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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on December 11, 2017, 1:20 am

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11 Dec: @ 01:14:00 
“Putting the lives of birds above the lives of people” Emails show Ryan Zinke push for controversial road - CNN [Dan Reiff]
11 Dec: @ 01:08:08 
Re: RFI: San Juan Island birding [Jane Hadley]
10 Dec: @ 23:19:07 
Snowy At Sandy Point????? YES [Rhett Wilkins]
10 Dec: @ 22:10:02 
Seattle Mountain Chickadees [pan]
10 Dec: @ 18:04:03 
Window collision prevention [Tiffany Linbo]
10 Dec: @ 16:12:04 
Snowy at Sandy Point today????? [Peggy Mundy]
10 Dec: @ 15:42:11 
Re: Whidbey Island Traverse [Scott Ramos]
10 Dec: @ 15:41:07 
Union Bay Watch } A Pirate's Bounty [Hubbell]
10 Dec: @ 15:02:47 
Fwd: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates  [Dan Reiff]
10 Dec: @ 15:02:13 
Re: Tweeters Digest, Vol 160, Issue 9 [Cathy Scott]
10 Dec: @ 14:19:43 
Re: Whidbey Island Traverse [Wilson Cady]
10 Dec: @ 13:15:21 
The Birdbooker Report [Ian Paulsen]
10 Dec: @ 13:05:05 
FW: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates  [Tucker, Trileigh]
10 Dec: @ 12:55:31 
Whidbey Island Traverse [Scott Ramos]
10 Dec: @ 12:44:25 
Snow goose (?), Green Lake, Seattle [Kevin T. Moore]
10 Dec: @ 11:36:04 
RFI: San Juan Island birding [Richard Anderson]
10 Dec: @ 10:52:02 
Raptor ID Help [Jack Nolan]
10 Dec: @ 07:42:41 
O.T. RFI Amphibians [sremse]
10 Dec: @ 00:01:11 
Cooper's Hawk eating a rabbit at Marymoor [Hank H]
09 Dec: @ 23:35:45 
Yellow-billed Loon at Point Hudson in Port Townsend [Duncan, Scot]
09 Dec: @ 22:57:22 
First Blog Post on California Trip [B B]
09 Dec: @ 18:17:25 
Intergrade Northern Flicker? [Byers]
09 Dec: @ 14:03:51 
BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 10, 2017 [Ellen Blackstone]
09 Dec: @ 13:39:39 
Skagit Gyrfalcon [Tom Mansfield]
09 Dec: @ 13:08:47 
Skagit Gyrfalcon (GYRF) [Tom Mansfield]
09 Dec: @ 08:10:45 
RFI from the Netherlands: winter birds in WA [Roland van der Vliet]
08 Dec: @ 23:46:39 
Magnuson Park, 8 December 2017 [Scott Ramos]
08 Dec: @ 22:35:51 
Rockpipers at Ocean Shores [Kenneth Trease]
08 Dec: @ 18:46:15 
Skagit Blue Jay [Charles Desilets]
08 Dec: @ 17:10:04 
Samish Flats Falco [B B]
08 Dec: @ 16:10:15 
RFI Western Screech Owl Nest Boxes [Eric Carlson]
08 Dec: @ 14:04:14 
Red Crossbills around Blaine WA [Eric Ellingson]
08 Dec: @ 07:27:26 
Re: Your message to Tweeters awaits moderator approval [Dan Reiff]
07 Dec: @ 23:10:57 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-12-07 [Michael Hobbs]
07 Dec: @ 20:19:02 
Birding in the fog [Mike & MerryLynn]
07 Dec: @ 17:01:41 
Eastside Audubon Samish-Skagit trip 12/6 [B&PBell]
07 Dec: @ 16:22:37 
Tufted Duck hybrid at Chambers Bay, Pierce Co. [Wayne Weber]
07 Dec: @ 12:26:55 
Samish Gyr & Dunlin Murmuration [Marv Breece]
07 Dec: @ 11:24:04 
Gyrfalcon in the Skagit? [STEVE KOHL M.D.]
07 Dec: @ 10:17:58 
RE: Tweeters Digest, Vol 160, Issue 4 Two Short-eared Owls at Billy Frank Jr./Nisqually [Steve Krival]
06 Dec: @ 17:24:42 
Asotin county Lesser Black-backed Gull x two [Keith Carlson]
06 Dec: @ 14:47:18 
Thanks to Marv and Mark [Barbara Deihl]
06 Dec: @ 13:39:04 
Swamp Sparrow in Longview [Russ Koppendrayer]
06 Dec: @ 12:31:36 
Trumpeter swans at Union Bay/Montlake Fill [Duncan, Scot]
06 Dec: @ 10:28:50 
Gyrfalcon in Skagit County [Mark Ahlness]
05 Dec: @ 21:09:44 
Re: Off topic: Birds of Chile, south to north [notcalm]
05 Dec: @ 18:57:55 
Off topic: Birds of Chile, south to north [Byers]
05 Dec: @ 16:29:27 
Common Redpoll [Karl Neice]
05 Dec: @ 15:11:16 
Re: King County Slaty-backed Gull [Andrew McCormick]
05 Dec: @ 12:14:14 
Common Redpoll [Dan McDougall-Treacy]





Subject: “Putting the lives of birds above the lives of people” Emails show Ryan Zinke push for controversial road - CNN
Date: Mon Dec 11 2017 1:14 am
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters,

I have not heard of Cold Bay. Has any Tweeters person been there and does it have once a year, the entire world population of black brant geese.?

Cold Bay, Alaska (CNN)Far down the Alaskan peninsula, where it curves into the Bering Sea, lies the remote Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. The federally protected, 492-square-mile wilderness area is home to brown bears, caribou, wolves, and, once a year, the entire world population of black brant geese.

The article link:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/10/...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: RFI: San Juan Island birding
Date: Mon Dec 11 2017 1:08 am
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
Hello Richard and Tweeters -

Richard Anderson asked for recommendations for birding the San Juan
Islands next week. A Birder's Guide to Washington, Second Edition
contains just this kind of information. And the guide has now been
placed online, so it is easy to get the information. The guide is at:
http://wabirdguide.org. The San Juan Islands info is at:
http://wabirdguide.org/san-jua...

Also, you can check out recent sightings in the San Juan Islands at:
http://birdingwashington.info/...

Select San Juan County and then search for sightings by hot spot, by
choosing any location yourself or by species.

Good luck with your birding.

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA

P.S. Birders who are out around the state birding: please go to
http://wabirdguide.org and post your comments if you find any
information of interest to birders about birding locations included in
the book. This can include access either now closed or now open or
otherwise altered, changes to habitat as a result of development or
fires, etc., new species that haven't been previously seen at a
location, parking issues, good viewing spots, etc. Let's keep the
content of the book updated!

P.P.S. You can buy the book at Seattle Audubon's Nature Shop, Powell's
Books, Buteo Books, Amazon.com or other booksellers.



Subject: Snowy At Sandy Point????? YES
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 23:19 pm
From: rhettwilkins AT gmail.com
 
For Peggy and her out of town guests.  Still there this morning, on the
north side of the water.



Subject: Seattle Mountain Chickadees
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 22:10 pm
From: panmail AT mailfence.com
 
Hi, Tweets,

The two Mountain Chickadees continue on the south side of Alki Point. I saw them, being fairly quiet but confiding, around 10:30 this morning in the pines at the southwestern corner of the water treatment building. I saw only one Black-capped with them, plus at least a couple Red-breasted Nuthatches in the area.

Testing luck, I then checked Martha Washington Park: Golden-crowned Sparrows, check, but no Harris's. I did see one slate-colored junco among the Oregons, and one brown Purple Finch eating native hawthorn fruits (or maybe seeds).

10 December, 2017,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Window collision prevention
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 18:04 pm
From: tiffany.linbo AT gmail.com
 
Im hoping someone out there has experience with this product to prevent birds from striking windows: 

http://stores.santarosanationa...

A friend uses 1/8 cord spaced 3 apart hung vertically in front of windows to prevent strikes, but was wondering about this company's use of monofilament instead. If you have any experience with this product or have strung monofilament in front of your windows as a deterrent, please let me know. Thanks.

Tiffany Linbo
Mountlake Terrace, WA



Subject: Snowy at Sandy Point today?????
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 16:12 pm
From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com
 
Friend visiting from Florida. We are wondring if the snowy owl is still at Sandy Point???
Peggy Mundy

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject: Whidbey Island Traverse
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 15:42 pm
From: lsr AT ramoslink.info
 
Thanks, Wilson. But, with one caveat: Rosario Beach is in Skagit County. Discounting that site, we did have 91 species for all the Island County stops.

Scott Ramos
Seattle


> On Dec 10, 2017, at 12:17 PM, Wilson Cady wrote:
>
> I checked the Big Day records at wabirder.com/ and this would break the Island County record for the month of December by 20 species! Sounds like a great trip, I hope someone turns in a report to Washington Birder.
>
>
> Wilson Cady
> Columbia River Gorge, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Union Bay Watch } A Pirate's Bounty
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 15:41 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

A few years ago, I wrote about a red-tailed hawk which I called, The Pirate of Kingfisher Cove. After reconsidering the evidence I have come to the conclusion that red-tailed hawks are a best second-rate pirates. Can you guess who I think are the first-class pirates on Union Bay? See the answer in this weeks post:

http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....

Have a great day of Union Bay, where the pirates live in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: Fwd: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates 
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 15:02 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters,
Wells Excellent Summer Adventure
Very interesting and detained data maps of the movement of a Snowy owl.
Dan Reiff

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Project SNOWstorm
> Date: December 7, 2017 at 9:03:28 AM PST
> To: Dan
> Subject: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates
> Reply-To:
>
>
> Read today's blog entry about cutting edge Snowy Owl research
> View this email in your browser
>
> Wells Excellent Summer Adventure
>
> Wells spring and summer movements, from late April to the end of October, including her nest site in northern Quebec. (Project SNOWstorm and Google Earth)
>
> As we mentioned last week, two of our 2016-17 owls have come back south and checked in. Chickatawbut has been quiet since her initial check, likely because her battery is still recharging. But Wells checked in a few days ago and uploaded her entire previous eight months worth of data, all in one enormous batch the first time weve gotten an owls whole summer backlog in one big rush.
>
> In all, the data trove totaled more than 10,500 GPS locations, tracking her movements in superb detail from southern Quebec last April, up through the middle of Quebec in May and into the Ungava Peninsula. Once there, she quickly settled down, and the data make very clear that she nested part of the huge concentration of snowy owls that were breeding in the Ungava this past summer, and whose offspring make up the bulk of this winters heavy irruption.
>
> Were still looking carefully at Wells data, but heres a synopsis of a very eventful year for this adult female.
>
> Shed last connected the end of April, when Wells was near Lac Saint-Jean, about 200 km (125 miles) north of Quebec City. April 22 she began moving steadily north through the boreal forest and muskeg of central Quebec. Even though her flight bouts were typically brief an hour or two, then a rest, which is normal for migrating snowies over the next week she made good time, only stopping for extended periods a couple of times, usually on islands in the immense hydroelectric impoundments that have reshaped the eastern drainage of James Bay.
>
> By May 1 Wells had moved roughly 1,000 km (600 miles) almost due north, and a few days later she had moved across the Mlezes and Feuilles rivers and into the heart of the Ungava. This vast area of subarctic tundra and rushing rivers is framed by Hudson Bay to the west, Hudson Strait to the north, and Ungava Bay to the east.
>
>
> The general area of Wells nest, covering about 1,000 hectares (2,700 acres). Most of her movements in this area are later in the summer, after the chicks have achieved some independence. (Project SNOWstorm and Google Earth)
>
> Wells made a final push, then settled down May 17 on the headwaters of the Vachon River and here is where she apparently nested. For the next four months, she rarely moved outside an area of roughly 1,000 hectares (2,700 acres), at the core of which was as 5 hectare (12 acre) nest site, where she spent the vast majority of her time. We have thousands of data points in this tiny area, showing how rarely she strayed from her nest, eggs and later her chicks.
>
>
> Home base the few acres around the nest site. (Project SNOWstorm and Google Earth)
>
> Along with similar nesting data we collected last summer from Dakota, up in Arctic Nunavut, this is the most detailed movement record of nesting female snowy owls that we know of, and something well be taking as much closer look at in the months ahead. We cant know how many chicks she raised, but the fact that she remained in the area all summer suggests she was guarding and helping to provision a successful clutch of babies.
>
> Four months to the day after settling down in her breeding territory, Wells began moving again on Sept. 17, and over the next month and a half she wandered in a big, flattened figure-eight some 400 km (250 miles) across northern Ungava, arriving back just south of her nesting site on Oct. 30. At this point she turned south right on time, based in tracks from other owls weve followed, which often commence their southbound migration around the end of October or early November.
>
> By that time, in that region, daylight is a scarce commodity, with the sun barely clearing the horizon. Wells solar-powered transmitter worked well but eventually the juice ran out, and it went into hibernation Nov. 5, when she was still fairly high up in the Ungava. It kicked to life enough to grab a few points as she headed south on Nov. 20 near the Quebec/Labrador border, and Nov. 22 in western Labrador. Then it woke up enough to send us an initial transmission on Nov. 26, when she was somewhere near the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
>
> The huge data transmission again depleted Wells battery, but it should be recharging, and when it reconnects next time well start to get current data for her this winter. But in the meantime weve put the huge treasure-trove of her spring, summer and autumn movements on her map page have fun exploring the subarctic landscape in her company!
>
> The post Wells Excellent Summer Adventure appeared first on Project SNOWstorm.
>
>
> Read in browser
>
>
>
>
>
> Recent Articles:
> Island Beach and Lenape, Down the Shore
> Sterling and Hilton Head West
> Chickatawbut and Wells Come Back
> On the Shoulders of Giants: Tom McDonald
> First of the Season: Hilton!
> Share
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>
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> Copyright 2017 Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art, All rights reserved.
>
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> Millersburg, PA 17061
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>



Subject: Re: Tweeters Digest, Vol 160, Issue 9
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 15:02 pm
From: catsatbow AT gmail.com
 
Looking for who to send dead birds to be tested to. More than 3 die-off
(probably 30-40 Anna's). Not window strikes or dirty feeders (I'm
educated). Skagit County Health Dept. website refers to Fish & Wildlife
phone number that is no longer monitored. I called county and they refuse
to help - says isn't their responsibility and they didn't seem to care that
their phone number wasn't good. I have 2 in the freezer. I've looked on US
Fish & Wildlife and sent them an email; sent local audobon an email, etc.
Just looking for a definite contact.


On Sat, Dec 9, 2017 at 12:00 PM, wrote:

> Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
> tweeters@u.washington.edu
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> tweeters-request@mailman1.u.washington.edu
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> tweeters-owner@mailman1.u.washington.edu
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Tweeters digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
> 1. Red Crossbills around Blaine WA (Eric Ellingson)
> 2. RFI Western Screech Owl Nest Boxes (Eric Carlson)
> 3. Samish Flats Falco (B B)
> 4. Skagit Blue Jay (Charles Desilets)
> 5. Rockpipers at Ocean Shores (Kenneth Trease)
> 6. Magnuson Park, 8 December 2017 (Scott Ramos)
> 7. RFI from the Netherlands: winter birds in WA
> (Roland van der Vliet)
> 8. Skagit Gyrfalcon (GYRF) (Tom Mansfield)
> 9. Skagit Gyrfalcon (Tom Mansfield)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Fri, 8 Dec 2017 20:03:07 +0000
> From: Eric Ellingson
> Subject: [Tweeters] Red Crossbills around Blaine WA
> To: Whatcom Bird List , tweeters
>
> Message-ID:
> namprd20.prod.outlook.com>
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> It seems to be a good year for crossbills.
>
>
> A bird I seldom get to see I've found in three different locations in the
> last month (Semiahmoo Spit, Point Whitehorn Marine Reserve and now five at
> my home in Blaine.
>
>
> I was under the impression the feed mostly on Spruce cones. I've been
> checking some of the heavily coned Spruce nearby the past few weeks with no
> sightings of them. Where I have found them is in Pine, Alder, and Western
> Cedar foraging.
>
>
> https://flic.kr/p/EanXqs
>
> [cid:2f52cba2-94ca-4444-a9fe-9fb764ffc1c9]Red Crossbill EanXqs>
> Morning light. A flock of five, three male, two female feeding high in a
> cedar tree, briefly came down lower to pose.
>
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com... <
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> [https://farm5.staticflickr.com...
>
>
>
> Eric Ellingson
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Fri, 8 Dec 2017 22:09:24 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Eric Carlson
> Subject: [Tweeters] RFI Western Screech Owl Nest Boxes
> To:
> Message-ID: <1675660888.1480387.1512770964261@mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> Hello Fellow Birders-
>
> I am interested in hearing from anyone who has had success with nest
> boxes for W. Screech Owls. I have had good success attracting Eastern
> Screech Owls (using nest boxes back East), but only for roosting during the
> day. According to Birdweb, W. Screech Owls are listed as a species of
> concern ( Red List) by Audubon and American Bird Conservancy and I'm also
> curious to what factors might be involved in their decline. I suspect loss
> of appropriate nest sites (especially in urban and suburban areas) i.e.
> lack of snags. Additionally, I have heard mention that Barred Owls are
> preying on them...
>
> In my personal experience, nest boxes should be pole mounted with a
> squirrel guard, otherwise you will attract squirrels. Also, nest boxes
> should have about 4" of wood shavings in the bottom. In the meantime, my W.
> Seattle Screech Owl box is being used as a nighttime roost for a Flicker,
> so I put up another box.
>
> Thanks for any information you have to share.
>
> Cheers,
> Eric Carlson
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Fri, 8 Dec 2017 23:08:32 +0000 (UTC)
> From: B B
> Subject: [Tweeters] Samish Flats Falco
> To: "tweeters@uw.edu"
> Message-ID: <1443240520.1317800.1512774512401@mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Steve and Connie Pink and I birded the Samish flats this afternoon quite
> thoroughly after the fog lifted. We had dozens of Bald Eagles, 20+ Red
> Tails, 6+ Rough Legged Hawks, 10+ Northern Harriers, 6 Short Eared Owls and
> more than a dozen falcons. Sadly no Gyrfalcon in spite of diligent
> searching but we had a Merlin in Edison, at least 4 Peregrines, maybe as
> many as 8 Kestrels and a Prairie Falcon perhaps 3/8 of a mile south of
> Sullivan Road viewed from Bayview Edison Road. Also some mighty fine
> pastries at the Breadfarm.
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Fri, 8 Dec 2017 16:45:11 -0800
> From: "Charles Desilets"
> Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Blue Jay
> To: "'Tweeters'"
> Message-ID: <0c1701d37086$f89a80c0$e9cf8240$@comcast.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Previously reported Blue Jay relocated 12/8 at 11:30 under feeder on
> private property in vicinity of towns of Bow & Edison. Exact location not
> detailed at behest of property owner.
>
>
>
> Charles Desilets
>
> Mukilteo
>
>
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Fri, 8 Dec 2017 20:34:17 -0800
> From: Kenneth Trease
> Subject: [Tweeters] Rockpipers at Ocean Shores
> To: Tweeters Tweeters
> Message-ID:
> gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Today at about 11:00 AM there were good numbers of Rock Sandpipers,
> Surfbirds, and Black Turnstones feeding in the rocks at the Point Brown
> jetty in Ocean Shores. It was a very nice day with sun and a stiff breeze
> blowing out to sea. Photos on my eBird checklist or at
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Fri, 8 Dec 2017 21:43:50 -0800
> From: Scott Ramos
> Subject: [Tweeters] Magnuson Park, 8 December 2017
> To: Tweeters Newsgroup
> Message-ID:
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Now that most wetlands ponds are full of water, there should be wintering
> duck action. Not. Particularly now that all but Promontory Pond are frozen,
> hardly any water birds were in the mitigation habitat. But, there were
> plenty on the lake. Scaup are back in increasing numbers, but grebes are
> hard to come by. Except for Western.
>
> It was an interesting day because of the frozen ground: less than 30 F to
> start, clear and just a slight breeze, then warming up to 40. The warm-up
> took its time though and the passerine activity seemed quite delayed. Some
> notables:
>
> Eurasian Wigeon - back for the winter, presumably, with the 100+ American
> Wigeon flock
> Canvasback - one male hanging out with the scaup (most of them are at the
> north end of the lake)
> Western Grebe - exact count of 485 birds, all but 20 or so in the
> typical large raft in the middle of the lake
> Sharp-shinned Hawk - adult male on Kite hill
> Coopers Hawk - immature female in the wetlands
> Herring Gull - one on the swim platform with the other 4 species
> Belted Kingfisher - as it has been doing all fall, flew out of its night
> roost in the meadows before dawn
> Northern Shrike - south fence line, eventually chased off by a pair of
> Annas; first of yearits been 4 years since I have seen one in the park!
> American Robin - tons! todays feasting was mostly on pyracantha berries
> plus some ground feeding:
> https://youtu.be/8W-K2_ze6iw
>
> For the day, 57 species.
> Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch... <
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
> Scott Ramos
> Seattle
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 14:09:06 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Roland van der Vliet
> Subject: [Tweeters] RFI from the Netherlands: winter birds in WA
> To: "Tweeters@u.washington.edu"
> Message-ID: <750488534.1060356.1512828546041@mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Tweeters,I will be visiting my family in Washington state again (after a
> previous visit in July-August 2016). They now live in Spanaway, south of
> Tacoma, and we will be visiting for X-mas (between 20 and 27 December).
> As a birder there are still several species that I would very much like to
> see. Last time, I received a lot of info on how and where I could find info
> on the web and also info on the 'Where to watch' book (that is now also on
> the web). So, I am now only soliciting for very recent info on the
> wintering specialities of WA state in the Tacoma area east to the Cascades
> (east of the Cascades is not doable this time unfortunately). So does
> anyone have recent info where, between Seattle, Olympia and the Cascades,
> it is possible to find:- Rusty Blackbird. I am aware of the Nisqually
> record earlier this autumn but it seems to have gone. I also read about a
> record east of the Cascades but that is really too far away. Any other
> birds around?- Ancient Murrelet. Until mid November regularly reported off
> Dash Point, but there are no recent reports on ebird or tweeters. Are they
> still around?- Northern Shrike. The bird at Nisqually seems to be
> infrequently seen (or reported?). What are its!
> regular spots? I read the North Dike but I cannot find this location on
> the Nisqually map: is this the Estuary Trail? Are there perhaps other
> reliable sites where it perhaps has not been reported as it has not been
> looked for (yet)? Like the restricted areas of Joint Base Lewis-McChord?
> Would the authorities allow me access to this site as a foreigner?-
> Northern Saw-whet Owl: the bird(s) in Nisqually have not been reported this
> month. Are they still being seen?- grouse (Sooty), other owls (Northern
> Pygmy, Western Screech), woodpeckers (Am. Three-toed) and rosy-finch: which
> trails at Paradise (Mt. rainier) would be best during winter to try for
> these? Or indeed elsewhere around Tacoma?
>
> A lot of questions (again, like last time). If you do not want to share
> info publicly, please respond in private.I hope you will be as helpful as
> last time!All the best, Roland van der Vliet, the Netherlands
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
> attachments/20171209/fb5930b0/attachment-0001.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 19:07:43 +0000
> From: Tom Mansfield
> Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Gyrfalcon (GYRF)
> To: Tweeters
> Message-ID: <2A84A97C-C9F4-4A53-A990-A57D218D7395@t-mansfield.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> As of the time of this post (11:05 on Sat) the juvenile GYRF is sitting on
> a pole watching ducks in the first slough on Bayview Edison Rd just north
> of the highway to Anacortes. Tom Mansfield watching
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
> attachments/20171209/84d37752/attachment-0001.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Sat, 9 Dec 2017 19:38:41 +0000
> From: Tom Mansfield
> Subject: [Tweeters] Skagit Gyrfalcon
> To: Tweeters
> Message-ID: <2013CCC7-EA34-4A7D-98B4-879B2A119EF1@t-mansfield.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Just flew west over dike toward Padilla Bay.
>
> Tom Mansfield moving on
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
> attachments/20171209/cc79e96a/attachment-0001.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@mailman1.u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
> End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 160, Issue 9
> ****************************************
>



Subject: Whidbey Island Traverse
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 14:19 pm
From: gorgebirds AT juno.com
 
I checked the Big Day records at wabirder.com/ and this would break the Island County record for the month of December by 20 species! Sounds like a great trip, I hope someone turns in a report to Washington Birder.  Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Scott Ramos
To: Tweeters Newsgroup
Subject: [Tweeters] Whidbey Island Traverse
Date: Sun, 10 Dec 2017 10:52:49 -0800

On a day full of superlatives, Andy Jacobson and I led an enthusiastic group of birders all over Whidbey Island for a Seattle Audubon field trip this Saturday. We visited several hotspots including Rosario Beach, Deception Pass SP including stops at Craberry Lake and the West Beach, Dugualla Bay, Oak Harbor Marina, Swantown/Bos Lake, Hastie Lake Rd beach access, Ebeys Landing, Keystone Ferry and Crockett Lake, Deer Lagoon and Useless Bay, with a final scan of the Clinton ferry dock after dark.

The morning started out cold and quite foggy, giving us qualms about the day to come. In fact, leaving Mt. Vernon toward the flats, the fog was so dense, we had to slow to 30 mph or less for safety. Fortunately, when we reached Rosario, we emerged from the fog and had glorious, if cold, weather for the rest of the day.

At Rosario Beach, we found the expected Harlequin Duck and Black Oystercatcher, but had a treat to see dozens of Red-throated Loon in the bay. From the rocky overlook, we could see that the loon presence extended quite far out into the sound. There was a single Eurasian Starling that gave us false alarms, imitating California Quail and Pine Grosbeak. On the rocks across the bay was a small group of Mourning Dove hunkered down. Heading back to the cars, we picked up a calling Huttons Vireo, then the hoped for Red Crossbills, a flock of 9 type 3 birds.

We made a couple of stops along Cranberry Lake, and, while looking for the sapsucker frequently present, found instead a Merlin perched right above the pullout. Closer to the swim area was a pair of Redhead that has been reported recently. At the West Beach, the flow of Red-throated Loon was quite a spectacle; rough estimates were close to 500 birds playing the fast moving currents. On the rock just off the parking area, a small group of perched Black Oystercatcher fulfilled an earlier promise. There were a a few Herring Gull mixed in with others and a small group of Sanderling flew in to perch there as well.

At the lake adjacent Dugualla Bay, a flock of at least 100 Trumpeter Swans were present as were several dozen Canvasback and the usual assortment of wintering ducks. At the shallow end, a group of Greater Yellowlegs were foraging and a Wilsons Snipe made a quick flight along the shore.

As usual, the Black Turnstones at the Oak Harbor marina did not disappoint. At least 200 birds lined the docks and boats, plus a small group of Dunlin and Least Sandpiper rested on the log boom.

Our first of several encounters of Long-tailed Duck was at the north beach access at Swantown. From the south access overlook we could see a few more, one still in alternate plumage. Across the road from the pullout was a pair of Red-tailed Hawks. One was consuming a dead Glaucous-winged Gull, unknown if this was its kill or a car/road kill. The other hawk gave up waiting its turn and flew off. Following its path, I noticed another perched raptor high above, a Peregrine Falcon. On the beach, another group of Sanderling grouped together, running and foraging southward and a few White-winged Scoter were seen. A little further south at the Hastie Lake Rd beach access were several more Long-tailed Duck.

As we turned off the highway toward Ebeys Landing, we had a quick fly-by of first a Sharp-shinned Hawk then an American Kestrel. Further down the road was another perched Kestrel. We then made a couple of stops at different points along Crockett Lake to peruse the large flocks of American Wigeon, finding just one Eurasian, and several other wintering ducks. Our first Northern Harrier appeared here and a Western Meadowlark was perched up on the opposite bank for a brief look. We also made the obligatory stop at the Keystone ferry terminal to study the old dock with all 3 cormorants present side by side. While watching the cormorants, a high and distant flock of birds flew over southbound that we were shocked to see were Sandhill Cranes!

By now, we were running out of time so made a quick run down to Deer Lagoon, always a good place for species diversity. Among our targets here were Short-eared Owl and Black-bellied Plover. Check! The owl was flying on the far shore from our vantage point but eventually perched in a decent location for shared scope views. While watching the Plovers, Dunlin and peeps, a Bald Eagle made a successful foray, bringing down one of the ducks (didnt see the kill so we were not sure which), scattering almost everyone in the process. Several Virginia Rail squeaked from the marshy edge, then, as were turning to leave, another high fly-by: a flock of 8 Sandhill Crane! Almost certainly the same 8 birds we saw near Crockett Lake earlier in the day.

We still had a little daylight, so made the quick swing to the Useless Bay access pointone the way there a Pileated Woodpecker flew right over our little caravanand found first a huge flock of dozens of White-winged Scoter, then in the diminishing light, a large raft of Brant.

We missed the first boat at the Clinton ferry dock so had a few minutes to do one last bird check at the dock, now well after sunset. And were rewarded with a good group of Barrows Goldeneye, barely visible in the vanishing light, the 100th species of the day!

A fitting end to a satisfying day of great company and excellent birding. Trip list available upon request.
Scott Ramos
Seattle



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Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: The Birdbooker Report
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 13:15 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) 50 Top Birding Sites in Kenya

2) Stuarts' Field Guide to the Larger Mammals of Africa.

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: FW: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates 
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 13:05 pm
From: TRI AT seattleu.edu
 
HI Tweets, 

Im posting on behalf of Dan Reiff, who was unable to share on Tweeters
the link for this interesting article on Snowy Owl research. Heres the
link for Project Snowstorms current blog post, and you can reach the
projects homepage from there:

https://www.projectsnowstorm.o...

Good birding to all,

Trileigh
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker, PhD
Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies
Seattle University

Pelly Valley, West Seattle
Natural Presence Arts website: naturalpresencearts.com
Photography: flickr.com/photos/trileigh/albums/72157661836833455





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Subject: Whidbey Island Traverse
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 12:55 pm
From: lsr AT ramoslink.info
 
On a day full of superlatives, Andy Jacobson and I led an enthusiastic group of birders all over Whidbey Island for a Seattle Audubon field trip this Saturday. We visited several hotspots including Rosario Beach, Deception Pass SP including stops at Craberry Lake and the West Beach, Dugualla Bay, Oak Harbor Marina, Swantown/Bos Lake, Hastie Lake Rd beach access, Ebeys Landing, Keystone Ferry and Crockett Lake, Deer Lagoon and Useless Bay, with a final scan of the Clinton ferry dock after dark.

The morning started out cold and quite foggy, giving us qualms about the day to come. In fact, leaving Mt. Vernon toward the flats, the fog was so dense, we had to slow to 30 mph or less for safety. Fortunately, when we reached Rosario, we emerged from the fog and had glorious, if cold, weather for the rest of the day.

At Rosario Beach, we found the expected Harlequin Duck and Black Oystercatcher, but had a treat to see dozens of Red-throated Loon in the bay. From the rocky overlook, we could see that the loon presence extended quite far out into the sound. There was a single Eurasian Starling that gave us false alarms, imitating California Quail and Pine Grosbeak. On the rocks across the bay was a small group of Mourning Dove hunkered down. Heading back to the cars, we picked up a calling Huttons Vireo, then the hoped for Red Crossbills, a flock of 9 type 3 birds.

We made a couple of stops along Cranberry Lake, and, while looking for the sapsucker frequently present, found instead a Merlin perched right above the pullout. Closer to the swim area was a pair of Redhead that has been reported recently. At the West Beach, the flow of Red-throated Loon was quite a spectacle; rough estimates were close to 500 birds playing the fast moving currents. On the rock just off the parking area, a small group of perched Black Oystercatcher fulfilled an earlier promise. There were a a few Herring Gull mixed in with others and a small group of Sanderling flew in to perch there as well.

At the lake adjacent Dugualla Bay, a flock of at least 100 Trumpeter Swans were present as were several dozen Canvasback and the usual assortment of wintering ducks. At the shallow end, a group of Greater Yellowlegs were foraging and a Wilsons Snipe made a quick flight along the shore.

As usual, the Black Turnstones at the Oak Harbor marina did not disappoint. At least 200 birds lined the docks and boats, plus a small group of Dunlin and Least Sandpiper rested on the log boom.

Our first of several encounters of Long-tailed Duck was at the north beach access at Swantown. From the south access overlook we could see a few more, one still in alternate plumage. Across the road from the pullout was a pair of Red-tailed Hawks. One was consuming a dead Glaucous-winged Gull, unknown if this was its kill or a car/road kill. The other hawk gave up waiting its turn and flew off. Following its path, I noticed another perched raptor high above, a Peregrine Falcon. On the beach, another group of Sanderling grouped together, running and foraging southward and a few White-winged Scoter were seen. A little further south at the Hastie Lake Rd beach access were several more Long-tailed Duck.

As we turned off the highway toward Ebeys Landing, we had a quick fly-by of first a Sharp-shinned Hawk then an American Kestrel. Further down the road was another perched Kestrel. We then made a couple of stops at different points along Crockett Lake to peruse the large flocks of American Wigeon, finding just one Eurasian, and several other wintering ducks. Our first Northern Harrier appeared here and a Western Meadowlark was perched up on the opposite bank for a brief look. We also made the obligatory stop at the Keystone ferry terminal to study the old dock with all 3 cormorants present side by side. While watching the cormorants, a high and distant flock of birds flew over southbound that we were shocked to see were Sandhill Cranes!

By now, we were running out of time so made a quick run down to Deer Lagoon, always a good place for species diversity. Among our targets here were Short-eared Owl and Black-bellied Plover. Check! The owl was flying on the far shore from our vantage point but eventually perched in a decent location for shared scope views. While watching the Plovers, Dunlin and peeps, a Bald Eagle made a successful foray, bringing down one of the ducks (didnt see the kill so we were not sure which), scattering almost everyone in the process. Several Virginia Rail squeaked from the marshy edge, then, as were turning to leave, another high fly-by: a flock of 8 Sandhill Crane! Almost certainly the same 8 birds we saw near Crockett Lake earlier in the day.

We still had a little daylight, so made the quick swing to the Useless Bay access pointone the way there a Pileated Woodpecker flew right over our little caravanand found first a huge flock of dozens of White-winged Scoter, then in the diminishing light, a large raft of Brant.

We missed the first boat at the Clinton ferry dock so had a few minutes to do one last bird check at the dock, now well after sunset. And were rewarded with a good group of Barrows Goldeneye, barely visible in the vanishing light, the 100th species of the day!

A fitting end to a satisfying day of great company and excellent birding. Trip list available upon request.
Scott Ramos
Seattle



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http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Snow goose (?), Green Lake, Seattle
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 12:44 pm
From: onewhitecandle AT yahoo.com
 
It's 10:30 am, Sunday, Dec 10th and there is, I think, an immature snow goose feeding in a flock of about 50 Canada geese and many Am. Wigeons on the playfield at Green Lake, Seattle. I took photos with my phone and can send if requested.

Kevin Moore
Seattle, WA
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Subject: RFI: San Juan Island birding
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 11:36 am
From: richardanderson59 AT yahoo.com
 
Hello,
I'm spending a couple days birding on the San Juan Islands next week. I'm not very familiar with the area. Any recommendations for productive locations (apart from - or to reaffirm eBird hotspots), effective scoping spots, owl habitat, etc. would be very much appreciated!
Thank you in advance!



Subject: Raptor ID Help
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 10:52 am
From: jacknolan62 AT comcast.net
 
Greetings,

A friend of mine had this bird take out a duck near her place in
Redmond. I'm thinking Cooper's Hawk.

Thoughts?

https://drive.google.com/file/...


Thanks in advance.

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Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
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Subject: O.T. RFI Amphibians
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 7:42 am
From: sremse AT comcast.net
 
Amphibians are part of my Big Year goal in 2018. I should be able to find Pacific Chorus Frog (aka Tree), Red-legged Frog, Western Toad, Long-toed Salamander and possibly Ensatina here on Whidbey Island.I know a trail in the North Cascades that crosses a creek that has Tailed Frogs.

I'm hoping some of you can point me to specific locations for ANY species not listed above. Pacific Giant , Olympic Torrent and Western Red-backed Salamanders would all be lifers for me. Rough-skinned Newts are no longer present where we used to find them. Does anyone know what large frog species inhabits Lake Terrell near Ferndale? I'm guessing Green because I've never heard Bullfrogs there.

I'm still taking fish spotting suggestions. If you have a locale for some unusual species, please send it my way ( Bridgelip Suckers is totally going to be the name of my next garage band- unless it's The Flammulated Owls). Thank you very much!
Regards,
----Steve Ellis
Coupeville, Washington
sremse@comcast.net



Subject: Cooper's Hawk eating a rabbit at Marymoor
Date: Sun Dec 10 2017 0:01 am
From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
> 
> While we were birding in Marymoor Park (King County, WA) Karen spotted a Cooper's Hawk subduing a rabbit. By the time I was in a position to take a video the rabbit was dead. Here is a video of the hawk eating the rabbit
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> & two photos
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> NE of Carnation, WA
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad



Subject: Yellow-billed Loon at Point Hudson in Port Townsend
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 23:35 pm
From: sduncan AT bsc.edu
 
Hi Tweeters,

Lonnie Somer and I did a marathon tour of coastal sites between Kingston and Port Townsend today. Best bird was a YELLOW-BILLED LOON seen at Point Hudson (which is within Port Townsend). Other highlights included an EARED GREBE at Fort Flagler State Park - Campground/Beach, and an estimated 50 ANCIENT MURRELETS (and Orcas!!) at Point Wilson Lighthouse. We ended the day with an EURASIAN WIGEON at Kah Tai Lagoon in Port Townsend. Ill try to post more details soon, but wanted to get the word out about the loon.

Scot Duncan



Subject: First Blog Post on California Trip
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 22:57 pm
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
I reported last week that I was very fortunate to be having a great birding trip in California. I got back late Tuesday and have had fun chasing some birds in Skagit County, but I have also found time to finish my first blog post about the trip. It covers some of the birds but more importantly talks about some of the wonderful people I met along the way. We are fortunate in Washington to be part of a great sharing birding community. The people I met in California added immeasurably to my trip and would be welcome as part of our community just as they made me feel a part of theirs.
There will be more blog posts to come - more about the birds and places. First the people.
blairbirding.wordpress.com/2017/12/09/people-places-and-birds-emphasis-on-people/

In general blairbirding.wordpress.com
Good to be back
Blair Bernson



Subject: Intergrade Northern Flicker?
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 18:17 pm
From: byers345 AT comcast.net
 
Hi Tweeters,

For the past several days I have had what I though was a
Yellow-shafted Flicker visiting my feeders. I had not got a reasonably good
picture until today. The bird does have beautiful yellow shafts on its
feathers, but, although it has a red crescent on the back of its head, it
has a red malar stripe. So is this an "intergrade" flicker?



https://www.flickr.com/photos/...




https://www.flickr.com/photos/...




Charlotte Byers, Edmonds



Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Dec. 10, 2017
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 14:03 pm
From: ellen AT 123imagine.net
 
Hey, Tweets,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* Spruce Grouse - Designed for the Boreal Forest
https://bit.ly/2AJGdj6
* Sandhill Cranes and the Gustavus Forelands Preserve
https://bit.ly/2BqUCNo
* Snake-Eagles Are Awesome
(and so is the accompanying photo--)
https://bit.ly/2AM8MfS
* Anniversary of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
https://bit.ly/2zD6YBN
* Winter on the Columbia
https://bit.ly/2zTn2DB
* Male vs. Female Plumage
Who's Who and How Do They Know?
https://bit.ly/2ivxIRa
* Montana Grassland Birds - Where They Go in Winter
https://bit.ly/2zEiL2E

View the photos and links for next week's shows:
https://bit.ly/2B442C7
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info@birdnote.org
========================Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podca...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



Subject: Skagit Gyrfalcon
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 13:39 pm
From: birds AT t-mansfield.com
 
Just flew west over dike toward Padilla Bay.

Tom Mansfield moving on

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Skagit Gyrfalcon (GYRF)
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 13:08 pm
From: birds AT t-mansfield.com
 
As of the time of this post (11:05 on Sat) the juvenile GYRF is sitting on a pole watching ducks in the first slough on Bayview Edison Rd just north of the highway to Anacortes. Tom Mansfield watching

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: RFI from the Netherlands: winter birds in WA
Date: Sat Dec 9 2017 8:10 am
From: rollie_nl AT yahoo.com
 
Tweeters,I will be visiting my family in Washington state again (after a previous visit in July-August 2016). They now live in Spanaway, south of Tacoma, and we will be visiting for X-mas (between 20 and 27 December).
As a birder there are still several species that I would very much like to see. Last time, I received a lot of info on how and where I could find info on the web and also info on the 'Where to watch' book (that is now also on the web). So, I am now only soliciting for very recent info on the wintering specialities of WA state in the Tacoma area east to the Cascades (east of the Cascades is not doable this time unfortunately). So does anyone have recent info where, between Seattle, Olympia and the Cascades, it is possible to find:- Rusty Blackbird. I am aware of the Nisqually record earlier this autumn but it seems to have gone. I also read about a record east of the Cascades but that is really too far away. Any other birds around?- Ancient Murrelet. Until mid November regularly reported off Dash Point, but there are no recent reports on ebird or tweeters. Are they still around?- Northern Shrike. The bird at Nisqually seems to be infrequently seen (or reported?). What are its regular spots? I read the North Dike but I cannot find this location on the Nisqually map: is this the Estuary Trail? Are there perhaps other reliable sites where it perhaps has not been reported as it has not been looked for (yet)? Like the restricted areas of Joint Base Lewis-McChord? Would the authorities allow me access to this site as a foreigner?- Northern Saw-whet Owl: the bird(s) in Nisqually have not been reported this month. Are they still being seen?- grouse (Sooty), other owls (Northern Pygmy, Western Screech), woodpeckers (Am. Three-toed) and rosy-finch: which trails at Paradise (Mt. rainier) would be best during winter to try for these? Or indeed elsewhere around Tacoma?

A lot of questions (again, like last time). If you do not want to share info publicly, please respond in private.I hope you will be as helpful as last time!All the best, Roland van der Vliet, the Netherlands



Subject: Magnuson Park, 8 December 2017
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 23:46 pm
From: lsr AT ramoslink.info
 
Now that most wetlands ponds are full of water, there should be wintering duck action. Not. Particularly now that all but Promontory Pond are frozen, hardly any water birds were in the mitigation habitat. But, there were plenty on the lake. Scaup are back in increasing numbers, but grebes are hard to come by. Except for Western. 

It was an interesting day because of the frozen ground: less than 30 F to start, clear and just a slight breeze, then warming up to 40. The warm-up took its time though and the passerine activity seemed quite delayed. Some notables:

Eurasian Wigeon - back for the winter, presumably, with the 100+ American Wigeon flock
Canvasback - one male hanging out with the scaup (most of them are at the north end of the lake)
Western Grebe - exact count of 485 birds, all but 20 or so in the typical large raft in the middle of the lake
Sharp-shinned Hawk - adult male on Kite hill
Coopers Hawk - immature female in the wetlands
Herring Gull - one on the swim platform with the other 4 species
Belted Kingfisher - as it has been doing all fall, flew out of its night roost in the meadows before dawn
Northern Shrike - south fence line, eventually chased off by a pair of Annas; first of yearits been 4 years since I have seen one in the park!
American Robin - tons! todays feasting was mostly on pyracantha berries plus some ground feeding:
https://youtu.be/8W-K2_ze6iw

For the day, 57 species.
Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
Scott Ramos
Seattle



Subject: Rockpipers at Ocean Shores
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 22:35 pm
From: krtrease AT gmail.com
 
Today at about 11:00 AM there were good numbers of Rock Sandpipers,
Surfbirds, and Black Turnstones feeding in the rocks at the Point Brown
jetty in Ocean Shores. It was a very nice day with sun and a stiff breeze
blowing out to sea. Photos on my eBird checklist or at

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...



Subject: Skagit Blue Jay
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 18:46 pm
From: csdesilets AT comcast.net
 
Previously reported Blue Jay relocated 12/8 at 11:30  under feeder on
private property in vicinity of towns of Bow & Edison. Exact location not
detailed at behest of property owner.



Charles Desilets

Mukilteo



Subject: Samish Flats Falco
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 17:10 pm
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
Steve and Connie Pink and I birded the Samish flats this afternoon quite thoroughly after the fog lifted. We had dozens of Bald Eagles, 20+ Red Tails, 6+ Rough Legged Hawks, 10+ Northern Harriers, 6 Short Eared Owls and more than a dozen falcons. Sadly no Gyrfalcon in spite of diligent searching but we had a Merlin in Edison, at least 4 Peregrines, maybe as many as 8 Kestrels and a Prairie Falcon perhaps 3/8 of a mile south of Sullivan Road viewed from Bayview Edison Road. Also some mighty fine pastries at the Breadfarm.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject: RFI Western Screech Owl Nest Boxes
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 16:10 pm
From: ericallencarlson AT yahoo.com
 
Hello Fellow Birders-

I am interested in hearing from anyone who has had success with nest boxes for W. Screech Owls. I have had good success attracting Eastern Screech Owls (using nest boxes back East), but only for roosting during the day. According to Birdweb, W. Screech Owls are listed as a species of concern ( Red List) by Audubon and American Bird Conservancy and I'm also curious to what factors might be involved in their decline. I suspect loss of appropriate nest sites (especially in urban and suburban areas) i.e. lack of snags. Additionally, I have heard mention that Barred Owls are preying on them...

In my personal experience, nest boxes should be pole mounted with a squirrel guard, otherwise you will attract squirrels. Also, nest boxes should have about 4" of wood shavings in the bottom. In the meantime, my W. Seattle Screech Owl box is being used as a nighttime roost for a Flicker, so I put up another box.

Thanks for any information you have to share.

Cheers,
Eric Carlson
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Subject: Red Crossbills around Blaine WA
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 14:04 pm
From: abriteway AT hotmail.com
 
It seems to be a good year for crossbills.


A bird I seldom get to see I've found in three different locations in the last month (Semiahmoo Spit, Point Whitehorn Marine Reserve and now five at my home in Blaine.


I was under the impression the feed mostly on Spruce cones. I've been checking some of the heavily coned Spruce nearby the past few weeks with no sightings of them. Where I have found them is in Pine, Alder, and Western
Cedar foraging.


https://flic.kr/p/EanXqs




Red
Crossbill

Morning light. A flock of five, three male, two female feeding high in a cedar tree, briefly came down lower to pose.









Eric Ellingson



Subject: Re: Your message to Tweeters awaits moderator approval
Date: Fri Dec 8 2017 7:27 am
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Dear moderator,
This is important research regarding Snowy owl movements that I believe will be useful and interesting to many people on Tweeters.
Please post.
Dan Reiff, PhD

> On Dec 8, 2017, at 5:23 AM, tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:
>
> Your mail to 'Tweeters' with the subject
>
> Fwd: Project SNOWstorm: Latest updates?
>
> Is being held until the list moderator can review it for approval.
>
> The reason it is being held:
>
> Message body is too big: 89272 bytes with a limit of 25 KB
>
> Either the message will get posted to the list, or you will receive
> notification of the moderator's decision. If you would like to cancel
> this posting, please visit the following URL:
>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-12-07
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 23:10 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT frontier.com
 
Tweets  As I drove into the park, the temperature plummeted.   At my house, it was 34.  Even just a half mile away, and already down in the valley, my thermometer read 31.  But by the time I got to the Viewing Mound, it read just 27 degrees.  Brrr.  Luckily, no wind.  Unluckily, we were beset by bands of fog on and off all morning.  From the Lake Platform we could only see to the close buoys.  But it was a pretty good day nonetheless, and at times the scenery was gorgeous, with sun shining through fog causing fog-bows, etc.

Highlights:
a.. Greater White-fronted Goose finally, First of Fall. One adult with Cacklers
b.. Cackling Goose about 1500 landed early. On a late drive-through, the flock had moved to the cricket field, and looked to have grown to 2000-2500. Impressive.
c.. Rock Pigeon a half-dozen near SR-520 were our first in weeks
d.. Green Heron One at Rowing Club pond and one in slough from Rowing Club dock, at the same time
e.. Barn Owl great views from the Viewing Mound after 7 a.m.; no other owls
f.. FIVE woodpecker day with our first Red-breasted Sapsucker in two months (near the windmill), and the other four simultaneously in the old heronry
g.. American Goldfinch amazingly, two at the Pea Patch were our first in a month
h.. Townsends Warbler in cedars near windmill
i.. Lincolns Sparrow one along SE edge of East Meadow
j.. Western Meadowlark five in East Meadow
I drove over to the NE corner of the lake to look at what we missed from the Lake Platform in the fog, and found:
a.. Scaup sp. - Four, only our second scaup sighting of the fall
b.. Bufflehead About 60, compared to ~10 from the Lake Platform
c.. Common Merganser at least 7, compared with 1 from the Lake Platform
d.. Pied-billed Grebe - ~15, compared to 1
e.. Horned Grebe one
f.. Western Grebe one
g.. Ring-billed Gull one
Misses included American Wigeon, Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Mew Gull, and Northern Shrike.

For the day, 57 species, plus 4 more at the NE corner of the lake. Not bad for a cold day in December.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor@frontier.com



Subject: Birding in the fog
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 20:19 pm
From: m.denny AT charter.net
 
Hello all,

Despite the freezing fog we decided to head to western Walla Walla
County to look for our target Rusty Blackbird. On Byrnes road was a
beautiful FERRUGINOUS HAWK - in their usual wintering area but right in
a field with rodent poison all over.

Up 9-Mile Canyon we stopped to look over a huge flock of House Finches -
and saw WESTERN BLUEBIRD, SAY'S PHOEBE AND LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE.

Started down Dodd road and eagle-eye Mike spotted a SNOWY OWL perched on
a fence post up in the fog! Needless to say we called friends and at
least 6 others got to see this bird.

At Tyson Blood Ponds were many blackbirds flying in and out continuously
- after some patient scoping ML finally spotted our target - a bright
female RUSTY BLACKBIRD among the hundreds of Brewer's, Redwings with a
few Yellow-headed and Tricoloreds mixed in. And the usual starlings and
a few cowbirds as well. Killdeer, Dunlin and a couple Least Sandpipers
were on the gunk.

Over 200 SNOW GEESE were in the cornfields on Dodd - with more on Hanson
Loop.

Ate lunch at Casey Pond - where Mike chummed for gulls - our
first-of-winter GLAUCOUS Gull was with Herring Gulls on the mud.

Heading back along our route - a SHORT-EARED OWL flew right over us as
we started down 9-Mile Canyon.

Yesterday up Blue Creek Rd we found a very cooperative PYGMY OWL with a
rodent -

Good birding - and it pays to head out even in the fog! M&ML

--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"



Subject: Eastside Audubon Samish-Skagit trip 12/6
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 17:01 pm
From: bellasoc AT isomedia.com
 
Hi Tweets



Yesterday, Eastside Audubon took a trip to the Samish and Skagit Flats
areas. We started out under chilly (35F) but sunny conditions. Somewhat
surprisingly, we didn't see a lot of birds on the way up (a few AMERICAN
CROWs, a couple of gulls) and no Red-tail Hawks. But, as we came down into
the Skagit Valley there was a large group of swans in a field west of I-5
(but no way to get close to view). It was perfectly clear and chilly. We did
take the Conway exit (with its usual ROCK PIGEONs) and turned right on
Cederdale Rd and walked a ways down Conway Hill Rd. to look over a group of
swans. They were mostly TRUMPETER SWANs but there was at least one TUNDRA
SWAN in with them. It was nice to get a couple of calls from the Trumpeters.
As we walked back out there were BLACK-CAPPED, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEEs,
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, and a BROWN CREEPER in the trees.



Our next exit was to Chuckanut Drive and then to Pulver Rd. - we saw a
RED-TAILED HAWK in the top of a conifer and a bunch of EUROPEAN STARLINGs.
At the intersection of Pulver and Sam Bell Rd. there were some more swans
but they were extremely backlit so we passed them by. We went up Ershig Rd.
and saw EUROPEAN STARLINGs, BREWER'S BLACKBIRDS, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDs,
distant swans and gulls. Along Worline Rd. we saw distant flying swans. From
Bow Cemetery we could see a BALD EAGLE in a treetop to the southwest. At the
house with feeders on Bow Cemetery Rd. we picked up BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEEs,
SPOTTED TOWHEE, DARK-EYED JUNCO and GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW.



Back on Chuckanut Dr. north of Bow there were several BALD EAGLEs perched.
In the lagoon inlet along Blanchard Rd. there were a couple of BUFFLEHEAD.
Back down Blachard Rd. there were several NORTHERN FLICKERs perched in the
trees. It was quiet at the feeders at Blanchard Rd. and Colony Rd, but we
did see BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, HOUSE SPARROW, GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW,
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, SPOTTED TOWHEE, SONG SPARROW and FOX SPARROW.



We turned on Smith Rd, coming into Edison, and saw a PEREGRINE FALCON and a
NORTHERN SHRIKE (they were in separate trees about 50 feet apart) - guess
that was why we didn't see the usual teal in the slough. In the slough
behind the Bread Farm Bakery there were a load of GREEN-WINGED TEAL and a
couple of MALLARDs. As we turned onto Bayview-Edison Rd. we had a NORTHERN
HARRIER off to the right and some more MALLARDs to the left. Further along
there were a couple of BALD EAGLEs in their usual tree and a ROUGH-LEGGED
HAWK was perched south of the road. A RED-TAILED HAWK was perched at the
north 90 and a BALD EAGLE off to the east. Around the corner from the East
90 there was a beautiful ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK on a pole.



It was pretty quiet at the West 90, but we did see several NORTHERN HARRIERs
(male, female and probable imm.), a bunch of BALD EAGLEs, a couple of
RED-TAILED HAWKs, an very distant ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK some flyby WESTERN
MEADOWLARK and a KILLDEER was heard. A group of gulls was waaay to distant
to i.d. Going up Samish Island Rd. there was another RED-TAILED HAWK. At the
public access point on Wharf St. we scanned Samish Bay and could see
BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, COMMON LOON, PACIFIC LOON (distant flyby),
HORNED GREBE, RED-NECKED GREBE, BRANT, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, LONG-TAILED
DUCK, SURF SCOTER and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER. We cruised the Samish Flats
and saw some more eagles and Red-tails.



As we came up Bayview-Edison Rd. just west of D'Arcy Rd. we stopped and
scanned Padilla Bay - There was a large group of SNOW GEESE on the water and
a lot of ducks. At the access point at Bayview-Edison State Park we could
see BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, some very distant AMERICAN WIGEON (no
Eurasian) and a few GREATER SCAUP.



We stopped at the feeders on Valentine Rd. and saw BLACK-CAPPED and
CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEEs, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, SPOTTED TOWHEE,
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, SONG SPARROW, DOWNY WOODPECKER, AMERICAN GOLDFINCH,
PINE SISKIN. We drove to the end of Rawlins Rd. and picked up RED-TAILED
HAWK, NORTHERN HARRIER, a MERLIN attacking some DUNLIN, a dowitcher species
and the best bird of the day - a PRAIRIE FALCON!



Scanning from the access off of Jensen there were a ton of ducks and DUNLIN
in Skagit Bay. Back up Fir Island Rd and a flock of about 10,000 SNOW GEESE.
At the Hayton Preserve we had two huge groups of DUNLIN being harassed by
PEREGINE FALCONs - spectacular. Then the Dunlin on Fir Island Rd. all took
off, swirled around and began to make their way toward us in large groups.
What a way to end the day!



At various time during the day we saw GREAT BLUE HERONs, AMERICAN KESTREL,
KILLDEER, MEW GULL, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE, BUSHTIT,
PACIFIC and MARSH WRENs, AMERICAN ROBIN, VARIED THRUSH, PURPLE FINCH.



We couldn't have asked for a better day (much better than the forecast very
foggy conditions), and saw 65 species!



Good Birding!



Brian H. Bell

Woodinville WA

bell asoc a t iso media dot com



Subject: Tufted Duck hybrid at Chambers Bay, Pierce Co.
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 16:22 pm
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
Tweeters,



Yesterday about 11:30 AM, while birding at Chambers Bay just north of
Steilacoom, I discovered a bird which I thought at first was a drake TUFTED
DUCK. It was in a group with 3 Lesser Scaup in the estuary, about 100 metres
east of the railway bridge. It had a very obvious tuft and a blackish back,
unlike the scaup which accompanied it. However, as I got closer looks at the
bird, it could be seen that the anterior (forward) part of the back was
gray, with darker cross-barring, not the jet-black that one expects to see
on a Tufted Duck. The tuft was also short for a Tufted Duck. For these
reasons, I believe that it was a hybrid TUFTED DUCK x SCAUP SP., not a pure
Tufted Duck. The scaup parent was more likely Greater Scaup than Lesser,
because Lesser Scaup are not found in the Old World where Tufted Ducks
breed.



I got several good photos of the bird with the scaup, which I hope to post
in the near photo when I solve some problems I am currently having with
uploading photos to eBird.



If other birders succeed in finding and photographing this bird, I would
appreciate other opinions on its parentage, but contrary to my initial
hopes, I don't think it is a pure Tufted Duck. Over the last 20 years or so,
we have recorded numerous Tufted Duck x scaup hybrids in the Vancouver, BC
area where I live. The hybrids have not been seen as often in the last few
years, but all purported Tufted Ducks in our area should be looked at
carefully for signs of hybrid origin.



Wayne C. Weber

Delta, BC

contopus@telus.net



Subject: Samish Gyr & Dunlin Murmuration
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 12:26 pm
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
Yesterday (12.06.17) at 7:30AM I spotted a juvenile GYRFALCON on the Samish Flats. The bird was perched on a pole along Bayview/Edison Rd between Sullivan and DArcy. It was still perched when I left at 8. I returned at 9 and the bird was perched on the ground deep in the field to the east. It was being harassed by a BALD EAGLE and also a PEREGRINE FALCON. After a few minutes the gyr flew out of sight to the southeast. I took some mediocre videos. 



The other main highlight of the day for me was an amazing murmuration by a massive number of Dunlin at Hayton Preserve on Fir Island (west of Wylie Rd).



There were other notable sightings, but in the interest of getting a report out as well as some photos/videos, Ill post this now.



3 Images:

http://www.pbase.com/marvbreec...

3 Videos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...



Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
marvbreece@q.com

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.



Subject: Gyrfalcon in the Skagit?
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 11:24 am
From: stkohl AT msn.com
 
Any updates on the gyr?
Thanks. Steve Kohl. Seattle

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: RE: Tweeters Digest, Vol 160, Issue 4 Two Short-eared Owls at Billy Frank Jr./Nisqually
Date: Thu Dec 7 2017 10:17 am
From: stevekrival AT live.com
 
I wonder if other locations in the area are seeing more SEOW (at least in the subjective sense) than in prior years, and might that be related to the recent changes in habitat along Eide Rd near Standwood, where there seems to be a drop off in SEOW numbers (again no objective measures; just subjective observations)?  I have not been following tweeters on a daily basis, but there was a birder who posted photographs of a SEOW interacting with crows at the Montlake Fill on UW Campus in Seattle about a month ago. I can't remember ever having seen a SEOW there, but perhaps they are occasional visitors. Last week I met a photographer who said he has seen just one SEOW at Eide Rd, and speculated that the new management plan, which includes a lack of corn being planted in drier sections of the marsh, might have been a casual factor in the decline of SEOWs there so far this year - corn being an attractant and cover for rodent prey.  It is an interesting issue made more complex by the fact that all three areas - Edie Rd., Montlake Fill and Nisqually, have undergone recent, major changes in habitat management, which are still to be completed, and it remains an open question as to what the effects might be on wintering SEOWs in each location. The situation seems to be beg for a well-designed study.

-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of tweeters-request@mailman1.u.washington.edu
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 12:00 PM
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 160, Issue 4

Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
tweeters@u.washington.edu

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than "Re: Contents of Tweeters digest..."


Today's Topics:

1. Green morph Pine Siskin at Seattle?s Martha Washington Park
(Jeffrey Bryant)
2. Snowy Owls In Michigan (ray holden)
3. Coopers Hawk with blue disc on back or shoulder
(Ethan Whitney Smith)
4. Two Short-eared Owls at Billy Frank Jr./Nisqually NWR Sunday
morning (T Varela)
5. XMAS bird count for Eastside Audubon (Megan Lyden)
6. Seattle Harris's Sparrow (pan)
7. Salmonella (mark girling)
8. Glaucous Gull (Dan McDougall-Treacy)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sun, 3 Dec 2017 12:10:24 -0800
From: Jeffrey Bryant
Subject: [Tweeters] Green morph Pine Siskin at Seattle?s Martha
Washington Park
To: tweeters
Message-ID: <9988F880-04AD-4137-BE24-4837BFB5369B@yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8


After checking the status of the Harris??? Sparrow this morning (still there,) I saw a flock of siskins fly into a tall maple just up Holly St. one was quite obviously different. When flock obligingly flew down to roost in a (much shorter) cherry tree above the driveway of 5545, joining several goldfinches and House Finches, I got much better looks. Back, rump, breast and sides a greenish yellow under the brown streaks. Brown cap and dark eyeline, but brow and cheek yellow. Never got a look at undertail to absolutely rule out even more exciting Eurasian Siskin, so...
This area has been very finchy of late, with all the aforementioned plus Purple Finches and a roving gang of crossbills. Another treat was a slate-colored junco today in the vicinity of the siskins.

Jeff Bryant
Seattle
jbryant_68 AT yahoo
Sent from my iPad


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Sun, 3 Dec 2017 21:59:58 +0000 (UTC)
From: ray holden
Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owls In Michigan
To: Tweeters Tweeters
Message-ID: <1713979673.838655.1512338398910@mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Here's an interesting article filed from Detroit in the USA Today about a large flock of Snowys in upper Michigan. Lots of details about their habits and history of migratory outbreaks.?? Plus pictures.??
Snowy owl mass migration blanketing parts of Michigan in feathery white


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Snowy owl mass migration blanketing parts of Michigan in feathery white

A large flock of migrating snowy owls has made its way into Michigan, with numbers unlike anything seen in some ...
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|




Ray Holden
Olympia, WA

Life is for the birds. ??
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Message: 3
Date: Sun, 03 Dec 2017 23:17:06 +0000
From: Ethan Whitney Smith
Subject: [Tweeters] Coopers Hawk with blue disc on back or shoulder
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Message-ID:

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Got a brief look at a Coopers Hawk in the Rainier Beach area of Seattle.
The hawk has what appears to be a blue disc maybe 1 and 1/2 inches across
with 911 printed on it attached to its shoulder, neck, or back. When I saw
it it was in its left shoulder. I could not tell how it is attached to the
bird. Anyone have any ideas?

Ethan Smith
Ethanwhitneysmith@gmail.com
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Message: 4
Date: Sun, 3 Dec 2017 18:39:23 -0800
From: T Varela
Subject: [Tweeters] Two Short-eared Owls at Billy Frank Jr./Nisqually
NWR Sunday morning
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <41BA0CB9-E1A7-47BD-B5DA-9BE4AB34B73C@hotmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

First time in the many years I???ve been visiting this refuge that I???ve seen two Short-Eared Owls at the same time. They were putting on a great show near the dike trail, interacting with up to four Northern Harriers. Also got a glimpse of an adult Great Horned Owl, there were two Peregrines perched on the same snag. And on a tree near the river I spotted three mixed age Bald Eagles and a Red-Tailed Hawk perched in the canopy. Great stuff.


https://nam01.safelinks.protec...





Tony Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
https://nam01.safelinks.protec...



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Mon, 4 Dec 2017 02:41:54 +0000
From: Megan Lyden
Subject: [Tweeters] XMAS bird count for Eastside Audubon
To: "tweeters@u.washington.edu"
Message-ID:


Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi Tweeters,

We could use a few people for my team for the XMAS bird count for Eastside Audubon. We basically hit a lot of Bellevue's "pocket parks" many of which are along Lake Sammamish; there is some walking involved. We will stop at Crossroads Shopping Center for lunch. We will finish somewhere between 3 and 4 PM.

To look at the route and read the driving directions: https://nam01.safelinks.protec...

Let me know by email if you are interested.

Megan Lyden
Bellevue, WA
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Message: 6
Date: Mon, 4 Dec 2017 04:03:43 +0100 (CET)
From: pan
Subject: [Tweeters] Seattle Harris's Sparrow
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <2144999349.188118.1512356623726@ichabod.co-bxl>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

While others reported seeing it again, another birder and I failed to find Harris's Sparrow at Seattle's Martha Washington Park between 1:30 and 3:30 this afternoon. I did study a flock of about 15 Golden-crowned Sparrows (and Fox, towhee).

3 December, 2017,

Alan Grenon
Seattle

recommended viewing: "Jane"


------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Mon, 4 Dec 2017 10:36:13 +0000 (UTC)
From: mark girling
Subject: [Tweeters] Salmonella
To: "tweeters@u.washington.edu"
Message-ID: <473262292.1054172.1512383773295@mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

I noticed I had a House Finch at my feeder the other day with one eye. A good friend Nadine Drisseq by trade is a biologist and alerted me to some diseases birds are picking up from feeders. So I found a small approx 5gal garbage can. Cleaned it out and filled with water and added bleach. Like a sanitizing solution beer brewers for their equipment. My feeders are now on a sanitizing schedule. Whilst one is feeding the other is having an overnight soak. Then I hose it off thoroughly and allow to dry. Then fill and hang. And then removing the loose seed from the next feeder and hosing it off before putting it in the sanitizer for the night. I hope this makes others see how quick and easy it is and perhaps keep the disease down to a minimum.Mark GirlingThe Birding BritWoodridge.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
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Message: 8
Date: Mon, 4 Dec 2017 11:32:16 -0800
From: Dan McDougall-Treacy
Subject: [Tweeters] Glaucous Gull
To: Tweeters
Message-ID:

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

The first winter Glaucous Gull continues to enjoy life (and the remains of
the salmon run) at the Carkeek Park beach, near the stream outlet.

Dan (bad hombre) MT
--

Dan McDougall-Treacy
Seattle, WA
danmcdt@gmail.com
206.402.9426
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End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 160, Issue 4
****************************************
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Subject: Asotin county Lesser Black-backed Gull x two
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 17:24 pm
From: kec201814 AT cableone.net
 
Taking advantage of the fog lifting to reveal a cold but beautiful day, Terry O'Halloran and I checked to see if the LBBG was still present at Swallows Park.We were pleasantly surprised to find not one, but two adult birds.bird one:   https://www.flickr.com/photos/... bird two:    https://www.flickr.com/photos/... Both are adult birds and are with 150+/- Ring-billed, California and Herring Gulls. Both yesterday and today the gulls flock was present in the early afternoon. Keith E. CarlsonLewiston



Subject: Thanks to Marv and Mark
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 14:47 pm
From: barbdeihl AT comcast.net
 
Along with the sun, this report is great to see.
Thanks to both of you.

Barb Deihl
Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle
barbdeihl@comcast.net

********************************
Message: 5
Date: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 08:28:01 -0800
From: Mark Ahlness
Subject: [Tweeters] Gyrfalcon in Skagit County

Marv Breece asked us to pass this on... This morning at 8:00, he was
observing a Gyrfalcon perched on a pole, on Bayview Edison Rd, between
Sullivan and D'Arcy.

Mark Ahlness
mahlness@gmail.com
Seattle, WA



Subject: Swamp Sparrow in Longview
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 13:39 pm
From: russkope AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

I just heard then briefly saw a Swamp Sparrow along Ditch#6 in west
Longview. From 48th Ave just south of Pacific Way there is a gravel road
following the drainage ditch that can be walked past the gate. The sparrow
was about 0.5 mile down where there is a large mowed back yard with a pond.
It was in the weedy area between the yard and the gravel road.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA



Subject: Trumpeter swans at Union Bay/Montlake Fill
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 12:31 pm
From: sduncan AT bsc.edu
 
Three Trumpeter Swan's are at Union Bay natural area right now feeding on the east side.

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Gyrfalcon in Skagit County
Date: Wed Dec 6 2017 10:28 am
From: mahlness AT gmail.com
 
Marv Breece asked us to pass this on... This morning at 8:00, he was
observing a Gyrfalcon perched on a pole, on Bayview Edison Rd, between
Sullivan and D'Arcy.

Mark Ahlness
mahlness@gmail.com
Seattle, WA



Subject: Off topic: Birds of Chile, south to north
Date: Tue Dec 5 2017 21:09 pm
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
 
Great set of photos and stories, Charlotte. 
Thank you for sharing them.
Dan Reiff

----- Original Message -----

From: "Byers"
To: "Tweeters"
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 4:56:34 PM
Subject: [Tweeters] Off topic: Birds of Chile, south to north



Hello Tweeters,

Bill and I returned from a 3-week birding trip to Chile at the end of November. We started in Punto Arenas and worked our way north birding on both and coast and in the mountains in each location. For me one of the highlights was visiting Torres del Paine. There was nothing between our little hotel, on an island in Lake Pehoe, and the mountains. Andean Condors sometimes swooped right over the island and then vanished over the show fields into the mountains.

Out of Valparaiso we did a pelagic cruise. This one did nothing to improve my opinion of these adventures. However, we had taken medicine and didnt get sick. The sun was out and the waves were awesome. Our little boat bobbed like a little cork down one side of monumental waves (Bill says they werent that big) and then crept back up to the top only to crash down the other side. I quickly decided to stash my camera and hold on for dear life. Bill stood up and took pictures while the boat tossed and heaved and he got covered in salt spray. Probably only one out of about 20-25 of his pictures were any good at all, but he took lots of pictures, including 4 species of albatross. I was very impressed and I think some of his pictures are phenomenal (wife bias here).

We spent several days driving up into mountains outside of Santiago (8000-9500 ft) and then in northern Chile, the group visited Lauca National Park. This park is basically a flat plateau with running water ringed by amazing volcanoes. When we got to Putre, an Aymara village at 11,500 feet, I developed altitude sickness and couldnt go higher. But Bill went and took pictures. By evening, after drinking coca leaf tea, I felt much better. But I was a day late and we returned to Arica on the coast the next day.

I am including two links: the first to just the birds we got reasonably good photos of. Most are Bills, but those taken with a 70-300 mm lens are mine. The second link is to some general photos of our trip and scenic (Chile is a really beautiful country!)



https://www.flickr.com/photos/... bird pictures



https://www.flickr.com/photos/... scenics for Chile



Charlotte Byers, Edmonds





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Subject: Off topic: Birds of Chile, south to north
Date: Tue Dec 5 2017 18:57 pm
From: byers345 AT comcast.net
 
Hello Tweeters,

Bill and I returned from a 3-week birding trip to Chile at
the end of November. We started in Punto Arenas and worked our way north
birding on both and coast and in the mountains in each location. For me one
of the highlights was visiting Torres del Paine. There was nothing between
our little hotel, on an island in Lake Pehoe, and the mountains. Andean
Condors sometimes swooped right over the island and then vanished over the
show fields into the mountains.

Out of Valparaiso we did a pelagic cruise. This one did
nothing to improve my opinion of these adventures. However, we had taken
medicine and didn't get sick. The sun was out and the waves were awesome.
Our little boat bobbed like a little cork down one side of monumental waves
(Bill says they weren't that big) and then crept back up to the top only to
crash down the other side. I quickly decided to stash my camera and hold on
for dear life. Bill stood up and took pictures while the boat tossed and
heaved and he got covered in salt spray. Probably only one out of about
20-25 of his pictures were any good at all, but he took lots of pictures,
including 4 species of albatross. I was very impressed and I think some of
his pictures are phenomenal (wife bias here).

We spent several days driving up into mountains outside of
Santiago (8000-9500 ft) and then in northern Chile, the group visited Lauca
National Park. This park is basically a flat plateau with running water
ringed by amazing volcanoes. When we got to Putre, an Aymara village at
11,500 feet, I developed altitude sickness and couldn't go higher. But Bill
went and took pictures. By evening, after drinking coca leaf tea, I felt
much better. But I was a day late and we returned to Arica on the coast the
next day.

I am including two links: the first to just the birds we
got reasonably good photos of. Most are Bill's, but those taken with a
70-300 mm lens are mine. The second link is to some general photos of our
trip and scenic (Chile is a really beautiful country!)



https://www.flickr.com/photos/... bird
pictures



https://www.flickr.com/photos/... scenics
for Chile



Charlotte Byers, Edmonds



Subject: Common Redpoll
Date: Tue Dec 5 2017 16:29 pm
From: krneice AT gmail.com
 
Met a birding visitor from New York lucky enough to spot a flock of at
least 10 Common Redpoll mixed with American Goldfinch and Pine Siskin (one
each, that I could tell) at east Green Lake nearer the big sequoia than the
bathrooms, about noon (so light was terrible). Did anybody see redpolls
last year? I sure didn't.

Karl Neice



Subject: King County Slaty-backed Gull
Date: Tue Dec 5 2017 15:11 pm
From: andy_mcc AT hotmail.com
 
Hello,

I apologize for not putting this on Tweeters sooner, but we've had some debate about this bird, and I was hoping for agreement from another person who saw it on Saturday. The essence of the debate is that it might be a Glaucous-winged x Western gull hybrid. However, the mantle and wings are very dark, the eye is pale yellow, the feet are pinkish red. The bill is mostly parallel with a small angle at the gonys. We could not see if there is an eye ring. The Slaty-backed is said to have a red eye ring. I still think it is a Slaty-backed Gull, but my experience with this species is limited to one observation of a flying gull identified by another person. I've read a lot about this species in the past two days. I posted photos, which I took on Sunday, on my eBird checklist and wanted to see if it would pass muster there before posting it on Tweeters. On Saturday and Sunday the bird was alone at the northern end of the seawall north of Salty's Restaurant. It moves from standing on logs to perching on a nearby building, to sitting on the water. It did not fly very much at all. It was separated from a large flock of gulls which congregate on buildings and along the boardwalk south of Salty's Restaurant. I have not returned to Redondo since Sunday. Any observations would be great.

Thanks,

Andy McCormick

Bellevue, WA



________________________________
From: Ian Paulsen
Sent: Monday, December 4, 2017 4:58 PM
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] King County Slaty-backed Gull

HI ALL:
Saw this posted on eBird:

Slaty-backed Gull (Larus schistisagus) (1)
- Reported Dec 03, 2017 13:00 by Andrew McCormick
- Redondo Pier, King, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF...
254466&ll=47.3484625,-122.3254466
- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Large gull uniformly slate gray color across mantle to wing
tips. Head white with gray streaking. Bill fairly straight with only a
shallow angle at the gongs. Feet reddish pink. First seen on Saturday,
Dec. 2 as part of Seattle Audubon Puget Sound Seabird Survey. Unable to
see eye or feet yesterday. Returned today and able to photograph the bird.
Confirmation of identification requested."

--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...



Subject: Common Redpoll
Date: Tue Dec 5 2017 12:14 pm
From: danmcdt AT gmail.com
 
Seen in a flock of Pine Siskin and American Goldfinch, two Common Redpoll.
East shore of Green Lake near restroom and fishing pier, in birch trees.
Dan Mc Dpugall-Treacy
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