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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on June 26, 2017, 2:35 pm

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26 Jun: @ 14:29:25 
Duck Stamps on sale today [Walter Kuciej]
26 Jun: @ 14:08:06 
Pictures from Vashon island this s past Saturday [Mark Filteau]
26 Jun: @ 00:21:32 
Re: Birding in Leavenworth and Wenatchee area [Mike Stropki]
25 Jun: @ 22:07:11 
Re: Not a bird... [Hilary Barnes]
25 Jun: @ 20:42:43 
The Banded Slinkeroo [Jeff Gibson]
25 Jun: @ 20:39:40 
Re: "Baby bird brought to Seattle from Lk Talapus - now what?" [Nadine Drisseq]
25 Jun: @ 19:16:49 
Not a bird ... BCI bat site [Jc dipper]
25 Jun: @ 18:57:18 
Re: Union Bay Watch } Elderberry Whine [Stewart Wechsler]
25 Jun: @ 15:41:19 
Baby bird - thank you! [Lynn Wohlers]
25 Jun: @ 14:53:23 
Re: "Baby bird brought to Seattle from Lk Talapus - now what?" [Louise Rutter]
25 Jun: @ 14:44:39 
"Baby bird brought to Seattle from Lk Talapus - now what?" [Lynn Wohlers]
25 Jun: @ 14:21:48 
The Birdbooker Report [Ian Paulsen]
25 Jun: @ 12:51:33 
Eastern Kingbird at Spencer: Great trip! Bring hand-clippers!!! [Ed Newbold]
25 Jun: @ 11:12:03 
trip to NE Wash [Marv Breece]
24 Jun: @ 23:48:03 
Boreal Chickadee Report [Jason Vassallo]
24 Jun: @ 20:45:46 
Not a bird... [Rick Tyler]
24 Jun: @ 18:22:28 
Re: Birding in Leavenworth and Wenatchee area [Jane Hadley]
24 Jun: @ 16:01:48 
Union Bay Watch } Elderberry Whine [Hubbell]
24 Jun: @ 14:04:03 
BirdNote - Last week & the week of June 25, 2017 [Ellen Blackstone]
24 Jun: @ 12:57:12 
Virginia rail, Edmonds marsh 6-23-17 [Bill Anderson]
24 Jun: @ 12:19:34 
Ooops...Spotted it is!! [Caryn Schutzler]
24 Jun: @ 12:12:02 
American Goldfinch in Mountain Bluet at Lake Joy [Hank H]
24 Jun: @ 10:19:26 
Red Breasted Sapsucker, Baby Towhees, etc. / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler]
24 Jun: @ 09:55:37 
RFI: Whistler Squamish info. [Darwin O.V. Alonso]
24 Jun: @ 00:48:48 
Birding in Leavenworth and Wenatchee area [Mike Stropki]
23 Jun: @ 22:22:41 
Re: Common Nighthawk - Seattle [Nan]
23 Jun: @ 20:11:09 
field trip today to Whatcom Land Trust properties [Ed Swan]
23 Jun: @ 17:54:00 
Merlin / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler]
23 Jun: @ 16:23:58 
Re: Common Nighthawk - Seattle [Ed Dominguez]
23 Jun: @ 15:34:35 
Common Nighthawk - Seattle [Izzy & Kendrick]
23 Jun: @ 14:45:48 
Black-throated Gray Warbler? [Dayna yalowicki]
23 Jun: @ 09:29:58 
Re: MAWA at Discovery Park - No [Matthew D]
22 Jun: @ 20:30:24 
RE: Hybrid chickadee? [Josh Hayes]
22 Jun: @ 20:26:16 
Re: Hybrid chickadee? [Hal Michael]
22 Jun: @ 20:03:25 
Hybrid chickadee? [Josh Hayes]
22 Jun: @ 17:38:55 
MAWA at Discovery Park [David Olsen]
22 Jun: @ 15:01:07 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-06-22 [Michael Hobbs]
22 Jun: @ 10:36:46 
Edmonds marsh Virginia rail 6-21-17 [Bill Anderson]
21 Jun: @ 11:46:36 
John Marzluff student seeks suet feeders in Seattle for project [Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser]
21 Jun: @ 05:04:05 
Re: Anna's Hummingbird and my hair ! [Barbara Deihl]
20 Jun: @ 23:41:12 
Re: Crow Kills Young Rabbit [T.L. Stokes]
20 Jun: @ 11:02:51 
Battle Ground Red-eyed Vireo and Sunday Common Nighthawk [Jim Danzenbaker]
20 Jun: @ 02:07:09 
Re: osprey chicks at the Montlake Fill? [Will's Email]
20 Jun: @ 00:32:45 
osprey chicks at the Montlake Fill? [William Driskell]
19 Jun: @ 21:55:14 
Crow kills young cottontail [Ed Swan]
19 Jun: @ 20:37:31 
Father's Day birding, Bethel Ridge [Paul Baerny]
19 Jun: @ 13:54:09 
American White Pelicans, Protection Island, Discovery Bay [Merce & Michael]
19 Jun: @ 13:46:16 
Re: Anna's Hummingbird & my hair ! [plkoyama]
19 Jun: @ 12:29:46 
Bellingham American White-Pelicans [Isaiah n]
19 Jun: @ 04:09:02 
Anna's Hummingbird & my hair ! [Barbara Deihl]





Subject: Duck Stamps on sale today
Date: Mon Jun 26 2017 14:29 pm
From: WALTERK74 AT comcast.net
 
Today, June 23rd, the new Federal and Junior Duck Stamps go on sale. Federal duck stamps are mandatory waterfowl hunting license requirements every hunter over the age of 16 must purchase and carry. Through this program, hunting ducks, geese, and other waterfowl has become a vital tool for wetland preservation, as 98% of the proceeds go to the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund. It has been called one of the most successful conservation programs ever initiated.
Since the Stamp™s creation, sales have raised over $950 million to support clean water, flood control, and outdoor recreation. This revenue has also been used to purchase or lease nearly 6 million acres of wetland habitat in the National Wildlife Refuge System. As a result, countless waterfowl and other birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians have prospered due to the acreage obtained. An estimated one third of America™s endangered and threatened species find food or shelter in refuges established using Federal Duck Stamp dollars.
If you bird any of the National Wildlife Refuges in the area, you have benefitted from this program.



Subject: Pictures from Vashon island this s past Saturday
Date: Mon Jun 26 2017 14:08 pm
From: marklfilteau AT mac.com
 
On the hottest weekend of the year so far, the birds were smarter than I was, staying cool and still in the shadows. Poking around Vashon is always fun though. 
Here's a link to an album of some that I did capture.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Mark

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Re: Birding in Leavenworth and Wenatchee area
Date: Mon Jun 26 2017 0:21 am
From: stropkimike AT gmail.com
 
Thanks so much.  Took your recommendation for the guide.  Will update if
appropriate.

Mike
On Sat, Jun 24, 2017 at 4:21 PM Jane Hadley wrote:

> Mike Stropki asked for suggestions as to where to go and what he might
> encounter while birding in the Leavenworth and Wenatchee area.
>
> A Birder's Guide to Washington, Second Edition, is now online and provides
> exactly this kind of information about all parts of the state.
>
> Mike, to see a discussion of the best places to bird and what to expect
> in the Leavenworth and Wenatchee areas, go to:
>
> http://wabirdguide.org/stevens...
>
> And after you've birded this territory, please be sure to post a comment
> on this same web page if you find anything that has changed or is worth
> letting other birders know about!
>
> Jane Hadley
>
> Seattle, WA
>
--
Sent from Gmail Mobile



Subject: Re: Not a bird...
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 22:07 pm
From: habarnes AT earthlink.net
 
Hello Rick-

Sounds like your guest is a little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). It will probably not stay long- we had one for a day or so last summer. There's useful information in "Living With Wildlife" PDF series provided by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at:

http://wdfw.wa.gov/publication...

which indicates that this behavior is typical of young bats just learning to fly.

There's also more interesting information posted by Bats Northwest:

http://www.batsnorthwest.org/

Bat poop can look a lot like mouse droppings- there were bats roosting under the eaves at our cabin rental in Manzanita- this can be a health hazard, causing a lung disease (histoplasmosis). But bats nearby are more beneficial than not, and help keep the mosquitoes vacuumed up.

This little guy was a Bellevue Master Naturalist's previous "Species of the Year." Some of our group continue to be active with Bats Northwest, and have conducted bat surveys in the Mercer Slough. I have emailed one of them (also a C.O.B. Volunteer Naturalist and a birder), who may have more information for you.

May we ask where you are located?

Hilary Barnes
habarnes@earthlink.net
206-331-6058 cell


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Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: The Banded Slinkeroo
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 20:42 pm
From: gibsondesign AT msn.com
 
I've been watching plankton the past couple of days off the Marine Science float here in Port Townsend and in the vast array of plankton floating by I discovered a new (to me) species - I call it the Banded Slinkeroo.

What is a Banded Slinkeroo? Well it's a mystery to me and I love a nature mystery . At first I thought it was


Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
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http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: "Baby bird brought to Seattle from Lk Talapus - now what?"
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 20:39 pm
From: bearsmartwa AT gmail.com
 
There is a songbird rehab - if you're within driving distance of Enumclaw -
Kelley whom runs it really knows her birds and the facility is excellent.
It's called Featherhaven and it is ONLY for songbirds.
PAWS is also good if that's much closer for you.
I've brought Pine Siskins here when they've gotten sick.
Good luck. Btw, bread and milk are really bad for most birds (except
crows). I'd buy some suet for it in the meantime. All my local birds love
suet as a feeder for their babies
Best of luck,
Nadine

*Nadine Drisseq*
*Biologist, **Bear Smart WA*

*PO Box 152*
*Issaquah, WA. 98027*

Tel: (530) 628-7787 (call / text)
bearsmartwa@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/BearS...

On Sun, Jun 25, 2017 at 12:43 PM, Lynn Wohlers wrote:

> Hi -
>
> Unfortunately, my son brought a baby bird back to his Seattle apartment
> yesterday, from a trail near Lake Talapus, off 90 near the pass.
>
> As of yesterday evening the bird was in a cardboard box, and was feeding
> on milk with bread mixed into it. A photo is below to estimate age - it
> has not fledged, and there were no adults or other birds in the area when
> my son found it. Maybe it's a Gray jay?
>
> Any suggestions on what to do?
>
> Thank you very much!
> Lynn
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>



Subject: Not a bird ... BCI bat site
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 19:16 pm
From: dipper2c AT gmail.com
 
batcon.org resources will help.

http://www.batcon.org/resource...

Bat Conservation International.
Check the videos, also.

As for relevancy to a bird list, these fellow insect-eaters and
pollinators are valued enough that Central Texans contributed funds to save
the Bracken property around the cave from housing development.

The Nature Conservancy lands are monitored for endangered nesting
Golden-cheeked Warblers. I helped survey the Bracken property several
years, seeing a diversity of bird species, including Merlin, Red-tailed
Hawk, and Barred and Great-horned Owl at bats' emergence.


Julie Crouch
Central Texas
near Bracken



Subject: Re: Union Bay Watch } Elderberry Whine
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 18:57 pm
From: ecostewart AT gmail.com
 
About 2 weeks ago, in Lincoln Park, West Seattle, I was interested to note
that the Black-headed Grosbeaks were eating the Red Elderberries when the
fruits were still green! I question whether the seeds were ripe enough
for the plant to benefit from this.

While it didn't surprise me, it was interesting to hear that the Pileated
Woodpeckers were also eating the ripe berries! While I haven't witnessed
it lately, I would be surprised if the American Robins weren't among the
birds also eating Red Elderberries. I did catch the Band-tailed Pigeons at
Lincoln Park in the act of eating them just yesterday!

-Stewart
www.stewardshipadventures.com


> Message: 2
> Date: Sat, 24 Jun 2017 13:59:10 -0700
> From: Hubbell
> Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } Elderberry Whine
> To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
> Message-ID: <792E1333-ACEC-4E2E-B44F-42B233966E21@comcast.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Tweeters,
>
> Can you name three local species of birds which eat elderberries? You will
> if you read this week™s post.
>
> By the way, I forgot to mention that I also saw cedar waxwings eating the
> elderberries. So now you are still trying to thing of three other,
> additional species besides the waxwings. Good Luck!
>
> http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.... <
> http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....
>
> Have a great day on Union Bay!
>
> Larry Hubbell
> ldhubbell at comcast dot net
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
> attachments/20170624/8096f0d9/attachment-0001.
>
>



Subject: Baby bird - thank you!
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 15:41 pm
From: wohlers13 AT gmail.com
 
Thanks to several tweeters for the PAWS information.

Much appreciated!

Lynn



Subject: "Baby bird brought to Seattle from Lk Talapus - now what?"
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 14:53 pm
From: louise.rutter AT eelpi.gotdns.org
 
Take it to a certified wildlife rehabilitation organisation such as PAWS or
Sarvey:

https://www.paws.org/wildlife/...

http://www.sarveywildlife.org/...

Louise Rutter
Kirkland

On Sun, Jun 25, 2017 at 12:43 PM, Lynn Wohlers wrote:

> Hi -
>
> Unfortunately, my son brought a baby bird back to his Seattle apartment
> yesterday, from a trail near Lake Talapus, off 90 near the pass.
>
> As of yesterday evening the bird was in a cardboard box, and was feeding
> on milk with bread mixed into it. A photo is below to estimate age - it
> has not fledged, and there were no adults or other birds in the area when
> my son found it. Maybe it's a Gray jay?
>
> Any suggestions on what to do?
>
> Thank you very much!
> Lynn
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>



Subject: "Baby bird brought to Seattle from Lk Talapus - now what?"
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 14:44 pm
From: wohlers13 AT gmail.com
 
Hi -

Unfortunately, my son brought a baby bird back to his Seattle apartment
yesterday, from a trail near Lake Talapus, off 90 near the pass.

As of yesterday evening the bird was in a cardboard box, and was feeding on
milk with bread mixed into it. A photo is below to estimate age - it has
not fledged, and there were no adults or other birds in the area when my
son found it. Maybe it's a Gray jay?

Any suggestions on what to do?

Thank you very much!
Lynn



Subject: The Birdbooker Report
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 14:21 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) RSPB Spotlight Kingfishers

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

2) Guide to Seabirds of Southern Africa

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Eastern Kingbird at Spencer: Great trip! Bring hand-clippers!!!
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 12:51 pm
From: ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all,
Delia and I had a wonderful trip to Spencer Island yesterday by Everett today, where there was an Eastern Kingbird on the north trail on the Spencer Island side. Delia posted results to ebird.

This Kingbird was seriously good-looking, scroll down to the bottom of this link to see the photo, plus some shots of sunbathing Barn Swallows.
http://ednewbold.com/spring-sh...


As per usual with areas that have been preserved for nature in this wonderful Puget Sound Basin, very few people are visiting this area.

Delia and I have a nice pair of hand-clippers for trimming vegetation, at many points we wished that we had thrown it into the backpack, it would have helped defend against the encroaching blackberries and rose branches and would be more or less necessary for trying to follow the trail that goes north on the Eastern side of the island..
Best wishes,
Ed Newbold ednewbold1@yahoo.com



Subject: trip to NE Wash
Date: Sun Jun 25 2017 11:12 am
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
>From June 17 thru June 22 I visited the Northeast corner of our state with friends John McMillan and Mary Manning. Our list of birds, mammals and flowers was ample; I'll mention a few here.


06.17.17 Calispell Lake, Pend Oreille Co.
55 species during a short visit including:
American White Pelican - 4
Wilson's Snipe
Greater Yellowlegs - 1 in alt plum
Wilson's Phalarope - pair
Red-eyed Vireo
Gray Catbird
American Redstart
Northern Waterthrush





06.18.17 Sullivan Lake & Mt Salmo, Pend Oreille Co.
A few common passerines around the lake. Couldn't reach Mt Salmo due to snow on the road. We made it to about 5800' elevation and didn't see much in the way of boreal species. Did see a Showshoe Hare and heard a Gray Jay.


06.19.17 Waitts Lake, Little Sweden Rd & Little Pend Oreille NWR, Stevens Co.
Waitt's Lake
Red-necked Grebe - 2 ; 1 likely on nest
Little Sweden Road - 21 species at one stop
Black-chinned & Rufous Hummingbird
Red-eyed Vireo
American Redstart
Nashville Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Little Pend Oreille NWR
arrived late in the day; had a few good birds
Bufflehead - female w/ 4 young
Common Nighthawk - several
Black-chinned Hummer - male at headquarters feeder
Calliope Hummer - male at hdqtrs feeder
Black-backed Woodpecker - 1 female
Snowshoe Hare


06.20.17 Colville STP, Stevens & Friedlander Meadows, Ferry Co
Colville STP - the gate was being opened as we arrived
Eared Grebe - 5
all 3 teal
Redhead - lost count; 20 or more
Common Goldeneye w/ 2 young
Bufflehead - 1 male
Yellow-headed Blackbirds - many
Bobolink - seen in neighboring field
Friedlander Meadows - we were distracted from birding by 2 Black Bears in the meadow.
videos at : https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


06.21.17 Sherman Pass, Ferry County
The birding was very good, but none of the sought after boreal species to report.
The highlight appeared on Hwy 20, just a bit west of the summit when a cow Moose with calf ran in front of our moving vehicle. It was a close call, but all escaped unharmed. There was no time for photos.


06.22.17 - Okanogan County
On the way home we saw a few Bobolinks at Aeneas Valley Road and a Golden Eagle at Pateros.











Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
marvbreece@q.com



Subject: Boreal Chickadee Report
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 23:48 pm
From: Jason.Vassallo AT outlook.com
 
Thank you to everyone that helped with details on Boreal Chickadees in Okanogan Co.! I was very successful this morning. Heading up from Conconully, I was only about 2 miles past Salmon meadows campground when I heard some chickadees calling from back in the forest. I started doing some pygmy owl tooting and then the chickadees rushed into the tree in front of me. There was a large number of Mountain Chickadees, but at least one Boreal with them. The trick definitely seems to listen for chickadees and hope to find a Boreal within the flocks, as others mentioned too. The stretch from the Campground to the top seems to be the best place to look (Road conditions were rough).
Given what people had said about how tricky it is to find Boreal Chickadee I had allotted a whole mornings work to try to find them. I got one in about 10 minutes. I believe I was exceptionally lucky, not to mention the great views.

The chickadee has competition for the highlight of the trip however, as I also enjoyed amazing views of one of the Hawk Owls that have nested in Ferry Co. (Exact location will not be given out for safety of the Owls).

Some pictures of both birds and some others from the trip can be seen here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Good birding,
Jason Vassallo
Jason.vassallo@outlook.com
Seattle



Subject: Not a bird...
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 20:45 pm
From: rhtyler AT gmail.com
 
Anyone here a bat expert? I have a very small brown bag perching over my
front door, and when I approached it did not move. It's there now but was
not there at around 3pm. I have pictures of anyone wants to see them. It's
definitely alive but that's all I can tell.

What should I know about bats on my porch?

Rick Tyler



Subject: Re: Birding in Leavenworth and Wenatchee area
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 18:22 pm
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
Mike Stropki asked for suggestions as to where to go and what he might
encounter while birding in the Leavenworth and Wenatchee area.

A Birder's Guide to Washington, Second Edition, is now online and
provides exactly this kind of information about all parts of the state.

Mike, to see a discussion of the best places to bird and what to expect
in the Leavenworth and Wenatchee areas, go to:

http://wabirdguide.org/stevens...

And after you've birded this territory, please be sure to post a comment
on this same web page if you find anything that has changed or is worth
letting other birders know about!

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA



Subject: Union Bay Watch } Elderberry Whine
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 16:01 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

Can you name three local species of birds which eat elderberries? You will if you read this week™s post.

By the way, I forgot to mention that I also saw cedar waxwings eating the elderberries. So now you are still trying to thing of three other, additional species besides the waxwings. Good Luck!

http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....

Have a great day on Union Bay!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of June 25, 2017
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 14:04 pm
From: ellen AT 123imagine.net
 
Hello, Tweeters,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* A Rufous in the Rain
http://bit.ly/19S4Rs4
* Megapodes - Mound-Builders
http://bit.ly/2rrGrmB
* Do Woodpeckers Harpoon Their Prey?
http://bit.ly/1IBQ5q4
* Summer Solstice - Dawn Songs
http://bit.ly/2sno5Vk
* Three Buntings - Indigo, Lazuli, and Painted
http://bit.ly/JLmNJU
* Robins Are Very Choosy Nesters
http://bit.ly/1dlfsl3
* White-headed Woodpecker
http://bit.ly/1nRWBfx
”””””””””””””””
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2rNqO9t
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info@birdnote.org
========================Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcas...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcas...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find nearly 1400
episodes and more than 900 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



Subject: Virginia rail, Edmonds marsh 6-23-17
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 12:57 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Friday afternoon (6/23) I saw a juvie Virginia rail once again at the Edmonds marsh. It was foraging in the small, circular mud flat off the boardwalk about halfway between the #1 (far west) and #2 (main) viewing platforms. This juvie may be one of the babies that were photographed by friend earlier this year at the same location when they were just walking, fuzzy 8 balls.
Scroll down page 13 for photos:http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Ooops...Spotted it is!!
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 12:19 pm
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Sorry T's I had my Spots all in a tizzy and it really IS the Spotted Towhee. I'll have to scold my husband for confusing me!! (Guess I had it reversed...) 
It was really just a test for all the new master birders out there! HA!

Thanks, Eric!! ;-))

Caryn / Bird name challenged in Wedgwood

On Jun 24, 2017, at 9:20 AM, Eric Kowalczyk wrote:

> Did they change the names AGAIN??? Here in the west they are called Spotted
> towhees...in the East...they are called Eastern towhees......But as I do not
> keep up on things as regularly as I should.....names may have gone back to
> Rufous-sided????
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu
> [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Caryn
> Schutzler
> Sent: Saturday, June 24, 2017 8:18 AM
> To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Tweeters] Red Breasted Sapsucker, Baby Towhees, etc. / Caryn /
> Wedgwood
>
> Good early morning, Birders, (sorry, I just can't bring myself to use the
> word containing the "T" word these days...)
>
> Heard a flicker on the telephone pole across the street yesterday and today
> but then this morning I heard a different "hammering" and looked over and a
> Red Breasted Sapsucker was drumming on the same spot! It then flew on to the
> next pole and was able to get a shot of it with my new superzoom (2000mm!)
> to confirm.
>
> Then in the back yard my husband "spotted" the first baby Rufous sided
> Towhee. He'd been calling it a Spotted Towhee and had to update him on the
> name change. He is a great spotter!!
>
> We also had a couple of rats beneath the feeder (they've been quite happy
> beneath the suet with all the "droppings"). Needless to say I did not take a
> "shot" of them! Would have liked to!! Any way to notify the owl they are
> here? I did hear him a couple of weeks ago - but too far away...guess I'll
> try ringing the dinner bell!
>
> Stay cool out there!
>
> Caryn / Wedgwood_______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>

_______________________________________________
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http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: American Goldfinch in Mountain Bluet at Lake Joy
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 12:12 pm
From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
> 
> The birds love it when we don't dead-head our flowers. In this video an American Goldfinch feasts on Mountain Bluet seeds.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> N.E. of Carnation, WA
>
>
> Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Red Breasted Sapsucker, Baby Towhees, etc. / Caryn / Wedgwood
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 10:19 am
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Good early morning, Birders, (sorry, I just can't bring myself to use the word containing the "T" word these days...)

Heard a flicker on the telephone pole across the street yesterday and today but then this morning I heard a different "hammering" and looked over and a Red Breasted Sapsucker was drumming on the same spot! It then flew on to the next pole and was able to get a shot of it with my new superzoom (2000mm!) to confirm.

Then in the back yard my husband "spotted" the first baby Rufous sided Towhee. He'd been calling it a Spotted Towhee and had to update him on the name change. He is a great spotter!!

We also had a couple of rats beneath the feeder (they've been quite happy beneath the suet with all the "droppings"). Needless to say I did not take a "shot" of them! Would have liked to!! Any way to notify the owl they are here? I did hear him a couple of weeks ago - but too far away...guess I'll try ringing the dinner bell!

Stay cool out there!

Caryn / Wedgwood_______________________________________________
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Subject: RFI: Whistler Squamish info.
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 9:55 am
From: dalonso AT uw.edu
 
I'm going on a climbing trip to Squamish (SW British Columbia), and I'm
looking for good birding locations in that neck of the woods. Do you all
have any recommendations for areas near Squamish or Garibaldi Park?
Gray-cheeked Thrushes are out of the question, right?What about Veeries
(Veerys?). We're willing to drive on rest-days.

Thanks,
Darwin

--
Darwin Alonso
University of Washington
HSB-J555
1705 NE Pacific St
Seattle, WA 98195-7350
dalonso@uw.edu



Subject: Birding in Leavenworth and Wenatchee area
Date: Sat Jun 24 2017 0:48 am
From: stropkimike AT gmail.com
 
Hello,

I am from Whidbey Island and will birding this area for the first time. I
would appreciate if you could provide me some suggestions where to go and
what I may encounter (hopefully).

Thanks.

Mike
--
Sent from Gmail Mobile



Subject: Common Nighthawk - Seattle
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 22:22 pm
From: billnan321 AT gmail.com
 
I am visiting Seattle near the airport. Had one or two Common Nighthawks overhead last night. 

Nancy LaFramboise
Still a Tweeter, Florida.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 23, 2017, at 2:22 PM, Ed Dominguez wrote:
>
> I heard one at 4:00 AM Wednesday the 14th at my home in Madrona....it was magical!
>
> Ed Dominguez
> Lead Naturalist
> Seward Park Audubon Center
>
>> On Fri, Jun 23, 2017 at 1:34 PM, Izzy & Kendrick wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> Sorry for this delayed report. On Wednesday evening, at about 9 pm, we heard the familiar peent call of a Common Nighthawk while at Sunset Hill in Ballard (Seattle). We saw one flying over Shilshole Bay. I realize these birds are occasionally seen/heard in town, but this was a first for us. Nice of it to show up as we watched the solstice sunset.
>>
>> Might be worth it to remember that they still visit this area this time of year.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> izzy wong
>> seattle, wa
>> gobirder@gmail.com_______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: field trip today to Whatcom Land Trust properties
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 20:11 pm
From: EdSwan2 AT comcast.net
 
I led a WOS field trip to the Catalyst, Riverstead, Ladies of the Lake and
Samish River headwater properties/preserves of the Whatcom Land Trust. It
was a pretty good day but the heat really dampened activity after 11am or
so. Some highlights were a Lazuli Bunting at the Catalyst area, the Barn
Owl using the barn there, two American Bitterns at the Samish River
headwaters and a heard of elk with some very young calves at Catalyst.



Lake Whatcom LW (extreme SE corner)

Ladies of the Lake LL

Samish Headwaters SH

Catalyst CA (south side of Rothenbuhler Rd)

Riverstead RI (north side of Rothenbuhler Rd)

Barker Property BP (north of Acme)



Canada Goose LW (just seen be a few where Alger/Cain Rd
hits the lake)

Wood Duck SH

Common Loon LW (seen by Ed Thursday scouting)

American Bittern SH 2

Turkey Vulture at each location

Bald Eagle RI

Virginia Rail SH heard

Spotted Sandpiper RI, CA one chick at RI with adult

Band-tailed Pigeon CA, LL

Mourning Dove CA, RI, LL

Eurasian Collared-Dove CA, RI

Barn Owl RI

Black Swift RI

Rufous Hummingbird everywhere

Belted Kingfisher everywhere

Red-breasted Sapsucker everywhere

Hairy Woodpecker CA

Northern Flicker several spots

Western Wood-Pewee RI, CA, SH

Willow Flycatcher everywhere

Hammond's Flycatcher CA

Pacific-slope Flycatcher CA, RI, LL

Warbling Vireo CA, RI, LL

Red-eyed Vireo CA, RI, LL

Steller's Jay LL

American Crow RI, CA

Common Raven RI, CA

Tree Swallow BP, SH

Violet-green Swallow several locations

Northern Rough-winged Swallow CA, LH

Barn Swallow several locations

Black-capped Chickadee several locations

Chestnut-backed Chickadee RI

Bushtit LL

Bewick's Wren BP

Swainson's Thrush everywhere

American Robin ditto

European Starling several locations

Cedar Waxwing everywhere

Yellow Warbler BP, SH, LL

Yellow-rumped Warbler RI, CA

Black-throated Gray Warbler BP

Common Yellowthroat everywhere

Wilson's Warbler LL, Alger Park and Ride

Western Tanager LL

Black-headed Grosbeak everywhere

Spotted Towhee LL

Savannah Sparrow CA, LL

Song Sparrow everywhere

White-crowned Sparrow CA, LL

Lazuli Bunting CA

Red-winged Blackbird everywhere

Brown-headed Cowbird several places

Bullock's Oriole CA

Purple Finch BP

American Goldfinch CA, RI, LL



Elk heard with several this season calves at Catalyst





Ed Swan

Nature writer and guide

www.theswancompany.com

edswan2@comcast.net

206.949.3545



Subject: Merlin / Wedgwood
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 17:54 pm
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Just had Merlin 3:51 fly over house south to north. Calling while flying.
Caryn / Wedgwood

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Subject: Common Nighthawk - Seattle
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 16:23 pm
From: edomino.ed AT gmail.com
 
I heard one at 4:00 AM Wednesday the 14th at my home in Madrona....it was
magical!

Ed Dominguez
Lead Naturalist
Seward Park Audubon Center

On Fri, Jun 23, 2017 at 1:34 PM, Izzy & Kendrick wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Sorry for this delayed report. On Wednesday evening, at about 9 pm, we
> heard the familiar peent call of a Common Nighthawk while at Sunset Hill
> in Ballard (Seattle). We saw one flying over Shilshole Bay. I realize these
> birds are occasionally seen/heard in town, but this was a first for us.
> Nice of it to show up as we watched the solstice sunset.
>
> Might be worth it to remember that they still visit this area this time of
> year.
>
> Thanks,
> izzy wong
> seattle, wa
> gobirder@gmail.com_______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>



Subject: Common Nighthawk - Seattle
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 15:34 pm
From: gobirder AT gmail.com
 
Hi,

Sorry for this delayed report. On Wednesday evening, at about 9 pm, we heard the familiar peent call of a Common Nighthawk while at Sunset Hill in Ballard (Seattle). We saw one flying over Shilshole Bay. I realize these birds are occasionally seen/heard in town, but this was a first for us. Nice of it to show up as we watched the solstice sunset.

Might be worth it to remember that they still visit this area this time of year.

Thanks,
izzy wong
seattle, wa
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Tweeters@u.washington.edu
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Subject: Black-throated Gray Warbler?
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 14:45 pm
From: dlwicki AT comcast.net
 
Walking around the yard, I spotted a bird feeding a chick inside of a large rhodie. When the adult left, I looked inside the bush and right into the face of the chick. I grabbed my binos and parked on the grass a ways away to wait for the mom to come back, which looks like a Black-throated Gray Warbler. I was unable to see a yellow spot near the eye and admittedly I am not very knowledgable about less common backyard birds but have examined my bird books and it seems a match. The almost constant call while back and forth with food was a chit chit chit similar to a Junco. Having never noticed this bird in the yard before, is it fairly common in the area? 

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa



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Subject: MAWA at Discovery Park - No
Date: Fri Jun 23 2017 9:29 am
From: matt.dufort AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweets,

Despite lots of searching yesterday and some this morning, as far as I know
the Magnolia Warbler has not been seen since yesterday morning.

Good birding,
Matt Dufort


On Thu, Jun 22, 2017 at 15:38 David Olsen
wrote:

> Hi Tweets,
>
>
> I seem to have found a Magnolia Warbler at Discovery Park this morning.
> It was perched 3m up in a small deciduous tree behind the chapel when I saw
> it at ~8:15am. Sorry for the delay but I was there for some time and just
> got a chance to look at my pictures. I initally thought it was a TOWA but
> the throat markings and partial white eyering indicate MAWA. See my eBird
> list for images.
>
>
> Happy birding!
>
> David G. Olsen
> MD Candidate Class of 2019
> University of Washington School of Medicine
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>



Subject: Hybrid chickadee?
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 20:30 pm
From: Coralliophila AT live.com
 
They seem to be pretty brown backed, but also black capped.

Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: Hal Michael
Sent: /2/017 6:25 PM
To: Josh Hayes
Cc: tweeters
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Hybrid chickadee?

How are they odd looking?



Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
ucd880@comcast.net

________________________________
We've got both species in our yard, and some odd looking fledglings. Any chance they're hybrids?

Josh currently at green lake

Sent from my Windows Phone

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Subject: Hybrid chickadee?
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 20:26 pm
From: ucd880 AT comcast.net
 
How are they odd looking?



Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
ucd880@comcast.net

----- Original Message -----

We've got both species in our yard, and some odd looking fledglings. Any chance they're hybrids?

Josh currently at green lake

Sent from my Windows Phone

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Subject: Hybrid chickadee?
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 20:03 pm
From: Coralliophila AT live.com
 
We've got both species in our yard, and some odd looking fledglings. Any chance they're hybrids?

Josh currently at green lake

Sent from my Windows Phone



Subject: MAWA at Discovery Park
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 17:38 pm
From: orbicularisoculi AT hotmail.com
 
Hi Tweets,


I seem to have found a Magnolia Warbler at Discovery Park this morning. It was perched 3m up in a small deciduous tree behind the chapel when I saw it at ~8:15am. Sorry for the delay but I was there for some time and just got a chance to look at my pictures. I initally thought it was a TOWA but the throat markings and partial white eyering indicate MAWA. See my eBird list for images.


Happy birding!

David G. Olsen
MD Candidate Class of 2019
University of Washington School of Medicine



Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-06-22
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 15:01 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT frontier.com
 
Tweets “ Our summer solstice edition of the survey was gorgeous, sunny, windless, birdy, and a rather chilly 45 degrees to start!  Baby birds were everywhere.  We had a very enjoyable, relaxed pace walk, and we spent a long time trying to get looks at birds.  Still managed to hear-but-never-see several species.

Highlights:

a.. Wood Duck “ 2 adult females and ~5 ducklings at lake
b.. Hooded Merganser “ first since April; eclipse male at Rowing Club
c.. Rufous Hummingbird “ probably ten juveniles noted, plus some adults
d.. Spotted Sandpiper “ two adults and a downy baby below weir
e.. CASPIAN TERN “ three flew down the slough “ First of Year
f.. Great Blue Heron “ fledged young all around the park, nests active with a variety of ages of young
g.. Green Heron “ adult and juvenile seen from Lake Platform
h.. Barn Owl “ Matt heard young in windmill *again* “ 3rd clutch???™
i.. Red-breasted Sapsucker “ One fledged baby and one still in the nest in snag near east end of boardwalk, both being fed
j.. All 5 common woodpecker species
k.. MERLIN “ flew through Tree Swallow swarm over Pea Patch
l.. Pacific-slope Flycatcher “ heard singing, eventually saw west of Dog Meadow
m.. All 6 common westside swallow species
n.. Orange-crowned Warbler “ one, looked to have bathed recently, possible juvenile
o.. Wilson™s Warbler “ one heard singing near Rowing Club building
Babies/juveniles were noted of the following species: Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Mallard, Rufous Hummingbird, Spotted Sandpiper, Great Blue Heron, Green Heron, Red-breasted Sapsucker, American Crow, Black-capped Chickadee, Brown Creeper, American Robin, European Starling, House Finch, Dark-eyed Junco, and Red-winged Blackbird.

For the day, 67 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor@frontier.com



Subject: Edmonds marsh Virginia rail 6-21-17
Date: Thu Jun 22 2017 10:36 am
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Wednesday evening I photographed what I believe is a juvie Virginia rail. It was in the same location off the #1 (far west) viewing platform where I usually photograph snipes. Going back through my old photos, I think it is the first rail I have seen at the marsh in five years. I know they are out there, I have just never been able to spot them.
Scroll down page 13 for photos.
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: John Marzluff student seeks suet feeders in Seattle for project
Date: Wed Jun 21 2017 11:46 am
From: whitney.n.k AT gmail.com
 
Hey, tweets.  See below...

Cheers,
Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 6:16 PM

Subject: Spy on the birds at your feeder, volunteer feeder sites needed ASAP

Cc: "Nikki E. Furner"



Have you ever wondered what kinds of birds you can attract with suet
feeders? Do you find yourself pondering what types of sneaky visitors
snack from your suet cakes when you aren™t looking? Perhaps you already
know who your regulars are; but wouldn™t you find it interesting to
contrast your feeder visitor log with who visits feeders in different
ecosystems (areas that are wilder, more urban, or simply covered with
different amounts of trees)? If so, then you will be interested in this
unique opportunity to participate in a suet-eating bird survey. For a few
weeks in July and October, we will be setting up multiple motion-detecting
cameras at suet feeders throughout the Seattle area. These sites will be
distributed all along the Urban-Wildland gradient in diverse landscapes. Once
the collection period is over, these images will then be used to determine
the species richness as it is distributed in many parts of Western
Washington in both Summer and Winter seasons. It certainly is exciting,
but we need your help! We need avid bird feeders who are willing to lend
us their feeding space as a data collection site for the two collection
periods. All that we require is that you agree to *allow us to set up a
camera* during the two collection periods and also *allow us access to the
site* to set up the cameras before data collection and to take them once
data collection is complete (for July and October). Of course, so we do
not miss out on any one of the amazing avian visitors, due to a
disappointing lack of food, we will also need you to *keep their suet
feeder filled* throughout the two data collection periods. For your
support, you will be given access to images from the camera at your feeder
as well as information about the study. Your privacy will be strictly
protected.

To volunteer for this project, please contact Nikki Furner, at
nfurner@uw.edu as soon as possible. We need at least 10 volunteers within
a ten-mile radius of UW campus. Others outside of that range are also
encouraged to apply (< 1.5 hr. drive). This project will be conducted by
ESRM Senior student, Nikki Furner, under the direction of wildlife expert,
Professor John Marzluff. Thank you for your attention.



Subject: Re: Anna's Hummingbird and my hair !
Date: Wed Jun 21 2017 5:04 am
From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net
 
No more encounters of the hair kind, but, in response to those of you who sent ideas and stories:  1. Yes, it could have been that the bird was attracted to my deep-pink T-shirt as well as the white hair;   2.  No noticeable nest was lodged within the maple; and,  3. The hummer did not attempt to gain access to either of my nostrils (see Penny Koyama's tale from Portal, AZ - Tweeters 6/19/17 !!!).
Thanks for the thoughts and entertainment :-)

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl@comcast.net_______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: Crow Kills Young Rabbit
Date: Tue Jun 20 2017 23:41 pm
From: tlstokespoetry AT gmail.com
 
It is interesting to hear about the crow vs young rabbit. About a week ago, a friend who lives near Ames Lake watched a squirrel grab a young rabbit by the ear, try to kill it and then dragged it across the yard into bushes.

T. L. Stokes
Redmond, WA

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Subject: Battle Ground Red-eyed Vireo and Sunday Common Nighthawk
Date: Tue Jun 20 2017 11:02 am
From: jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

On Sunday night, I heard my first ever Common Nighthawk for Clark County
and it flew over my Battle Ground yard! This morning's treat was a singing
Red-eyed Vireo which continues my string of 8 consecutive years for this
species recorded from my yard. A quick analysis of arrival dates shows
that this is only about two days earlier than average.

Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker@gmail.com



Subject: osprey chicks at the Montlake Fill?
Date: Tue Jun 20 2017 2:07 am
From: yekramw AT gmail.com
 
Great post!  I wish I could have seen seen how with a cigar in his beak!

Will Markey
General Adjuster
Cell - 253-569-8455
Sent from my IPhone

> On Jun 19, 2017, at 22:31, William Driskell wrote:
>
> Tweets!
>
> This evening I noted a couple of changes in the behavior of the nesting female osprey. At first I noticed she was more active, standing and looking down into the nest rather than her usual brooding self. And when she chirped for the male to bring her fish takeout, there was a series of muted buzzy afternotes coming from the nest. When the male finally arrived with dinner, she fiddled about on the edge of the nest, then flew off as usual but instead of sitting on the distant lighting pole and consuming it, she returned bringing the fish. She did this a couple of times (usually she's just gone with the meal). Might this suggest the beginning of chick feeding? The final clue was papa watching it all from the perch... and smoking a cigar. I was astounded; how could he even light a cigar with those talons?
>
> --
> William Driskell
> Seattle WA
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
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Subject: osprey chicks at the Montlake Fill?
Date: Tue Jun 20 2017 0:32 am
From: bdriskell AT comcast.net
 
Tweets!

This evening I noted a couple of changes in the behavior of the nesting
female osprey. At first I noticed she was more active, standing and
looking down into the nest rather than her usual brooding self. And
when she chirped for the male to bring her fish takeout, there was a
series of muted buzzy afternotes coming from the nest. When the male
finally arrived with dinner, she fiddled about on the edge of the nest,
then flew off as usual but instead of sitting on the distant lighting
pole and consuming it, she returned bringing the fish. She did this a
couple of times (usually she's just gone with the meal). Might this
suggest the beginning of chick feeding? The final clue was papa
watching it all from the perch... and smoking a cigar. I was astounded;
how could he even light a cigar with those talons?

--
William Driskell
Seattle WA

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Subject: Crow kills young cottontail
Date: Mon Jun 19 2017 21:55 pm
From: Edswan2 AT comcast.net
 
Just now a crow caught a good sized young cotton tail bunny and pecked it to death. My wife saw it fly over to the yard with the bunny still squirming, grabbed by the neck. The crow then pounded it with its beak. There are a number of bunnies that run around along the sides of the sidewalk and front yards in our West Seattle neighborhood. This one was definitely at least a month or so old. It seems like a very large prey item for a crow.
Ed
Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
edswan2@comcast.net
206.949.3545
www.theswancompany.com



Subject: Father's Day birding, Bethel Ridge
Date: Mon Jun 19 2017 20:37 pm
From: pbaerny AT gmail.com
 
My nearly 19 year old daughter, Emma, went birding with me yesterday for
Father's Day. She likes camping, so we went to Bethel Ridge so that I might
pick up Flammulated Owl, Black-backed and American Three-toed Woodpeckers.
Emma is not a birder! But occasionally is up for humoring her dad. Despite
herself, she is developing a nice list of bird's.
Emma's highlights:
Indigo Bunting: Audubon Rd. (She found the bird while I was gabbing with
another birder). I was very proud!
Lewis's Woodpecker, Lazuli Bunting and Yellow-breasted Chat: Oak Creek Rd.
At Bethel Ridge Rd.
Black-backed Woodpecker feeding Young at nest cavity. (Just before MP.1.5
left side, heading up road).
Common Nighthawk:
Flammulated Owl: (heard this morning from camp) Just past MP. 4.5
She also picked up Sooty Grouse (heard), Chipping Sparrow, Hermit Thrush
and Townsend Solitaire, while avoiding helping setting up camp.
Birds Emma missed:
Common Poorwill: Landed at campsite after Emma turned in for the night.
American Three-toed Woodpecker and Prairie Falcon: (while Emma slept in).



Subject: American White Pelicans, Protection Island, Discovery Bay
Date: Mon Jun 19 2017 13:54 pm
From: owlright AT yahoo.com
 
My wife & I were hostess & host for the Port Townsend Marine Science Center's boat trip out to Protection Island, Discovery Bay, yesterday afternoon, Sunday 6.18. We saw 13 adult American White Pelicans loafing on the shore, a first for the Island's bird list.

Cheers!

Michael Tarachow & Merce Dostale,
Port Townsend
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Subject: Anna's Hummingbird & my hair !
Date: Mon Jun 19 2017 13:46 pm
From: plkoyama AT comcast.net
 
Barb,

I can't say why it was attracted to you, but when David and I were in Portal
AZ in April, we were at Bob Rodriguez's place (formerly Dave Jaspers') for
the Streak-backed Oriole. When he was walking us to the bird feeding area,
a Broad-billed Hummingbird flew up to him and proceeded to probe his nostril
with its bill. He stood right there and let the bird go at it. He didn't
seem shocked, but we were, so much so that we didn't ask him anything about
it!! His nose was not red and it did not seem to have nesting material!

Penny Koyama, Bothell
plkoyama at comcast dot net

-----Original Message-----
From: Barbara Deihl
Sent: Monday, June 19, 2017 2:08 AM
To: Tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Anna's Hummingbird & my hair !

Yesterday morning as I was looking around the yard for the source of the
honey-sweet scent, a hummingbird drew me to it - a honeysuckle winding
through a Japanese maple! The moment I arrived at the location of the
flowers, out popped a hummer, heading toward my head. How did it know I was
as intent on sipping on those little tubules as it was ? ! Was it trying to
compete with me, OR, was it, as once happened a few years ago, attempting to
gather up some of the soft, white wisps of my hair, to line a nest ? Or
...?
Anyone else have this sort of encounter with one of the little spitfires?
I'd love to hear any tales or thoughts on the whys of it's attraction to
me - and no, I had not applied any flowery scent to myself .
I can't wait to try this again this morning - such a delicious and
delightful immersion into an almost-summer morning :-)

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl@comcast.net

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Subject: Bellingham American White-Pelicans
Date: Mon Jun 19 2017 12:29 pm
From: isaiahn0919 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweets,
There's currently 26 American White-Pelicans in Bellingham Bay off Marine
Dr Park.



Subject: Anna's Hummingbird & my hair !
Date: Mon Jun 19 2017 4:09 am
From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net
 
Yesterday morning as I was looking around the yard for the source of the honey-sweet scent, a hummingbird drew me to it - a honeysuckle winding through a Japanese maple!  The moment I arrived at the location of the flowers, out popped a hummer, heading toward my head.  How did it know I was as intent on sipping on those little tubules as it was ? !  Was it trying to compete with me, OR, was it, as once happened a few years ago, attempting to gather up some of the soft, white wisps of my hair, to line a nest ?  Or ...?
Anyone else have this sort of encounter with one of the little spitfires?
I'd love to hear any tales or thoughts on the whys of it's attraction to me - and no, I had not applied any flowery scent to myself .
I can't wait to try this again this morning - such a delicious and delightful immersion into an almost-summer morning :-)

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl@comcast.net

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Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Contact us.

  • 93 Clinton Street Suite ABA
  • Delaware City, DE 19706
  • Toll Free: (800) 850-2473
  • Phone: (302) 838-3660
  • Fax: (302) 838-3651

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