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Updated on June 20, 2018, 5:30 pm

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20 Jun: @ 17:24:15 
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck [b flewelling]
18 Jun: @ 12:36:09 
Re: Anyone seen whistling ducks? [Keri Charles]
18 Jun: @ 12:33:21 
Re: Anyone seen whistling ducks? [Steven Lamonde]
18 Jun: @ 05:45:09 
No Subject [Claudia P. Casey]
16 Jun: @ 18:38:06 
Bald eagle [Charlie Teske]
15 Jun: @ 21:53:05 
Mansfield photos [Chris Rimmer]
15 Jun: @ 21:44:40 
Re: NO JPEGS? [Marv Elliott]
15 Jun: @ 19:11:41 
NO JPEGS? [edgreen3]
14 Jun: @ 14:32:38 
Re: Woodpecker activity [Jane Stein]
14 Jun: @ 14:18:24 
Re: Moose Bog & Victory Boreal Species [Veer Frost]
14 Jun: @ 14:00:12 
Re: Woodpecker activity [Veer Frost]
14 Jun: @ 10:46:47 
Pileated wp baby update [carolclyde]
14 Jun: @ 00:55:12 
Re: Woodpecker activity [Jane Stein]
14 Jun: @ 00:12:07 
Woodpecker activity [CLYDE YARNELL]
13 Jun: @ 21:09:06 
Re: Moose Bog & Victory Boreal Species [Nancy Goodrich]
13 Jun: @ 19:17:57 
Moose Bog & Victory Boreal Species [tfberriman]
13 Jun: @ 14:14:23 
Birds of Ecuador program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, June 14 [E Talmage]
13 Jun: @ 13:20:01 
Re: Surprises on Mansfield [Scott Morrical]
13 Jun: @ 12:21:26 
Re: Surprises on Mansfield [Veer Frost]
13 Jun: @ 12:04:24 
Surprises on Mansfield [Chris Rimmer]
12 Jun: @ 23:11:14 
Common nighthawk [Sarah Fellows]
12 Jun: @ 15:11:22 
Black-bellied whistling-ducks [Jennifer Megyesi]
12 Jun: @ 14:53:16 
Black-bellied whistling-ducks [Jennifer Megyesi]
12 Jun: @ 11:07:47 
Whistling Duck still present yesterday afternoon. [Ian Worley]
12 Jun: @ 00:18:50 
Re: Pileated wp babies [Jane Stein]
12 Jun: @ 00:04:20 
Pileated wp babies [carolclyde]
11 Jun: @ 09:55:40 
Whistling Ducks [alison wagner]
11 Jun: @ 02:41:50 
Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk [Ken Copenhaver]
11 Jun: @ 00:41:50 
Whistling Ducks still present 2-4pm today [Jeannie Elias]
10 Jun: @ 16:15:22 
Mansfield update, better late than never [Chris Rimmer]
10 Jun: @ 15:47:57 
Black bellied whistling ducks still there [Graham Bates]
10 Jun: @ 01:19:14 
Re: Bb Whistling Ducks being seen?? [Bruce MacPherson]
10 Jun: @ 00:17:26 
Re: Bb Whistling Ducks being seen?? [Jane Stein]
10 Jun: @ 00:10:54 
Re: Bb Whistling Ducks being seen?? [Coleen Lawlor]
09 Jun: @ 20:08:48 
Re: whistling-ducks video / bobolinks [Jane Stein]
09 Jun: @ 18:50:24 
Hawk Hill Trails, Jun 9, 2018 [SUE WETMORE]
09 Jun: @ 15:17:24 
Olive-sided flycatcher, Colchester [Jon]
09 Jun: @ 15:14:53 
Bb Whistling Ducks being seen?? [Kaye Danforth]
09 Jun: @ 15:09:42 
No Whistling Ducks [Becky Giroux]
08 Jun: @ 23:16:48 
Re: whistling-ducks video / bobolinks [Jane Stein]
08 Jun: @ 20:24:35 
whistling-ducks video / bobolinks [Mike Sargent]
08 Jun: @ 19:00:07 
Re: Whistling Ducks present [JO jo]
08 Jun: @ 18:13:41 
Clay-colored sparrow [Sue]
08 Jun: @ 16:33:24 
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks Still Present [Isis Erb]
08 Jun: @ 01:35:31 
Re: Whistling Ducks present [Josh Phillips]
08 Jun: @ 00:22:36 
Golden-winged Warbler update [LaBarr, Mark]
07 Jun: @ 23:50:32 
Fwd: eBird Report - Richville Pond, Jun 7, 2018 [Roy Pilcher]
07 Jun: @ 21:58:03 
Whistling Ducks present [Zacheriah Cota-Weaver]
06 Jun: @ 22:03:41 
Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Richville Pond, Shoreham Depot Rd, Shoreham [Barbara Brosnan]
06 Jun: @ 21:17:42 
Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Richville Pond, Shoreham Depot Rd, Shoreham [B Bobolinks]





Subject: Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
Date: Wed Jun 20 2018 17:24 pm
From: bflewelling3263 AT comcast.net
 
The pair of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were still at Richville when I left at 11:15 this morning. In their present location, they can be seen from the Shoreham Depot road bridge, but not from the RR bridge. They seemed undisturbed when I quietly paddled my kayak past them, allowing me to get a decent picture with my little point and shoot Kodak.


Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester



Subject: Anyone seen whistling ducks?
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 12:36 pm
From: kericharles AT gmail.com
 
Coleen,

I started to reply saying that there was an eBird report saying they were seen Sunday 6/17 at noon, but I just noticed that that eBird report was yours! Happy you got to see them. :)

Keri
Norwich VT



Subject: Anyone seen whistling ducks?
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 12:33 pm
From: slamonde AT antioch.edu
 
Hi Coleen,

The pair was still present on Saturday morning when I visited. They were
resting on the north side of the river, east of the covered bridge.

-Steven

On Sun, Jun 17, 2018 at 7:54 AM, lawlor wrote:

> Thank you
> Coleen
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>



--
Steven Lamonde
Conservation Biology (MS) student
Department of Environmental Studies
Antioch University New England
Keene, New Hampshire
[email protected]
(339) 236-1421



Subject:
Date: Mon Jun 18 2018 5:45 am
From: 00000366628af127-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
http://fullfill.bostonweddings...raphy
Claudia P. Casey



Subject: Bald eagle
Date: Sat Jun 16 2018 18:38 pm
From: cteske140 AT myfairpoint.net
 
Added bald eagle (adult) to my back yard list in Hyde Park today.  Sailed off in the direction of Green River Reservoir  Anyone
know of sightings there?



Subject: Mansfield photos
Date: Fri Jun 15 2018 21:53 pm
From: crimmer AT vtecostudies.org
 
To view a few of Chuck Gangas's great photos from VCE's Mansfield outing
earlier this week, see our blog post:
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/...

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/



Subject: NO JPEGS?
Date: Fri Jun 15 2018 21:44 pm
From: 0000000de58b8aa5-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
No photos will post but you can post them elsewhere on a website and post a link on VTBird
Marv Elliott

> On Jun 15, 2018, at 3:11 PM, edgreen3 wrote:
>
>
> I just had an email rejected because I attached a photo. Is this new?
>
>
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



Subject: NO JPEGS?
Date: Fri Jun 15 2018 19:11 pm
From: edgreen3 AT comcast.net
 
I just had an email rejected because I attached a photo. Is this new?


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



Subject: Woodpecker activity
Date: Thu Jun 14 2018 14:32 pm
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
Veer, I take your point, but chickadees are notoriously friendly birds,
maybe because they're so small and swift. I've had them take seed out
of my hand in a nature preserve in Mass., and they've nearly landed on
my head when I refill the feeders in winter here. When I futilely
attempt to shoo away a crowd of grackles or RW Blackbirds, all the birds
anywhere near the feeders vamoose, and the "deplorables" are the first
ones back.

So I do find Carol's wonderful description odd. Good for her, and good
for you. It's just never worked that way for me with anything other
than the fearless little chickadees. (Who maybe shouldn't be quite so
fearless, given their very large clutches of up to a dozen and the fact
that we're still not overrun with them!)

Jane
(Shoreham)

On 6/14/2018 10:00 AM, Veer Frost wrote:
> Not really strange, the woodpeckers and small feeder birds here have
> picked up that I only clap at/chase Blue Jays and chipmunks (e.g.) and
> indeed chickadees wait right on the railing until I've done the job
> that lets them get a seed or bite of suet. The pecking order, as noted
> by Carol below, remains in place but for the bully/hogs. (They get
> their share when no one's on duty : ) )Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
>
> On June 13, 2018 at 8:55 PM, "Jane Stein" wrote:How strange. The
> grackels were afraid of you, but the other birds weren't.
> On 6/13/2018 8:11 PM, CLYDE YARNELL wrote:
>> Kept our suet feeder down most of the day because the grackles have
> taken it over and can clean it out within 5 minutes. Around dinner
> time we put it out because we heard the red bellied wp in the trees.
> As soon as the red bellied landed on the feeder, the grackle would fly
> in and peck at it and chase it away. So while I was cooking dinner, my
> husband sat about 10 feet away from the feeder. When this happened,
> the red bellied came back and fed several times and took beaks of suet
> away to feed its young. After dinner I took up guard ten feet from the
> feeder from about 6:30 until 8:00pm. There was an almost constant
> stream of downy, hairy and red bellied woodpeckers at the suet. A few
> times a young hairy joined a parent. On several occasions, I observed
> that the hairy chased a downy away, and a red bellied chased the hairy
> off the suet. The downy would just move into a nearby bush until the
> hairy left, then it would fly back to the feeder.
>>
>> I went inside at 8:00 and peered out the window right after I closed
> the door and the grackles were already devouring the suet. They had
> been making noises from the trees the whole time I was on guard, and
> made several fly-bys but never came to the feeder until after I went
> inside.
>>
>> Hope all the baby woodpeckers appreciated my teaming with their
> parents to get them some tasty suet....
>>
>>
>> Carol Yarnell
>> South Alburgh
>>



Subject: Moose Bog & Victory Boreal Species
Date: Thu Jun 14 2018 14:18 pm
From: veer.frost AT hushmail.com
 
Inspiring and a privilege to see these, Tom! Many thanks, (also
dazzled by colors of the shrike in your video a bit farther down),
Veer, Passumpsic NEK

On June 13, 2018 at 5:09 PM, "Nancy Goodrich" wrote:Tom--Thanks so
much for sharing your wonderful shots with those of us
unable to get to these spots; Great views, great birds, and many
thanks!!
Nancy Goodrich

On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 3:17 PM, tfberriman wrote:

>
>
> Met up with a couple birders on the Moose Bog Trail this morning,
one from
> Texas & one from Pennsylvania. We had a 15 minute delay on the trail
while
> a
> male Spruce Grouse took a bath (dust bath) First time I've seen this
and
> didn't know it took so long. I was able to get some video
(digiscoped) as
> well as with a 200-500mm lens ( a little shaky holding the weight).
At
> Victory yesterday a male Black-backed allowed me to film him digging
for a
> beetle (digiscoped). On May 9th Mark Paul found a nest cavity for
Boreal
> Chickadees, We both did some video and I've been keeping an eye on
the
> cavity for 5 weeks. Up until Monday all was fine with "parent"
coming &
> going but in the last 48 hours it's failed or the young were able to
leave
> on their own.hopefully the latter. I have some video of that also
with the
> grouse and woodpecker at:
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>
>
> I've been able to get by with 40% deet on mild days, 98% on bad
days.
>
>
>
>
>
> The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to
do
> nothing.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
> 802-626-9071
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>
>



Subject: Woodpecker activity
Date: Thu Jun 14 2018 14:00 pm
From: veer.frost AT hushmail.com
 
Not really strange, the woodpeckers and small feeder birds here have
picked up that I only clap at/chase Blue Jays and chipmunks (e.g.) and
indeed chickadees wait right on the railing until I've done the job
that lets them get a seed or bite of suet. The pecking order, as noted
by Carol below, remains in place but for the bully/hogs. (They get
their share when no one's on duty : ) )Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK

On June 13, 2018 at 8:55 PM, "Jane Stein" wrote:How strange. The
grackels were afraid of you, but the other birds weren't.
On 6/13/2018 8:11 PM, CLYDE YARNELL wrote:
> Kept our suet feeder down most of the day because the grackles have
taken it over and can clean it out within 5 minutes. Around dinner
time we put it out because we heard the red bellied wp in the trees.
As soon as the red bellied landed on the feeder, the grackle would fly
in and peck at it and chase it away. So while I was cooking dinner, my
husband sat about 10 feet away from the feeder. When this happened,
the red bellied came back and fed several times and took beaks of suet
away to feed its young. After dinner I took up guard ten feet from the
feeder from about 6:30 until 8:00pm. There was an almost constant
stream of downy, hairy and red bellied woodpeckers at the suet. A few
times a young hairy joined a parent. On several occasions, I observed
that the hairy chased a downy away, and a red bellied chased the hairy
off the suet. The downy would just move into a nearby bush until the
hairy left, then it would fly back to the feeder.
>
> I went inside at 8:00 and peered out the window right after I closed
the door and the grackles were already devouring the suet. They had
been making noises from the trees the whole time I was on guard, and
made several fly-bys but never came to the feeder until after I went
inside.
>
> Hope all the baby woodpeckers appreciated my teaming with their
parents to get them some tasty suet....
>
>
> Carol Yarnell
> South Alburgh
>



Subject: Pileated wp baby update
Date: Thu Jun 14 2018 10:46 am
From: carolclyde AT fairpoint.net
 
Looks like one is a male and one is a female based on the red head patterns. The male started callingas he was hanging out of the nest hole this morning. Didn't see any parents arrive for the 15 minutes I watched the nesthole. 6:25-6:40.
Carol YarnellSouth Alburgh
Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



Subject: Woodpecker activity
Date: Thu Jun 14 2018 0:55 am
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
How strange.  The grackels were afraid of you, but the other birds weren't.


On 6/13/2018 8:11 PM, CLYDE YARNELL wrote:
> Kept our suet feeder down most of the day because the grackles have taken it over and can clean it out within 5 minutes. Around dinner time we put it out because we heard the red bellied wp in the trees. As soon as the red bellied landed on the feeder, the grackle would fly in and peck at it and chase it away. So while I was cooking dinner, my husband sat about 10 feet away from the feeder. When this happened, the red bellied came back and fed several times and took beaks of suet away to feed its young. After dinner I took up guard ten feet from the feeder from about 6:30 until 8:00pm. There was an almost constant stream of downy, hairy and red bellied woodpeckers at the suet. A few times a young hairy joined a parent. On several occasions, I observed that the hairy chased a downy away, and a red bellied chased the hairy off the suet. The downy would just move into a nearby bush until the hairy left, then it would fly back to the feeder.
>
> I went inside at 8:00 and peered out the window right after I closed the door and the grackles were already devouring the suet. They had been making noises from the trees the whole time I was on guard, and made several fly-bys but never came to the feeder until after I went inside.
>
> Hope all the baby woodpeckers appreciated my teaming with their parents to get them some tasty suet....
>
>
> Carol Yarnell
> South Alburgh
>



Subject: Woodpecker activity
Date: Thu Jun 14 2018 0:12 am
From: carolclyde AT fairpoint.net
 
Kept our suet feeder down most of the day because the grackles have taken it over and can clean it out within 5 minutes. Around dinner time we put it out because we heard the red bellied wp in the trees. As soon as the red bellied landed on the feeder, the grackle would fly in and peck at it and chase it away. So while I was cooking dinner, my husband sat about 10 feet away from the feeder. When this happened, the red bellied came back and fed several times and took beaks of suet away to feed its young. After dinner I took up guard ten feet from the feeder from about 6:30 until 8:00pm. There was an almost constant stream of downy, hairy and red bellied woodpeckers at the suet. A few times a young hairy joined a parent. On several occasions, I observed that the hairy chased a downy away, and a red bellied chased the hairy off the suet. The downy would just move into a nearby bush until the hairy left, then it would fly back to the feeder. 

I went inside at 8:00 and peered out the window right after I closed the door and the grackles were already devouring the suet. They had been making noises from the trees the whole time I was on guard, and made several fly-bys but never came to the feeder until after I went inside.

Hope all the baby woodpeckers appreciated my teaming with their parents to get them some tasty suet....


Carol Yarnell
South Alburgh



Subject: Moose Bog & Victory Boreal Species
Date: Wed Jun 13 2018 21:09 pm
From: nancyg3219 AT gmail.com
 
Tom--Thanks so much for sharing your wonderful shots with those of us
unable to get to these spots; Great views, great birds, and many thanks!!
Nancy Goodrich

On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 3:17 PM, tfberriman wrote:

>
>
> Met up with a couple birders on the Moose Bog Trail this morning, one from
> Texas & one from Pennsylvania. We had a 15 minute delay on the trail while
> a
> male Spruce Grouse took a bath (dust bath) First time I've seen this and
> didn't know it took so long. I was able to get some video (digiscoped) as
> well as with a 200-500mm lens ( a little shaky holding the weight). At
> Victory yesterday a male Black-backed allowed me to film him digging for a
> beetle (digiscoped). On May 9th Mark Paul found a nest cavity for Boreal
> Chickadees, We both did some video and I've been keeping an eye on the
> cavity for 5 weeks. Up until Monday all was fine with "parent" coming &
> going but in the last 48 hours it's failed or the young were able to leave
> on their own.hopefully the latter. I have some video of that also with the
> grouse and woodpecker at:
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>
>
> I've been able to get by with 40% deet on mild days, 98% on bad days.
>
>
>
>
>
> The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
> nothing.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
> 802-626-9071
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>
>



Subject: Moose Bog & Victory Boreal Species
Date: Wed Jun 13 2018 19:17 pm
From: blackpoll AT charter.net
 
Met up with a couple birders on the Moose Bog Trail this morning, one from
Texas & one from Pennsylvania. We had a 15 minute delay on the trail while a
male Spruce Grouse took a bath (dust bath) First time I've seen this and
didn't know it took so long. I was able to get some video (digiscoped) as
well as with a 200-500mm lens ( a little shaky holding the weight). At
Victory yesterday a male Black-backed allowed me to film him digging for a
beetle (digiscoped). On May 9th Mark Paul found a nest cavity for Boreal
Chickadees, We both did some video and I've been keeping an eye on the
cavity for 5 weeks. Up until Monday all was fine with "parent" coming &
going but in the last 48 hours it's failed or the young were able to leave
on their own.hopefully the latter. I have some video of that also with the
grouse and woodpecker at:



https://www.flickr.com/photos/...



I've been able to get by with 40% deet on mild days, 98% on bad days.





The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing.



Tom Berriman

802-626-9071



https://www.flickr.com/photos/...



Subject: Birds of Ecuador program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, June 14
Date: Wed Jun 13 2018 14:14 pm
From: bovm_erin AT gmavt.net
 
Join us Thursday, June 14, for a program by Hank Kaestner on the Birds of Ecuador.

Hank, an avid birder, will tell us about his latest adventure to Ecuador, and about many of the birds he encountered.
The doors open at 6:30, and the program will start at 7:00.
Refreshments served!

For more information, please see https://www.sevendaysvt.com/ve...

We also have bird walks, carving classes, an art show, and more! See our website for our complete list of events http://www.birdsofvermont.org/...
-
Erin Talmage
-
Executive Director
Birds of Vermont Museum
900 Sherman Hollow Road
Huntington, VT 05462
802-434-2167
www.birdsofvermont.org



Subject: Surprises on Mansfield
Date: Wed Jun 13 2018 13:20 pm
From: smorrica AT uvm.edu
 
Chris,
Congrats on the Philly Vireo, a nice record. Looking forward to photos.
Scott

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 13, 2018, at 8:03 AM, Chris Rimmer wrote:
>
> VCE's third field visit to Mt. Mansfield on Tues-Wed yielded some surprises
> among the 61 birds we captured in our 23 mist nets. Weather was favorable,
> though breeze a bit strong from the SW on Wednesday morning, when activity
> subsided rapidly after ~9:00 am.
>
> Far and away, the most unexpected capture was a Philadelphia Vireo, the
> first we have encountered on Mansfield in 27 years of banding. The bird
> showed no signs of breeding and might be a very late migrant, or just a
> non-breeding wanderer. Very exciting for all to see. As has become
> increasingly the norm, but more often later in the season than this early,
> we captured several species characteristic of northern hardwoods forests.
> We suspect that many or most of these are failed or non-breeders.
>
> The capture of a juvenile White-winged Crossbill with incompletely-grown
> flight feathers was another notable surprise, and strongly suggests that
> the bird was locally hatched. That helps explain our capture of the same
> adult pair in the two previous successive weeks. This was, however, our
> only encounter with crossbills on the ridgeline. A few small flocks of
> siskins were still present, and we captured 3.
>
> Bicknell's Thrush continue to make a good showing, and we have now captured
> 30 individuals so far this season. Still not a single red squirrel has been
> encountered on the mountain, though I was on Okemo Mountain this past
> Sunday and ran into half a dozen up there. It looks like a very light fir
> cone crop emerging this year.
>
> Our 2-day list of mist-netted birds:
>
> Least Flycatcher 1
> Philadelphia Vireo 1 Carefully examined in hand and photographed;
> conspicuous yellowish underparts, small size. Photos to follow. First
> banding record on Mansfield in 27 years.
> Brown Creeper 1 female with beginning brood patch; failed breeder(?)
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1 male
> Bicknell's Thrush 14 6 new, 3 returns (birds from 2015, 2016 and
> 2017), 5 within-season recaptures
> Swainson's Thrush 3 1 return from 2016, 2 from 2017
> American Robin 4 new bandings (1 male, 3 females with full
> incubation/brood patches)
> Black-and-white Warbler 1 male
> Blackpoll Warbler 11 3 new, 5 returns (2 from 2016, 3 from 2017), 3
> within-season recaptures
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 6 3 new, 1 return from 2016, 2
> within-season retraps; 2 females with fully-developed incubation patches
> Black-throated Green Warbler 1 female with regressing brood patch;
> probably a failed breeder
> Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 3
> White-throated Sparrow 8 6 new, 2 within-season recaptures
> Purple Finch 2
> White-winged Crossbill 1 locally-hatched juvenile with stubby tail and
> wings (~2/3 grown)
> Pine Siskin 3 2 juveniles, 1 adult female
>
> We''ll be back up there next week on Tuesday-Wed.
>
> Chris
>
> ________________________
>
> Chris Rimmer
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x202
> http://vtecostudies.org/
>
>



Subject: Surprises on Mansfield
Date: Wed Jun 13 2018 12:21 pm
From: veer.frost AT hushmail.com
 
Hi, I am wondering whether fewer squirrels equals more Bicknells??
Thank you, Chris,Veer Frost, Passumpsic

On June 13, 2018 at 8:04 AM, "Chris Rimmer" wrote:VCE's third field
visit to Mt. Mansfield on Tues-Wed yielded some surprises
among the 61 birds we captured in our 23 mist nets. Weather was
favorable,
though breeze a bit strong from the SW on Wednesday morning, when
activity
subsided rapidly after ~9:00 am.

Far and away, the most unexpected capture was a Philadelphia Vireo,
the
first we have encountered on Mansfield in 27 years of banding. The
bird
showed no signs of breeding and might be a very late migrant, or just
a
non-breeding wanderer. Very exciting for all to see. As has become
increasingly the norm, but more often later in the season than this
early,
we captured several species characteristic of northern hardwoods
forests.
We suspect that many or most of these are failed or non-breeders.

The capture of a juvenile White-winged Crossbill with
incompletely-grown
flight feathers was another notable surprise, and strongly suggests
that
the bird was locally hatched. That helps explain our capture of the
same
adult pair in the two previous successive weeks. This was, however,
our
only encounter with crossbills on the ridgeline. A few small flocks of
siskins were still present, and we captured 3.

Bicknell's Thrush continue to make a good showing, and we have now
captured
30 individuals so far this season. Still not a single red squirrel has
been
encountered on the mountain, though I was on Okemo Mountain this past
Sunday and ran into half a dozen up there. It looks like a very light
fir
cone crop emerging this year.

Our 2-day list of mist-netted birds:

Least Flycatcher 1
Philadelphia Vireo 1 Carefully examined in hand and photographed;
conspicuous yellowish underparts, small size. Photos to follow. First
banding record on Mansfield in 27 years.
Brown Creeper 1 female with beginning brood patch; failed
breeder(?)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1 male
Bicknell's Thrush 14 6 new, 3 returns (birds from 2015, 2016 and
2017), 5 within-season recaptures
Swainson's Thrush 3 1 return from 2016, 2 from 2017
American Robin 4 new bandings (1 male, 3 females with full
incubation/brood patches)
Black-and-white Warbler 1 male
Blackpoll Warbler 11 3 new, 5 returns (2 from 2016, 3 from 2017),
3
within-season recaptures
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 6 3 new, 1 return from 2016, 2
within-season retraps; 2 females with fully-developed incubation
patches
Black-throated Green Warbler 1 female with regressing brood patch;
probably a failed breeder
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 3
White-throated Sparrow 8 6 new, 2 within-season recaptures
Purple Finch 2
White-winged Crossbill 1 locally-hatched juvenile with stubby
tail and
wings (~2/3 grown)
Pine Siskin 3 2 juveniles, 1 adult female

We''ll be back up there next week on Tuesday-Wed.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/



Subject: Surprises on Mansfield
Date: Wed Jun 13 2018 12:04 pm
From: crimmer AT vtecostudies.org
 
VCE's third field visit to Mt. Mansfield on Tues-Wed yielded some surprises
among the 61 birds we captured in our 23 mist nets. Weather was favorable,
though breeze a bit strong from the SW on Wednesday morning, when activity
subsided rapidly after ~9:00 am.

Far and away, the most unexpected capture was a Philadelphia Vireo, the
first we have encountered on Mansfield in 27 years of banding. The bird
showed no signs of breeding and might be a very late migrant, or just a
non-breeding wanderer. Very exciting for all to see. As has become
increasingly the norm, but more often later in the season than this early,
we captured several species characteristic of northern hardwoods forests.
We suspect that many or most of these are failed or non-breeders.

The capture of a juvenile White-winged Crossbill with incompletely-grown
flight feathers was another notable surprise, and strongly suggests that
the bird was locally hatched. That helps explain our capture of the same
adult pair in the two previous successive weeks. This was, however, our
only encounter with crossbills on the ridgeline. A few small flocks of
siskins were still present, and we captured 3.

Bicknell's Thrush continue to make a good showing, and we have now captured
30 individuals so far this season. Still not a single red squirrel has been
encountered on the mountain, though I was on Okemo Mountain this past
Sunday and ran into half a dozen up there. It looks like a very light fir
cone crop emerging this year.

Our 2-day list of mist-netted birds:

Least Flycatcher 1
Philadelphia Vireo 1 Carefully examined in hand and photographed;
conspicuous yellowish underparts, small size. Photos to follow. First
banding record on Mansfield in 27 years.
Brown Creeper 1 female with beginning brood patch; failed breeder(?)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1 male
Bicknell's Thrush 14 6 new, 3 returns (birds from 2015, 2016 and
2017), 5 within-season recaptures
Swainson's Thrush 3 1 return from 2016, 2 from 2017
American Robin 4 new bandings (1 male, 3 females with full
incubation/brood patches)
Black-and-white Warbler 1 male
Blackpoll Warbler 11 3 new, 5 returns (2 from 2016, 3 from 2017), 3
within-season recaptures
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 6 3 new, 1 return from 2016, 2
within-season retraps; 2 females with fully-developed incubation patches
Black-throated Green Warbler 1 female with regressing brood patch;
probably a failed breeder
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 3
White-throated Sparrow 8 6 new, 2 within-season recaptures
Purple Finch 2
White-winged Crossbill 1 locally-hatched juvenile with stubby tail and
wings (~2/3 grown)
Pine Siskin 3 2 juveniles, 1 adult female

We''ll be back up there next week on Tuesday-Wed.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/



Subject: Common nighthawk
Date: Tue Jun 12 2018 23:11 pm
From: towanda2 AT comcast.net
 
Standing in my yard at 1 pm, a nighthawk whizzed by my head and I had great 2 second look as it whipped through into the trees. A yardbird first!!!

Sally fellows
Williston, Vermont



Subject: Black-bellied whistling-ducks
Date: Tue Jun 12 2018 15:11 pm
From: fatroosterfarm AT gmail.com
 
Sorry, richville pond, not richmond. Stupid auto correct



Subject: Black-bellied whistling-ducks
Date: Tue Jun 12 2018 14:53 pm
From: fatroosterfarm AT gmail.com
 
Still present off shoreham depot road,west of trestle bridge, on north side
of little lemon fair/richmond pond adjacent to trail going to covered
bridge. Ag pump is going full bore, ducks are sleeping. Cant see them from
covered bridge right now. Have to locate from trestle bridge, then walk
down path and look into brush about 50-60 met we es west of big rock on
path.



Subject: Whistling Duck still present yesterday afternoon.
Date: Tue Jun 12 2018 11:07 am
From: iworley AT uvm.edu
 
Seen from the water west of the covered bridge, and later well east of
the road bridge. Only person seen during our visit was an old gentleman
fishing for crappies off the road bridge. Lots of other birds,
including a Blue-winged Teal. Also one courageous grackle bothering a
Peregrine Falcon.

https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec...

Ian



Subject: Pileated wp babies
Date: Tue Jun 12 2018 0:18 am
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
Oh, gosh, how wonderful!



On 6/11/2018 8:03 PM, carolclyde wrote:
> Tonight I watched a pileated woodpecker hammering on a cedar in our property for 20 minutes. Then it flew into a tree near its nest and yelled for about a minute. By the time I went inside to get my binoculars the bird had disappeared. About a half minute after I was watching the nest hole, it flew out of the hole and two babies stuck their heads out and started opening and closing their beaks. All of a sudden they both looked up as two crows flew in, higher up in the same dead tree. The babies quickly ducked back inside the nest hole. They poked their heads out again when the crows flew away. The flickers nesting in the same tree came along calling and the pileated babies disappeared inside the nest hole again. I waited about five more minutes but they didn't reappear in that time so I headed back to the house.
> Cool having flicker and pileated babies in the same tree!
> Carol YarnellSouth Alburgh
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>



Subject: Pileated wp babies
Date: Tue Jun 12 2018 0:04 am
From: carolclyde AT fairpoint.net
 
Tonight I watched a pileated woodpecker hammering on a cedar in our property for 20 minutes. Then it flew into a tree near its nest and yelled for about a minute. By the time I went inside to get my binoculars the bird had disappeared. About a half minute after I was watching the nest hole, it flew out of the hole and two babies stuck their heads out and started opening and closing their beaks. All of a sudden they both looked up as two crows flew in, higher up in the same dead tree. The babies quickly ducked back inside the nest hole. They poked their heads out again when the crows flew away. The flickers nesting in the same tree came along calling and the pileated babies disappeared inside the nest hole again. I waited about five more minutes but they didn't reappear in that time so I headed back to the house.
Cool having flicker and pileated babies in the same tree!
Carol YarnellSouth Alburgh
Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



Subject: Whistling Ducks
Date: Mon Jun 11 2018 9:55 am
From: alikatofvt AT gmavt.net
 
Birders of a Feather who have flocked to Richville.....

Glad to see so many birders are enjoying these unusual guests in VT. I was inspired to make a contribution to The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Conservation of Species and Habitat Conservation fund. It was easy (and painless) to do.

Ali
Huntington



Subject: Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
Date: Mon Jun 11 2018 2:41 am
From: copenhvr AT gmail.com
 
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday June16, 2018 on the
Old Railroad Passage Trail. Meet at 8:00 AM at the refuge parking lot on
Tabor Rd, about 1 mile south of the refuge Visitor Center. If you have any
questions, email me at [email protected]

The monthly walks gather long-term data on the presence of birds, their
abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather will be
entered into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. These walks
are appropriate for all levels of birders and provide a wonderful
opportunity to learn about birds throughout the seasons. Led by Ken
Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife
Refuge board members.

After 98 months of walks we have observed 152 species. (In May we added an
Orchard Oriole to the list.) Hope to see you there!


--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit:
http://friendsofmissisquoi.org...



Subject: Whistling Ducks still present 2-4pm today
Date: Mon Jun 11 2018 0:41 am
From: moosewoman AT gmavt.net
 
A handful of Birders observed the pair of Black Bellied Whistling Ducks this afternoon from 2PM - 4PM, thanks to the keen eyes of Team G&B from Poultney. The Ducks were first observed from the iron bridge on Shoreham Depot Road. If one looks west toward the Wooden Covered Railroad Bridge from the Iron Bridge on Shoreham Depot Rd., the Ducks were along the right bank, which is actually the NORTH bank of the Lemon Fair River between the iron and covered bridges, maybe 50 yards away  (east) from the Covered Bridge. They were on the same side as the log where they were originally seen.
They are also visible from the left or south bank of the Lemon Fair River, accessible after crossing the CoveredRailroad bridge and descending to the left, heading back east, down a small trail about ten yards, then looking across the water.

Jeannie Elias
Happy Birding.

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



Subject: Mansfield update, better late than never
Date: Sun Jun 10 2018 16:15 pm
From: crimmer AT vtecostudies.org
 
Although "old news" now, VCE's second field 2018 visit to Mt. Mansfield
took place last Wednesday-Thursday. We set 25 mist nets on the ridgeline
during early evening under calm, cool and partly cloudy conditions. We
immediately started catching birds and had 18 by nightfall, when we closed
our nets. The dusk chorus was robust, and several Bicknell's Thrushes
(BITH) performed their signature flight songs as complete darkness fell.
Nine of the 18 birds we captured were BITH.

Clouds moved in and lowered overnight, with temps dipping into the mid-40s
F, though the wind thankfully stayed calm. Conditions for banding were
chilly and our nets wet, but we managed to have a solid morning, with
several small groups of White-winged Crossbills and Pine Siskins moving
around the ridgeline. Again, not a single Winter Wren was heard, a most
conspicuous absence. As last week, Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Purple Finches
were singing in above-average numbers, and I have never heard as many as
the 5 Am. Robins that were singing within striking distance of the
uppermost parking lot. After last fall's bountiful balsam fir cone crop, it
was truly surprising not to encounter hide nor hair of a red squirrel on
the ridgeline.

Our two-day banding total of 77 birds:

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 1
Bicknell's Thrush 21 6 new, 11 returns from previous years (1 banded
in each of 2011-2013, 4 from 2016, 4 from 2017), 4 within-season retraps
Swainson's Thrush 6 4 new, 2 returns from previous years (2015 and
2017)
American Robin 1
Blackpoll Warbler 7 5 new, 2 returns from 2016
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 4
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 8 7 new, 1 return from 2017)
White-throated Sparrow 15 13 new, 1 banded in 2017, 1 within-season
retrap)
Purple Finch 4 3 males and 1 female with fully-developed brood patch
White-winged Crossbill 3 1 new female + retrap of pair banded last
week on 31 May
Pine Siskin 7 4 free-flying juveniles, 3 adults

None of the long-distance migrants showed evidence of active nesting (i.e.,
no incubation patches), while robins, juncos, W-t Sparrows and PUFIs are
all on eggs, if not tending young nestlings. Both the female crossbills and
siskins showed regressing brood patches, indicating that they had nested at
least a couple of weeks ago, if not earlier.

We'll be back up there on Mon-Tues this week and will try to post a more
timely update.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/



Subject: Black bellied whistling ducks still there
Date: Sun Jun 10 2018 15:47 pm
From: batesg AT gmail.com
 
Just left Richville dam in shoreham at 11am, the black bellied whistling ducks are still there. Thanks to my dad Fred's eagle eyes we got great looks from the iron bridge (with a scope) not sure they would have been visible from the covered bridge as they were tucked pretty close in to the shore on the west bank. Life bird dance for both of us!

Graham

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Bb Whistling Ducks being seen??
Date: Sun Jun 10 2018 1:19 am
From: 00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
I saw them at 5:30 PM today. The ducks were perched on the usual log halfway between the bridge across Shoreham Depot road and the  covered bridge.

Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 9, 2018, at 11:14 AM, Kaye Danforth wrote:
>
> Has anyone seen the Shoreham ducks today? My brother arrived from Conn. this morning to find a farmer using an irrigation pump near the bridge. Alas, no ducks.
> Anyone??
>
> Kaye from Hinesburg



Subject: Bb Whistling Ducks being seen??
Date: Sun Jun 10 2018 0:17 am
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
Did anybody tell these people's bosses or controlling authority that
there were incredibly rare birds hanging out there?

Jane
(Shoreham)

On 6/9/2018 8:10 PM, Coleen Lawlor wrote:
> No whistling ducks at 12:30 pump still running.
>
> Coleen Lawlor, LICSW
> Certified EMDR Therapist
> 23 School Street
> P.O. Box 162
> Chester, Vermont 05143
> 1-802-289-3107
>
> Important: Email is not a secure from of communication. Please call me if
> you have concern about privacy.
> My business hours are 8 am - 6 pm Monday- Thursday and 8 am - 3 pm most
> Fridays. My phone is turned off outside these hours and emails may also
> remain unchecked. If your situation is urgent please contact the Mental
> Health Crisis Team @ *1-800- 622-4235* or contact other emergency services.
>
>
> Notice of Confidentiality: This email and/or the attached documents
> may contain protected, confidential and privileged material for the sole
> use of the intended recipient(s). Any review, use, retention, distribution
> disclosure by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended
> recipient, please contact the sender with a reply email and delete/shred
> all copies of this email and/or attachments. Also note that email is
> susceptible to data corruption, interception, unauthorized amendment,
> viruses or other forms of tampering. As a result, I send and receive
> emails on the understanding that I am not liable for any such corruption,
> interception, amendment, virus, tampering or related consequences of such
> acts. Your assistance with these protections is appreciated.
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 9, 2018 at 11:14 AM, Kaye Danforth
> wrote:
>
>> Has anyone seen the Shoreham ducks today? My brother arrived from Conn.
>> this morning to find a farmer using an irrigation pump near the bridge.
>> Alas, no ducks.
>> Anyone??
>>
>> Kaye from Hinesburg
>>



Subject: Bb Whistling Ducks being seen??
Date: Sun Jun 10 2018 0:10 am
From: lawlor.coleen AT gmail.com
 
No whistling ducks at 12:30 pump still running.

Coleen Lawlor, LICSW
Certified EMDR Therapist
23 School Street
P.O. Box 162
Chester, Vermont 05143
1-802-289-3107

Important: Email is not a secure from of communication. Please call me if
you have concern about privacy.
My business hours are 8 am - 6 pm Monday- Thursday and 8 am - 3 pm most
Fridays. My phone is turned off outside these hours and emails may also
remain unchecked. If your situation is urgent please contact the Mental
Health Crisis Team @ *1-800- 622-4235* or contact other emergency services.


Notice of Confidentiality: This email and/or the attached documents
may contain protected, confidential and privileged material for the sole
use of the intended recipient(s). Any review, use, retention, distribution
disclosure by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended
recipient, please contact the sender with a reply email and delete/shred
all copies of this email and/or attachments. Also note that email is
susceptible to data corruption, interception, unauthorized amendment,
viruses or other forms of tampering. As a result, I send and receive
emails on the understanding that I am not liable for any such corruption,
interception, amendment, virus, tampering or related consequences of such
acts. Your assistance with these protections is appreciated.


On Sat, Jun 9, 2018 at 11:14 AM, Kaye Danforth
wrote:

> Has anyone seen the Shoreham ducks today? My brother arrived from Conn.
> this morning to find a farmer using an irrigation pump near the bridge.
> Alas, no ducks.
> Anyone??
>
> Kaye from Hinesburg
>



Subject: whistling-ducks video / bobolinks
Date: Sat Jun 9 2018 20:08 pm
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
Such beautiful birds!  Thanks for taking the pix and for posting them.

I note that in one pic, one duck appears to be feeding the other one.
Could this be courtship behavior?

Jane
(Shoreham)


On 6/8/2018 4:24 PM, Mike Sargent wrote:
> I watched the whistling-ducks yesterday morning as they alternated between preening on a log jutting out into the pond and then flying out to the middle of the pond, swimming around and taking a few drinks, and returning to the log. This apparently is typical daytime behavior, and in the evening they go off to feed. As people have noted, the covered railroad bridge serves as a convenient blind, as does the thick vegetation on the bank of the pond. The bridge, built over a hundred years ago, is a magnificent structure, almost Gothic in impact, and is worth the short hike for its own sake. I posted a brief video/slideshow at:
>
> https://vimeo.com/274149805
>
> On an unrelated note, I stopped at the Dead Creek WMA on the way back and saw some bobolinks on Gage Road, in the fields on the north side about halfway down the road.
>



Subject: Hawk Hill Trails, Jun 9, 2018
Date: Sat Jun 9 2018 18:50 pm
From: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
 
Birds weren't abundant however the scarlet tanager was a hit. Pine warbler came down and sat on a branch and sang so all could see.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Hawk Hill Trails, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jun 9, 2018 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> 25 species
>
> Pileated Woodpecker 2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 4
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Blue-headed Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 11
> Blue Jay 1
> Common Raven 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 2
> Tufted Titmouse 2
> Brown Creeper 1
> Winter Wren 1
> Veery 2
> Hermit Thrush 3
> American Robin 1
> Cedar Waxwing 2
> Ovenbird 12
> American Redstart 1
> Blackburnian Warbler 1
> Pine Warbler 1
> Black-throated Green Warbler 2
> Song Sparrow 4
> Scarlet Tanager 2
> Brown-headed Cowbird 1
> American Goldfinch 2
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)



Subject: Olive-sided flycatcher, Colchester
Date: Sat Jun 9 2018 15:17 pm
From: 000002227229d7c3-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
There's currently (11:15am) an olive-sided flycatcher in my yard on shore acres drive in Colchester.
Jon Katz



Subject: Bb Whistling Ducks being seen??
Date: Sat Jun 9 2018 15:14 pm
From: danforthpainting AT me.com
 
Has anyone seen the Shoreham ducks today?  My brother arrived from Conn. this morning to find a farmer using an irrigation pump near the bridge.  Alas, no ducks.
Anyone??

Kaye from Hinesburg



Subject: No Whistling Ducks
Date: Sat Jun 9 2018 15:09 pm
From: ravenrr AT wcvt.com
 
Saturday morning 10:15 the ducks were not present.  I did notice that a local farmer was pumping water from the brook and the engine was rather loud.  Maybe they will be back tonight.



Subject: whistling-ducks video / bobolinks
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 23:16 pm
From: jeshawks AT shoreham.net
 
It's the extra-long legs on these guys that gets me.  When they're
standing up on a log, they hardly look like ducks.

(I haven't seen ours yet, hoping they'll stick around until Saturday,
but I've seen them on birding trips to south Texas in the past.)

Jane
(Shoreham)

On 6/8/2018 4:24 PM, Mike Sargent wrote:
> I watched the whistling-ducks yesterday morning as they alternated between preening on a log jutting out into the pond and then flying out to the middle of the pond, swimming around and taking a few drinks, and returning to the log. This apparently is typical daytime behavior, and in the evening they go off to feed. As people have noted, the covered railroad bridge serves as a convenient blind, as does the thick vegetation on the bank of the pond. The bridge, built over a hundred years ago, is a magnificent structure, almost Gothic in impact, and is worth the short hike for its own sake. I posted a brief video/slideshow at:
>
> https://vimeo.com/274149805
>
> On an unrelated note, I stopped at the Dead Creek WMA on the way back and saw some bobolinks on Gage Road, in the fields on the north side about halfway down the road.
>



Subject: whistling-ducks video / bobolinks
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 20:24 pm
From: msargent AT uvm.edu
 
I watched the whistling-ducks yesterday morning as they alternated between preening on a log jutting out into the pond and then flying out to the middle of the pond, swimming around and taking a few drinks, and returning to the log. This apparently is typical daytime behavior, and in the evening they go off to feed. As people have noted, the covered railroad bridge serves as a convenient blind, as does the thick vegetation on the bank of the pond. The bridge, built over a hundred years ago, is a magnificent structure, almost Gothic in impact, and is worth the short hike for its own sake. I posted a brief video/slideshow at:

https://vimeo.com/274149805

On an unrelated note, I stopped at the Dead Creek WMA on the way back and saw some bobolinks on Gage Road, in the fields on the north side about halfway down the road.



Subject: Whistling Ducks present
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 19:00 pm
From: kittiwake_3 AT hotmail.com
 
Still present 100pm at the shoreham railroad covered bridge in the clear water to the east of the bridge between the covered bridge and the metal bridge. June 8.

Jo Jo

Sent from my iPhonejbbinhmbjmjjn

> On Jun 8, 2018, at 2:34 AM, Zacheriah Cota-Wueaver wrote:
>
> Hello all,
>
> The two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were still present on the same log in East Shoreham as of 5:45 this evening.
>
> Zac Cota
>
> Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Clay-colored sparrow
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 18:13 pm
From: 2birdvt AT comcast.net
 
At 12:40 today clay-colored sparrow was singing away at Farrell Access.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod



Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks Still Present
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 16:33 pm
From: isisunit AT gmail.com
 
As of 12:30 still present, seen from the path to the covered bridge, a bit
before the 2nd side trail. Sitting on a floating mat of vegetation.

Spotted this afternoon by Mike Libby - thanks for sharing!!

Cheers,
Isis Erb
--
Isis Erb Jericho, VT Sent from my iPhone, so please forgive any egregious
spelling errors.



Subject: Whistling Ducks present
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 1:35 am
From: jdp AT scriberule.org
 
And still at 7:30pm. Unfortunately they were repeatedly flushed by some folks fishing by canoe who seemed to know that the ducks were weird enough to warrant a picture, but not enough to know that they shouldn't try to paddle within 10 feet to get that picture. Still, the ducks seemed intent on staying around that log, and I suspect they'll still be there in the morning.

https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Josh Phillips

----- Original Message -----
> From: "Zacheriah Cota-Weaver"
> To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
> Sent: Thursday, June 7, 2018 5:56:34 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Whistling Ducks present
>
> Hello all,
>
> The two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were still present on the same
> log in East Shoreham as of 5:45 this evening.
>
> Zac Cota
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>



Subject: Golden-winged Warbler update
Date: Fri Jun 8 2018 0:22 am
From: MLaBARR AT audubon.org
 
Greetings all...just wanted to update everyone on some of the recent golden-wing activity. Last Saturday, June 2, was the first Buckner Preserve Winged-warbler Blitz. Staff from Audubon, The Nature Conservancy and intrepid volunteers surveyed TNC's Helen W. Buckner Preserve in West Haven. We located 8 golden-wings, 7 blue-wings and 4 hybrids. In addition there were 5 other winged warblers that were heard not seen so we could not positively identify. The day was windy so there was some speculation that there were birds we missed. These numbers were similar to what we found in 2014 when Buckner was first surveyed. Not only that but there were an abundance of Prairie Warblers to boot. Thanks everyone for a great event.

On another note...on a Green Mountain Audubon walk of June 2 we located 3 (possibly 4) golden-wings and a hybrid. Two of the golden-wings, Mr. Orange and Mr. White (named after their colored leg bands) returned for the fourth year. In 2016 and 2017 these birds carried geolocators to their wintering grounds and back. Mr. Orange spent his winter in Columbia and Mr. White in Costa Rica. They have both given many birders great looks over the past month.

We welcome all winged warbler sightings and don't forget to upload to EBird.

Mark

Mark LaBarr
Conservation Program Manager
Audubon Vermont
255 Sherman Hollow Road
Huntington, VT 05462
802-434-3068
[email protected]



Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Richville Pond, Jun 7, 2018
Date: Thu Jun 7 2018 23:50 pm
From: 00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
Additional images of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks today, Thursday.

Cheers, Roy Pilcher



-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist
To: shamwariVT
Sent: Thu, Jun 7, 2018 7:30 pm
Subject: eBird Report - Richville Pond, Jun 7, 2018

Richville Pond, Addison, Vermont, US
Jun 7, 2018 8:40 AM - 9:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.25 mile(s)
16 species

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 2
Green Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 1
Warbling Vireo 1
Blue Jay 1
House Wren 2
American Robin 1
Gray Catbird 1
Brown Thrasher 1
Common Yellowthroat 1
Yellow Warbler 1
Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
Red-winged Blackbird 1
American Goldfinch 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)



Subject: Whistling Ducks present
Date: Thu Jun 7 2018 21:58 pm
From: zcotaweaver AT gmail.com
 
Hello all,

The two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were still present on the same log in East Shoreham as of 5:45 this evening.

Zac Cota

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Richville Pond, Shoreham Depot Rd, Shoreham
Date: Wed Jun 6 2018 22:03 pm
From: bbrosnan AT gmavt.net
 
Thanks for the clear directions.  What beautiful birds and what a nice little place to bird!
Barbara Brosnan

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Ron Payne
Sent: Tuesday, June 5, 2018 9:59 PM
To: VTBIRD AT LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [VTBIRD] Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Richville Pond, Shoreham Depot Rd, Shoreham

I know a lot of people know about this from their eBird alerts, but it's still a good idea to post rare bird sightings here as well.

Two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were found this morning on Richville Pond off Shoreham Depot Rd, in Shoreham by Wesley Butler and were posted to eBird at this checklist:

https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec...

Several birders also reported them throughout the day, and they were last seen as far as I know, at 7:30 PM by myself and others. It's important to note that the road sign for Shoreham Depot Rd. at the intersection with Richville Rd. is missing. It's a bit of a blind turn at the top of a hill. There is a parking area on the west side of the road. Best views of the birds were from the old covered rail bridge which you will find at the end of the trail off the parking lot. The bridge acted as a very effective blind to look at the birds from.

Good luck if you go. I Hope they stick around.

---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT



Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Richville Pond, Shoreham Depot Rd, Shoreham
Date: Wed Jun 6 2018 21:17 pm
From: 0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request AT list.uvm.edu
 
The two BBWDs are still here now at 4:31.Mae MayvilleEssex VT


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 9:59 PM, Ron Payne wrote:

I know a lot of people know about this from their eBird alerts, but it's still a good idea to post rare bird sightings here as well.

Two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were found this morning on Richville Pond off Shoreham Depot Rd, in Shoreham by Wesley Butler and were posted to eBird at this checklist:

https://ebird.org/vt/view/chec...

Several birders also reported them throughout the day, and they were last seen as far as I know, at 7:30 PM by myself and others. It's important to note that the road sign for Shoreham Depot Rd. at the intersection with Richville Rd. is missing. It's a bit of a blind turn at the top of a hill. There is a parking area on the west side of the road. Best views of the birds were from the old covered rail bridge which you will find at the end of the trail off the parking lot. The bridge acted as a very effective blind to look at the birds from.

Good luck if you go. I Hope they stick around.

---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT



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