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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on August 18, 2017, 8:35 pm

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18 Aug: @ 20:22:52 
Golden plover , probable pacific , Tulalip bay spit at 3:00 pm, 18 august2017 [Maxine Reid]
18 Aug: @ 15:40:05 
Seattle western tanagers [Jerry Neufeld-Kaiser]
18 Aug: @ 12:15:21 
Solitary Sandpiper at Union Bay Natural Area [D R]
18 Aug: @ 11:35:22 
Immature Ruff/Reeve [Jim Danzenbaker]
17 Aug: @ 22:38:27 
Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 8-17-2017 [Denis DeSilvis]
17 Aug: @ 20:38:27 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-08-17 [Matt Bartels]
16 Aug: @ 22:10:06 
The Great Blue Feather [Jeff Gibson]
16 Aug: @ 21:24:25 
photos of TUFTED PUFFIN - Richmond Beach [Joe Sweeney]
16 Aug: @ 18:44:04 
Bushtits in Duvall [Hank H]
16 Aug: @ 18:15:58 
Nisqually NWR 8/16/17 [Phil Kelley]
16 Aug: @ 15:15:26 
Re: Rio Grande Valley [Mike Stropki]
16 Aug: @ 14:33:19 
Baird's Sandpiper at Wenatchee [Russ Koppendrayer]
16 Aug: @ 12:59:53 
Tufted puffin flew north from Richmond beach [Joe Sweeney]
16 Aug: @ 12:38:03 
Update to egret update [Philip Dickinson]
16 Aug: @ 12:20:02 
Egret update [Philip Dickinson]
16 Aug: @ 11:54:51 
Tufted puffin at Richmond Beach [Joe Sweeney]
16 Aug: @ 11:50:02 
Great Egret [Philip Dickinson]
16 Aug: @ 11:01:22 
Tufted puffin @ Richmond beach [Joe Sweeney]
16 Aug: @ 10:37:50 
Chestnut-sided Warbler Nisqually NWR [Shep Thorp]
15 Aug: @ 22:40:44 
Everett STP Franklin's Gull [Josh Adams]
15 Aug: @ 19:10:00 
Montlake Fill Solitary Sandpiper [Louis Kreemer]
15 Aug: @ 16:25:06 
Snowy Plovers [dlmoor2]
15 Aug: @ 15:20:01 
Re: Rio Grande Valley [Hal Michael]
15 Aug: @ 14:53:35 
Rio Grande Valley [Debbie Mcleod]
15 Aug: @ 14:37:16 
Green Herons in Tukwila - 8 birds, fledglings & adults [Carol Schulz]
15 Aug: @ 08:55:27 
August 13 Westport Seabirds Pelagic Trip - Laysan Albatross and Buller's Shearwaters [Gene Revelas]
14 Aug: @ 23:15:00 
Frenchmans Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA [Bob]
14 Aug: @ 15:24:55 
Re: Swifts in Monroe [Phil Kelley]
14 Aug: @ 12:14:20 
Swifts in Monroe [Larry Schwitters]
14 Aug: @ 10:08:49 
Update: Mallard X Teal Hybrid at Canyon Park North of Bothell, Snohomish County [Jeremy Schwartz]
14 Aug: @ 00:06:18 
Back from Arizona [B B]
13 Aug: @ 22:28:46 
Eastern WA shorebirds this weekend in PO, Ferry & Columbia Co [Matt Bartels]
13 Aug: @ 20:54:10 
Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on August 13, 2017 [ErikKnight05]
13 Aug: @ 19:15:16 
Stilt Sandpipers in Everett [Philip Dickinson]
13 Aug: @ 18:22:55 
Re: Possible Mallard X Teal Hybrid at Canyon Park North of Bothell, Snohomish County [Hal Michael]
13 Aug: @ 18:16:16 
RFI: Women's field shirts for birding [Rachel Lawson]
13 Aug: @ 17:25:11 
Possible Mallard X Teal Hybrid at Canyon Park North of Bothell, Snohomish County [Jeremy Schwartz]
13 Aug: @ 16:29:45 
Swift Night Out [Larry Schwitters]
13 Aug: @ 16:01:38 
Bird Guide Found at Edmonds Marsh [Nathan Keen]
13 Aug: @ 15:24:32 
Siberia Corrrection [Jeff Gibson]
13 Aug: @ 14:32:04 
The Birdbooker Report [Ian Paulsen]
12 Aug: @ 20:34:19 
Blk Throated Gray Warbler / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler]
12 Aug: @ 20:25:51 
Stilt Sandpiers still at Everett STP [Steve Pink]
12 Aug: @ 17:51:55 
Request for help from TN birder: Scrub Jay [James Peters]
12 Aug: @ 17:06:10 
Our Migration Problem [Jeff Gibson]
12 Aug: @ 16:17:53 
Fw: Pelicans over View Ridge [plkoyama]
12 Aug: @ 16:04:50 
Union Bay Watch } Smoke and Ash [Hubbell]
12 Aug: @ 15:45:42 
Ocean Shores Black Phoebe [Steve Giles]
12 Aug: @ 14:04:03 
BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 13, 2017 [Ellen Blackstone]
12 Aug: @ 13:13:53 
Mt Salmo Info and some birds in Pend Oreille [Terry Little]





Subject: Golden plover , probable pacific , Tulalip bay spit at 3:00 pm, 18 august2017
Date: Fri Aug 18 2017 20:22 pm
From: baconmf AT mail.com
 
Hi tweets
This golden plover was seen with about 150 black bellied plovers.
Pics on ebird.
Seems like a molting adult, still has some black feathers on abdomen,primary wing projections seem too short for American.
Would appreciate input,.
Cheers,Maxine Reid

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Subject: Seattle western tanagers
Date: Fri Aug 18 2017 15:40 pm
From: jerry.n.k AT gmail.com
 
5 western tanagers at my backyard birdbath in north Seattle this morning.
I guess their migration is underway like the shorebirds. I wonder if our
friends in the Teanaway just stopped seeing them for the year.


--- jerry



Subject: Solitary Sandpiper at Union Bay Natural Area
Date: Fri Aug 18 2017 12:15 pm
From: somegum2 AT hotmail.com
 
Hi there,
The Solitary Sandpiper continues again today, along with a Western Sandpiper, at the Main Pond of the Union Bay Natural Area (Montlake Fill).
Dave Robichaud
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Subject: Immature Ruff/Reeve
Date: Fri Aug 18 2017 11:35 am
From: jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
 
at Hoquiam STP now.  In rightmost (Western most) of the three large ponds.  Check the back stretch of mud.  Also check around edge of Eastern most pond.

Jim Danzenbaker

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Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 8-17-2017
Date: Thu Aug 17 2017 22:38 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

A bit cloudy, and mild temps today (mid-upper 60's with little or no wind), and the 16 of us (including two from New Jersey) had a pleasant walk around the outskirts of the JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course. Highlights include a pair of PIED-BILLED GREBES at Hodge Lake with 5 very young (small, striped) chicks, one of which kept hitching a ride on one of the adult's back. An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, also at Hodge Lake, was the first sighting of this species on our walk here this year (!). One of the largest flocks of BUSHTITS we've seen was notable for the number of birds (30, at least, by several folks' count), but also by where they were feeding: 30-50-ft up in Douglas-firs. Both BLACK-CAPPED and CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEES were seen in higher-than-usual numbers (50/25), most likely because of family groupings. The four DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS were the first larger grouping this year. Noteworthy: NO crows seen or heard this trip.



The only mammal we tallied were two Douglas squirrels.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

• September 21

• October 19

• November 16

Anyone is welcome to join us!


32 species



Pied-billed Grebe 7 At Hodge Lake - the young were very small, and striped. Assume male/female adults.

Double-crested Cormorant 4

Band-tailed Pigeon 1

Mourning Dove 2

Anna's Hummingbird 2

hummingbird sp. 1 Too backlit and darted by us quickly for positive ID

Downy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 5

Olive-sided Flycatcher 1 At Hodge Lake

Western Wood-Pewee 3

Steller's Jay 3

California Scrub-Jay 1

Purple Martin 3

Barn Swallow 65

Black-capped Chickadee 50

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 25

Bushtit 30 Foraging 30-50 ft up in Doduglas-firs

Red-breasted Nuthatch 9

American Robin 60

European Starling 21

Cedar Waxwing 7

MacGillivray's Warbler 1 At power-line cut-through

Yellow-rumped Warbler 5

Black-throated Gray Warbler 2

Dark-eyed Junco 9

White-crowned Sparrow 5

Song Sparrow 6

Spotted Towhee 5

Western Tanager 4

Brown-headed Cowbird 2

House Finch 10

Pine Siskin 17

American Goldfinch 3



View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis

avnacrs4birds@outlook.com



Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-08-17
Date: Thu Aug 17 2017 20:38 pm
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Tweets -
Well, still in the doldrums ” Marymoor Park today did a good job of showing just how quiet the mid-August birding can be ” it was mighty quiet almost all day ” Brian Bell & I substituted for Michael Hobbs in leading this week™s walk ” weather was great, in the low-to-mid 60s - but the birds were mostly quiet.
Highlights:

Greater Yellowlegs - one heard at about 5:30, from the meadow viewing mound. Likely our first for the year at the park.
Green Heron - 2 juvies along the slough, 1 adult at the Rowing Club
Barn Owl - one flying in the east meadow and model airplane field around 5:30 - 5:45
Black-throated Gray Warbler - 1 seen in south end of dog meadow
Yellow Warbler - only 1, heard singing

Only 1 Willow Flycatcher heard, and other heard-only birds included Purple Martin, Pileated Woodpecker, Killdeer, Red-breasted Nuthatch and more.
We missed things that might be moving on like Black-headed Grosbeak, Swainson™s Thrush, and Spotted Sandpiper , as well as a few locals like Bushtit and Red-breasted Sapsucker.

We did have a nice show of Vaux™s Swifts late, with a flock of ~20 over the entrance bridge.

For the day, 43 species, well below the total for the last several weeks.

Good birding,

Matt Bartels
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Subject: The Great Blue Feather
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 22:10 pm
From: gibsondesign AT msn.com
 
The  Great Blue Heron is not  exactly a rare bird here in Port Townsend, yet I don't  see nearly as many here as in my former habitat of Everett WA with it's marshy Snohomish river estuary.

Herons like mudflats and marshes which Port Townsend is a bit short on. So on my way driving across town to Fort Worden, I spotted a big bird flying over, and assumed it was a Bald Eagle, which are all over this place. But getting closer to the big bird I noted it's crooked wings - and slow wing-beat. Is there any big bird that flaps slower than a Great Blue Heron?

Getting to my destination, the PT marine science center, looking for fish and plankton - no luck there- but I did find an immaculate feather on the pier -Blue-grey , perfect and about 10 inches long, it couldn't been have been anything else than a Great Blue Heron feather.

So that was my Port Townsend heron day.


Jeff Gibson
in Port Townsend Wa



Subject: photos of TUFTED PUFFIN - Richmond Beach
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 21:24 pm
From: sweeneyfit AT mac.com
 
To view some photos of the TUFTED PUFFIN that was seen this morning, August 16, from Richmond Beach Park in Shoreline, click on my eBird checklist below:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
sweeneyfit at mac dot com


sweeneyfit.wordpress.com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/s...

http://joe-sweeney.fineartamer...



Subject: Bushtits in Duvall
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 18:44 pm
From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
> 
> Today while birding in the Snoqualmie Valley we encountered two large flocks of Bushtits. Here is a video of 3 juveniles on a branch adjacent to the Snoqualmie Valley trail in Duvall.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Here is a link to the album of all the Bushtit photos at the same location.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Hank Heiberg
> Lake Joy
> NE of Carnation, WA
>
>
> Sent from my iPad



Subject: Nisqually NWR 8/16/17
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 18:15 pm
From: scrubjay323 AT gmail.com
 
Tweets,

Today 35 of us enjoyed a special day at Nisqually, even if a bit slow.
It was a great day for a walk, warm with a light breeze. While we are
in the dog days of August we had some great birds. We had a 10.11 high
tide at 2:30 so it was good for shorebirds.

Highlight of the day occurred early on when we found a 1st winter
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER in the thicket near the entrance to the
Education Center. It stayed in the area for several minutes before
heading off toward the orchard. Hopefully someone in the group got
some decent photos that Shep will include in his ebird report.

The other highlight was a GREAT EGRET seen from the end of the estuary
boardwalk by those of us who went that far. We also saw some PURPLE
MARTINS near Luhr Beach from there.

Waterfowl were almost non-existent and passerines were mostly quiet
and roosting. There appears to be some gathering into mixed flocks
prior to migration.

For the day I had 45 species and now have 119 for the year.

We had a RIVER OTTER at the visitor center at the start and saw
COTTON-TAILED RABBIT, GRAY SQUIRREL, BLACK-TAILED DEER, MUSKRAT, and
HARBOR SEALS during the walk.

Until next week when Shep will lead in my absence....

Phil Kelley
scrubjay323@gmail.com
Lacey, WA
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Subject: Rio Grande Valley
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 15:15 pm
From: stropkimike AT gmail.com
 
Much appreciated.  Looking forward to coming down from Washington 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 15, 2017, at 4:18 PM, Hal Michael wrote:
>
> Further downstream is the Sabal Palm refuge. It is actually outside of an existing (Bush-era) wall. There was a big flap about, if memory serves, the previous operators not opposing the wall. When were last there it was being run by a local group and well worth the visit.
>
> Hal Michael
> Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
> Olympia WA
> 360-459-4005
> 360-791-7702 (C)
> ucd880@comcast.net
>
>
>
>
> My first birding trip here last fall was unforgettable - and I was always aware of my proximity to the Border. News coverage over the weekend of anti-Wall protests in Mission TX points out that the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park and the World Butterfly Center are in the crosshairs.
>
> http://www.caller.com/story/ne...
>
> http://www.audubon.org/news/po...
>
> https://www.nationalbutterflyc...
>
> Debbie McLeod in Kirklandia
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
> _______________________________________________
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> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
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Subject: Baird's Sandpiper at Wenatchee
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 14:33 pm
From: russkope AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

At noon today there were two Baird's Sandpiper at Walla Walla Point Park. I
scoped the gull roost from the west end of the park and they were on the
mud near the gulls.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA



Subject: Tufted puffin flew north from Richmond beach
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 12:59 pm
From: sweeneyfit AT mac.com
 
The tufted puffin was visible from Richmond Beach from 9 AM until 10:45 AM. At 10:45 it flew north towards Edmonds when we lost sight of it. We walked north on the beach 200 yards but we were not able to re-find the bird. 
Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
Sweeneyfit at Mac dot com

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Subject: Update to egret update
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 12:38 pm
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
Relocated at Legion Park overlook. Distant photo

Phil Dickinson

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Subject: Egret update
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 12:20 pm
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
Can no longer locate the Great Egret at Everett Marine Park. Could be down among the piling a out of view

Phil Dickinson

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Subject: Tufted puffin at Richmond Beach
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 11:54 am
From: sweeneyfit AT mac.com
 
Tufted puffin is still visible today August 16 at 9:55 AM but it is slowly drifting south and a greater distance from shore. 
Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
Sweeneyfit at Mac dot com

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Subject: Great Egret
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 11:50 am
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
Great Egret at heron rookery at Everett Marine Park at 9:45 am this morning

Phil Dickinson
Lake Stevens

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Subject: Tufted puffin @ Richmond beach
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 11:01 am
From: sweeneyfit AT mac.com
 
Present now at 9am, hanging out with guillemot. Fairly close to shore.
Joe Sweeney
NE Seattle
Sweeneyfit at Mac dot com

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Subject: Chestnut-sided Warbler Nisqually NWR
Date: Wed Aug 16 2017 10:37 am
From: shepthorp AT gmail.com
 
At Education Center entrance. Showing now. Immature. Photos. Yellow cap, wing bars, gray face. White eye ring.  
Shep and Phil, wed walk.

Shep Thorp, VMD
Emergency Clinician, Medical Director
BluePearl Veterinary Partners
253.370.3742 mobile
253.474.0791 Tacoma
bluepearlvet.com



Subject: Everett STP Franklin's Gull
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 22:40 pm
From: xjoshx AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweets,
Just before 5pm this evening myself and three other birders had a
Franklin's Gull fly past us at the Everett Sewage Treatment Plant. It
continued north, but this area has been good for FRGU in the past, so
perhaps it'll hang around. The tide was still too high for shorebirds,
so no Stilt Sandpipers were present. Unfortunately there is a
temporary "no trespassing" sign at the gate to the road that goes
along the east side of the sewage ponds, so that great shorebird
habitat is inaccessible at the moment. Hopefully this is related to
the construction and won't last long.

Earlier in the evening I managed to time the tides perfectly mudflats
north of the marina and had good numbers of shorebirds while the shore
was still close enough to scope easily. At least three Baird's
Sandpipers were present along with many peeps. The peeps were mostly
Western Sandpipers, but quite a few Least's and a couple Semipalmated
Sandpipers were present as well. It's always interesting to me how
little species diversity there is at this spot, despite sometimes
immense numbers of individual birds.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Subject: Montlake Fill Solitary Sandpiper
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 19:10 pm
From: lpkreemer AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

This morning a Solitary Sandpiper flew into Main Pond at the Fill, much to
the delight of Connie Sidles and I. Also around were: A female or juvenile
Yellow-headed Blackbird, a juvenile Long-billed Dowitcher and two
Red-breasted Nuthatches.



Louis Kreemer



Subject: Snowy Plovers
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 16:25 pm
From: dlmoor2 AT coastaccess.com
 
Hey Tweets...I received a request to post this to Tweeters on behalf of
Cyndie Sundstrom. If you are birding Grays Harbor County and see banded
Snowy Plovers, she is trying to keep track of the dispersal of this
year's chicks from Grayland-Midway and Graveyard Spit. Please note the
band colors and on which leg and send her an email at
Cyndie.Sundstrom@dfw.wa.gov or send it to me and I will forward it to
her.

Thanks!

Dianna Moore

Ocean Shores



Subject: Rio Grande Valley
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 15:20 pm
From: ucd880 AT comcast.net
 
Further downstream is the Sabal Palm refuge. It is actually outside of an existing (Bush-era) wall. There was a big flap about, if memory serves, the previous operators not opposing the wall. When were last there it was being run by a local group and well worth the visit.

Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
ucd880@comcast.net

----- Original Message -----




My first birding trip here last fall was unforgettable - and I was always aware of my proximity to the Border. News coverage over the weekend of anti-Wall protests in Mission TX points out that the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park and the World Butterfly Center are in the crosshairs.

http://www.caller.com/story/ne...

http://www.audubon.org/news/po...

https://www.nationalbutterflyc...

Debbie McLeod in Kirklandia

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Rio Grande Valley
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 14:53 pm
From: skepsou AT icloud.com
 
My first birding trip here last fall was unforgettable - and I was always aware of my proximity to the Border.  News coverage over the weekend of anti-Wall protests in Mission TX  points out that the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park and the World Butterfly Center are in the crosshairs.

http://www.caller.com/story/ne...

http://www.audubon.org/news/po...

https://www.nationalbutterflyc...

Debbie McLeod in Kirklandia

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Green Herons in Tukwila - 8 birds, fledglings & adults
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 14:37 pm
From: carol.schulz50 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters:

Sorry I'm late sending this. Yesterday, Aug 14 we observed lots of Green
Heron activity near BECU in Tukwila. We stood at the fencing on the Green
River trail just south of BECU. We parked by the trail at the ambulance
place just south of BECU. From the fencing, you can look directly across
the Duwamish River to an Osprey platform which is in Codiga Farms Park. The
juvenile Osprey was on the platform pole at the nest. Apparently the OSPR
just fledged this weekend, but it perches at the nest, or on a light pole
almost right across the river on our side.

While we were there from about 2:45 to 4:00 pm we started seeing Green Heron
activity. They nested in a tree that has lots of foliage, near BECU on the
BECU side of the river, and apparently there was another nest nearby. In
the nest there are 4 nestling herons that are now fledglings. The juveniles
are as big as adults, but w/ down. Feathers are growing in.

3 of us viewed a fledgling (looked like an adult when we viewed w/ bins, but
a closer view w/ a scope showed that it still had down on its head). It was
at the edge of the river just upriver from our viewing spot at the fence.
It slowly walked down the edge of the river. But when an adult flew into
the nest tree, there was all sorts of action. Green Herons flew into trees
and bushes right near BECU, and at least 1 or 2 of the 8 herons was an
adult. The juvs perched down along the river's edge below BECU, and in
trees and bushes above the river. Then an adult flew down river, and two
juveniles followed it around the bend in the river.

The area near BECU has been planted w/ natives on the BECU side and across
the river at Codiga Farms Park. Codiga has two trails going down to the
river on both sides of a channel cut from the river for fish. BECU-Codiga
is interesting in the winter too, because that is where a number of Thayer's
Gulls like to perch, and fly around.

For at least 2 years we have been seeing Green Herons in that area of the
Duwamish River, and down-river to Cecil Moses Park. When we have our
Tukwila Backyard Wildlife Festival in mid May at the Tukwila Community
Center, we have one or two sightings of a Green Heron. Down river from the
Community Center at North Winds Weir and Cecil Moses Park we very often see
a Green Heron from the foot bridge.

I was excited to see the activity. Up until last week, I had never seen a
Green Heron stick nest up in a tree. About 25 feet up, and well hidden by
foliage. Very cool.

Yours, Carol Schulz

Des Moines



Subject: August 13 Westport Seabirds Pelagic Trip - Laysan Albatross and Buller's Shearwaters
Date: Tue Aug 15 2017 8:55 am
From: grevelas AT integral-corp.com
 
Hi Tweets -

This past Sunday, August 13th, we had another great trip with Westport Seabirds. With about 18 enthusiastic birders from near (Olympia), far (Sweden), and many points in between, we left the dock at Westport about 6 am and headed due west along our usual track toward the deep waters of Grays Canyon. Seas were confused and bumpy heading west but winds were relatively light throughout the day and we enjoyed a smooth and sunny ride home. Just outside the Jetty, we passed through about 13,000 Sooty Shearwaters, with much smaller numbers of Brown Pelicans, Heerman's Gulls, Common Murres, and a few Red-necked Phalaropes. As is typical, bird numbers dropped as we left the nearshore zone, but by 8:30 we picked up our first Black-footed Albatross, Northern Fulmars, and Pink-footed Shearwaters. A very cooperative South Polar Skua picked up off the water just ahead of the boat and flew close down the starboard side. Captain Phil then found a shrimper on the horizon and once there we picked up much better looks of both Black-foots and Pink-foots, and our first Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel of the day. Moving on to deeper water, a few Cassin's Auklets were seen, and our first of the season Buller's Shearwater flew by. We would see 11 Buller's by the end of the trip. Over the edge of the canyon, we found a Hagfish Boat processing its catch with about 75 Black-footed Albatross in its shadow, as well as more Pink-foots, Sooties, and many juvenile California Gulls, the most common gull offshore in summer. A lost juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird landed briefly on the boat. As we were about to move on, a Laysan Albatross flew up our wake and alongside the boat for all to see. This was the avian highlight of the day as we only see this species on about 5% of our August trips. Phil then took us northeast from there and straight into the mouth of the canyon as we turned for home. This extended period in deep water was birdy and we added Sabine's Gulls and one Parasitic Jaeger. As we motored smoothly back towards Westport with a tail wind, several Humpback Whales put on a show with a couple animals breaching nearby. A few Dall's Porpoise played in our wake and better looks at Red-necked Phalaropes and Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels were had. A good size ocean sunfish was also seen well. Back at the Westport Jetty, we added Surfbird and Wandering Tattler to the trip list, and in the marina, a few 100 Marbled Godwits and 1 Whimbrel were roosting on the floating docks.
The numbers above are preliminary. The final numbers and complete species listed will be posted on Westport Seabirds.com and on ebird. Spotters for the trip were Scott Mills, Cara Borre, and Gene Revelas. As usual Skipper Phil Anderson and Chris Anderson (deckhand, crew, ginger snap purveyor) made sure fun was had by all.
Please check http://westportseabirds.com/ for information on upcoming trips. There are many trips scheduled in August and September, and one on October 7th, the final trip of 2017. Hope to see you out there sometime soon!

Gene Revelas
Olympia, WA



Subject: Frenchmans Bar Regional Park, Clark Co, WA
Date: Mon Aug 14 2017 23:15 pm
From: rflores_2 AT msn.com
 
I was there for two hours early this morning the conditions were perfect although the birding was ok. Highlights are

Swainson's thrush 2
Black-throated gray warbler 4
Black-headed grosbeak 7
Wilson's warbler 1
Townsend's warbler 1
Bullocks oriole 1
Yellow warbler 2
Warbling vireo 6
Western tanager 2
Red-breasted nuthatch 1

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WAPOST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
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Subject: Swifts in Monroe
Date: Mon Aug 14 2017 15:24 pm
From: scrubjay323 AT gmail.com
 
I had 20 to 30 swifts over Tumwater Valley Golf Course yesterday morning


Phil Kelley

On Aug 14, 2017 10:13 AM, "Larry Schwitters" wrote:

> About 3000 Vaux™s Swifts spent the night in the Monroe Wagner communal
> roost last night.
>
> Our Vaux™s Happening project could use some help keeping track of how many
> swifts are using this roost. You may be surprised by how my fun it can be.
>
> Email me.
>
> Larry Schwitters
> Issaquah
> Project coordinator
> Audubon Vaux™s Happening
>
> vauxshappening.org
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>



Subject: Swifts in Monroe
Date: Mon Aug 14 2017 12:14 pm
From: leschwitters AT me.com
 
About 3000 Vaux™s Swifts spent the night in the Monroe Wagner communal roost last night.

Our Vaux™s Happening project could use some help keeping track of how many swifts are using this roost. You may be surprised by how my fun it can be.

Email me.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
Project coordinator
Audubon Vaux™s Happening

vauxshappening.org



Subject: Update: Mallard X Teal Hybrid at Canyon Park North of Bothell, Snohomish County
Date: Mon Aug 14 2017 10:08 am
From: jschwartz1124 AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweeters!

I've had a number of discussions with birding experts, both here and with a
volunteer reviewer from eBird, and the consensus has changed: the duck I
originally suspected as a mallard X teal hybrid at the Canyon Park wetlands
just north of Bothell is most likely just a male mallard transitioning out
of eclipse plumage. I'll keep an eye on it over the coming days/weeks to
see how it continues to change.

Sorry for jumping the gun!

Keep watching the skies,

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com



Subject: Back from Arizona
Date: Mon Aug 14 2017 0:06 am
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
Frank Caruso returned Thursday night from the WINGS Second Spring SE Arizona trip. Although very hot a few days, it was actually hotter in Seattle some of the time we were gone and definitely wetter in SE Arizona.
I had birded the area extensively in the winter and summer 40 years ago and had not been back since. I was amazed at how green it was - lush. Although the numbers of individuals was pretty low and many birds were not singing, we had some excellent birds. I had seen most of the specialty birds on earlier trips, so the focus this time was getting photos of as many new birds as I could and also adding some life birds if possible - plus just enjoying "old friends".
All told the tour turned out over 180 species. We missed some of the rarities (could not even try for Flame Colored Tanager) and a Yellow Green Vireo was reported the day after we visited the spot where it was seen. Also no White Eared or Plain Capped Starthroat Hummingbirds were around. And same for Sinaloa Wren. But there were excellent birds.
Highlights included: Lucifer, Purple Crowned, Rivoli's (Magnificent) and Blue Throated Hummingbirds, Mexican Chickadee, Tufted Flycatcher, Rufous Capped Warbler (and 11 other warbler species), Black Capped and Black Tailed Gnatcatchers, Elegant Trogon, Montezuma Quail, Mississippi Kite, Whiskered Screech and Elf Owls (no Spotted), Mexican Whippoorwill, Thick Billed Kingbird, Crissal and Bendire's Thrashers, Five Striped, Black Throated, Cassin's, Rufous Crowned, Rufous Winged and Botteri's Sparrows, and Bronzed Cowbird (1 only).
My camera stopped working after day two and I was saved by a loan from one of the other tour members (a good group). Some of the roughest roads I have been on (in a less than comfortable van) but at least we did not get stuck in some of the flooded washes. We saw a suburban stuck in one and heard horror stories of other mishaps. I think Frank and I each added a half dozen ABA life birds and despite the camera mishap and it really not being a photo friendly tour, I added more than 50 new ABA photos and hit my goal (arbitrary?) of now more than 600 ABA species photographed.
We stayed three nights at the Casa de San Pedro in Hereford, AZ - a wonderful place (B and B) with great food and great people. I can highly recommend it and hope to return. I do not plan to wait another 40 years before returning to SE Arizona again - but next time it will not be in the heat of August nor on a tour with everyone packed into a bouncy van on those roads.
Blair Bernson



Subject: Eastern WA shorebirds this weekend in PO, Ferry & Columbia Co
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 22:28 pm
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Hi all -
I spent a bit of time birding some the less shore-birdy counties this weekend seeing what shorebirds might be around.

Ferry County:
Saturday 8/12
Nothing much at the mouth of the Sanpoil River.
Republic STP - only Spotted Sandpipers & Killdeer for me.
Then I went up to Sanpoil Lake, just north of Republic ” as reported by Donna Bragg, the marshy area north of the lake is hosting a lot of shorebirds these days:
Stilt Sandpipers - 2
Semipalmated Sanpiper - 1 or 2
Least Sandpiper - several
Long-billed Dowitcher - 1
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
Pectoral Sandpiper - 1
Solitary Sandpiper - 1-2

Pend Oreille County:
Saturday 8/12
Flying Goose Ranch ” it was Baird™s Day
Baird™s Sandpiper - 30+ ! The sandbar was just full of them
Semipalmated Plover - 3
Lesser & Greater Yellowlegs - 3-4 each
Killdeer - many
Spotted Sandpiper -1

Dike Road - no luck on shorebirds except for Spotted Sandpiper, and the Peregrine reported by Terry Little wasn™t around. But the Lewis™s Woodpeckers were still there.

Calispell Lake
The mud on the north end of the lake is extensive ” so extensive that I wasn™t able to do much with most of the shorebirds I could make out far away ” a large group of peeps was flying around, and yellowlegs were present.
Best of all was having one of the Peregrine Falcons reported by Terry cruising through on my second visit, later perching on a roadside power pole.

Columbia County:
Sunday 8/13
Mouth of the Tuccannon River on the Snake River
there a a nice sandbar this year, viewable from 261 after parking just beyond the mouth.
Long-billed Dowitcher - 1 ” nice code 5 bird!

Just south of Starbuck, near MP 6 on SR 261 - nice flooded fields that have produced shorebirds in past years ” you have to stare for a long time and from different angles to turn up the birds, but it can be worth the search:
Solitary Sandpiper - 2 [code 4]
Baird™s Sandpiper - 1, maybe 2 [code 5]

Trips out to Little Goose Dam and up Tuccannon River valley to the fish hatchery and Beaver & Watson Lakes ended up producing no shorebirds ”

Good shore-birding!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA



Subject: Census Count: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington on August 13, 2017
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 20:54 pm
From: ErikKnight05 AT gmail.com
 
This report was mailed for Erik Knight by http://birdnotes.net



Date: August 13, 2017

Location: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, Washington



Wind direction: N

Prevailing wind speed: 1-5 km/h gusting to: 6-11 km/h

Percentage of sky covered by clouds: 80%

Precipitation: none



from 11:06AM to 4:15PM. Birded both units.



Birds seen (in taxonomic order):



Wood Duck 4

Gadwall 4

Mallard 125

Cinnamon Teal 19

Northern Shoveler 7

Northern Pintail 5

Double-crested Cormorant 2

Great Blue Heron 10

Turkey Vulture 6

Osprey 4

Bald Eagle 3 [1]

Red-tailed Hawk 1

American Kestrel 1

American Coot 18 [2]

Killdeer 1

Greater Yellowlegs 1

Least Sandpiper 1

Eurasian Collared-Dove 2

Mourning Dove 1

Belted Kingfisher 1

Northern Flicker 2

Western Wood-Pewee 12

Eastern Kingbird 3 [3]

Hutton's Vireo 1

Steller's Jay 1

Western Scrub-Jay 6

Purple Martin 4

Tree Swallow 80

Violet-green Swallow 50

Barn Swallow 55

Black-capped Chickadee 12

White-breasted Nuthatch 1

Brown Creeper 1

Bewick's Wren 4

Marsh Wren 1

American Robin 2

Cedar Waxwing 20

Yellow Warbler 1

Common Yellowthroat 25

Spotted Towhee 3

Savannah Sparrow 2

Song Sparrow 13

Red-winged Blackbird 15

American Goldfinch 15



Footnotes:



[1] adult & juvenile pair

[2] adults & 15 juveniles

[3] seen along Kiwa Trail West of bench near 2nd

bridge



Total number of species seen: 44



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Subject: Stilt Sandpipers in Everett
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 19:15 pm
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
As Pam Myers reported earlier, the Stilt Sandpipers were still at the
corner of the marsh next to the large Everett Sewage Lagoon. Later, I also
saw two, possibly three, Baird's Sandpipers on the flats further down the
gravel road next to the lagoon. Two Spotted Sandpipers were moving along
the wall of the lagoon, but I did not see the Solitary Sandpiper reported
earlier.

Ominously, there is a brand new no-trespassing sign on the gate to this
gravel road. It was not there when I last visited on 8/4, but on another
recent visit there were people in a could of trucks conferring down there.
The sign refers to some company, not to the sewer district. The road always
has been open to walkers and birders previously.

Phil Dickinson
Lake Stevens



Subject: Possible Mallard X Teal Hybrid at Canyon Park North of Bothell, Snohomish County
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 18:22 pm
From: ucd880 AT comcast.net
 
Looks like an ordinary drake Mallard molting out of eclipse.



Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
ucd880@comcast.net

----- Original Message -----

Hello Tweeters!

More birding news from the wonderful wetlands of the north Bothell office parks!

I was out Friday morning birding at the Canyon Park wetlands in south Snohomish County, abutting 228th Street SE to the south and the Bothell-Everett Highway to the west.

The smoke was still hanging in the air, but dissipating. I set out at about 6:30 a.m. to bird the area, which is made up of waterlogged wetlands to the north and grassy reaches dotted with stands of trees to the south. The two areas are split in two by a wonderfully maintained asphalt walking and biking path. Keep an eye out for bicyclists if you go!

I walked a leisurely pace along the path, spotting belted kingfishers over the water, cedar waxwings, goldfinches and sparrows darting from tree to tree and at least three willow flycatchers sending their sneeze-like fitz-bew out over the landscape.

As a I rounded a curve in the path, I came across at least 30 mallard-looking ducks sitting on the asphalt. The air still had a chill in it, so I could only guess they were soaking up the absorbed heat from the path to keep warm. I saw mostly males with eclipse plumage, with some domestics thrown in for good measure.

The ducks allowed me to get surprisingly close, allowing me a good look at an oddly colored member of their gathering. It had a decidedly teal-like head and associated coloring, but a mallard body beneath.

I asked around with some birding friends and submitted a photo to the ABA's What's This Bird Facebook page. With this input gathered, I'm pretty confident in saying I spotted a mallard X green-winged teal hybrid. Here's my checklist, which includes some photos:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

eBird tells me this is rare, hence my desire to share the find with all of you. If this turns out to be not that big of deal, still make a point to check out the Canyon Park wetlands. Like the other spots I bird in the North Creek area of Bothell, it's quite the hidden gem.

Keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com

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Subject: RFI: Women's field shirts for birding
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 18:16 pm
From: rwlawson AT q.com
 
Dear female Tweets,

I am having a very hard time finding tropical-weight, long-sleeved women's field shirts in birding-appropriate colors. In my searches online and in Seattle stores, all I see are shirts in white or bright colors like fuchsia and coral. I would love to hear if you know of a source of women's shirts in colors like khaki, dark green, dark blue, etc. Shirts without mesh ventilation panels designed to let leeches through would be especially desirable. Please reply offlist.

Rachel Lawson
Seattle





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Subject: Possible Mallard X Teal Hybrid at Canyon Park North of Bothell, Snohomish County
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 17:25 pm
From: jschwartz1124 AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweeters!

More birding news from the wonderful wetlands of the north Bothell office
parks!

I was out Friday morning birding at the Canyon Park wetlands in south
Snohomish County, abutting 228th Street SE to the south and the
Bothell-Everett Highway to the west.

The smoke was still hanging in the air, but dissipating. I set out at about
6:30 a.m. to bird the area, which is made up of waterlogged wetlands to the
north and grassy reaches dotted with stands of trees to the south. The two
areas are split in two by a wonderfully maintained asphalt walking and
biking path. Keep an eye out for bicyclists if you go!

I walked a leisurely pace along the path, spotting belted kingfishers over
the water, cedar waxwings, goldfinches and sparrows darting from tree to
tree and at least three willow flycatchers sending their sneeze-like
*fitz-bew* out over the landscape.

As a I rounded a curve in the path, I came across at least 30
mallard-looking ducks sitting on the asphalt. The air still had a chill in
it, so I could only guess they were soaking up the absorbed heat from the
path to keep warm. I saw mostly males with eclipse plumage, with some
domestics thrown in for good measure.

The ducks allowed me to get surprisingly close, allowing me a good look at
an oddly colored member of their gathering. It had a decidedly teal-like
head and associated coloring, but a mallard body beneath.

I asked around with some birding friends and submitted a photo to the ABA's
What's This Bird Facebook page. With this input gathered, I'm pretty
confident in saying I spotted a mallard X green-winged teal hybrid. Here's
my checklist, which includes some photos:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

eBird tells me this is rare, hence my desire to share the find with all of
you. If this turns out to be not that big of deal, still make a point to
check out the Canyon Park wetlands. Like the other spots I bird in the
North Creek area of Bothell, it's quite the hidden gem.

Keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com



Subject: Swift Night Out
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 16:29 pm
From: leschwitters AT me.com
 
Tweeters,

There all most wasn™t a September Monroe Vaux™s Swift Community Celebration this year. That would have been a shame with it having been a very successful event each of the last 8 years. I suspect it was mostly the Pilchuck Audubon President Cindy Easterson who pulled it off. Here™s what she has to say.

Yes...there will be a Swifts Night Out this year although it hung in the balance until just yesterday! Various issues with the power and amenities needed to run this event were in limbo but with a HUGE shout out to the Monroe Arts Council and to the City of Monroe in partnership with Pilchuck Audubon we will dash forward to pull this event together.

Mark your calendars for September 9, 2017, with the festivities starting at 4pm at the Wagner Center on Main Street in Monroe. While a lot of the details are still getting cemented...it is possible that we will have a "Species Parade" starting at the beautiful swift art installation by Kevin Pettelle/Soul in Bronze in downtown Monroe and traveling along the sidewalk to the Monroe swift chimney at Wagner Center. We'd love to have any and all participate in this part of the celebration. So let me know if anyone wants to walk in our parade.

Please do come and enjoy these amazing "wee birds" with us.

Welcome back swifts! And hope to see you all at Swifts Night Out!
Cindy Easterson
(425) 876-1055

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah



Subject: Bird Guide Found at Edmonds Marsh
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 16:01 pm
From: mnckeen AT frontier.com
 
I found a Peterson Bird Guide at the Edmonds Marsh on Sunday morning, August
13th. It was located at the viewing station next to the tennis courts.
Please contact me via email if this belongs to you.



Nathan Keen



Subject: Siberia Corrrection
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 15:24 pm
From: gibsondesign AT msn.com
 
In my last post, " Our Migration Problem" I identified  Wrangell Island, source of Russian Spies (Snow Geese) as being in siberia. That was my Russia ignorance .


My big sister Margie, arctic explorer, just informed me that Wrangell Island is located in the Russian far east, while siberia makes up the central part of that vast country.


Really, most of what I know about Russia comes from two sources.


If you're old enough , you may remember Boris and Natasha, the Russian spies who somehow wound up on the ol' Rocky and Bullwinkle show- "Moose and Squirrel" as the soviets referred to them .


The second source is the wonderful Akira Kurosawa film "Dersu Uzala ", beautifully filmed (in Russia). It's the most powerful movie I've seen about the change from the "old" ways, to the "new" ways. You might wanna check it out.



Jeff Gibson

not in Siberia, Wa.



Subject: The Birdbooker Report
Date: Sun Aug 13 2017 14:32 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Discovering the Mammoth

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

2) The Extended Specimen

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...
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Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Blk Throated Gray Warbler / Caryn / Wedgwood
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 20:34 pm
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Thanks to all who helped me id the bird which was here so briefly. Based on consensus and studying Sibley , I do think it was a Black Throated Gray Warbler. It would be a first in our garden, though who knows if one slipped through. I seem to recall a spot of yellow above the eye, which I think made me think of the Townsend's since the mask looked so similar. 

I've had many Townsends so this was a nice new addition to my yard list.

Also, while watering today, found a dead crow beneath some plants.

Caryn / Wedgwood_______________________________________________
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiers still at Everett STP
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 20:25 pm
From: pirangas AT hotmail.com
 
Hi,

They were not there this morning. But at 4.15 we found 2 Stilt Sandpipers. They were the only shorebirds present


Thanks to David Poortinga for reporting them yesterday.

Also several Bird's Sandpiper, in with lots peeps, at Everett Waterfront.

Cheers, Steve

Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S 6, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



Subject: Request for help from TN birder: Scrub Jay
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 17:51 pm
From: jpeters AT sewanee.edu
 
Dear Tweeters,

I am in Seattle (Ballard) visiting my son, Nate Peters, and would like to
see the local Scrub Jay species which would be a lifer for me since the
recent split. This year I lost my Iceland Gull and am trying to stay
ahead of my son on life birds at least for a couple more years!

I would be grateful for any advice. Feel free to contact me off-line if
you wish at jpeters@sewanee.edu.


Thank you!


James Peters



Subject: Our Migration Problem
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 17:06 pm
From: gibsondesign AT msn.com
 
Oh sure, we've got this huge immigration "problem" in the USA. It's been going on for thousands of years, before there even was a USA.


There is still a lot of debate and research going on about exactly who all the first Human Beans that got to North America were and how they got here. But one thing is for sure, their arrival was a big game changer. One of the deal breakers for the native wildlife was the opposable thumb possessed by these new bipeds. All the Mammoths, Mastodons, Camels, Horses, Giant Sloths, etc., and less than megafauna species soon found out what these critters could do with those thumby hands - like create sharp stone tipped spears that they could kill the above species with and with other crafty tricks. They were smart survivors and worked cooperatively for the whole group, quite unlike our current "leadership".


Well, thousands of years on, these folks who got here first diversified and further organized into tribal societies. They developed a close relationship with the natural world they depended on and were closely part of. Then things got complicated. The "first nations", as they say in Canada, were in for a big surprise.


Because then a bunch of high tech gold diggers , thieves and slavers sailed over from Europe and took the continent as their own. It wasn't a pretty process. The fact is , that the vast majority of Human Beans in North America are immigrants - we are here to stay, wether we volunteered to or not. Homo Sapiens (us) means "wise man" - well good luck with that.


Much larger than our Immigration issues, is our Migration Problem. Rather than moving to a new place and staying, migrants are ongoing travelers, they go to wherever meets their needs. They have no county, state or national allegiance . Of course some of the most disrespectful of political lines are birds. They just don't even know about these petty details. They are completely ignorant of "wise man" rules. Can we Americans trust them?


Just think about it. When you're out watching birds, those birds are watching you. Take for example watching Snow Geese in Western Washington. These birds are born on Wrangell Island - that's in Siberia - like Russia. Every winter we have Russian bred birds watching us. They all kinda look the same to us, but not all go strait back to Wrangell - some fly back to Moscow and report to the Kremlin. "Vlad" they report", "America is a sick surveillance state- everywhere we go, groups of people are watching us with binoculars and scopes. They're brazen - they don't even try to hide what they're doing!"


Could this get the cold or hot war going? Don't blame the birds.Its a Homo Sapiens problem.


Then we have the "Wall". Which is just a government "private contractor" scam. I talked to some birds about it recently.

"Reallly !" they said, " we thought you were the big brains around here! Even a Roadrunnner could fly over that ."


Personally, I like migration. And immigration too - people are interesting.


Jeff Gibson

just sayin' from

Port Townsend WAw



Subject: Fw: Pelicans over View Ridge
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 16:17 pm
From: plkoyama AT comcast.net
 
Tweets,
Thought NE Seattle folks might be interested in this forward from my daughter, who lives in View Ridge. Anyone else see this flock yesterday?
Penny Koyama, Bothell
plkoyama at comcast dot net
Sent: Saturday, August 12, 2017 9:19 AM
To: Penny Koyama
Subject: Fw: Pelicans over View Ridge

What??


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


On Fri, Aug 11, 2017 at 11:34 PM, Nextdoor View Ridge
wrote:
Kim Jenkins, View Ridge

Did anyone else see the flock of 30+ pelicans flying over the neighborhood? I've lived here 48 years and, until today, have never seen them in the city. I have a (not great) iPhone video but don't know how to attach it here.
Aug 11 in General to 13 neighborhoods

View or reply

Thank Private message


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Subject: Union Bay Watch } Smoke and Ash
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 16:04 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

This week™s post focuses on two young osprey still in the nest, at least on Thursday morning, in the Union Bay Natural Area. Have you learned to tell them apart? If not maybe this post will help. Good luck!

http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....

Have a great day on Union Baywhere young osprey learn to fly in the city!

Larry Hubbell



Subject: Ocean Shores Black Phoebe
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 15:45 pm
From: jfsgiles01 AT gmail.com
 
The Black Phoebe reported by Hal Opperman several days ago was still
present at mid day today. It was fly catching and calling fairly actively
at the West end of the lake. Park at the Cabana Pool and take the nature
trail to the right to get to it.
Good birding
Steve Giles
Camano Island



Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 13, 2017
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 14:04 pm
From: ellen AT 123imagine.net
 
Hey, Tweeters,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* The Gulls of Summer
http://bit.ly/OtAqzq
* Albatross Surfs the Wind
http://bit.ly/NuL0Hr
* Evolving the INability to Fly
http://bit.ly/2vqMld3
* Flying and Molting - A Tricky Balance
http://bit.ly/1DSUgiZ
* Canary in a Coal Mine - What Was That About?
http://bit.ly/2vqwRFO
* Burrowing Owls Hiss Like a Rattlesnake
http://bit.ly/1rFjkTN
* The Importance of Paying Attention
http://bit.ly/Q1zamo
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Subject: Mt Salmo Info and some birds in Pend Oreille
Date: Sat Aug 12 2017 13:13 pm
From: terry AT crossoverchurch.info
 
Hello

Yesterday I birded Pend Oreille County from Calispell Lake to Sullivan Lake. For those who are thinking about birding Mt Salmo in the near future, the ROAD TO MT SALMO IS CLOSED due to fire on Hall Mt at Sullivan Lake. Noisy Creek Campground on the south end of Sullivan Lake is closed as well. Harvey Creek Rd (to Bunchgrass Meadows) remains open and probably will continue to be open unless there is a major shift in the direction of the fire. Apart from some unforeseen significant rain, I suspect the road to Salmo will be closed for a while, perhaps well into September.

Now some bird reports from the day. Seemed to be a falcon day in PO. 4 PEREGRINE FALCONS, 2 at Calispell Lake, 1 on the Cusick Meadows, 1 along the Dike Rd on the Kalispell Indian Reservation; 2 Merlin at Calispell Lake; 8 American Kestrels at Calispell Lake, 28 in a one mile stretch on Cusick Meadows Rd, 5 at Flying Goose Ranch.

Shorebirds were pretty slim, though conditions seem to be perfect along the river. I haven™t figured out the shorebird patterns in PO county yet. With conditions appearing to be the same, some years there are lots of shorebirds, other years they are almost non existent. There was a small mixed flock of Western and Least Sandpipers at Flying Goose. There were 2 Pectoral and 7 Baird™s Sandpipers on the North side of Calispell Lake.

Four Lewis™s Woodpeckers continue to be easy to find along the Dike Rd. A flock of seven Red-necked Grebes and one Western Grebe were at Manresa Grotto (Kalispell Indian Reservation). Evening Grosbeaks and Red Crossbills were seen all day long in a number of places.

Blessings
Terry Little



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