Birding News
ABA's Birding News >> Vermont

Vermont bird news by date

Updated on February 20, 2018, 12:50 pm

Want to easily find posts that mention ABA rare birds? Choose a code below:

ABA Code 2 Birds  |  ABA Code 3 Birds  |  ABA Code 4 Birds  |  ABA Code 5 Birds


20 Feb: @ 12:48:58 
Bellows Falls Peregrine [Clifford Seifer]
20 Feb: @ 07:28:13 
Turkey Vulture [Robert Dudley]
20 Feb: @ 06:44:41 
Nesting Eagle [Mitchell Harrison]
19 Feb: @ 15:21:02 
Re: Long-eared Owls --- western Addison County [Ron Payne]
19 Feb: @ 14:52:07 
Re: NO BIRDS! and chickadees ...... some numbers [Ruth]
19 Feb: @ 06:33:27 
Re: Long-eared Owls --- western Addison County [Veer Frost]
19 Feb: @ 05:54:59 
Long-eared Owls --- western Addison County [Ian Worley]
18 Feb: @ 09:38:56 
Ravens [Evergreen Erb]
17 Feb: @ 21:55:08 
Iceland Gulls [Scott Morrical]
17 Feb: @ 17:39:27 
Re: TV'sOverBrattleboro [Jane Stein]
17 Feb: @ 17:26:36 
TV'sOverBrattleboro [Paul Miksis]
17 Feb: @ 15:11:50 
Snowy owl [Sue]
17 Feb: @ 14:51:36 
Red Wing Blackbird [Robert Dudley]
17 Feb: @ 14:13:32 
signs of spring [Bonnie Dundas]
17 Feb: @ 09:46:24 
Chickadees [Mundi Smithers]
17 Feb: @ 09:34:53 
chickadee numbers [Maeve Kim]
17 Feb: @ 08:50:06 
Black-capped Chicks [Barbara Brosnan]
16 Feb: @ 15:15:39 
Cedar Waxwings in Rutland City [Linda L Kulas]
16 Feb: @ 12:12:23 
Migrants from afar [Chris Rimmer]
16 Feb: @ 11:15:23 
Re: Birds and beans! [Doug Hardy]
16 Feb: @ 10:35:39 
Re: NO BIRDS! and chickadees [Robert Dudley]
16 Feb: @ 09:42:59 
Birds and beans! [Catherine Crawley]
16 Feb: @ 09:10:13 
Re: NO BIRDS! and chickadees ...... some numbers [Leslie Nulty]
16 Feb: @ 02:04:21 
Snowy Owl [Michele Patenaude]
15 Feb: @ 19:49:42 
Re: NO BIRDS! and chickadees ...... some numbers [Ian Worley]
15 Feb: @ 19:12:08 
Re: NO BIRDS! and chickadees [alison wagner]
15 Feb: @ 17:42:31 
Re: NO BIRDS! and chickadees [Pamela Coleman]
15 Feb: @ 16:25:06 
Re: NO BIRDS! and chickadees [Jane Stein]
15 Feb: @ 16:08:41 
NO BIRDS! and chickadees [Ruth]
15 Feb: @ 12:24:45 
N. Goshawk [Thomas Berriman]
15 Feb: @ 12:12:14 
Great Backyard Bird Count - February 16-19 [Susan Elliott]
15 Feb: @ 08:56:28 
Spring? [lizl]
15 Feb: @ 07:07:18 
Re: VTBIRD Digest - 13 Feb 2018 to 14 Feb 2018 (#2018-43) reasons for plumage coloration differences in snowies [Ellie George]
14 Feb: @ 11:50:30 
Re: VTBIRD Digest - 12 Feb 2018 to 13 Feb 2018 (#2018-42) [Ian Miyashiro]
13 Feb: @ 14:24:17 
Snowy in Bridport [Jean Arrowsmith]
12 Feb: @ 08:15:30 
Eastern Towhee in Cornwall - confirmed by I. Worley [Andrea Landsberg]
11 Feb: @ 19:37:41 
Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver]
10 Feb: @ 20:57:27 
Snowy owls and snow buntings in Addison County - Feb. 9 [Karen Uhlendorf]
10 Feb: @ 13:09:26 
Harlequin, Barrow's, Longspurs [Scott Morrical]
10 Feb: @ 07:29:10 
Snowy owl just found at Springfield reservoir. Sitting on edge of outflow. Can be seen from bridge that leads to dam [Michael Foster]
09 Feb: @ 20:23:52 
Addison Co. Birding [Ken Cox]
09 Feb: @ 15:50:27 
Hermit Thrush - Bomoseen State Park, Feb 9, 2018 [Susan Elliott]
08 Feb: @ 20:07:18 
Four eagles near probable carcass and seven snowy owls in Bridport [Ellie George]
08 Feb: @ 17:24:25 
Snowy Owl in Charlotte [Bruce MacPherson]
07 Feb: @ 21:10:25 
Re: Short-eared Owls, Gage Road [Ruth]
07 Feb: @ 19:03:45 
Re: raven flock [Liz Lackey]
07 Feb: @ 17:53:07 
Re: raven flock [anneboby]
07 Feb: @ 15:41:10 
Re: raven flock [Ian Worley]
07 Feb: @ 15:35:08 
Re: raven flock [hilke breder]
07 Feb: @ 14:02:20 
Re: raven flock [Donald Clark]





Subject: Bellows Falls Peregrine
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 12:48 pm
From: clifdisc AT gmail.com
 
This morning a Peregrine Falcon flew over Canal St and settled on the clock
tower above Town Hall.

I don't know if this is one of the local Peregrines either over-wintering
or returning, or if this was a non-resident Peregrine just passing through.

-- Cliff Seifer
Keene NH



Subject: Turkey Vulture
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 7:28 am
From: greyowlvermont AT live.com
 
Yesterday morning I watched a large red tail hawk interact with a couple of crows.  I don't know who got the best of it though the hawk flew away with his dignity intact.  Heading towards Albany I observed a turkey vulture.  Unfortunately is was not in Vermont, it was literally 200 yds into NY State.  Saw a couple of more in Salem NY.  Finally crossing the Hudson at Troy I Observed a Bald Eagle.  He/she/it looked pretty bedraggled but it had a fish in its claws.


The rest of the birds observed yesterday were the usual ones.


Cheers,


Bob



Subject: Nesting Eagle
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 6:44 am
From: 000002ef5c1f1853-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
Looking from Charlestown, NH across the river to the VT bank. I could see that the Bald eagle nest that has been occupied for the past few years had an adult bald eagle sitting in it yesterday.
Mitch Harrison



Subject: Long-eared Owls --- western Addison County
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 15:21 pm
From: rpayne72 AT myfairpoint.net
 
Here are the links to the Long-eared Owl recordings on iNaturalist.
Long-eared Owl "excitement call" with audible hoots in the background if you turn it up:
https://www.inaturalist.org/ob...

Classic Long-eared Owl hooting:
https://www.inaturalist.org/ob...

A Short-eared Owl that flew overhead "barking" while I was trying to record the Long-eared Owl:
https://www.inaturalist.org/ob...

---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT



On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:54:51 -0500, Ian Worley wrote:

Long-eared Owls are now singing and vocalizing in western Addison County.

Last night Ron Payne and I searched two locations, and at one located
three Long-eared Owls as well as a Short-eared Owl, a Northern Saw-whet
Owl, and a Great Horned Owl. We were able to record (check out
iNaturalist for some recordings) for the Long-eared Owls alert calls,
excitement calls, and hoot songs, as well as the calls of the
Short-eared. The hoot songs of the Long-eareds were sometimes
counter-sung and sometime overlapping, and were at different pitches
identifying different birds. We saw at least two, and maybe all three
of the Long-eareds, and the Short-eared (there may have been two).

The location was representative of good habitat for Long-eared Owls in
Addison County. The birds were in, and flying from and to, a mature
thicket stand of red cedars (juniper) adjacent to extensive open
fields. Most of our listening and viewing was from the field 100-200
feet from the edge of the trees.

We typically search for Long-eareds from just after sunset, and also
later in the night. Last night sunset was at 5:25pm, and the end of
(Civil) twilight was 5:55pm. Our first encounter was a bird that
acknowledged our presence at 5:36 with numerous repeats of a single
alarm call as it made circles over the thicket. We both had fleeting
glimpses of that individual.

At 5:48pm a single Long-eared began a characteristic, soft, hoot song
from the thicket. That it was only 7 minutes from the end of Civil
Twilight was quite typical and expected. From then until 6:35pm (when
we left the viewing/listening site) we heard various combinations of
excitement and hoot songs from three different individual Long-eareds.
They moved around during that time. At one point two of the Long-eareds
were flying low back and forth in front of us (well below tree height),
between us and the edge of the thicket stand of cedars. We also heard
the other three owl species during this time. The actions and
vocalizations were suggestive of a nesting site, and the thicket is
mature and tall enough to fit that possibility.

Unless you are well experienced with the variety of calls and alternate
songs of each owl species, it is very difficult to separate some of the
calls of Long-eared Owls from calls of Northern Saw-whet Owls.
Sometimes only careful reading of sonograms made from on-site recordings
is the only sure way to know. There are also some "conversational"
simple calls that are very similar sounding among several species of
owls. The best way to verify a Long-eared Owl by sound is with the
slow-paced hoot song. They also make mechanical sounds, notably bill
snaps and wing claps. We did not hear either of these last night.

In the last 10 days at two other locations we also heard Long-eareds
singing hoot songs for extended durations, at times which were well into
the dark of night.

You can read much more about the Long-eareds of western Addison County
and how to find them in this report of our 2016 discovery of their
habitat of preference in this area.
https://ebird.org/vt/news/find...

Please note the "Precautions" section of the article. We know very
little about these birds in Vermont and we believe they should be given
every protection of privacy that we can.

If you go to eBird Species Maps and search for Long-eared Owls for the
period 2016-2018 you will get a good idea where they have been found in
the western Addison County area. Only a couple of the markers on that
map are exactly where the observations were made. For the safety of the
birds and the species, the markers are put in generalized locations.
There are many other locations with seemingly good habitat to be searched.

If you then look at the map for all years, you will find other records.
Since there is an owl banding station at the north end of Snake
Mountain, you will find many of its mist-netted birds mapped at
scattered locations on or near Snake Mountain. The actual location for
those scattered map pins is just one place near Route 17 at the north
end of the mountain.

At least two of the locations that we have found for Long-eared Owls
this year have a strong possibility of being nesting sites. If you
locate hooting Long-eareds in the next few weeks, you may also have
discovered a possible nest site. It is our practice, and strongly
encourage others to do the same, to not map those sites until after the
4th of July. Furthermore, we strongly encourage not returning to the
locations where you discovered the species, at least not until next year.

We hope others will seek out new locations for this enigmatic species,
so that we can better understand their status in Vermont and guide us
further on how to protect them.

Good owling all!

Ian and Ron



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees ...... some numbers
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 14:52 pm
From: birder_rws AT outlook.com
 
Thank you, Ian and Ron, for this very detailed reporting.  AND for your analysis of ebird data relative to chickadee reports..... a perfect example of the power of ebird - and the expertise of someone who can extract that data.


So, yes, BCCH numbers are down.... but why? why? why?


Can you please add a link to your inaturalist entry?


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds on behalf of Ian Worley
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 8:49 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] NO BIRDS! and chickadees ...... some numbers

Well, we are now six weeks into 2018 and the question still seems to be
are Black-capped Chickadee numbers down in numbers as they were during
the Christmas Bird Count? And a lot of us are looking at our feeders
and the answer seems to be yes indeed.

So using eBird data for all of Vermont from 2008 to 2018 for the first
six weeks of the year we can get an overall view, but it is not really
possible to sort out specifically data from feeders.

I pulled out from eBird the "frequency" and "average count" data for
each of the first six weeks of the year for those 11 years plus for all
years combined as far back as they go, averaged them for each year and
the combined "all years", and compared the years.

"Frequency" is the percent of all eBird checklists submitted during the
period that had at least one Black-capped Chickadee. This measures notes
how common or not the species is in the landscapes being birded,
including feeders reported to eBird. "Average Count" is the average
numbers of birds reported on the checklists having at least one
chickadee. This corresponds with comments such as "there were a lot of
chickadees in the woods today" or "haven't seen as many chickadees at my
feeder as I saw last year.

Some results:

The average 'frequencies" for the six week period range from 43% to 64%,
for the 11 years.

The average "average counts" for the six week period range from 4.7 to
7.5 birds per checklist.

Ranking the years from highest "frequency of observation" to lowest,
this year is the 4th highest at 58% of all checklists submitted. I.e.,
Chickadees are being reported more frequently than in most years.

Ranking the years from highest "average count" to lowest, this year is
dead last at 4.7 birds per observation. I.e. the number of Chickadees
on checklists is the lowest during this time period for any year since
sometime before 2008.

The data for all years combined for Vermont for these six weeks of the
year are: "frequency" of 55%, three percent lower than this year's
frequency; and "average count" 6.1, which is substantially higher than
this year's 4.7.

Compared with the previous two years, this year the birds are being seen
more often, but significantly fewer in numbers when seen.

Good luck with your Great Backyard Bird Counts!

Ian




On 2/15/2018 6:42 PM, Pamela Coleman wrote:
> None up the road in Mt Tabor either - seems like when the temps soar the birds disappear :-( Sure hope colder temps bring them back for the GBBC!!
>
>
> From: Ruth
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:08 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] NO BIRDS! and chickadees
>
> Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today. From dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS! Not a junco in sight. I looked around for predators, but saw none. Now as dusk approaches... still not a bird at my feeders. Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?
>
>
> I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts https://vtecostudies.org/blog/... EVERYONE, reported low numbers of chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall... and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very disconcerting to me.
[https://vtecostudies.org/wp-co...

CBC Roundup: The 118th Christmas Bird Count by the Numbers ...
vtecostudies.org
The Christmas Bird Count (CBC) season has come to an end and as we warm our frozen extremities and dream of spring birding, it's time to revel in what has been



>
>
>
>
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT
>
>



Subject: Long-eared Owls --- western Addison County
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 6:33 am
From: veer.frost AT hushmail.com
 
Vermont birders are so fortunate to receive in-depth accounts like
this sterling glimpse into the mysterious owl world...something of our
real and our political winter responds to these images and imagined
sounds of great birds at their rituals.Thank you Ian and Ron! Veer
(Passumpsic NEK)

On February 19, 2018 at 6:55 AM, "Ian Worley" wrote:Long-eared Owls
are now singing and vocalizing in western Addison County.

Last night Ron Payne and I searched two locations, and at one located
three Long-eared Owls as well as a Short-eared Owl, a Northern
Saw-whet
Owl, and a Great Horned Owl. We were able to record (check out
iNaturalist for some recordings) for the Long-eared Owls alert calls,
excitement calls, and hoot songs, as well as the calls of the
Short-eared. The hoot songs of the Long-eareds were sometimes
counter-sung and sometime overlapping, and were at different pitches
identifying different birds. We saw at least two, and maybe all three

of the Long-eareds, and the Short-eared (there may have been two).

The location was representative of good habitat for Long-eared Owls in

Addison County. The birds were in, and flying from and to, a mature
thicket stand of red cedars (juniper) adjacent to extensive open
fields. Most of our listening and viewing was from the field 100-200
feet from the edge of the trees.

We typically search for Long-eareds from just after sunset, and also
later in the night. Last night sunset was at 5:25pm, and the end of
(Civil) twilight was 5:55pm. Our first encounter was a bird that
acknowledged our presence at 5:36 with numerous repeats of a single
alarm call as it made circles over the thicket. We both had fleeting
glimpses of that individual.

At 5:48pm a single Long-eared began a characteristic, soft, hoot song
from the thicket. That it was only 7 minutes from the end of Civil
Twilight was quite typical and expected. From then until 6:35pm (when

we left the viewing/listening site) we heard various combinations of
excitement and hoot songs from three different individual Long-eareds.

They moved around during that time. At one point two of the
Long-eareds
were flying low back and forth in front of us (well below tree
height),
between us and the edge of the thicket stand of cedars. We also heard

the other three owl species during this time. The actions and
vocalizations were suggestive of a nesting site, and the thicket is
mature and tall enough to fit that possibility.

Unless you are well experienced with the variety of calls and
alternate
songs of each owl species, it is very difficult to separate some of
the
calls of Long-eared Owls from calls of Northern Saw-whet Owls.
Sometimes only careful reading of sonograms made from on-site
recordings
is the only sure way to know. There are also some "conversational"
simple calls that are very similar sounding among several species of
owls. The best way to verify a Long-eared Owl by sound is with the
slow-paced hoot song. They also make mechanical sounds, notably bill
snaps and wing claps. We did not hear either of these last night.

In the last 10 days at two other locations we also heard Long-eareds
singing hoot songs for extended durations, at times which were well
into
the dark of night.

You can read much more about the Long-eareds of western Addison County

and how to find them in this report of our 2016 discovery of their
habitat of preference in this area.
https://ebird.org/vt/news/find...

Please note the "Precautions" section of the article. We know very
little about these birds in Vermont and we believe they should be
given
every protection of privacy that we can.

If you go to eBird Species Maps and search for Long-eared Owls for the

period 2016-2018 you will get a good idea where they have been found
in
the western Addison County area. Only a couple of the markers on that

map are exactly where the observations were made. For the safety of
the
birds and the species, the markers are put in generalized locations.
There are many other locations with seemingly good habitat to be
searched.

If you then look at the map for all years, you will find other
records.
Since there is an owl banding station at the north end of Snake
Mountain, you will find many of its mist-netted birds mapped at
scattered locations on or near Snake Mountain. The actual location
for
those scattered map pins is just one place near Route 17 at the north
end of the mountain.

At least two of the locations that we have found for Long-eared Owls
this year have a strong possibility of being nesting sites. If you
locate hooting Long-eareds in the next few weeks, you may also have
discovered a possible nest site. It is our practice, and strongly
encourage others to do the same, to not map those sites until after
the
4th of July. Furthermore, we strongly encourage not returning to the
locations where you discovered the species, at least not until next
year.

We hope others will seek out new locations for this enigmatic species,

so that we can better understand their status in Vermont and guide us
further on how to protect them.

Good owling all!

Ian and Ron



Subject: Long-eared Owls --- western Addison County
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 5:54 am
From: iworley AT uvm.edu
 
Long-eared Owls are now singing and vocalizing in western Addison County.

Last night Ron Payne and I searched two locations, and at one located
three Long-eared Owls as well as a Short-eared Owl, a Northern Saw-whet
Owl, and a Great Horned Owl. We were able to record (check out
iNaturalist for some recordings) for the Long-eared Owls alert calls,
excitement calls, and hoot songs, as well as the calls of the
Short-eared. The hoot songs of the Long-eareds were sometimes
counter-sung and sometime overlapping, and were at different pitches
identifying different birds. We saw at least two, and maybe all three
of the Long-eareds, and the Short-eared (there may have been two).

The location was representative of good habitat for Long-eared Owls in
Addison County. The birds were in, and flying from and to, a mature
thicket stand of red cedars (juniper) adjacent to extensive open
fields. Most of our listening and viewing was from the field 100-200
feet from the edge of the trees.

We typically search for Long-eareds from just after sunset, and also
later in the night. Last night sunset was at 5:25pm, and the end of
(Civil) twilight was 5:55pm. Our first encounter was a bird that
acknowledged our presence at 5:36 with numerous repeats of a single
alarm call as it made circles over the thicket. We both had fleeting
glimpses of that individual.

At 5:48pm a single Long-eared began a characteristic, soft, hoot song
from the thicket. That it was only 7 minutes from the end of Civil
Twilight was quite typical and expected. From then until 6:35pm (when
we left the viewing/listening site) we heard various combinations of
excitement and hoot songs from three different individual Long-eareds.
They moved around during that time. At one point two of the Long-eareds
were flying low back and forth in front of us (well below tree height),
between us and the edge of the thicket stand of cedars. We also heard
the other three owl species during this time. The actions and
vocalizations were suggestive of a nesting site, and the thicket is
mature and tall enough to fit that possibility.

Unless you are well experienced with the variety of calls and alternate
songs of each owl species, it is very difficult to separate some of the
calls of Long-eared Owls from calls of Northern Saw-whet Owls.
Sometimes only careful reading of sonograms made from on-site recordings
is the only sure way to know. There are also some "conversational"
simple calls that are very similar sounding among several species of
owls. The best way to verify a Long-eared Owl by sound is with the
slow-paced hoot song. They also make mechanical sounds, notably bill
snaps and wing claps. We did not hear either of these last night.

In the last 10 days at two other locations we also heard Long-eareds
singing hoot songs for extended durations, at times which were well into
the dark of night.

You can read much more about the Long-eareds of western Addison County
and how to find them in this report of our 2016 discovery of their
habitat of preference in this area.
https://ebird.org/vt/news/find...

Please note the "Precautions" section of the article. We know very
little about these birds in Vermont and we believe they should be given
every protection of privacy that we can.

If you go to eBird Species Maps and search for Long-eared Owls for the
period 2016-2018 you will get a good idea where they have been found in
the western Addison County area. Only a couple of the markers on that
map are exactly where the observations were made. For the safety of the
birds and the species, the markers are put in generalized locations.
There are many other locations with seemingly good habitat to be searched.

If you then look at the map for all years, you will find other records.
Since there is an owl banding station at the north end of Snake
Mountain, you will find many of its mist-netted birds mapped at
scattered locations on or near Snake Mountain. The actual location for
those scattered map pins is just one place near Route 17 at the north
end of the mountain.

At least two of the locations that we have found for Long-eared Owls
this year have a strong possibility of being nesting sites. If you
locate hooting Long-eareds in the next few weeks, you may also have
discovered a possible nest site. It is our practice, and strongly
encourage others to do the same, to not map those sites until after the
4th of July. Furthermore, we strongly encourage not returning to the
locations where you discovered the species, at least not until next year.

We hope others will seek out new locations for this enigmatic species,
so that we can better understand their status in Vermont and guide us
further on how to protect them.

Good owling all!

Ian and Ron



Subject: Ravens
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 9:38 am
From: evergreenerb AT comcast.net
 
When I first moved onto my property here in Jericho over 40 years ago, it was a huge treat to see and hear Ravens.  The last years, I hear and see them most days, which is wonderful, as they are one of my favorite birds (along with their cousins, the crows).  But today, when I was out in my yard, I saw and heard 11 (!) Ravens flying overhead, all gronking away, and looking like ravens flying, with their wedge shaped tails.  I dont know where our resident Crows were, but no one was giving the Ravens any trouble.  It was thrilling, and has me wondering where they were going and where they had been.  Lucky me, and its the backyard bird count weekend besides!  Evergreen in Jericho



Subject: Iceland Gulls
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 21:55 pm
From: smorrica AT uvm.edu
 
Dear eBirders:
Sorry for this late post. Ted Murin and I birded the lakeshore from Charlotte Ferry Dock to Converse Bay, Thompson's Point, and Town Farm Bay. There were 2 Iceland Gulls on the ice edge in Town Farm Bay. Also at least 11 Bald Eagles including 8 from Thompson's Point to Town Farm Bay. Good birding,
Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: TV'sOverBrattleboro
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 17:39 pm
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
Hurray!  TVs and RWBs-- spring is going to come not too far behind.

Thanks for the good news.

Jane
Shoreham

On 2/17/2018 6:26 PM, Paul Miksis wrote:
> Seems a bit early for here, but there they were, about 10.
> Paul Miksis
>



Subject: TV'sOverBrattleboro
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 17:26 pm
From: pjmiksis AT comcast.net
 
Seems a bit early for here, but there they were, about 10.
Paul Miksis



Subject: Snowy owl
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 15:11 pm
From: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
 
A snowy owl was in the field this morning across from the intersection of Swinton and Basin Harbor Rds.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod



Subject: Red Wing Blackbird
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:51 pm
From: greyowlvermont AT live.com
 
West Arlington at my sunflower seed feeder.


Bob



Subject: signs of spring
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:13 pm
From: kinglet AT sover.net
 
First Red-winged Blackbirds in shaftsbury.



Subject: Chickadees
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 9:46 am
From: amen1farm AT gmail.com
 
Here in the southwestern most Vermont town the chickadees are present every day.  When the ground is bare as it is just now I dont seem to see as many juncos or goldfinches.  The usual cast of characters..Chickadee, Nuthatch, Titmice, Hairy, Downy, Red-bellied, Blue Jay, etc. are here off and on every day.  The one species that is here in significantly lower numbers is the Mourning Dove.

Mundi
North Pownal



Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)



Subject: chickadee numbers
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 9:34 am
From: maevulus AT surfglobal.net
 
We seem to have more chickadees than usual here in Jericho Center. Its always hard to tell how many there in all, but we often have three and sometimes four at feeders at the same time, with others waiting in the trees. In past years, we rarely got more than two coming to the feeders at once. I dont know if there are more birds, or if theyre more comfortable this year with the security of all the old Christmas trees and wreaths weve got around the feeders.
Maeve Kim
Jericho Center



Subject: Black-capped Chicks
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 8:50 am
From: bbrosnan AT gmavt.net
 
Only 1 yesterday and 2 today so far in our GBBC.  They are here almost all
day off and on but they are not necessarily the same birds. ( I think they
are all clones anyway. ) Our woods are filled with hemlocks where they are
permanent residents. I have often commented that when we begin losing our
chickadees we are all in trouble. Let's hope not.



Also, along with 11 squirrels this morning, we had a CHIPMUNK. Happy
spring.



Barbara Brosnan

Weybridge



Subject: Cedar Waxwings in Rutland City
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 15:15 pm
From: lglk AT icloud.com
 
A chance glance out our back door at 3:30 p.m. this afternoon revealed 45 cedar waxwings scattered in three trees in the tree and alder boundary that separates us from the properties to the east in Rutland Town.
They flew off after we watched them for 5 minutes with binocs.

Linda Kulas
Hilltop Terrace
Rutland City



Subject: Migrants from afar
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 12:12 pm
From: crimmer AT vtecostudies.org
 
This isn't strictly relevant to Vermont birders, but I recently returned
from a 10-day field expedition to eastern Cuba's Sierra Maestra, where I
encountered several familiar migrants overwintering there, plus a number of
captivating endemics. If you're interested in learning more, check out this
VCE blog post:
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/...

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/



Subject: Birds and beans!
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 11:15 am
From: dhardy AT geo.umass.edu
 
Thanks to Catherine for posting this report.

Study after study is arriving at the same result, and since many of us
love our morning coffee, our purchasing choices can make a tremendous
difference - not only to neotropical migrants, but to the communities
who do the farming.

The lead author of this report says that "An encouraging result of the
study is that coffee production in the Western Ghats, a global
biodiversity hotspot, can be a win-win for birds and farmers."

When you purchase certified coffee from an expert roaster and add in
great taste, win-win becomes win-win-win. Such coffee does not have to
cost substantially more money, especially when purchased wisely though a
"coffee club." Consider starting one in your community!

More information is here:

Doug Hardy
Norwich


On 2/16/2018 10:42 AM, Catherine Crawley wrote:
> Here's a neat study on bird diversity and our fave morning beverage.
>
> Birds and beans: Study shows best coffee for bird diversity
>
> It's an age-old debate for coffee lovers. Which is better: Arabica beans
> with their sweeter, softer taste, or the bold, deep flavor of Robusta
> beans? A new study has taken the question to unlikely coffee aficionados:
> birds.
> https://www.sciencedaily.com/r...
>



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 10:35 am
From: greyowlvermont AT live.com
 
Looking out my window right now at 6 chickadees.  I gbbc number was 7 this morning.  Not a lot of birds at the feeder with the warmer weather, however the number of chickadees have increase.


Cheers,


Bob



________________________________
From: Vermont Birds on behalf of Ruth
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:08 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] NO BIRDS! and chickadees

Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today. From dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS! Not a junco in sight. I looked around for predators, but saw none. Now as dusk approaches... still not a bird at my feeders. Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?


I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts https://vtecostudies.org/blog/... EVERYONE, reported low numbers of chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall... and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very disconcerting to me.
[https://vtecostudies.org/wp-co...

CBC Roundup: The 118th Christmas Bird Count by the Numbers ...
vtecostudies.org
The Christmas Bird Count (CBC) season has come to an end and as we warm our frozen extremities and dream of spring birding, it's time to revel in what has been






Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT



Subject: Birds and beans!
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 9:42 am
From: crawley.catherine AT gmail.com
 
Here's a neat study on bird diversity and our fave morning beverage.

Birds and beans: Study shows best coffee for bird diversity

It's an age-old debate for coffee lovers. Which is better: Arabica beans
with their sweeter, softer taste, or the bold, deep flavor of Robusta
beans? A new study has taken the question to unlikely coffee aficionados:
birds.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/r...



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees ...... some numbers
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 9:10 am
From: lenulty84 AT gmail.com
 
We have always had swarms of chickadees at our feeders, here in Jericho at
1000feet. And we continue to have them. Usually more than I feel capable
of counting accurately! Maeve Kim who visits us frequently will confirm
this.

On Thu, Feb 15, 2018 at 8:49 PM, Ian Worley wrote:

> Well, we are now six weeks into 2018 and the question still seems to be
> are Black-capped Chickadee numbers down in numbers as they were during the
> Christmas Bird Count? And a lot of us are looking at our feeders and the
> answer seems to be yes indeed.
>
> So using eBird data for all of Vermont from 2008 to 2018 for the first six
> weeks of the year we can get an overall view, but it is not really possible
> to sort out specifically data from feeders.
>
> I pulled out from eBird the "frequency" and "average count" data for each
> of the first six weeks of the year for those 11 years plus for all years
> combined as far back as they go, averaged them for each year and the
> combined "all years", and compared the years.
>
> "Frequency" is the percent of all eBird checklists submitted during the
> period that had at least one Black-capped Chickadee. This measures notes
> how common or not the species is in the landscapes being birded, including
> feeders reported to eBird. "Average Count" is the average numbers of birds
> reported on the checklists having at least one chickadee. This corresponds
> with comments such as "there were a lot of chickadees in the woods today"
> or "haven't seen as many chickadees at my feeder as I saw last year.
>
> Some results:
>
> The average 'frequencies" for the six week period range from 43% to 64%,
> for the 11 years.
>
> The average "average counts" for the six week period range from 4.7 to 7.5
> birds per checklist.
>
> Ranking the years from highest "frequency of observation" to lowest, this
> year is the 4th highest at 58% of all checklists submitted. I.e.,
> Chickadees are being reported more frequently than in most years.
>
> Ranking the years from highest "average count" to lowest, this year is
> dead last at 4.7 birds per observation. I.e. the number of Chickadees on
> checklists is the lowest during this time period for any year since
> sometime before 2008.
>
> The data for all years combined for Vermont for these six weeks of the
> year are: "frequency" of 55%, three percent lower than this year's
> frequency; and "average count" 6.1, which is substantially higher than this
> year's 4.7.
>
> Compared with the previous two years, this year the birds are being seen
> more often, but significantly fewer in numbers when seen.
>
> Good luck with your Great Backyard Bird Counts!
>
> Ian
>
>
>
>
> On 2/15/2018 6:42 PM, Pamela Coleman wrote:
>
>> None up the road in Mt Tabor either - seems like when the temps soar the
>> birds disappear :-( Sure hope colder temps bring them back for the GBBC!!
>>
>>
>> From: Ruth
>> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
>> Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:08 PM
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] NO BIRDS! and chickadees
>> Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today. From
>> dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS! Not a junco in sight. I
>> looked around for predators, but saw none. Now as dusk approaches... still
>> not a bird at my feeders. Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?
>>
>>
>> I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts
>> https://vtecostudies.org/blog/...
>> s-bird-count-by-the-numbers/ EVERYONE, reported low numbers of
>> chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall...
>> and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has
>> happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very
>> disconcerting to me.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Ruth Stewart
>> E. Dorset, VT
>>
>>
>>
>


--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496



Subject: Snowy Owl
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 2:04 am
From: michelep AT sover.net
 
Yesterday there was a Snowy Owl on Lake Road in Charlotte. It was sitting on the ground in one of the hedge rows at the edge of the big farm fields on the south side of the road. It was probably the same bird that Bruce MacPherson saw a few days ago in the same area.

Michele Patenaude
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees ...... some numbers
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 19:49 pm
From: iworley AT uvm.edu
 
Well, we are now six weeks into 2018 and the question still seems to be
are Black-capped Chickadee numbers down in numbers as they were during
the Christmas Bird Count? And a lot of us are looking at our feeders
and the answer seems to be yes indeed.

So using eBird data for all of Vermont from 2008 to 2018 for the first
six weeks of the year we can get an overall view, but it is not really
possible to sort out specifically data from feeders.

I pulled out from eBird the "frequency" and "average count" data for
each of the first six weeks of the year for those 11 years plus for all
years combined as far back as they go, averaged them for each year and
the combined "all years", and compared the years.

"Frequency" is the percent of all eBird checklists submitted during the
period that had at least one Black-capped Chickadee. This measures notes
how common or not the species is in the landscapes being birded,
including feeders reported to eBird. "Average Count" is the average
numbers of birds reported on the checklists having at least one
chickadee. This corresponds with comments such as "there were a lot of
chickadees in the woods today" or "haven't seen as many chickadees at my
feeder as I saw last year.

Some results:

The average 'frequencies" for the six week period range from 43% to 64%,
for the 11 years.

The average "average counts" for the six week period range from 4.7 to
7.5 birds per checklist.

Ranking the years from highest "frequency of observation" to lowest,
this year is the 4th highest at 58% of all checklists submitted. I.e.,
Chickadees are being reported more frequently than in most years.

Ranking the years from highest "average count" to lowest, this year is
dead last at 4.7 birds per observation. I.e. the number of Chickadees
on checklists is the lowest during this time period for any year since
sometime before 2008.

The data for all years combined for Vermont for these six weeks of the
year are: "frequency" of 55%, three percent lower than this year's
frequency; and "average count" 6.1, which is substantially higher than
this year's 4.7.

Compared with the previous two years, this year the birds are being seen
more often, but significantly fewer in numbers when seen.

Good luck with your Great Backyard Bird Counts!

Ian




On 2/15/2018 6:42 PM, Pamela Coleman wrote:
> None up the road in Mt Tabor either - seems like when the temps soar the birds disappear :-( Sure hope colder temps bring them back for the GBBC!!
>
>
> From: Ruth
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:08 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] NO BIRDS! and chickadees
>
> Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today. From dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS! Not a junco in sight. I looked around for predators, but saw none. Now as dusk approaches... still not a bird at my feeders. Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?
>
>
> I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts https://vtecostudies.org/blog/... EVERYONE, reported low numbers of chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall... and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very disconcerting to me.
>
>
>
>
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT
>
>



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 19:12 pm
From: alikatofvt AT gmavt.net
 
Ive seen/heard good-sized flocks in the woods this winter.  Perhaps plenty of seed there?  Cones?  At home, the flock sizes increased when there was cold and deep snow and have dropped again here now with melt and rising temps.
----- Original Message -----
From: Ruth
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Sent: Thu, 15 Feb 2018 17:08:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [VTBIRD] NO BIRDS! and chickadees

Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today. From dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS! Not a junco in sight. I looked around for predators, but saw none. Now as dusk approaches... still not a bird at my feeders. Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?


I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts https://vtecostudies.org/blog/... EVERYONE, reported low numbers of chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall... and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very disconcerting to me.




Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 17:42 pm
From: 0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
None up the road in Mt Tabor either - seems like when the temps soar the birds disappear :-( Sure hope colder temps bring them back for the GBBC!!


From: Ruth
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:08 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] NO BIRDS! and chickadees

Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today. From dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS! Not a junco in sight. I looked around for predators, but saw none. Now as dusk approaches... still not a bird at my feeders. Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?


I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts https://vtecostudies.org/blog/... EVERYONE, reported low numbers of chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall... and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very disconcerting to me.




Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 16:25 pm
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
I've had some temporary health issues that have prevented me from
maintaining a feeder this winter, but I have seen a small number of
chickadees around here and there from time to time.

And I've had three gorgeous male bluebirds hanging around in the tree
branches just outside the window of my office for the last week. I
usually have bluebirds make random appearances over the winter, but
these guys have been here every day for a week, which is definitely not
the usual. They busy themselves darting down to the snow-covered ground
and back up again, but I can't imagine what they're finding there to eat.

Jane
Shoreham


On 2/15/2018 5:08 PM, Ruth wrote:
> Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today. From dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS! Not a junco in sight. I looked around for predators, but saw none. Now as dusk approaches... still not a bird at my feeders. Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?
>
>
> I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts https://vtecostudies.org/blog/... EVERYONE, reported low numbers of chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall... and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very disconcerting to me.
>
>
>
>
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT
>



Subject: NO BIRDS! and chickadees
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 16:08 pm
From: birder_rws AT outlook.com
 
Unbelievably, I have seen NO birds at my feeders or suet today.  From dawn till I left the house at 9 a.m. - NO BIRDS!  Not a junco in sight. I looked around for predators, but saw none.  Now as dusk approaches... still not a bird at my feeders.  Is this happening any were else today - Thurs.?


I have just read the summary report of this year's CBirdCounts https://vtecostudies.org/blog/... EVERYONE, reported low numbers of chickadees. This goes along with fewer birds at feeders during the fall... and who knows what the GBBC will turn up. Has anyone speculated what has happened to the chickadees? Die off? moved south? hiding? This is very disconcerting to me.




Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT



Subject: N. Goshawk
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 12:24 pm
From: blackpoll AT charter.net
 
Good morning as first a Sharp-shinned Hawk came through the front lawn area
and a few hours later an adult Northern Goshawk perched outside but flew off
when he saw me set up to photograph him.







The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing.



Tom Berriman

802-626-9071




https://www.flickr.com/photos/...



Subject: Great Backyard Bird Count - February 16-19
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 12:12 pm
From: 00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
The Great Backyard Bird Count starts tomorrow, February 16 and runs through the 19th. If you haven't participated in citizen science, this is a great introduction. It's also a good project for families and kids. Participate for as little as 15 minutes for any or all of the four days. It's easy!http://gbbc.birdcount.org/?utm...
Sue Elliott



Subject: Spring?
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 8:56 am
From: lizl AT gmavt.net
 
Carolina wren heard singing "tea kettle" this AM, for the first time this season.
Liz




Sent from Samsung tablet



Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 13 Feb 2018 to 14 Feb 2018 (#2018-43) reasons for plumage coloration differences in snowies
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 7:07 am
From: elgeorge46 AT gmail.com
 
I suspect that the plumage differences are related to breeding behavior.   Female snowies do most or all of the incubating and chick brooding, so they are on the nest on the open tundra, and some dark patterns on their feathers may help to camouflage them.   Male snowies are the defenders of the territory, and "want" to be seen by other snowies and potential intruders, so being bright white aids this purpose.  Sexual plumage differences might also help the owls identify each other from a distance.

Ellie George,
Paradox, NY

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of VTBIRD automatic digest system
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 12:00 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 13 Feb 2018 to 14 Feb 2018 (#2018-43)

There is 1 message totaling 54 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. VTBIRD Digest - 12 Feb 2018 to 13 Feb 2018 (#2018-42)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 14 Feb 2018 12:49:56 -0500
From: Ian Miyashiro
Subject: Re: VTBIRD Digest - 12 Feb 2018 to 13 Feb 2018 (#2018-42)

Most male Snowys phase out most of the black when they reach maturity around five years. The females and immature birds use the black for camouflage against the rocks, ice, and snow of the tundra, the male's white feathers assist in camouflage against the sky.



*Ian T. Miyashiro*
[email protected]
415-297-5677

If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the big problems in the world.
-Thomas Lovejoy

On Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system < [email protected]> wrote:

> There is 1 message totaling 11 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Snowy in Bridport
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2018 15:24:05 -0500
> From: Jean Arrowsmith
> Subject: Snowy in Bridport
>
> The SNOW was seen Tuesday morning fr0m Basin Harbor Rd. north of the
> intersection with Crown Point Road, on the west side of the road, on a
> fence post in a swale. This is a white bird, and my question is why
> the immature have dark feathering? I know that black feathers are
> stronger, but cant make the next step. The dark feathers make the
> bird more conspicuous against snow.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 12 Feb 2018 to 13 Feb 2018 (#2018-42)
> ************************************************************
>

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 13 Feb 2018 to 14 Feb 2018 (#2018-43)
************************************************************



Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 12 Feb 2018 to 13 Feb 2018 (#2018-42)
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 11:50 am
From: imiyashiro AT gmail.com
 
Most male Snowys phase out most of the black when they reach maturity
around five years. The females and immature birds use the black for
camouflage against the rocks, ice, and snow of the tundra, the male's white
feathers assist in camouflage against the sky.



*Ian T. Miyashiro*
[email protected]
415-297-5677

If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the big problems
in the world.
-Thomas Lovejoy

On Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <
[email protected]> wrote:

> There is 1 message totaling 11 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Snowy in Bridport
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 13 Feb 2018 15:24:05 -0500
> From: Jean Arrowsmith
> Subject: Snowy in Bridport
>
> The SNOW was seen Tuesday morning fr0m Basin Harbor Rd. north of the
> intersection with Crown Point Road, on the west side of the road, on a
> fence post in a swale. This is a white bird, and my question is why the
> immature have dark feathering? I know that black feathers are stronger,
> but cant make the next step. The dark feathers make the bird more
> conspicuous against snow.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 12 Feb 2018 to 13 Feb 2018 (#2018-42)
> ************************************************************
>



Subject: Snowy in Bridport
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 14:24 pm
From: jeanbird AT gmavt.net
 
The SNOW was seen Tuesday morning fr0m Basin Harbor Rd.  north of the intersection with Crown Point Road, on the west side of the road, on a fence post in a swale.  This is a white bird, and my question is why the immature have dark feathering?  I know that black feathers are stronger, but cant make the next step.  The dark feathers make the bird more conspicuous against snow.



Subject: Eastern Towhee in Cornwall - confirmed by I. Worley
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 8:15 am
From: andrea.landsberg AT sbcglobal.net
 
Male adult first seen Jan 17th.  Saw again (assume same bird) 3 times in past week at feeders with Juncos (good for size comparison).  Posted photos on eBird.  Not certain of eye color - will try to determine that if see again.



Subject: Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
Date: Sun Feb 11 2018 19:37 pm
From: copenhvr AT gmail.com
 
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday February 17, 2018 on
the Stephen Young Marsh Trail. Meet at 8:00 AM at the refuge parking lot
on Tabor Rd, about 1 mile south of the refuge Visitor Center. If you have
any questions, email me at [email protected]

The monthly walks gather long-term data on the presence of birds, their
abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather is
entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology. These walks are appropriate for all levels of
birders and provide a wonderful opportunity to learn about birds throughout
the seasons. Led by Ken Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of
Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge board members.

After 94 months of walks we have observed 151 species. Hope to see you
there!


--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/



Subject: Snowy owls and snow buntings in Addison County - Feb. 9
Date: Sat Feb 10 2018 20:57 pm
From: ku AT sover.net
 
A snowy owl was seen preening Friday around 4:30 p.m. on a farm fencepost at the corner of Rt. 17 and Jersey St. in Addison until a raven flew in and sent the snowy flying west out of sight behind farm structures. A small flock of snow buntings was also on the ground there. A short distance along Jersey St. and the same or another snowy was on the ground not far off the road. It took off and glided only inches above the snow to another location on the ground. Beautiful to see!

Then, in Bridport around 5:00 p.m., another snowy owl was perched on a fence post on the west side of Basin Harbor Rd., a little north of Middle Rd. It dropped down to the ground and back up to the post twice, possibly seeking prey, though we couldn't see if it got anything. It then flew to another few posts further away from the road until out of view.

Karen Uhlendorf
Hyde Park, VT



Subject: Harlequin, Barrow's, Longspurs
Date: Sat Feb 10 2018 13:09 pm
From: smorrica AT uvm.edu
 
Hello:
Ted Murin and I birded Charlotte Town Beach and Little Chicago Road (Ferrisburgh) this morning. Highlights at CTB: Harlequin Duck (male only), Barrow's Goldeneye (female), Gadwall, Bald Eagle. Highlights at LCR: at least 5 Lapland Longspurs in mixed flocks of ~200 Snow Buntings and Horned Larks.
Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Snowy owl just found at Springfield reservoir. Sitting on edge of outflow. Can be seen from bridge that leads to dam
Date: Sat Feb 10 2018 7:29 am
From: mfoster AT vermontel.net
 
Sent from my iPhone
Breezyhillturning.com



Subject: Addison Co. Birding
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 20:23 pm
From: kencox5 AT gmail.com
 
Great day birding Addison Co. today.  Don Clark, Martha Adams and I located
9 snowy owls and 10 rough-legged Hawks. Also, many snow buntings, horned
larks and a few lapland longspurs. Details will posted on eBird tomorrow
morning.

--
Kenneth Cox
South Reading, VT
http://northernwingsbirder.blo...



Subject: Hermit Thrush - Bomoseen State Park, Feb 9, 2018
Date: Fri Feb 9 2018 15:50 pm
From: 00000032e9152660-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
A Hermit Thrush, accompanied by White-throated Sparrows, was feasting on sumac at Bomoseen State Park this morning.

Bomoseen State Park, Rutland, Vermont, US
Feb 9, 2018 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.826 mile(s)
12 species

Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 4
American Crow 4
Common Raven 1
Black-capped Chickadee 3
Tufted Titmouse 2
Hermit Thrush 1 photo
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 5
White-throated Sparrow 6
Northern Cardinal 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Sue and Marv Elliott



Subject: Four eagles near probable carcass and seven snowy owls in Bridport
Date: Thu Feb 8 2018 20:07 pm
From: elgeorge46 AT gmail.com
 
On S. Jersey St. in Addison, behind a hog and cow farm on the E side of the
road just north of Country Club Rd., were at least 4 bald eagles, a red
tailed hawk, and numerous ravens and crows. I could not see the carcass
they must have been feeding on, but there was constant movement of raptors
to and from an area behind a concrete bunker. In a tree near the road, a
mature bald eagle, a juvenile bald eagle, and a mature red tailed hawk were
all perched together, until a third eagle flew in and scared off the red
tail.



In Bridport, 7 snowy owls were located between 4:00 and 5:30 PM. A dark
owl on a utility pole and a light owl on the roof of a new house were found
on Rattlin Bridge Rd. A light owl was perched on top of an older type
windmill, right on the top blade, on the NE corner of Rt. 125 and Basin
Harbor Rd. Three owls were found on Middle Rd., one E of Basin Harbor Rd.
far out on a fence post, one on top of the silo at the farm on the NW corner
of Middle Rd. and Basin Harbor Rd., and one on a utility pole on the S side
of Middle Rd. a third of a mile W of Basin Harbor Rd. The seventh owl was
found on top of a utility pole on the E side of Rt. 125 near Goose Bay Dr.



If you go to look for snowy owls, make sure you are searching from 4 PM
until dark, because that is when most owls leave their daytime roosts, which
are often on the ground, sometimes in tall grass where they are hard to
spot, and fly up onto poles, posts, buildings, and other higher structures
to get a better vantage point for hunting. Also, you are more likely to
see owls flying around at this time, pursuing prey, changing hunting
perches, or interacting with other raptors. I think there are at least a
dozen snowy owls in the Addison/Bridport/Shoreham area, and probably more.



Ellie George,

Paradox, NY



Subject: Snowy Owl in Charlotte
Date: Thu Feb 8 2018 17:24 pm
From: 00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
At dusk today I happened upon still another Snowy Owl. This one was located on Lake Road in Charlotte not far from Greenbush Road. The owl was perched on a telephone pole near one of the farms and the adjacent fields.


Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington



Subject: Short-eared Owls, Gage Road
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 21:10 pm
From: birder_rws AT outlook.com
 
Great footage, Mike, of the Short-eared in flight. Loved seeing the under and upper wing markings.. to say nothing of that distinctive face.  Thanks for sharing.


Can someone explain to me why I did not get that VTBIRD posting from Mike, yet I got Ali's with his attached???? I think I miss many VTBIRD postings.


Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds on behalf of Alison Wagner
Sent: Wednesday, February 7, 2018 11:53 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Short-eared Owls, Gage Road

SEOWers,

Ron Payne, Ian Worley and I watched three short-eared owls yesterday from
5:09 until too-dark. 2 were west & south of dilapidated barns and the third
was in the field south of Gage Road. Good optics gave satisfying looks in
dim light and I enjoyed seeing faces while they flowed along on air. We
also saw a Snowy close to the Goose Viewing area and heard a Great Horned.
A nice trio of owl species!

Enjoy!

Ali

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Sargent
Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 11:42 AM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Short-eared Owls, Crows - Video

The South Burlington crows have been active lately. On Saturday afternoon
they congregated behind the forestry lab on the UVM cross country course,
before taking off in a steady stream toward the lake. On Monday at dusk,
there were many hundreds in the trees just north of the correctional
facility on Farrell Street. For an interesting and opinionated discussion
about the origins and usage of the term "murder", check out the Audubon Web
site at: http://www.audubon.org/news/no...
[http://cdn.audubon.org/cdn/far...

No, Its Not Actually a Murder of Crows | Audubon
www.audubon.org
Youve heard them all before, somewhere. In a bad poem, maybe, or as part of an online clickbait-y slideshow. Did you know that a group of owls is called a ...




I've also posted a video clip of short-eared owls, from the Dead Creek WMA
and the Parker River NWR on Plum Island. The Gage Road group tend to come
out 10 minutes after sunset, so there's not much time to see them before it
gets dark. In December, after 3 days of dawn and dusk searching all over
Plum Island, I saw an owl that happily showed up about a half-hour before
sunset. Not surprisingly, there were several northern harriers in the
vicinity. And of course there were several snowy owls, just like everywhere
else in northern New England.

The video clips, along with various other ones, are at:

http://vimeo.com/sfmornay
[https://i.vimeocdn.com/portrai...

SF Mornay
vimeo.com
SF Mornay is a member of Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.



Subject: raven flock
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 19:03 pm
From: lackeytomliz AT pwshift.com
 
On Sunday, in Stowe, I watched and counted 35 ravens fly overhead in a loosely organized group.  I wondered what they had been feeding on as they had a lot to talk about.

Typically I see this behavior when I xc ski on the other side of the valley at Trapps Outdoor Center. The onsite composting attracts quite a number of ravens as well as other species.

Liz Lackey

> On Feb 7, 2018, at 6:52 PM, anneboby <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> In early June the feast must have been yummy...Yuk!
>
> Bob Yunick
> Schenectady, NY
>
>
>
> New Mail
> 865
>
>
> Old Mail
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ian Worley
> To: VTBIRD
> Sent: Wed, Feb 7, 2018 4:41 pm
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] raven flock
>
> A couple of years ago a nearby barn fire killed a number of cows and
> heifers. As part of the clean up, manure and carcasses were piled in a
> long row in a field to compost, as is the practice. Ravens assembled and
> fed there for several weeks, often in the 20s and 30s in number. 39 at
> a time was my highest count. This was in early June.
>
> Ian Worley
>
> Cornwall
>
> ==================================================================================>
>
> On 2/7/2018 3:02 PM, Donald Clark wrote:
>> Interesting. Ken Cox & I had 21 on a carcass in Chester on saturday.
>>
>> Don
>>
>>> On Feb 7, 2018, at 2:31 PM, Kent McFarland wrote:
>>>
>>> Kyle Jones alerted me to a deer carcass in a field on the south end of
>>> Prosper Road in Woodstock with a bunch of ravens on it. He wasn't able to
>>> get a good count at the time, so I visited it. They were shy and flew up
>>> upon approach by car, but Liza Morse and I were able to get a good count.
>>> There were 27 of them! Not sure I have ever had that many at one spot like
>>> that. Check out the images on our Vermont eBird checklist at
>>> https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec... It was quite a spectacle in
>>> the snow storm!
>>>
>>> Kent
>>> ____________________________
>>>
>>> Kent McFarland
>>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>>> 802.649.1431 x201
>>>
>>>



Subject: raven flock
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 17:53 pm
From: 00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
In early June the feast must have been yummy...Yuk!

Bob Yunick
Schenectady, NY



New Mail
865


Old Mail





-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Worley
To: VTBIRD
Sent: Wed, Feb 7, 2018 4:41 pm
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] raven flock

A couple of years ago a nearby barn fire killed a number of cows and
heifers. As part of the clean up, manure and carcasses were piled in a
long row in a field to compost, as is the practice. Ravens assembled and
fed there for several weeks, often in the 20s and 30s in number. 39 at
a time was my highest count. This was in early June.

Ian Worley

Cornwall

==================================================================================

On 2/7/2018 3:02 PM, Donald Clark wrote:
> Interesting. Ken Cox & I had 21 on a carcass in Chester on saturday.
>
> Don
>
>> On Feb 7, 2018, at 2:31 PM, Kent McFarland wrote:
>>
>> Kyle Jones alerted me to a deer carcass in a field on the south end of
>> Prosper Road in Woodstock with a bunch of ravens on it. He wasn't able to
>> get a good count at the time, so I visited it. They were shy and flew up
>> upon approach by car, but Liza Morse and I were able to get a good count.
>> There were 27 of them! Not sure I have ever had that many at one spot like
>> that. Check out the images on our Vermont eBird checklist at
>> https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec... It was quite a spectacle in
>> the snow storm!
>>
>> Kent
>> ____________________________
>>
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x201
>>
>>



Subject: raven flock
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 15:41 pm
From: iworley AT uvm.edu
 
A couple of years ago a nearby barn fire killed a number of cows and
heifers. As part of the clean up, manure and carcasses were piled in a
long row in a field to compost, as is the practice. Ravens assembled and
fed there for several weeks, often in the 20s and 30s in number. 39 at
a time was my highest count. This was in early June.

Ian Worley

Cornwall

==================================================================================

On 2/7/2018 3:02 PM, Donald Clark wrote:
> Interesting. Ken Cox & I had 21 on a carcass in Chester on saturday.
>
> Don
>
>> On Feb 7, 2018, at 2:31 PM, Kent McFarland wrote:
>>
>> Kyle Jones alerted me to a deer carcass in a field on the south end of
>> Prosper Road in Woodstock with a bunch of ravens on it. He wasn't able to
>> get a good count at the time, so I visited it. They were shy and flew up
>> upon approach by car, but Liza Morse and I were able to get a good count.
>> There were 27 of them! Not sure I have ever had that many at one spot like
>> that. Check out the images on our Vermont eBird checklist at
>> https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec... It was quite a spectacle in
>> the snow storm!
>>
>> Kent
>> ____________________________
>>
>> Kent McFarland
>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>> 802.649.1431 x201
>>
>>



Subject: raven flock
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 15:35 pm
From: htbreder AT gmail.com
 
Great photos. Your report reminds me of Bernd Heinrich's wonderful book The
Mind of the Raven wherein he describes attracting ravens with a cow(?)
carcass.

Hilke Breder
Brattleboro

On Wed, Feb 7, 2018 at 2:31 PM, Kent McFarland
wrote:

> Kyle Jones alerted me to a deer carcass in a field on the south end of
> Prosper Road in Woodstock with a bunch of ravens on it. He wasn't able to
> get a good count at the time, so I visited it. They were shy and flew up
> upon approach by car, but Liza Morse and I were able to get a good count.
> There were 27 of them! Not sure I have ever had that many at one spot like
> that. Check out the images on our Vermont eBird checklist at
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec... It was quite a spectacle in
> the snow storm!
>
> Kent
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
>
>
>



Subject: raven flock
Date: Wed Feb 7 2018 14:02 pm
From: sapsbks AT gmail.com
 
Interesting. Ken Cox & I had 21 on a carcass in Chester on saturday.

Don

> On Feb 7, 2018, at 2:31 PM, Kent McFarland wrote:
>
> Kyle Jones alerted me to a deer carcass in a field on the south end of
> Prosper Road in Woodstock with a bunch of ravens on it. He wasn't able to
> get a good count at the time, so I visited it. They were shy and flew up
> upon approach by car, but Liza Morse and I were able to get a good count.
> There were 27 of them! Not sure I have ever had that many at one spot like
> that. Check out the images on our Vermont eBird checklist at
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec... It was quite a spectacle in
> the snow storm!
>
> Kent
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
>
>



Contact us.

  • 93 Clinton Street Suite ABA
  • Delaware City, DE 19706
  • Toll Free: (800) 850-2473
  • Phone: (302) 838-3660
  • Fax: (302) 838-3651

How to join or post to a listserv >>