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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on January 17, 2019, 6:05 pm

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17 Jan: @ 18:04:59 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-01-17 [Michael Hobbs]
17 Jan: @ 16:06:01 
Re: Upadate on Victoria Ferry [Rick Tyler]
17 Jan: @ 15:28:02 
Upadate on Victoria Ferry [Jane Hadley]
16 Jan: @ 20:44:03 
Senate Votes to Protect Additional 17, 000 Acres of U.S. Coastline | Audubon [Dan Reiff, PhD]
16 Jan: @ 15:33:58 
Tennessee Warbler at Butyl Creek, complete with headache-inducing photo!!! [Ed Newbold]
16 Jan: @ 14:52:34 
Re: Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO [Philip Dickinson]
16 Jan: @ 14:31:29 
Re: Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO [jstewart]
16 Jan: @ 10:48:39 
Bald eagles Everywhere [T.L. Stokes]
16 Jan: @ 07:00:01 
Washington County Year List Project 2018 summary & 2019 launch [Matt Bartels]
16 Jan: @ 00:25:20 
The other Screech-Owl [Dalton Spencer]
15 Jan: @ 23:00:46 
Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO [tomboulian]
15 Jan: @ 21:46:56 
Re: Twitter mobile problem - rfi [John Puschock]
15 Jan: @ 17:06:40 
My next birding/electronics issue [Jon Houghton]
15 Jan: @ 16:32:06 
Re: Tweeters Mobile Problem - rfi - Fixed! [Jon Houghton]
15 Jan: @ 16:19:57 
Birding Recommendation Needed [Bates Estabrooks]
15 Jan: @ 15:36:03 
Re: Twitter mobile problem - rfi [Randy Robinson]
15 Jan: @ 13:17:49 
Re: Twitter mobile problem - rfi [Randy Robinson]
15 Jan: @ 12:26:15 
An Eide Afternoon 1/14/19 [Barbara Deihl]
15 Jan: @ 11:58:00 
(My) World's Largest Evergreen Huckleberry [Jeff Gibson]
14 Jan: @ 23:35:18 
Eared Grebes and Spotted Sandpiper on Vashon, red-faced Northern Shrike at Marymoor. [Ed Newbold]
14 Jan: @ 20:24:00 
Sandhill crane hit by car? [Michelle Maani]
14 Jan: @ 20:21:41 
Twitter mobile problem - rfi [Jon Houghton]
14 Jan: @ 19:07:04 
Eagles, Hauling Stuff [Jeff Gibson]
14 Jan: @ 18:53:45 
American Pipit in Tree? [Vicki Biltz]
14 Jan: @ 13:58:38 
Fill injured raptor [Constance Sidles]
14 Jan: @ 13:04:52 
Fir Island and Samish Flats 1-13-19 [Bill Anderson]
14 Jan: @ 11:20:54 
Citizen science opportunity - call for banded Horned Lark sightings [Devin de Zwaan]
13 Jan: @ 22:17:22 
Northern Waterthrush not seen Saturday. [Al n Donna]
13 Jan: @ 18:24:03 
Renton Glaucous Gull [Jeffrey Bryant]
13 Jan: @ 18:03:00 
FOY fox sparrow, Brush Prairie [Michelle Maani]
13 Jan: @ 17:28:30 
Palm Warbler - Olympia (Capital Lake) [T Varela]
13 Jan: @ 15:18:13 
The Birdbooker Report [Ian Paulsen]
13 Jan: @ 15:14:04 
Re: Osprey near Matthews Beach [Robert C. Faucett]
13 Jan: @ 15:08:31 
Report back on ferries to Victoria [Jane Hadley]
13 Jan: @ 15:02:17 
Osprey near Matthews Beach [Barbara Deihl]
13 Jan: @ 01:30:13 
Re: Osprey in Whatcom County [Sammy Catiis]
13 Jan: @ 00:13:50 
Osprey in Whatcom County [B B]
12 Jan: @ 22:36:27 
Re: RFI Iceland [wallydavis3]
12 Jan: @ 20:34:35 
Edmonds Greater White-Fronted Goose [Dee Dee]
12 Jan: @ 19:06:47 
Palm Warbler [Kenneth Brown]
12 Jan: @ 18:31:29 
Re: RFI Iceland [HAL MICHAEL]
12 Jan: @ 17:03:20 
RFI Iceland [David Parent]
12 Jan: @ 16:01:55 
RFI ferries to Victoria [Jane Hadley]
12 Jan: @ 15:23:37 
Re: Closure at Everett STP [Philip Dickinson]
12 Jan: @ 15:16:02 
Union Bay Watch } Brilliance [Hubbell]
12 Jan: @ 14:29:16 
Lesser Goldfinch Pair at my Feeders in Auburn! [Garrett Haynes]
12 Jan: @ 14:26:07 
Re: Snowy Owl predation rfi [Keith Bagnall]
12 Jan: @ 14:03:16 
BirdNote, last week and the week of Jan. 13, 2018 [Ellen Blackstone]
12 Jan: @ 13:00:59 
Closure at Everett STP [AnnMarie Wood]
12 Jan: @ 12:32:44 
Late Osprey [Roger Moyer]





Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2019-01-17
Date: Thu Jan 17 2019 18:04 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
 
Tweets - It was warm, a bit breezy, and cloudy this morning, and we had a
bit of mizzle & drizzle. Not bad weather, actually, and it was birdy for
the first half of the morning.

Highlights;
—Cackling Geese - a couple of thousand in flight predawn; 1000+ came back
and landed
—Virginia Rail - responded to clapping on boardwalk
—Green Heron - Matt spotted a skulker north of the Rowing Club dock
—Double-crested Cormorant -caught and swallowed a very large trout in slougj
—Common(?) Loon - one too far out to ID; probably Common
—Western Screech-Owl - Matt heard one early
—Northern Saw-Whet Owl - ditto
—Merlin - near weir. Male, and not a "Black". Probably "Taiga"

For the day, 55 or 56 species.

Last week we also had 55 species. My car was broken into during the walk,
and they grabbed only the totebag that had my raincoat, rain pants, fleece
vest, hip pouch, gloves, hats, etc, etc, etc. I had everything with resale
value with me, but I'm still out ocer $500 bucks. But in the aftermath,
writing a note to Tweeters fell by the wayside.

- Michael Hobbs
- Kirkland, WA



Subject: Upadate on Victoria Ferry
Date: Thu Jan 17 2019 16:06 pm
From: rhtyler AT gmail.com
 
I've taken all three ferries to Vancouver Island (Tsawassen, Anacortes and
Port Angeles, plus a couple of bonus trips on Tsawassen-Nanaimo), and there
really isn't much to choose between them. If you don't want to cross the
border by car, forget Tsawassen. Anacortes is closer, but the ferry makes
stops along the way and it takes a while. Port Angeles is farther from
Seattle, but the ferry is direct and fast. Flip a coin, they all seem to
take about the same amount of time. The BC ferries are generally nicer.

Rick Tyler


On Thu, Jan 17, 2019 at 1:27 PM Jane Hadley wrote:

> Dear Tweetsters - Recently, I posted to Tweeters comparing three ferry
> routes to Victoria, assuming we would be driving from central Seattle.
>
> I concluded that for a trip in early June, the best route for us would be
> the Washington State Ferries (WSF)route from Anacortes to Sidney, BC.
>
> However, I have since found out that that is not the case.
>
> It was difficult to get information about the Anacortes-Sidney run,
> because it does not run in winter. Inexplicably in my mind, the WSF website
> and phone app provide no information (at least that I was able to find)
> about the route at this time of year. Finally, I called the ferry system on
> the phone to get the information.
>
> What I found is that though WSF starts taking reservations for the run in
> April, the run does not actually begin service until June 24. That is too
> late for our group. Also there currently is no schedule for the runs,
> although the ferry person did say she expected it would sail twice a day
> and depart about the same times it did in 2018: (8:25 a.m. and 2:50 p.m.).
>
> It's true, as I said in the earlier post, that reservations are required
> and are free. However, if you are a "no show" and fail to cancel soon
> enough in advance, you will be charged a fee.
>
> Just wanted to follow up with this bit of information about the
> Anacortes-Sidney ferry. Wish we could take it.
>
> Jane Hadley
>
> Seattle, WA
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>


--
Rick Tyler



Subject: Upadate on Victoria Ferry
Date: Thu Jan 17 2019 15:28 pm
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
Dear Tweetsters - Recently, I posted to Tweeters comparing three ferry
routes to Victoria, assuming we would be driving from central Seattle.

I concluded that for a trip in early June, the best route for us would
be the Washington State Ferries (WSF)route from Anacortes to Sidney, BC.

However, I have since found out that that is not the case.

It was difficult to get information about the Anacortes-Sidney run,
because it does not run in winter. Inexplicably in my mind, the WSF
website and phone app provide no information (at least that I was able
to find) about the route at this time of year. Finally, I called the
ferry system on the phone to get the information.

What I found is that though WSF starts taking reservations for the run
in April, the run does not actually begin service until June 24. That is
too late for our group. Also there currently is no schedule for the
runs, although the ferry person did say she expected it would sail twice
a day and depart about the same times it did in 2018: (8:25 a.m. and
2:50 p.m.).

It's true, as I said in the earlier post, that reservations are required
and are free. However, if you are a "no show" and fail to cancel soon
enough in advance, you will be charged a fee.

Just wanted to follow up with this bit of information about the
Anacortes-Sidney ferry. Wish we could take it.

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA



Subject: Senate Votes to Protect Additional 17, 000 Acres of U.S. Coastline | Audubon
Date: Wed Jan 16 2019 20:44 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
https://www.audubon.org/news/s...





_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Tennessee Warbler at Butyl Creek, complete with headache-inducing photo!!!
Date: Wed Jan 16 2019 15:33 pm
From: ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com
 
Hi All,
At 10 am this morning Delia found what we decided must be a Tennessee Warbler in our backyard sitting behind tangled branches and furiously preening after a bath in Butyl Creek.
Because of bright greenness of the back and the whiteness of the underside which ruled out Orange-crowned, and a light eye-stripe, we called it a Tenessee, but our sighting was frustratingly short and we got no photos.
We then commenced a 3 hour vigil in hopes the bird would return, with two false starts involving Am. Goldfinch and a Yellow-rumped Warbler that weren't trying to get photographed, they just wanted a bath.
The bird to our surprise did return at 1 pm and I got only one shot which is poor in quality, but I think it shows enough to rule out anything but a male Tennessee, although of course, we are hoping for experts will risk a migraine to review the shot, which is at:
Ed Newbold | It™s winter wonderland in the bootheel!!!


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Ed Newbold | It™s winter wonderland in the bootheel!!!


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(Scroll down to the bottom of the blog.)





Thanks all,
Ed Newbold (and Delia Scholes) residential Beacon Hill, Seattle, [email protected]



Subject: Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO
Date: Wed Jan 16 2019 14:52 pm
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
Zonotrichia is a genus of sparrows that includes White-crowned, Golden-crowned and Harris™s Sparrow. The latter often associates with flocks of the others.

Phil Dickinson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 16, 2019, at 12:30 PM, wrote:
>
> What is a ˜zono flock™?
>
> Jane Stewart
> 121 Solar Lane
> Sequim, WA 98382-8324
> (360) 681-2827
> [email protected]
>
> From: Tweeters On Behalf Of [email protected]
> Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2019 9:00 PM
> To: tweeters
> Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO
>
> Nathan Keene found it 2 days ago, but I was unable to locate today. Found zono flock and canvassed area for an hour from water treatment plant, both sides Edmonds Way, and brush line over to marsh boardwalk. 3 Fox, 2 GC, 16 WC, two dozen song sparrows, 8 towhees, plus the usual swamp denizens responded to alarm call playbacks and flock playbacks. Great habitat so don™t give up trying
>
> Mark Tomboulian
> Shoreline, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO
Date: Wed Jan 16 2019 14:31 pm
From: jstewart AT olympus.net
 
What is a ˜zono flock™?



Jane Stewart

121 Solar Lane

Sequim, WA 98382-8324

(360) 681-2827

[email protected]



From: Tweeters On Behalf Of [email protected]
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2019 9:00 PM
To: tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO



Nathan Keene found it 2 days ago, but I was unable to locate today. Found zono flock and canvassed area for an hour from water treatment plant, both sides Edmonds Way, and brush line over to marsh boardwalk. 3 Fox, 2 GC, 16 WC, two dozen song sparrows, 8 towhees, plus the usual swamp denizens responded to alarm call playbacks and flock playbacks. Great habitat so don™t give up trying



Mark Tomboulian

Shoreline, WA



Subject: Bald eagles Everywhere
Date: Wed Jan 16 2019 10:48 am
From: tlstokespoetry AT gmail.com
 
In answer to Ed™s question on limited sightings of bald eagles, not to worry! I™m seeing them active and just about every destination I™ve been to recently.

Mated pair of adults sitting side by side in large moss-covered tree which overhangs Ames Lk Rd and a creek. Their nest is nearby.

Pair of adults team fishing off Mercer Island on Lake Wash...dive-bombing and stealing a fish from waterfowl. First time observing fluttering of wings trying to hover and swoop down repeatedly almost like Osprey behavior.

Single perching adults here and there between Redmond and Mercer Island, near Marymoor, and along 520 bridge to Seattle.

Adult and juvie flying to perch near Luther Burbank on MI along the lake.

And other sightings, all in the last 2 weeks. Most this week.

News has it the pair near the Snoqualmie nest have been seen recently. Imagine the male and new female from last year are prepping their nest. Will be out there this week.



Cheers from Redmond,
T.L. Stokes





Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Washington County Year List Project 2018 summary & 2019 launch
Date: Wed Jan 16 2019 7:00 am
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Hi Tweeters & INWBers -

Here™s the year-end report for the 2018 round of the county year-list project. Full results posted here:
http://wabirder.com/county_yea...

This was the 13th year we™ve recruited compilers from every county to keep track of sightings. The idea behind the project is to get behind the fun of individual county listing to compile a ˜community™ list ” rather than just birds seen by a single individual, we attempt to pull together birds seen by anyone over the course of the year. It provides one perspective on the birds of Washington in 2018.

Some results for 2018:
389 species were reported statewide. That™s below average [394.8] and tied for the 2nd lowest we™ve reported in 13 years, 8 below last year.
319 species for Eastern Washington. That™s one better than last year, but still below our average [323.8]
366 species for Western Washington. That™s one lower than last year, but still a little above the average [364.1].


Record high totals were reported for nine counties: Island [227], Lewis [208], San Juan [213], Snohomish [262 (tie w/2017], Wahkiakum [191], Chelan [244], Klickitat [246], Spokane [239], and Walla Walla [264].

19 Counties came in with totals higher than last year, 16 came in lower, and four (!) reported the same result his year and last.

27 counties had totals higher than their 2006-2018 average. The counties with the biggest variance from their average included Lewis [+20], Pierce [+21], San Juan [+22], Chelan [+23] on the upside, and Adams [-14], Okanogan [-21], & Pend Oreille [-13] on the low-side.


Species:
70 species were seen in all 39 counties, 166 were seen in 30 or more counties. While that™s fewer 39-county birds this year than last, the # of 30+ county birds is identical to last year. At the other end of the spectrum, 29 species were reported in only one county this year. Eight of those 29 species were seen only in Clallam County.

There really were no totally surprising misses this year - the only missing species that are not a Washington Bird Records Committee review-list species were pelagic birds - things lik Parakeet Auklet and Horned Puffin.

In addition to the regular info at the link [http://wabirder.com/county_yea... ] , I've included a simple sheet that compiles the annual county totals for each county from 2007-2018-- if you'd like to see how any county has trended over the years, this is the sheet to study.

2019 compiling is underway, and I encourage you to look up the compiler for counties you bird in and send along unusual sightings -- most compilers are checking eBird reports already, but eBird still misses a good bit and we appreciate the help making sure we hear about these sightings. You can find a list of the compilers at the above link

Thanks to all the compilers who track each county, and here's to a fun and surprising 2019. If you notice anything not noted on the 2018 list, let us know and make a resolution to report your sightings to the compiler this year .

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA



Subject: The other Screech-Owl
Date: Wed Jan 16 2019 0:25 am
From: offthehookflyshop AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all,
While I was out owling on Thursday I was reminded of an age older birding conundrum that I thought I might share.
I was owling in the intent of finding a Western Screech-Owl in an area of Lewis County that had previously had one. After 15 minutes of waiting I decided to try some playback. Within 5 minutes of calling a Barn Owl sounded off a hundred yards away. I laughed becasue here I was calling for Screech-Owl and all I could get to respond was a "screeching owl".
Most everybody knows that Western Screech-Owls' songs and calls are that of bouncy balls bouncing and dogs barks. Whereas a Barn Owl can sound like a shreeking demon or a Rail. These two birds are often confused my beginners and by nonbirders.
I would rank this confusion up there somewhere between American Robin's being thrushes and American Coots not being ducks.
This confusion will always be around just like seagulls and blue jays will always make birders cringe.
Dalton SpencerChehalis, Washington
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject: Edmonds Harris' sparrow NO
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 23:00 pm
From: tomboulian AT comcast.net
 
Nathan Keene found it 2 days ago, but I was unable to locate today.  Found zono flock and canvassed area for an hour from water treatment plant, both sides Edmonds Way, and brush line over to marsh boardwalk.  3 Fox, 2 GC, 16 WC, two dozen song sparrows, 8 towhees, plus the usual swamp denizens responded to alarm call playbacks and flock playbacks.  Great habitat so don™t give up trying

Mark Tomboulian
Shoreline, WA



Subject: Twitter mobile problem - rfi
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 21:46 pm
From: g_g_allin AT hotmail.com
 
If you're still getting the 404 error message, the problem at this point is actually on your end, not the ABA's. Clear your browser cache, and you should be fine.  There was a problem with the ABA's website a few days ago, but it's been fixed.

John Puschock

[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/image... Virus-free. www.avast.com



Subject: My next birding/electronics issue
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 17:06 pm
From: jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com
 
Hi Tweets - Today, I finally got around to attempting to order a SongFinder device that Bruce Paige had highly recommended for us older birders with high frequency hearing loss.  (OK, it was a year ago that he made that recommendation.)  They're no longer making them!! - Arrggh!!  "He who hesitates..."  If anyone knows of a set that is no longer in use, or some form of hearing aid that works for both high frequency and directionality, I'd be most interested in hearing (preferably below 4,000 hz) about either.  - Jon Houghton, Edmonds



Subject: Tweeters Mobile Problem - rfi - Fixed!
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 16:32 pm
From: jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com
 
Many thanks to Randy Robinson for providing the correct url to satisfy my phone and get me from https to http (whatever that means) to allow me access into Washington Tweeters!  What caused it to go away in the first place, I haven't a clue, but for now, it's working. - Happier Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds



Subject: Birding Recommendation Needed
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 16:19 pm
From: wgpu AT hotmail.com
 
Greetings.

I am planning a visit in May/June to the Puget Sound region, and am interested in finding Hermit Warbler. That would be a lifer for me. Can anyone here recommend some places where I might stand a reasonable chance of finding one?

Thanks much.

Bates Estabrooks
Andersonville, TN
wgpu at hotmail dot com



Subject: Twitter mobile problem - rfi
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 15:36 pm
From: rwr.personal AT gmail.com
 
Kevin Lucas has kindly pointed out that my earlier reply to Jon Houghton's
message was not exactly on target. The 404 message (file not found) can
occur for a variety of reasons. Kevin is able to connect just fine to the
ABA site whereas Jon and I cannot.

If you are having this issue you do need to contact ABA ([email protected]) and
include as much detail as you can about the error message and your device,
such as the versions of the operating system and browser you are using.
Hopefully if enough of us contact them they will be able to fix the problem.

Randy Robinson
Seattle, WA

On Tue, Jan 15, 2019 at 11:16 AM Randy Robinson
wrote:

> I have also had the same problem as Jon reading the ABA Tweeters listing
> on my phone. The problem is with the ABA. The 404 error means that the web
> file that contains the mobile Tweeters listing has been deleted from the
> ABA site.
>
> I recently wrote an email to ABA alerting them to the problem (
> [email protected]). It probably wouldn't hurt for others to do the same.
>
> In the meantime the Surfbirds listing continues to work:
> https://surfbirds.com/birdingm...
>
> This isn't formatted for small devices but at least you can read the
> messages.
>
> Randy Robinson
> Seattle, WA
>



Subject: Twitter mobile problem - rfi
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 13:17 pm
From: rwr.personal AT gmail.com
 
I have also had the same problem as Jon reading the ABA Tweeters listing on
my phone. The problem is with the ABA. The 404 error means that the web
file that contains the mobile Tweeters listing has been deleted from the
ABA site.

I recently wrote an email to ABA alerting them to the problem ([email protected]).
It probably wouldn't hurt for others to do the same.

In the meantime the Surfbirds listing continues to work:
https://surfbirds.com/birdingm...

This isn't formatted for small devices but at least you can read the
messages.

Randy Robinson
Seattle, WA



Subject: An Eide Afternoon 1/14/19
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 12:26 pm
From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net
 
Friend Anne & I moseyed around Eide Rd. And other areas of the Stillaguamish River and the Stanwood area.  We were most excited to watch a couple of Short-eared Owls, a Northern Harrier and a roosting Barn Owl.  So were the group of spectators and photographers who showed up at Eide.  No ugly scene as has occurred previously, especially in the winter of 2015, to view and chase some Long-eared Owls (there were no longears there yesterday)  A dark Red-Tailed Hawk was on a wire down near Boe Rd., thousands of Snow Geese filled the sky with sound and criss-crossing skeins, no hunters were visible, robins filled bushes as they berry-picked, only one Great Blue Heron was seen, and a few other incidentals.  Apparently there was a Merlin at Eide Rd. - we missed it. A smattering of swans was scattered on the landscape.  A nice outing on a sunny, balmy, blue-sky afternoon, capped off by a tasty, pleasant  Asian dinner afterward in Stanwood, at The Chatterbox.

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
[email protected]
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: (My) World's Largest Evergreen Huckleberry
Date: Tue Jan 15 2019 11:58 am
From: gibsondesign15 AT gmail.com
 
This past week I've been forting around Port Townsend, both Fort Worden and
Fort Townsend, and saw cool things.

On several walks around Artillery Hill at Fort Worden, I've gotten into the
habit of Yew Watching: While birds are few in the winter forest, and
flighty besides, Yew's can be depended on to stay in one place so one can
go back and visit them. The more I went looking for Yew's, the more I
noticed. I have an affinity for Yew's - a small charismatic conifer that
generally takes a short droopy form in the understory of taller conifers:
At least, I consider them charismatic. Whatever.

Anyhoo, I took my freshly- honed Yew finding skills down to Fort Townsend,
with it's great Yew habitat of tall timber. Fort Townsend is also a sorta
interesting habitat for other things like Pacific Rhododendron's and
Evergreen Huckleberry's , which make standout understory shrubs here - a
relatively uncommon habitat these days in Washington State.

Alas, the winter forest was a quart short of birds: a Hairy Woodpecker,
couple of Raven's and Varied Thrush,several Golden-crown Kinglets, a Winter
Wren (oop's, mean Pacific), and several Junco's was about all I saw in the
forest over two trips. So, mostly undistracted by birds I could focus on
plant appreciation. It really is a pleasant forest, albeit a tad dark even
on a clear day at high noon - not much direct sun gets in there.

While I was yew-dee-doing around enjoying the unique shrubbery of the
place, and finding Yew''s, I came around a bend in the trail, and spotted
another Yew at the edge of a sorta open spot. This particular vegetable had
the somewhat open form with somewhat droopy branch tips typical of
understory yews. But as I walked past it on the trail and got a closer
look, I realized it was an Evergreen Huckleberry. The Largest Evergreen
Huckleberry I've Ever Seen! Really! Let me explain.

In the Fort Townsend forest are many Evergreen Huckleberry's about as big
as they get: Huckleberry bushes arching up to 12 or maybe even 15' are not
uncommon, though most are less. I think I can be forgiven for assuming "My"
plant was a small Yew tree - it looked like one: it starts off with a
single trunk about 7ft tall. The trunk, sort of oval, measures about 3" x
6" at breast height, or 16" in circumference (19" a foot off the ground).
Above this trunk it branches out widely (and sparsely) to a "crown" 24ft
across. Near as I could tell, it was a bit more than 20ft tall. (will go
back later to double-check.on that - all other measurements good).

Of course, how would the National Registry of Real Big Shrubs rate it? Who
knows. It would score real good on trunk diameter I'd say, and on height.
Spread was in one direction only - it's sort of a narrow fan shape - might
be hard to quantify. How 'bout those intangibles? Like, 'good-lookin",
"funky", "charismatic" ,"one- half to three-quarters dead" or what have
you. I guess I'd go with a "funky/charismatic" score, whatever that might
be.

By the way, although the plant looks a bit straggly down low, in it's upper
reaches it has healthy growth. While it is a bit funky, it's strong! I gave
the trunk a hard shove and found it to be rooted in solid as a rock. Long
may it live.

Well, that's my story, and I'm sticking with it.


Jeff Gibson
lurking in the shrubs of
Port Townsend Wa



Subject: Eared Grebes and Spotted Sandpiper on Vashon, red-faced Northern Shrike at Marymoor.
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 23:35 pm
From: ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all,
We had maybe 4 Eared Grebes today on Vashon Island at Tramp Harbor. With the afternoon sun full on, these birds had fire-red eyes visible even from a great distance. A half-decent photo I took shows this.
There was a Spotted Sandpiper at the overly-lawn-mowered Lisabeula Park on the Western Side of Vashon.
We had White-winged Scoters at Quartermaster Bay and a large flock of Common Mergansers there.
Also, all three Loons, and true-to-form, Brian Pendleton spotted a distant Eurasian in a distant flock of Wigeon at Tramp Harbor.

On Sunday we went to Marymoor and found one Northern Shrike with a telltale red face.
On Saturday at Lake Sammamish we had a Hutton's Vireo and heard but did not see a Bald Eagle, uncharacteristically the only Bald Eagle we've encountered all year. (Should I be happy or sad?)


Photos of the Grebe and the Shrike are the first Sightings blog at ednewbold.com, but you have to scroll down past the photos of Coatis and Bluebirds playing in the snow.

Here's that link:


Ed Newbold | It™s winter wonderland in the bootheel!!!


|
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Ed Newbold | It™s winter wonderland in the bootheel!!!


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Thanks all,
Ed Newbold residential Beacon Hill, Seattle [email protected]



Subject: Sandhill crane hit by car?
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 20:24 pm
From: lamoustique AT yahoo.com
 
I saw the body of a Sandhill Crane in a ditch just south of the entrance to Frenchman's Bar Park (Vancouver, WA) today. I see people speeding up and down 501 and wonder if it had been hit by a car. I regularly see other animals dead on that stretch of road. I know animals die, but I'd rather see them go when Nature deems it right, not when some idiot speeding down the road can't brake in time.Michelle MaaniVancouver, WA



Subject: Twitter mobile problem - rfi
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 20:21 pm
From: jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com
 
Hi Tweeterdom - I have a strange problem with getting onto this site with my Android cell phone that just cropped up this morning: When I tap the icon I've used for years, instead of popping the Washington Tweeters list open , I get a symbol of a red dot with a raincloud in it and the number 404 under it. There is a message that reads "The page you requested cannot be found." And a logo that says "SiteGround".  I have no problem getting onto the ABA Mobile Edition for any other geographic area!?!?  I'm not completely blackballed, because I can log in on my laptop as always. Any clues would be welcome!  Happy Birding - Jon Houghton, Edmonds



Subject: Eagles, Hauling Stuff
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 19:07 pm
From: gibsondesign15 AT gmail.com
 
I've written recently about our neighborhood Bald Eagle's hauling lots of
long grass material to their nest, also big sticks. This evening both Ma
and Pa eagle were carrying fairly good - sized Madrone branches - loaded
with leaves all aflutter, as they trailed behind, which looked fairly
amusing, somehow .

Jeff Gibson
just sayin'
Port Townsend WA



Subject: American Pipit in Tree?
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 18:53 pm
From: vickibiltz AT gmail.com
 
Okay, it™s a short tree, just as you leave the pond at Oyhut Refuge.
Couldn™t get a photo as it was too close. And flitted and his. Not sure if
it had been spooked by the Pregrine Falcon that had flown over, and that™s
where he ended up landing?Very few birds at the pond. 25+ Gadwall, 20 or
more American plover, Lesser Yellowlegs. The falcon got to the pond before
I did. Nuff said.
I need to find a better ocean view location with better birds for my
ocean only, what™s a bird Family.
Seriously ˜’
Vicki Biltz
Buckley Washington,
[email protected]

--



[email protected]
http://www.flickr.com/photos/s...



Subject: Fill injured raptor
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 13:58 pm
From: constancesidles AT gmail.com
 
Hey tweets, I just opened a late email from the CUH librarian, who reported that last Friday, a person came in to say that a "baby eagle" was on the ground. It appeared to be injured and was surrounded by crows.

Did any Tweets out there observe this?

FYI, I'm not sure what the observer meant by "baby eagle." There wouldn't be any small babies around this time of year, and I doubt anybody would call an immature eagle a baby. This makes me wonder if the observer really saw a smaller raptor, such as a juvenile Red-tailed Hawk or Cooper's.

What say? - Connie, Seattle

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Subject: Fir Island and Samish Flats 1-13-19
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 13:04 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
My son and I took advantage of the sunshine and made a run north Sunday afternoon with stops at the Hayton Preserve(?) on Fir Island and the West 90 DFW site on the Samish Flats in search of the elusive short-eared owl. 

No owls, but we did see a northern shrike at Hayton. Photos are here:
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...
With the beautiful weather, there were lots of folks out with spotting scopes and big telephoto lenses.
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Citizen science opportunity - call for banded Horned Lark sightings
Date: Mon Jan 14 2019 11:20 am
From: drdezwaan AT gmail.com
 
Hi all,

My name is Devin de Zwaan and I am a PhD student at the University of
British Columbia studying an alpine population of Horned Larks in Northern
B.C. We have been colour banding adult larks since 2002 and we have been
using geolocators to track migration since 2015. From the geolocators, we
know that some individuals winter in Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

We are requesting any information on the location of colour banded Horned
Larks. Specifics on where we suspect larks from our population may be
wintering and what information we hope to gather can be found in the PDF at
this link: (
https://www.dropbox.com/s/wm2h...
).

Although we suspect most individuals will be east of the Cascades, some
geolocator data suggests a few individuals winter at least partially in the
Willamette Valley. Essentially, if you know an area near you where larks
are frequently sighted, there is chance a banded lark may be among them!

Any information on the location of banded larks is extremely valuable, as
it will help us substantiate our findings and better understand the
wintering ecology of our population. Last but not least, any volunteers
will of course be credited if we are able to gather enough data!

Please feel free to ask any questions using the email provided on the PDF.
Thank you in advance!

Sincerely,
Devin


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Devin de Zwaan, BSc
PhD Candidate - Forest and Conservation Sciences
University of British Columbia
Website: https://www.researchgate.net/p...
Twitter: @DevindeZwaan



Subject: Northern Waterthrush not seen Saturday.
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 22:17 pm
From: alndonna AT wamail.net
 
We spent 3 hours looking near the Wylie Slough boat ramp. Some duck hunters saw the group of us with binoculars and came over to talk. We told him we were looking for the Waterthrush. One of them asked,  Is it good to eat? (what do you expect from a duck hunter!)

Al in Tacoma



Subject: Renton Glaucous Gull
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 18:24 pm
From: jbryant_68 AT yahoo.com
 
At Cedar River Mouth at 3:30, roosting on Boeing bridge over mouth of river.  Ebird currently having problems uploading photos, but they™re coming. Adult with very clean head, or worn third-winter bird with slightly premature red gonydeal spot

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: FOY fox sparrow, Brush Prairie
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 18:03 pm
From: lamoustique AT yahoo.com
 
A beautiful winter day brought the birds out in Brush Prairie. At the Botanical Gardens I saw two Fox Sparrows, my FOY. There were a lot of Brown-headed Cowbirds. I don't like their parasitic ways, but I do love their gurgling song, like a brook. Of course the usual suspects...Dark-eyed Juncos, Golden-crowned Sparrows, House Sparrows, a few White-crowned Sparrows. Black-capped Chickadees, but not in the plenitude I've come to expect. A couple of Anna's Hummingbirds. A walk to the ponds behind the gardens saw a lot of American Robins, a handful of Steller's Jaysand one Scrub Jay. Near the back pond I saw a dozen or more Bushtits, and a Red-breasted Sapsucker. There also were more Black-capped Chickadees and Dark-eyed Juncos near the forested area, as well as three Ruby-crowned Kinglets. In the back pond a lone male Hooded Merganser did a very nice disappearing act into the vegetation at the edge. As I left I saw a Cooper's Hawk.
Michelle MaaniVancouver, Washington (you know, the one across the river from Oregon)



Subject: Palm Warbler - Olympia (Capital Lake)
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 17:28 pm
From: tvarela AT hotmail.com
 
A very approachable Palm Warbler Saturday morning on South Capitol Lake trail in Olympia at second bench on lake side and later on pond trail at T intersection high in trees.

Palm Warbler Image


T Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/t...



Subject: The Birdbooker Report
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 15:18 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) A Field Guide to Cape Cod

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

2) Carnivores of the World (2nd edition)

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...
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Tweeters mailing list
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Subject: Osprey near Matthews Beach
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 15:14 pm
From: rfaucett AT uw.edu
 
My starling. Does a heck of a good job on Osprey.  California Quail is indistinguishable to me. He™s a super star.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 13, 2019, at 13:01, Barbara Deihl wrote:
>
> I heard an Osprey calling for about 10 minutes this morning (around 9 a.m.), coming from Matthews Beach area south of me. Never saw it, but I™m very familiar with the calls.
>
> Barb Deihl
> Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
> [email protected]
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
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Subject: Report back on ferries to Victoria
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 15:08 pm
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweetsters - On January 12, I asked for advice and opinions for
which ferry I should take for a June trip from Seattle to Victoria. I
mentioned specifically the Port Angeles -Victoria ferry and the
Tsawwassen-Swartz Bay route. I had forgotten about the Anacortes-Sydney
route.

I heard from eight Tweeters people with great comments and information.
I also then did some research of my own. Here's how it all shakes out.

There are three ferries we could take to get to Victoria: 1. Port
Angeles to Victoria (Black Ball Ferry Line, a private company); 2.
Anacortes, WA to Sydney, BC (Washington State Ferries); and 3.
Tsawwassen, BC to Swartz Bay (BC Ferries).

Reservations are definitely recommended on all three routes in June and
are required on the Anacortes route.

QUALITATIVE FACTORS

The Port Angeles ferry is a small vessel compared to the Washington
State or British Columbia ferries, so depending on the weather, the boat
can rock and roll. Most people deemed the Port Angeles ferry to be
reliable and a good service.

Several thought the Port Angeles-Victoria ferry would have better
birding than the Tsawwassen-Swartz Bay ferry.

Those who live south of Seattle viewed the Port Angeles ferry as a way
to avoid driving through Seattle. Also, the Black Ball ferry arrives
directly in Victoria, whereas the Anacortes and Tsawwassen ferries
arrive at terminals about a half hour outside Victoria. Also getting
through the border check is thought to be faster via ferry than by car
at the Peace Arch (Blaine).

COST

(This is a round-trip figure for six people in a minivan leaving from
central Seattle. It includes gas for driving and ferry costs. Remember
that there are two ferries involved in the Port Angeles route. I
converted the Tsawwassen ferry costs to US dollars.)

Port Angeles: $428
Tsawwassen: $309
Anacortes: $251 (There is a senior rate for passengers which helps.
There is no reservation fee, unlike for the other two routes. Also, cost
to get to the departure terminal is less than for the other two routes.)

TIME IT TAKES TO GET TO VICTORIA

Includes driving time, waiting time at departure terminals, border
crossing time, sailing time. (I figured half hour for border crossing
at the Peace Arch vs. 15 minutes for Victoria/Sydney, probably all
optimistic estimates. I estimated 1 hour waiting time at departure
terminals, except 1/2 hour for the Seattle-Bainbridge Island ferry.)

Port Angeles: 6 hours (two ferries involved)

Tsawwassen: 6 hours (lots of driving to get to Tsawwassen, border
crossing perhaps longer)

Anacortes: 5 hours 50 minutes (ferry ride is the longest of the three
routes)


FREQUENCY OF SAILINGS

Port Angeles: 3 x day (8:15am, 12:45pm, and 5:20pm)

Tsawassen: hourly, about 16 x day

Anacortes: 2 x day (8:25am, 2:50pm)


SUMMING UP

All of the routes take about the same time: 6 hours. But those hours are
spent in very different ways.

Biggest advantage of Tsawwassen is that it has hourly departures.
Biggest advantages of Anacortes are cost and also least amount of time
getting to the departure terminal. Biggest advantage of Port Angeles
route is for those who will avoid driving through Seattle. Those who
live in or north of Seattle don't reap this advantage. Also birding may
be better on Port Angeles ride.

Biggest weaknesses of Port Angeles route is the ferry ride can be rough,
depending on conditions. Also it is the costliest. Biggest weakness of
Anacortes is it has only two sailings a day. Biggest weakness of
Tsawwassen is the 2 1/2 hours it takes to drive to the departure
terminal plus the probable 1/2 hour to 1 hour border crossing at the
Peace Arch.

If we can get reservations on the Anacortes-Sydney ferry and if either
of the two departure times fits with our schedule, I think it would be
our best bet.



Subject: Osprey near Matthews Beach
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 15:02 pm
From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net
 
I heard an Osprey calling for about 10 minutes this morning (around 9 a.m.), coming from Matthews Beach area south of me.  Never saw it, but I™m very familiar with the calls.

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
[email protected]
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http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Osprey in Whatcom County
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 1:30 am
From: hikersammy AT msn.com
 
Not to fully doubt the recording, but many plumages of the Bald Eagle at age 2.5 have what I have always called, the Osprey look.. white head with dark eye stripe.  Often I have had to do a doubletake..  This is a common but not always plumage, leaving a very white front as well,   just something to think about.

Sammy
Sequim
________________________________
From: Tweeters on behalf of B B
Sent: Saturday, January 12, 2019 10:13 PM
To: [email protected]; WHATCOM BIRDERS
Subject: [Tweeters] Osprey in Whatcom County

A bird wise but non-birding friend was visiting another friend in Whatcom County today and saw an Osprey on Rutsatz Road about three miles east of SR9 on the North Fork of the Nooksack. Her friend told her that they see Osprey there all winter long. As best I can tell there are only two records of Osprey in January in Whatcom County in the past 10 years.

Blair Bernson



Subject: Osprey in Whatcom County
Date: Sun Jan 13 2019 0:13 am
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
A bird wise but non-birding friend was visiting another friend in Whatcom County today and saw an Osprey onRutsatz Road about three miles east of SR9 on the North Fork of the Nooksack. Her friend told her that they see Osprey there all winter long. As best I can tell there are only two records of Osprey in January in Whatcom County in the past 10 years.
Blair Bernson



Subject: RFI Iceland
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 22:36 pm
From: wallydavis3 AT gmail.com
 
My wife and I spent a week in Iceland during August a couple of years ago.
Here's the reference I bought while there; it is great
http://www.stanfords.co.uk/Ice... The ISBN
is 978-9979-3-3042-4. It has a map of the entire island with hot spots
identified and shows where each species is found on small maps. We saw lots
of shorebird nesting including puffins, terns, godwit, and whooper swan.
Like you, my wife is not a birder, so we emphasized the sites but stopped
quite a few times for birding particularly near the shore.

We decided to book a self-guided tour through Iceland Travel. They arranged
the hotels and a rental car and gave us suggested sites to see each day.
The tour we took was titled "Geysers, glaciers, and waterfalls."
https://www.icelandtravel.is/s...
alls. Really enjoyable and we want to go back to circumnavigate the island
which should be at least a 2 week tour.

Iceland Air owns many of the hotels and, if you use Iceland Travel, you will
likely be staying most of the time at an Iceland Air hotel.

Good luck,
Wally Davis
Snohomish

-----Original Message-----
From: Tweeters On Behalf Of
David Parent
Sent: Saturday, January 12, 2019 3:03 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] RFI Iceland

Hello Tweeters!

My wife (a non-birder but loves to watch us quirky birders) and I are
planning a trip to Iceland this summer. If anyone has experience there we
would be very appreciative! We plan to drive the ring road around the
country. Questions are;

Best time to go to see breeding birds
Not to miss birding areas
Not to miss points of interest
Great accommodations
Recommended bird guidebooks and human guides

Thanks so much in advance!,
Dave and Cathy Parent

Sent from my iPad
_______________________________________________
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[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....

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Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Edmonds Greater White-Fronted Goose
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 20:34 pm
From: deedeeknit AT yahoo.com
 
Saw a single Greater White-fronted Goose Saturday afternoon in the flock of Canada geese that were hanging at the Edmonds Civic Field (I was there from 2:30 to 4pm).
Speculating it is the same one that I have seen at the field on my occasional visits there throughout the Fall and Winter (usually weeks apart).

Dee Warnock
Edmonds
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Subject: Palm Warbler
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 19:06 pm
From: kenbrownpls AT comcast.net
 
western non-breeding adult observed picking through leaves, along lake side of trail near south basin of Capitol Lake, just south of cut-off trail.


Sent from Xfinity Connect Application



Subject: RFI Iceland
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 18:31 pm
From: ucd880 AT comcast.net
 
We were there last September, which was too late for breeders but some hung around ling enough. Been told that June is probably best for the breeding seabirds. Check out the Birding Iceland website. They point out a lot of places to see most of the specialties.  A guide would be a good idea.

The western. northwestern quadrant is probably best/birdiest. There is a whale watching trip that has great luck with the Sea Eagle.

We had a company set up the ground accommodations, which were all pretty nice. I can sent the name if you want. Lots of spectacular scenery and coastline. Iceland is expensive.

Should also note that I spent a day chasing Brown Trout and Arctic Char. A flock of Harlequins entertained us most of the day.


Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
[email protected]


> On January 12, 2019 at 3:02 PM David Parent wrote:
>
>
> Hello Tweeters!
>
> My wife (a non-birder but loves to watch us quirky birders) and I are planning a trip to Iceland this summer. If anyone has experience there we would be very appreciative! We plan to drive the ring road around the country. Questions are;
>
> Best time to go to see breeding birds
> Not to miss birding areas
> Not to miss points of interest
> Great accommodations
> Recommended bird guidebooks and human guides
>
> Thanks so much in advance!,
> Dave and Cathy Parent
>
> Sent from my iPad
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: RFI Iceland
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 17:03 pm
From: dpdvm AT whidbey.com
 
Hello Tweeters!

My wife (a non-birder but loves to watch us quirky birders) and I are planning a trip to Iceland this summer. If anyone has experience there we would be very appreciative! We plan to drive the ring road around the country. Questions are;

Best time to go to see breeding birds
Not to miss birding areas
Not to miss points of interest
Great accommodations
Recommended bird guidebooks and human guides

Thanks so much in advance!,
Dave and Cathy Parent

Sent from my iPad
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: RFI ferries to Victoria
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 16:01 pm
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
We're planning a mid-June trip to Victoria from Seattle and will be taking
our car.

We have never taken the Port Angeles- Victoria ferry.

We'd appreciate information and opinions on the difference between the Port
Angeles ferry and the Tsawwassen ferry trip to Victoria.

Cost, comfort, scenery, reliability, time, etc. Are reservations advisable?

Thanks,

Jane Hadley
Seattle, Ea



Subject: Closure at Everett STP
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 15:23 pm
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
Noticed it Thursday and meant to post. Sorry, Ann Marie. Seems to be some construction.

Phil Dickinson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 12, 2019, at 10:59 AM, AnnMarie Wood wrote:
>
> Just discovered that the road is closed to cars. Pedestrians ok. Could be due to water on the road - or hunters in area.
> Ann Marie Wood
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
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Subject: Union Bay Watch } Brilliance
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 15:16 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

Which local woodpecker do you find the hardest to notice? In spite of the flaming red feathers here is my choice.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: Lesser Goldfinch Pair at my Feeders in Auburn!
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 14:29 pm
From: garrettwhaynes AT me.com
 
Hello Tweets,

I have been getting a male and female pair of Lesser Goldfinches at my feeders in downtown Auburn for three days in a row now! I finally got some good pictures of them today and sent them to Ryan Merrill and he confirmed that they are both Lesser's. Very cool to have them in my yard. I got some new ground peanut feed for my thistle feeder from Wild Birds Unlimited in Maple Valley and they really seem to like it. I have decided to resurrect my Flickr account and use it for my birding adventures, so here is a link to the photos:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/1471...

Happy Birding!

Garrett Haynes



Subject: Snowy Owl predation rfi
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 14:26 pm
From: kebagnall AT gmail.com
 
Jaegers will raid Snowy Owl nests but I don't know how common that is. I
recall seeing a Paul Bannick photo of it. Also possibly wolves? I imagine
anything trying to prey on Snowy Owls cannot avoid some element of risk.
- -
Keith Bagnall
[email protected]



Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Jan. 13, 2018
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 14:03 pm
From: ellen AT 123imagine.net
 
Hello, Tweeters,

Last week on BirdNote:
* Black Kites - Do Birds Start Fires?
http://bit.ly/2Vx6UPj
* Ridgway's Rails on San Francisco Bay
http://bit.ly/2CSdBUI
* Kittiwake, Kittiwake
http://bit.ly/2SDDY6t
* Hooded Merganser
http://bit.ly/2TxntJ7
* Bohemian Waxwing - Exquisite Winter Visitor
http://bit.ly/2CR7oIx
* Treeswifts: Exquisite Minimalists at Nesting
http://bit.ly/2C5GECu
* Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary
http://bit.ly/2QnmY2k
-----------------------------------------------
Check out next week's stories about Western Tanagers and Hanging-Parrots PLUS
A Birdwalk 65 Million Years Ago ~and~ A Brief History of Cars Named for Birds!
https://mailchi.mp/birdnote/we...
-------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Please let us know.
mailto:[email protected]
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========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Subject: Closure at Everett STP
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 13:00 pm
From: amw.5737 AT gmail.com
 
Just discovered that the road is closed to cars. Pedestrians ok. Could be
due to water on the road - or hunters in area.
Ann Marie Wood



Subject: Late Osprey
Date: Sat Jan 12 2019 12:32 pm
From: rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com
 
Sorry for the tardiness of the report. I had an Osprey at the Salmon Hatchery about 12 miles east of Raymond on Hwy 6 on Wednesday.

Roger Moyer
Chehalis, WA



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