haaf Road starts from Main
Street. On the 12th there was a Bald Eagle perched on a tree in the tree
line a bit farther along Haaf Road, closer to the row of houses.

Sincerely
Dave Neimeyer



Subject: Mourning Doves Galore - Allegheny County
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 12:05 pm
From: van126 AT comcast.net
 
About 30 minutes after I filled my feeders and scattered seed on the ground
this morning, I looked out from my bedroom window and counted 45 mourning
doves. During this very cold period, the most I counted until today has been
26 doves. The usual numbers are between 10 - 15. Juncos and cardinals seem
not to be scared off by the doves, but feed on the periphery of them. Many
goldfinches are around too. They tend to stay on the finch feeders when
there is lots of ground activity below them.

Good birding,

Bob Van Newkirk

Ross Township

Allegheny County



Subject: Sharpsburg Marina--destroyed
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 11:51 am
From: mpfial AT verizon.net
 
The river flow was swift yesterday with a lot of the ice broken up.  There was still quite a jam around Creighton.


The White-winged Scoters, Long-tailed Duck and others that have been at Dam #4 on the Allegheny River were gone yesterday and the only waterfowl I found were six Common Mergansers at Chapel Harbor.


Mike Fialkovich
Pittsburgh Area, Allegheny County



-----Original Message-----
From: Sameer Apte
To: PABIRDS
Sent: Mon, Jan 15, 2018 11:33 am
Subject: [PABIRDS] Sharpsburg Marina--destroyed

Hi all,
Aidan Place and I attempted to bird James Sharp Landing in Sharpsburg,
Allegheny County on the 13th. We were shocked to find that the recent
floods had both closed off the entry road under the bridge and wrecked
large chunks of the physical marina.
There is still some viewing access for the location by crossing the RR
tracks above the marina, but please use caution as I believe this is an
active line.
Crossing my fingers that the damage is repairable when the flood does
recede and everyone's property is OK. This is a great birding location and
I'd hate to lose it.

A couple miles upriver, Bell Harbor Marina was also submerged, but the
infrastructure of the boardwalk, marina, etc. seems to be OK.

On a happier note, earlier that morning we had a Bald Eagle, Brown Creeper,
8 Cedar Waxwings, and a hybrid chickadee at Harrison Hills County Park. Two
American Black Ducks continue at Carnegie Lake, Highland Park, Pittsburgh.

Good birding,
Sameer Apte



Subject: Last Call For 2017 List Numbers, Bird of the Year Vote, Comments
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 11:21 am
From: pabirder AT hotmail.com
 
12:18 pm


PA Birders --


If you have not already done so, please send your 2017 List numbers within the next few days for the PA Birds magazine summary.


Peter Robinson
Hanover, York County, PA



Subject: Sharpsburg Marina--destroyed
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 10:33 am
From: sameerapte1 AT gmail.com
 
Hi all,
Aidan Place and I attempted to bird James Sharp Landing in Sharpsburg,
Allegheny County on the 13th. We were shocked to find that the recent
floods had both closed off the entry road under the bridge and wrecked
large chunks of the physical marina.
There is still some viewing access for the location by crossing the RR
tracks above the marina, but please use caution as I believe this is an
active line.
Crossing my fingers that the damage is repairable when the flood does
recede and everyone's property is OK. This is a great birding location and
I'd hate to lose it.

A couple miles upriver, Bell Harbor Marina was also submerged, but the
infrastructure of the boardwalk, marina, etc. seems to be OK.

On a happier note, earlier that morning we had a Bald Eagle, Brown Creeper,
8 Cedar Waxwings, and a hybrid chickadee at Harrison Hills County Park. Two
American Black Ducks continue at Carnegie Lake, Highland Park, Pittsburgh.

Good birding,
Sameer Apte



Subject: Greater White-fronted Goose, Lehigh Co
Date: Mon Jan 15 2018 8:36 am
From: 00000039f782d598-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
Yesterday there were 3 GWFG at the Dorney Park pond in AllentownOther waterfowl wereN Pintail, Gadwall, Coot, Common Merg and Cackling Goose.
Mike Schall, Bath



Subject: Rusty blackbird, Schenley, Pittsburgh, Allegheny
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 14:51 pm
From: 0000000f59b962a9-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
On a walk from home to Oakland I saw a rusty blackbird flipping leaves in Phipps Run below the Visitors Center in Schenley Park.
Also 12 dark-eyed juncoes at Bartlett Shelter where someone left birdseed.
Complete checklist is here:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Kate St. John
birdsoutsidemywindow.org



Subject: Monroe county WRS
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 14:46 pm
From: foandla AT epix.net
 
Doug Burton and I ran our Monroe WRS today. Numbers were about average, although we had 6 of our redtails before we did thirty miles.Merlin was a bonus for this route. There was minimal open water. Last bird was the adult eagle munching on something unidentified on the ice at Saylor's Lake. About the only thing in the air were corvids.

County-Monroe
Date-1-14-2018
Observers- Dan Zmoda, Doug Burton
Time on Route-3:30
Start/End-1015/145
Miles on Route-75.5

#TVs-0
#BVs-0

#Harriers (Male/Female/Imm.)-0

#Red-tails (Ad./Imm./ND)-4/0/4

#Rough-legs (Light/Dark)-0

#Kestrels (M/F/ND)-0

Sharp-shins(Ad/Imm)-0
Cooper's (Ad/Imm.)-0

Red-shouldered hawks (Ad/Imm.)-3/0

Bald Eagles (Ad./Imm.)-1/0

other raptors- Merlin imm

Shrikes or Owls-0

Avg Temperature-19 14-24
Sky(Clear/ Pt cloudy/ Cloudy)- clear
Wind (light/medium/strong)-light
Avg Snow Cover-traceOther birds of note- sapsucker, bluebirds, ravens
Dan ZmodaPen Argyl



Subject: Rough-legged Hawk- Armstrong Co
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 12:15 pm
From: davbrooke AT gmail.com
 
Rough-legged hawk, dark morph continuing on Claypole Rd near Worthington in
Armstrong Co.
Photos are post in PA Birds- Photography Facebook group.


Dave Brooke
Allegheny Co
--
Dave Brooke
DDB Photography



Subject: Ash-throated refound at Green Lane Montgomery
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 12:14 pm
From: joe AT grecofamily.org
 
Steve Grunwald refound the Ash-throated Flycatcher that was first seen on the Upper Bucks CBC 12/17. It is in the same general area in Green Lane Park by the horse trial lot off Rte 29.  Walk across knight road and follow the trail as it turns left into the cedars.  It was with a flock of American Robins. 


Joe Greco
Upper Hanover
Montgomery County



Subject: Peace Valley Park (IBA) - (1/7 -1/13), etc.
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 11:45 am
From: 00000010a3d6847b-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
All,
Birder reports were very light this week. The lake remained mostly ice covered. The species count was 57. Some highlights include:
Snow Goose-the dark adult continued
7 duck species including:
1 Lesser Scaup 1/13
Ring-necked Duck-high report 6 1/11
Red-breasted Merganser-high report 3 1/13 (photo)
1 Pied-billed Grebe 1/11
Bald Eagles remain visible often standing on the ice.
1 adult Red-shouldered Hawk 1/9
Lesser Black-backed Gull continues as usual-high report 62 1/13
Great Black-backed Gull -high report 10 1/13
1 Merlin 1/11 (photo)


For those who don't follow eBird, the Harris's Sparrrow at 135 Rickert Rd. Doylestown continues. Almost everyone who goes sees it. Remember to view from the road only. The only other known county occurrence was at New Hope in 1965.


Thanks to all who share their sightings.
August Mirabella
North Wales, PA



Subject: RFI - Banded Ross's Goose
Date: Sun Jan 14 2018 5:26 am
From: 000000fa147293ff-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
Jim Figlar™s eBird checklist submitted Jan 13, 2018 included great photos of the Ross™s Goose continuing to be seen at Beltzville State Park in Carbon County, PA.  The photos show the bird is banded.  I am hoping Jim will contact me off-list to discuss this.  If you know Jim, please share this request with him.

Thanks,
Rich Rehrig
Palmerton, PA
[email protected]

Sent from Mail for Windows 10



Subject: Eastern PA Birdline: 1/13/2018
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 20:27 pm
From: becard AT rcn.com
 
- RBA
* Pennsylvania
* Lehigh / Northampton Counties and Vicinity
* January 13, 2018
* PAEA1801.13
- Birds mentioned

BARROW™S GOLDENEYE
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
GLAUCOUS GULL
ICELAND GULL
ROSS™S GOOSE
REDHEAD
LONG-TAILED DUCK
BRANT
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE

- Transcript

Hotline: Eastern PA Birdline
Date: January 13th at 9:00 PM
To Report by E-Mail: Send to [email protected] with Birdline in subject
heading.
Compiler: Dave DeReamus
My reporting area includes all of Lehigh and Northampton Counties with the
northern edge of the area reaching Beltzville State Park and the southern
edge reaching Peace Valley Park in Bucks County. Updates are typically done
every Friday, more often when necessary.

You can visit the Lehigh Valley Audubon Society Website at
http://www.lvaudubon.org/ .

You can visit my 'Eastern PA Birding' Website for photos and information at
http://users.rcn.com/becard/ho... .

There will be a field trip to waterfowl and gull hotspots in nearby New
Jersey on January 20th. Meet at the Tilghman Square parking lot, near the
Red Robin restaurant, just west of Route 309 at 7:30 AM. Trip leader will
be Mark Boyd.

Directions to many of the sites in this report can be found in the area™s
birding guidebook, Birds of the Lehigh Valley and Vicinity. A completely
revised, 2nd edition of the book can be ordered at:
http://www.lvaudubon.org/shop/ .

NOW FOR THE BIRDS!

Sightings from the BELVIDERE area in nearby New Jersey:
BARROW™S GOLDENEYE “ 1 back on 12/31 and 1/1 (female; downriver from
bridge).

Sightings from the MARTINS CREEK PPL POWER PLANT area, Northampton County:
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK “ 1 on 1/3 (light morph).
At the boat launch area:
Blue-winged Teal “ 1 to at least 1/6 (late date)
Spotted Sandpiper “ 1 to at least 1/2.

Sightings from PLAINFIELD TOWNSHIP, Northampton County:
At the Grand Central landfill:
GLAUCOUS GULL “ 1 to at least 1/12 (first-winter)
ICELAND GULL “ 1 on 1/12 (adult).

Sightings from the NAZARETH QUARRY, Northampton County:
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE “ 1 on 1/10
ROSS™S GOOSE “ 2 on 1/1; 3 on 1/10; 1 on 1/11
Snow Geese “ 20,000+ to at least 1/10.

Sightings from PALMER TOWNSHIP, Northampton County:
DICKCISSEL “ 1 on 1/10 (first-winter; at a private feeder)
LAPLAND LONGSPURS “ 5 on 1/3 (between Tatamy exit of Route 33 and Van Buren
Road).

Sightings from WEIR LAKE, Monroe County:
ROSS™S GEESE “ up to 9 to at least 1/11.

Sightings from BELTZVILLE STATE PARK, Carbon County:
ROSS™S GOOSE “ 1 to at least 1/11
Double-crested Cormorant “ 1 back on 12/31.

Sightings from the COPLAY area, Lehigh County:
At the Sheetz Quarry:
Snow Geese “ ~20,000 on 1/1.

Sightings from the ALLENTOWN area, Lehigh County:
At Lehigh Canal Park:
CANVASBACKS “ 4 on 1/7
REDHEADS “ 15 on 1/7
GREATER SCAUP “ 2 on 1/7
Killdeer “ 1 on 1/7.
Also Gadwall, Common Goldeneye, and Pied-billed Grebe.

Sightings from the ALBURTIS area, Lehigh County:
Along Smith Lane:
LAPLAND LONGSPURS “ 2 on 1/1.

Sightings from GREEN LANE RESERVOIR, Montgomery County:
At the Hill Road area:
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE “ 2 on 1/9 and 1/10
Cackling Goose “ 1 on 1/11
REDHEADS “ 4 on 1/6; 2 on 1/7; 3 on 1/10 and 1/11; 2 on 1/12
LONG-TAILED DUCK “ 1 on 1/7
Red-breasted Mergansers “ 16 on 1/6 (high count); 5 to at least 1/11
Common Goldeneye “ 11 on 1/11.
Also Pied-billed Grebe and American Wigeon.
At the Church Road area:
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS “ 2 to at least 1/12 (dark morph and light morph).

Sightings from TINICUM TOWNSHIP, Bucks County:
REDHEADS “ 3 on 1/11 (at the Frenchtown bridge).

Sightings from LAKE NOCKAMIXON, Bucks County:
REDHEADS “ 3 back on 12/31
ICELAND GULL “ 1 back on 12/31 (first-winter).

Sightings from PEACE VALLEY PARK, Bucks County:
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE “ 1 on 1/1 and 1/2
Red-breasted Mergansers “ 2 on 1/6.
Also Cackling Geese, Common Goldeneye, and Eastern Towhee.

- End transcript



Subject: on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 16:53 pm
From: dkruel300 AT comcast.net
 
Scott,
Would you have a good suggested action for birders in response to this direction from the administration ?

Dave


On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 22:22:55 -0500, Scott Weidensaul wrote:

> Realistically, no one is going to get in trouble for using a mirror pole to check on a bird nest (any more than you'll be arrested for opening your nest box to see if the bluebird eggs have hatched yet). The more sensitive the species -- including raptors, and especially eagles -- the more likely state or federal law enforcement will take issue with nest disturbance, but if you're peeking in your backyard robin nest, you're fine.
>
> Ironically, this discussion comes at a time when the Trump administration has moved to seriously weaken the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, just in time for the MBTA's 100th birthday. (Audubon, Nat Geo, the Cornell Lab and 50 other organizations have declared 2018 "The Year of the Bird" to commemorate this historic, bedrock law.) The new interpretation of the law, announced over the holidays, will make it extraordinarily difficult to hold oil companies, energy producers and others liable for killing native birds, unless it can be shown that their actions were intended to "render an animal subject to human control." That would have left those responsible for the Exxon Valdez and the BP oil spill, to take two examples under which MBTA violations were prosecuted, off the hook despite immense damage to bird populations.
>
> Just today, 17 former Interior Department officials, representing eight administrations of both parties back to Nixon (and yes, including Reagan appointees) wrote to Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke asking that the department reverse its ruling, calling the new guidelines a "contrived legal standard that creates a huge loophole" in the MBTA.
>
> Scott Weidensaul
> Schuylkill Haven, PA
>
>
>
>
>
>On Jan 12, 2018, at 9:52 PM, Grant Stevenson wrote:
>
>> In response to Chris, maybe poles with mirrors disturb the nest to much,
>> possibly causing nest failure. For example, even causing some of the
>> chicks.
>>
>> On the other hand, pole monitoring may be more genteel compared with
>> climbing the tree. Mostly raptors and herons perhaps, it is best to let
>> wildlife academic people with training and permits, or the PGC, do iit.
>> Somme colleges have raptor biology courses and a degree, and the raptor
>> research place in Steven's Point, WI, www.raptorresearch.com. You will
>> learn to climb a tree or cliff, for example, with disturbing it minimally.
>> If you have the habit of visiting breeding raptors and herons and coming
>> too close, even the tamer species of birds will permanently leave the nest
>> unless the chicks have fledged. U. of Minnesota ornithologist/raptor
>> biologist David Andersen, published a paper saying when he climbs a nest
>> tree of some Red-tailed Hawk pair, as the chicks grew, he was attacked
>> fewer times.
>>
>> The Migratory Bird Treaty Act may cover nests, disturbance, and taking
>> birds, bird parts, and eggs, and two other acts cover the transportation of
>> these materials. Bald and Golden Eagles, according to the Eagle Act, are
>> protected strongly and can lead to a $5000 first offense or year in jail,
>> or both, $10,000 each additional offense. Migratory other species, like
>> songbirds, if violated, can render a $500 fine or six months in prison, or
>> both. Oops, the latter is from the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation
>> Act! Vagrants and House Sparrows, European Starlings, and Rock Pigeons are
>> not protected. Also, according to the Congressional Record, Lesser
>> Black-backed Gulls, Cattle Egrets, and Eurasian Collared Doves may not have
>> gotten on the okay list for protection yet
>>
>> People do seem to violate wildlife law, a lot surprisingly: one person I
>> met was from Florida, and shot an Alligator after they were remove from the
>> Endangered Species List. He thought it wasn't protected anymore.
>>
>> Nice subject... thank you very much,, Chris and the other respondents to my
>> box inquiry. Natural history is still exciting!
>>
>> Grant Stevenson
>> Fountain Hill, Lehigh County



Subject: Am. Goldfinch increase in numbers Wayne TWP. Schuylkill Co. PA
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 16:31 pm
From: 000000d98121eaef-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
Hello all,
This morning I was happy to see an increase in Goldfinch numbers at the feeders. There had been only one or two visiting occasionally until today.
We have a Downy WP. roosting in one of the Bluebird boxes since fall.
Good birding,
Ann Liebner
Wayne Twp. Schuylkill Co. PA



Subject: birds
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 15:26 pm
From: herb1013 AT epix.net
 
At my feeders today are the usual 25 or so Blue Jays that come mostly
for the unshelled peanuts that we put out for them. There are also a few
dozen Dark Eye Juncos. Plus the usual 40 or 50 Doves This morning there
were 2 Pine Siskins on the tube feeder, In case anyone is interested
here are a bunch of pictures of our pet farm. to see different pictures
you need to push the back arrow. There are a few pictures of all the
Canada geese that used to nest here. Yea I fed them to. There is also a
picture of a nurse Guinea Hen sitting on 26 eggs.Herb Flavell. Gods
Knob, Milk Can Corners Susquehanna County.

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/bo...



Subject: Purple finches
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 14:16 pm
From: talbot.nanette AT gmail.com
 
A few purple finches at my frozen feeders this morning, a nice surprise.

Nanette Talbot
Montgomery County, PA

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Pine Warbler Montour County
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 14:00 pm
From: kaboommals AT verizon.net
 
A friend got a great pic of a Pine Warbler at his home outside of Exchange. He said it fed at the suet feeder.

Moses Martin
Millville, PA



Subject: pine siskin, Beaver County
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 13:45 pm
From: 0000008b6c2ed4a5-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
I also have my first pine siskin of the season at my feeder today.

Cheryl Abel
Beaver County



Subject: Allegheny Co. Ring-billed Gull
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 13:35 pm
From: wvwarblers AT hotmail.com
 
Had a Ring-billed Gull fly right over our street in Bridgeville this morning. I think it was lost...


Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA



Subject: Feeders
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 13:21 pm
From: 000000f9755bef14-dmarc-request AT list.audubon.org
 
The gold finches have returned to the feeders!   Mixed in I found a single pine Siskin.   On the ground I had two American tree sparrows.   

Sam Gutherie
Armstrong county.
Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Pine Siskin & RW Blackbird - Clearfield County
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 11:42 am
From: marianne5 AT windstream.net
 
As I do every day, today, I scoured the flock of about 75 goldfinches at my bird feeding area and aha, there is ONE Pine siskin for FOW (First of Winter)! We got about 5" of snow last night.

A Red winged blackbird showed up here a little bit ago also for FOW. I don™t mind one blackbird, but in other years in the winter, the blackbirds have turned into a flock of about 100! Boy, do they eat a lot of seeds! Expensive!

I put white millet and sunflower hearts on the ground. I also have 3 hanging sunflower feeders and 3 suet feeders.

Marianne Atkinson
Clearfield County near DuBois



Subject: Siskins and purple finches - Forest County
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 11:12 am
From: jbweyant AT verizon.net
 
Nice surprise this morning at the bird feeder.  Yesterday's storm blew in a
couple dozen pine siskins to our feeder. We also have a couple purple
finches - the first of the winter.



Brenda Weyant

Marienville, PA



Subject: Berks county snowy owl
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 9:51 am
From: erin.ranson AT gmail.com
 
Can anyone give me some rough directions to find the snowy owl on Mertz Rd
in Berks county coming from Lancaster? I'm not that familiar with Berks
county and finally have time this Monday during the morning to go see if I
can find it.

Thanks in advance.

Erin Ranson, CPC
717.468.8312 (cell)



Subject: Siskins! Cameron County
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 9:08 am
From: luckybirder AT gmail.com
 
Over thirty FOW (first of the winter) Pine Siskins with scores of American
Goldfinches at the feeder this morning, on five inches of fresh snow.

Mark Johnson



Subject: continuing the legal thread: Scott is right
Date: Sat Jan 13 2018 3:47 am
From: pahawkowl AT gmail.com
 
Thanks to Scott for pointing out that box monitoring is generally okay with
state and US, as they have no time to be petty, and get birders/citizen
scientists/amateur ornithologists do a lot to record data in the field.
keeping a database, or writing it down, uses a different part of the brain
than technology,Plus many will monitor over a larger biogeographical area
they often can't get to unless their college/university is well endowed
thus helping to restore and rest the brain from too much adrenaline and
cortisol, the stress chemicals in the body. Eagles age slower, in yearly
steps, clutch size is 1-2 eggs, indicating the same or less final
offspring, as predation continues is tragic, but rare, as eagles have a
sort of generalized diet.
The brain. Also, bigger birds like eagles have a larger bodies to provide
more surface area on their bodies. Also, some may feel that smaller birds
more easily are predated, but may be able to lay more eggs after. The size
issue is called "Bergman's Rule", And, small birds with several clutches,
mostly 2-3, and more eggs, are called "r-selection"and red-tails, and
goshawks, and some beautiful buteos, while eagles and peregrines and
gyrfalcons are referred to by "k-selection". Studies are needed to
determine when one ends and the other begins again.

In birding,

Grant Stevenson
Fountain Hill, Lehigh County



Subject: on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 22:59 pm
From: herb1013 AT epix.net
 
Years ago I planted a Red Pine by the stairs of my enclosed front deck.
In a few years the tree was over 18 feet tall because of the 300 years
of cow poop on this part of an old dairy farm. One day I looked out the
window to see a Robin building her nest right near the window. Every day
I watched that nest grow. Mom Robin knew that I was watching. Then she
had 3 eggs. So I got to watch her sit on her eggs till they hatched.
Finally all 3 eggs hatched. So I got to watch them grow till they all
flew away. But then birds destroyed my bird observatory. A family of
Yellow Bellied Sapsuckers killed the tree along with 25 White Birch that
I had planed. Only the stump of the Red Pine is left. But seeds from the
White Birch have started between 40 and 50 more that are now 25 or 30
feet tall. I have always loved birds. As a kid in the late 40s I bought
a surplus U.S. Army pigeon coop. It was used to send secret messages
from Europe back to England. That way the Germans could not intercept
the secret message by radio. Pigeons helped to win the war. I used to be
able to feed the pigeons by putting cracked corn on my tongue and
opening my mouth to let the pigeons eat the corn off my tongue. What did
I know about lice. Years later I became a letter Carrier for the United
States Post Office Department. Now the USPS. One day while I was
delivering the mail a pigeon landed on my shoulder and sat there for a
few minutes. It did that for 4 or 5 days. One lady said I see you have a
helper delivering your mail with you Herb. It made me wonder if it was
one of my birds that just flew away when I let them fly. Being outside
delivering mail for 6 to 8 hours I had lots of time to watch birds. One
Saturday I found a live bat lying on the sidewalk on its back. I bent
over to look at it and it clicked its teeth at me. There were kids
playing all over so I rang the bell at 3 Jefferson. The homeowner came
to the door so I asked her to call the police. She said ok. Then I saw a
hub cap on her lawn so I put the hub cap over the bat. Then continued my
deliveries. A few minutes later a squad car pulls up and asked wheres
the bat. So I told him. A few weeks later the same cop stopped me and
said that the bat was rabid. I found another on that same route but it
was crushed and died out. So a man living there dug a hole and buried
it. i Have another bat story for another time. Herb Flavell, Gods Knob,
Milk Can Corners. Susquehanna County.


On 1/12/2018 10:22 PM, Scott Weidensaul wrote:
> Realistically, no one is going to get in trouble for using a mirror pole to check on a bird nest (any more than you'll be arrested for opening your nest box to see if the bluebird eggs have hatched yet). The more sensitive the species -- including raptors, and especially eagles -- the more likely state or federal law enforcement will take issue with nest disturbance, but if you're peeking in your backyard robin nest, you're fine.
>
> Ironically, this discussion comes at a time when the Trump administration has moved to seriously weaken the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, just in time for the MBTA's 100th birthday. (Audubon, Nat Geo, the Cornell Lab and 50 other organizations have declared 2018 "The Year of the Bird" to commemorate this historic, bedrock law.) The new interpretation of the law, announced over the holidays, will make it extraordinarily difficult to hold oil companies, energy producers and others liable for killing native birds, unless it can be shown that their actions were intended to "render an animal subject to human control." That would have left those responsible for the Exxon Valdez and the BP oil spill, to take two examples under which MBTA violations were prosecuted, off the hook despite immense damage to bird populations.
>
> Just today, 17 former Interior Department officials, representing eight administrations of both parties back to Nixon (and yes, including Reagan appointees) wrote to Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke asking that the department reverse its ruling, calling the new guidelines a "contrived legal standard that creates a huge loophole" in the MBTA.
>
> Scott Weidensaul
> Schuylkill Haven, PA
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jan 12, 2018, at 9:52 PM, Grant Stevenson wrote:
>
>> In response to Chris, maybe poles with mirrors disturb the nest to much,
>> possibly causing nest failure. For example, even causing some of the
>> chicks.
>>
>> On the other hand, pole monitoring may be more genteel compared with
>> climbing the tree. Mostly raptors and herons perhaps, it is best to let
>> wildlife academic people with training and permits, or the PGC, do iit.
>> Somme colleges have raptor biology courses and a degree, and the raptor
>> research place in Steven's Point, WI, www.raptorresearch.com. You will
>> learn to climb a tree or cliff, for example, with disturbing it minimally.
>> If you have the habit of visiting breeding raptors and herons and coming
>> too close, even the tamer species of birds will permanently leave the nest
>> unless the chicks have fledged. U. of Minnesota ornithologist/raptor
>> biologist David Andersen, published a paper saying when he climbs a nest
>> tree of some Red-tailed Hawk pair, as the chicks grew, he was attacked
>> fewer times.
>>
>> The Migratory Bird Treaty Act may cover nests, disturbance, and taking
>> birds, bird parts, and eggs, and two other acts cover the transportation of
>> these materials. Bald and Golden Eagles, according to the Eagle Act, are
>> protected strongly and can lead to a $5000 first offense or year in jail,
>> or both, $10,000 each additional offense. Migratory other species, like
>> songbirds, if violated, can render a $500 fine or six months in prison, or
>> both. Oops, the latter is from the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation
>> Act! Vagrants and House Sparrows, European Starlings, and Rock Pigeons are
>> not protected. Also, according to the Congressional Record, Lesser
>> Black-backed Gulls, Cattle Egrets, and Eurasian Collared Doves may not have
>> gotten on the okay list for protection yet
>>
>> People do seem to violate wildlife law, a lot surprisingly: one person I
>> met was from Florida, and shot an Alligator after they were remove from the
>> Endangered Species List. He thought it wasn't protected anymore.
>>
>> Nice subject... thank you very much,, Chris and the other respondents to my
>> box inquiry. Natural history is still exciting!
>>
>> Grant Stevenson
>> Fountain Hill, Lehigh County



Subject: on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 21:23 pm
From: scottweidensaul AT verizon.net
 
Realistically, no one is going to get in trouble for using a mirror pole to check on a bird nest (any more than you'll be arrested for opening your nest box to see if the bluebird eggs have hatched yet). The more sensitive the species -- including raptors, and especially eagles -- the more likely state or federal law enforcement will take issue with nest disturbance, but if you're peeking in your backyard robin nest, you're fine.

Ironically, this discussion comes at a time when the Trump administration has moved to seriously weaken the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, just in time for the MBTA's 100th birthday. (Audubon, Nat Geo, the Cornell Lab and 50 other organizations have declared 2018 "The Year of the Bird" to commemorate this historic, bedrock law.) The new interpretation of the law, announced over the holidays, will make it extraordinarily difficult to hold oil companies, energy producers and others liable for killing native birds, unless it can be shown that their actions were intended to "render an animal subject to human control." That would have left those responsible for the Exxon Valdez and the BP oil spill, to take two examples under which MBTA violations were prosecuted, off the hook despite immense damage to bird populations.

Just today, 17 former Interior Department officials, representing eight administrations of both parties back to Nixon (and yes, including Reagan appointees) wrote to Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke asking that the department reverse its ruling, calling the new guidelines a "contrived legal standard that creates a huge loophole" in the MBTA.

Scott Weidensaul
Schuylkill Haven, PA





On Jan 12, 2018, at 9:52 PM, Grant Stevenson wrote:

> In response to Chris, maybe poles with mirrors disturb the nest to much,
> possibly causing nest failure. For example, even causing some of the
> chicks.
>
> On the other hand, pole monitoring may be more genteel compared with
> climbing the tree. Mostly raptors and herons perhaps, it is best to let
> wildlife academic people with training and permits, or the PGC, do iit.
> Somme colleges have raptor biology courses and a degree, and the raptor
> research place in Steven's Point, WI, www.raptorresearch.com. You will
> learn to climb a tree or cliff, for example, with disturbing it minimally.
> If you have the habit of visiting breeding raptors and herons and coming
> too close, even the tamer species of birds will permanently leave the nest
> unless the chicks have fledged. U. of Minnesota ornithologist/raptor
> biologist David Andersen, published a paper saying when he climbs a nest
> tree of some Red-tailed Hawk pair, as the chicks grew, he was attacked
> fewer times.
>
> The Migratory Bird Treaty Act may cover nests, disturbance, and taking
> birds, bird parts, and eggs, and two other acts cover the transportation of
> these materials. Bald and Golden Eagles, according to the Eagle Act, are
> protected strongly and can lead to a $5000 first offense or year in jail,
> or both, $10,000 each additional offense. Migratory other species, like
> songbirds, if violated, can render a $500 fine or six months in prison, or
> both. Oops, the latter is from the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation
> Act! Vagrants and House Sparrows, European Starlings, and Rock Pigeons are
> not protected. Also, according to the Congressional Record, Lesser
> Black-backed Gulls, Cattle Egrets, and Eurasian Collared Doves may not have
> gotten on the okay list for protection yet
>
> People do seem to violate wildlife law, a lot surprisingly: one person I
> met was from Florida, and shot an Alligator after they were remove from the
> Endangered Species List. He thought it wasn't protected anymore.
>
> Nice subject... thank you very much,, Chris and the other respondents to my
> box inquiry. Natural history is still exciting!
>
> Grant Stevenson
> Fountain Hill, Lehigh County



Subject: on wildlife law and research techniques: response to Chris Grecco
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 20:52 pm
From: pahawkowl AT gmail.com
 
In response to Chris, maybe poles with mirrors disturb the nest to much,
possibly causing nest failure. For example, even causing some of the
chicks.

On the other hand, pole monitoring may be more genteel compared with
climbing the tree. Mostly raptors and herons perhaps, it is best to let
wildlife academic people with training and permits, or the PGC, do iit.
Somme colleges have raptor biology courses and a degree, and the raptor
research place in Steven's Point, WI, www.raptorresearch.com. You will
learn to climb a tree or cliff, for example, with disturbing it minimally.
If you have the habit of visiting breeding raptors and herons and coming
too close, even the tamer species of birds will permanently leave the nest
unless the chicks have fledged. U. of Minnesota ornithologist/raptor
biologist David Andersen, published a paper saying when he climbs a nest
tree of some Red-tailed Hawk pair, as the chicks grew, he was attacked
fewer times.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act may cover nests, disturbance, and taking
birds, bird parts, and eggs, and two other acts cover the transportation of
these materials. Bald and Golden Eagles, according to the Eagle Act, are
protected strongly and can lead to a $5000 first offense or year in jail,
or both, $10,000 each additional offense. Migratory other species, like
songbirds, if violated, can render a $500 fine or six months in prison, or
both. Oops, the latter is from the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation
Act! Vagrants and House Sparrows, European Starlings, and Rock Pigeons are
not protected. Also, according to the Congressional Record, Lesser
Black-backed Gulls, Cattle Egrets, and Eurasian Collared Doves may not have
gotten on the okay list for protection yet

People do seem to violate wildlife law, a lot surprisingly: one person I
met was from Florida, and shot an Alligator after they were remove from the
Endangered Species List. He thought it wasn't protected anymore.

Nice subject... thank you very much,, Chris and the other respondents to my
box inquiry. Natural history is still exciting!

Grant Stevenson
Fountain Hill, Lehigh County



Subject: Com. Goldeneyes - Beaver Co.
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 16:35 pm
From: hawk5571 AT gmail.com
 
This afternoon there was a flock of four Common Goldeneyes and a
Ring-necked Duck at the mouth of the Beaver River

Mark Vass
Beaver Co.



Subject: Peregrine Allegheny Co
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 12:34 pm
From: davbrooke AT gmail.com
 
A pair of Peregrine Falcons are active under the Tarentum bridge on the Allegheny river. They were out on an ice flow and appeared to be eating. They have also flown up to the bridge to perch.

Dave Brooke
Allegheny Co.

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Big Day definition clarification
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 10:03 am
From: PSO AT pabirds.org
 
A big Day consists of one team that stays together all day (except for
potty breaks), not multiple teams or parties.

Frank





--
Pennsylvania Society for Ornithology



Subject: RFI: Big Day Totals
Date: Fri Jan 12 2018 8:08 am
From: fhaasbirds AT gmail.com
 
I am looking for Big Day records for Pennsylvania to put on the PSO website.

I know that back in the 70s and 80s especially, a lot of birders in the
state ran big days. Does anyone do them anymore?

For the uninitiated, a Big Day is a list of all of the species seen in a
prescribed area (state, county, back yard...) Between midnight and midnight
on one day by a party of two or more birders. Most over the years have been
run in mid-may, hoping to catch the peak of migration, but others have been
run throughout the year. It is a great way to learn where all of the
breeding species can be found in your area (you have to plan out your route
so as to maximize both breeders and migrants).

I would like to gather all of the Big Day totals that have been run in
Pennsylvania (statewide or local) and add them to the listing section of
the website.

If you ran (or run) Big Days in the state (doesn™t matter how long ago),
please send me your information on them.

I would like the date, whether it was a state, county, backyard, etc.,
names of the participants, total species for the day, total species
seen/heard by all participants (in other words, sometimes a birds flies by
and is seen by one or two in the party, but not everyone), and any comments
you would like to make about that day.

Please send the info to [email protected]

Thanks

Frank Haas





--
Frank Haas

Wisdom begins with putting the right name to a thing.



Subject: Sixteen Harriers at Pennsylvania Furnace Rd. (Huntingdon Co.)
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 18:27 pm
From: gwg2 AT psu.edu
 
Thursday evening while waiting for Short-eared Owls, which we did not see, 16 N. Harriers were counted coursing around the fields at Pennsylvania Furnace Rd (Hunt. County)

Greg Grove
Editor - Pennsylvania Birds
9524 Stone Creek Ridge Road, Huntingdon, PA. 16652
814 643 3295
[email protected]



Subject: Hermit Thrush Beaver cty
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 11:47 am
From: dcollett57 AT gmail.com
 
I was pleasantly surprised to see a very active Hermit Thrush at Raccoon
Creek SP. Also had a fly over of one of the resident Ravens.
A lovely day to try and work out stiffness and see a few birds.
Donna Collett
Beaver County



Subject: Northern Shrike, Rough-legged Hawks, Northern Harrier, Clearfield Co.
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 10:45 am
From: drichards7 AT verizon.net
 
This morning I took a drive around NW Clearfield County and observed the following notable species:


Northern Shrike (1) Saddle Club Rd., Luthersburg


Rough-legged Hawk (2) Kirk Rd. & Stoney Lonesome Rd., Luthersburg


Northern Harrier (1) Sandy Ridge Rd., Clover Run


Purple Finch (2) Anderson Creek Rd., Home Camp




Dan Richards
Treasure Lake



Subject: Winter Roost Boxes.
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 9:44 am
From: chris.grecco65 AT gmail.com
 
I saw a posts regarding the use of nest boxes as winter roosting quarters,
for cavity nesting and other species of birds during colder months.

There are "roost boxes" available for purchase, and plans for same
available.

I have witnessed non-cavity nesters such as dark-eyed juncos exit nest
boxes during extreme cold weather situations.

I also saw a reference to a beauty mirror on a pole being possibly illegal?
Just wondering what that was about and the reason?

Chris Grecco
Clearfield,Pa.
Clearfield Co.



Subject: winter bird boxes question
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 9:13 am
From: jettpakk AT gmail.com
 
Yes. My EABL boxes have groups in winter and I've seen multiple birds come
out of other breeding holes in cooler seasons.

On 8:00AM, Thu, Jan 11, 2018 Michael Barcaskey
wrote:

> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jan 11, 2018, at 1:35 AM, "Grant Stevenson"
> wrote:
> >
> > Has anyone seen in a cavity a bird spps. huddling in trees, and perhaps
> > nest boxes, like a winter roost box, such as the one used for breeding
> the
> > previous year, together in a circle with heads in center?
> >
> > The literature seems to indicate so far that the following may be such
> > species : Eastern Bluebirds, Brown Creepers, chickadee spps., like
> > Black-capped and Carolina, and Boreal up in Canada, titmice spps.
> (Tufted),
> > nuthatch spps., especially White-breasted, and possibly Downy
> Woodpeckers.
> > A pole with a beauty mirror may come in handy, but may be illegal. I ope
> > soon to contact the PGC about this soon.
> >
> > Grant Stevenson
> > Fountain Hill, Lehigh County
>
--

J Pat Valentik
Huntsville, AR
479 981 0901



Subject: winter bird boxes question
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 8:00 am
From: mikebarcaskey AT outlook.com
 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 11, 2018, at 1:35 AM, "Grant Stevenson" wrote:
>
> Has anyone seen in a cavity a bird spps. huddling in trees, and perhaps
> nest boxes, like a winter roost box, such as the one used for breeding the
> previous year, together in a circle with heads in center?
>
> The literature seems to indicate so far that the following may be such
> species : Eastern Bluebirds, Brown Creepers, chickadee spps., like
> Black-capped and Carolina, and Boreal up in Canada, titmice spps. (Tufted),
> nuthatch spps., especially White-breasted, and possibly Downy Woodpeckers.
> A pole with a beauty mirror may come in handy, but may be illegal. I ope
> soon to contact the PGC about this soon.
>
> Grant Stevenson
> Fountain Hill, Lehigh County



Subject: winter bird boxes question
Date: Thu Jan 11 2018 0:35 am
From: pahawkowl AT gmail.com
 
Has anyone seen in a cavity a bird spps. huddling in trees, and perhaps
nest boxes, like a winter roost box, such as the one used for breeding the
previous year, together in a circle with heads in center?

The literature seems to indicate so far that the following may be such
species : Eastern Bluebirds, Brown Creepers, chickadee spps., like
Black-capped and Carolina, and Boreal up in Canada, titmice spps. (Tufted),
nuthatch spps., especially White-breasted, and possibly Downy Woodpeckers.
A pole with a beauty mirror may come in handy, but may be illegal. I ope
soon to contact the PGC about this soon.

Grant Stevenson
Fountain Hill, Lehigh County



Subject: Snow Geese, Berks/Lehigh Co.
Date: Wed Jan 10 2018 20:40 pm
From: birdgyrl AT gmail.com
 
We had a huge flock on Saturday along Route 222 near Church Road not too far from the Lehigh County line in Maxatawny. They stretched over the hills, so I couldn™t estimate.

Amy L.
Morgantown, PA

> On Jan 10, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Heveran . wrote:
>
> Hello PA Birders,
>
> I saw a large flock of Snow Geese while driving home at the intersection of Valley Rd and Dorney Rd. I hastily estimated 5,000 as more settled in the distance. I saw a few dark geese mixed in, but wasn't sure if they were blue morph Snows or Canada Geese.
>
> Good birding,
> Paul Heveran



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