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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on October 22, 2017, 2:05 am

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22 Oct: @ 01:58:41 
Ino or Leucistic crow? [Bill Anderson]
21 Oct: @ 23:30:45 
Additional Information and Photos---Fwd: Incredibly rare British Ino owl seen near Durham [notcalm]
21 Oct: @ 17:58:07 
Franklin's Gull at Everett STP [Steve Pink]
21 Oct: @ 15:43:07 
Union Bay Watch } Warbler Reflections [Hubbell]
21 Oct: @ 14:13:18 
major snow geese influx to skagit [William Driskell]
21 Oct: @ 14:04:03 
BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 22, 2017 [Ellen Blackstone]
21 Oct: @ 13:57:12 
Re: Ino vs. Leucistic birds [Sammy Catiis]
21 Oct: @ 12:00:02 
Ino vs. Leucistic birds [Bill Anderson]
21 Oct: @ 03:41:05 
Fwd: Rare 'ghost owl' with white feathers spotted in Britain | Fox News [notcalm]
21 Oct: @ 03:31:14 
Cornell Lab eNews: 9/11 Tribute in Light Reveals How City Lights Affect Migration [notcalm]
20 Oct: @ 22:47:37 
Re: Cruise ship question [Linda Talman]
20 Oct: @ 22:12:42 
Re: Bird Activity After the Rain? [Hans-Joachim Feddern]
20 Oct: @ 20:09:48 
Snow Geese on Slater [Michelle Landis]
20 Oct: @ 16:06:56 
Re: Bird Activity After the Rain? [Rick Tyler]
20 Oct: @ 15:39:04 
Bird Activity After the Rain? [Jeremy Schwartz]
20 Oct: @ 14:16:32 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-10-19 [Michael Hobbs]
20 Oct: @ 14:02:42 
Re: White-throated Sparrow, Semiahmoo, Blaine [Barry Ulman]
20 Oct: @ 13:17:50 
Are birds evolving to eat from feeders? [Philip Dickinson]
20 Oct: @ 11:59:20 
Re: My junco is back [Dennis Vroman]
20 Oct: @ 11:25:40 
RE: Cruise ship question [Denis DeSilvis]
20 Oct: @ 10:32:44 
My junco is back [Bob]
20 Oct: @ 09:37:25 
Cruise ship question [Linda Talman]
20 Oct: @ 03:56:29 
some birdie stories that are freely available [Devorah the Ornithologist]
20 Oct: @ 00:57:33 
Edmonds marsh northern shrike 10-19-17 [Bill Anderson]
19 Oct: @ 21:27:55 
Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 10-19-2017 [Denis DeSilvis]
19 Oct: @ 19:46:55 
White-throated Sparrow, Semiahmoo, Blaine [Eric Ellingson]
19 Oct: @ 15:14:07 
Re: Edmonds Mystery Sandpiper 8-13-2010 [Dennis Paulson]
19 Oct: @ 14:22:52 
(no subject) [Sam Neuffer]
19 Oct: @ 10:00:02 
Top 10 Dreaming during the Birding Doldrums [B B]
19 Oct: @ 03:04:02 
Edmonds Mystery Sandpiper 8-13-2010 [Bill Anderson]
19 Oct: @ 00:14:27 
RE: Fwd: Cruise ship fallout [Denis DeSilvis]
18 Oct: @ 23:02:45 
RE: Fwd: Cruise ship fallout [Louise Rutter]
18 Oct: @ 22:26:16 
Fwd: Cruise ship fallout [Ed Swan]
18 Oct: @ 21:23:57 
Edmonds Harlequins 10-18-17 [Bill Anderson]
18 Oct: @ 18:33:18 
Book Recommendations List [Stephen Chase]
18 Oct: @ 18:11:37 
Dash Point Dock Franklin's Gull Continues [Hans-Joachim Feddern]
18 Oct: @ 16:21:10 
Northern Pygmy Owl in Robinswood neighborhood?? [Hilary Barnes]
18 Oct: @ 14:01:27 
Long-Term Field Studies Explain Why These American Woodpeckers Are Communists [Devorah the Ornithologist]
18 Oct: @ 12:08:37 
Seattle Audubon Whidbey trip ) Oct 17 [B&PBell]
17 Oct: @ 18:09:15 
Seen and Heard [Tom and Carol Stoner]
17 Oct: @ 16:40:29 
Can a bird brighten your day ?? [T Varela]
17 Oct: @ 16:04:36 
RFI Foreign Travel [Roger Moyer]
17 Oct: @ 15:43:49 
Book Recommendations [Karl Neice]
17 Oct: @ 15:35:14 
California Scrub-Jay [Megan Ward]
17 Oct: @ 15:13:34 
Dragon Fly vs Anna's [dmcvay]
17 Oct: @ 14:08:25 
Steller's jays versus hummingbird feeder [Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser]
17 Oct: @ 09:38:20 
RE: Book Recommendations? [Jeff Kozma]
17 Oct: @ 01:46:20 
Point-no-Point Today [Hans-Joachim Feddern]
16 Oct: @ 23:54:00 
Book recommendations [Mary Metz]
16 Oct: @ 22:52:24 
Another Steller's Jay Movement [Hans-Joachim Feddern]





Subject: Ino or Leucistic crow?
Date: Sun Oct 22 2017 1:58 am
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
On 4-14-2010 I photographed a crow At Marina Park in Edmonds that had white feathers and normal eyes. A leucistic bird or an ino bird? The viewing audience can check out my photos at this link and decide for themselves.
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Additional Information and Photos---Fwd: Incredibly rare British Ino owl seen near Durham
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 23:30 pm
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
 
Tweets,

Additional information and photos of the Ino Owl.

Dan Reiff

----- Original Message -----

From: "Dan Reiff"
To: "Tweeters"
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 11:40:45 AM
Subject: Incredibly rare British Ino owl seen near Durham


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new...


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Franklin's Gull at Everett STP
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 17:58 pm
From: pirangas AT hotmail.com
 
This afternoon - about 1:40 pm there was a winter Franklin's Gull on the pond on the south side of road leading to Spencer Island. The large pond with the aerators.  It was swimming with Bonaparte's Gulls.


Tried to relocate the bird an hour later without success.


I had them a number of times at this location at this time of year over many years. Not as often in recent years.


Cheers, Steve Pink


Steve Pink Edmonds, WA mailto: pirangas@hotmail.com



Subject: Union Bay Watch } Warbler Reflections
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 15:43 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

This week I felt like I fell into a swirl of yellow reflections which caused me question my knowledge of yellow-rumped warblers. I hope you find my struggle to comprehend as helpful as I imagine it to be.

May migrating warblers reflect a golden warmth into your autumn.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry



Subject: major snow geese influx to skagit
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 14:13 pm
From: bdriskell AT comcast.net
 
Late yesterday afternoon, Inge Watson and I watched numerous flocks of
snow geese stretching horizon to horizon arriving to the Skagit nearshore.

--
William Driskell
Seattle WA
206-522-5930 h/o

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 22, 2017
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 14:04 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hello, Tweeters,

Here are the BirdNote stories from last week:
* Birds of the Northeastern Salt Marshes
http://bit.ly/2z7kf4S
* What the Pacific Wren Hears - Slowing Down the Song
http://bit.ly/2yoijHP
* Bird-friendly Planting in Autumn
http://bit.ly/2gh7JvI
* Starlings Say It with Flowers
http://bit.ly/2ipox4A
* Black-footed Albatross, Graceful Giant
http://bit.ly/2yoSRln
* Tropical Wake-up Call
http://bit.ly/2yJN7nr
* Canada Geese - Migratory or Not?
http://bit.ly/2yKXWWz
””””””
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2gWl1Lx
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info@birdnote.org
========================Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcas...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcas...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and nearly 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



Subject: Ino vs. Leucistic birds
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 13:57 pm
From: Hikersammy AT msn.com
 
http://kmbreeding.weebly.com/u...

This link will explain it better than I can. Or I would have to take just as long..


So, it's kinda funny.. but a lot of the terms are umbrella terms to begin with.. such as Pied or Piebald.. which really means little spots of no color. Now even amongst Ornithologist.. the term Leucistic or Leukistic < spelled both ways.. is not always welcomed. In fact when I was taking my ornithology classes.. it was not the 'going' term at all. So.. here is a breakdown of why.. and where the controversy begins.


Albino.. used to mean.. and lack of melanin ""

albino (plural albinos or albinoes)

1. (countable) A person or animal congenitally lacking melanin pigmentation in the skin, eyes, and hair or feathers (or more rarely only in the eyes); one born with albinism.


But as we know.. all color in birds is not Melanin.. therefore.. an albino Stellers Jay would have a white head and still a blue body.. this was an accepted by Ornithologist in the wider sense..


Now the coin has flipped.. and more people and Ornithologist.. and Scientists in all biology.. have adopted more often than not.. as Albino meaning "lack of any color" BUT they also threw in the lack of some color.. such as muted ashy birds.. not just pure white. I was called out to ID an blackbird.. I ID'd it as a Brewers Blackbird.. Leucistic.. Cornell said Albino but then later changed it to match my ID as I pointed out the "yellow" eye ring. That was the only color.. red eyes to boot.


So.. it's kinda a mix still out there. THe Ino's is described above in the link way better though..


Hope that helped clear it up a little?


Sammy


________________________________
From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu on behalf of Bill Anderson
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 9:58 AM
To: notcalm@comcast.net; tweeters@uw.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Ino vs. Leucistic birds

Following up on Dan's post (thanks, Dan).

I had never heard the term "Ino", but I became familiar with the term "leucistic" a few years ago after I photographed an unusual crow at Marina Park in Edmonds. All of its feathers were white, but it had dark eyes. I was told it was leucistic and not albino because its eyes were normal, like the owl in the article posted up by Dan.

So what is the difference between an Ino bird and a leucistic one?

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Ino vs. Leucistic birds
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 12:00 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Following up on Dan's post (thanks, Dan).  

I had never heard the term "Ino", but I became familiar with the term "leucistic" a few years ago after I photographed an unusual crow at Marina Park in Edmonds. All of its feathers were white, but it had dark eyes. I was told it was leucistic and not albino because its eyes were normal, like the owl in the article posted up by Dan.

So what is the difference between an Ino bird and a leucistic one?

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Fwd: Rare 'ghost owl' with white feathers spotted in Britain | Fox News
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 3:41 am
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,
I found article and photo this interesting:

"An incredibly rare ghostly white "Ino" owl has been spotted in the UK.
It is a British species called a Little Owl which has been turned white due to a rare genetic condition known as Ino, which makes it look a bit like an albino."

I did not know that Albinos had poor eyesight. Apparently "Inos do not have have the same problems with eyesight.

Dan Reiff

----- Original Message -----

From: "Dan Reiff"
To: notcalm@comcast.net, "Dan Reiff"
Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2017 6:21:35 AM
Subject: Rare 'ghost owl' with white feathers spotted in Britain | Fox News


http://www.foxnews.com/science...


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Cornell Lab eNews: 9/11 Tribute in Light Reveals How City Lights Affect Migration
Date: Sat Oct 21 2017 3:31 am
From: notcalm AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,
Look up the article regarding Light and Bird Migration. My speculation is that artificial light may also be relevant to Birds landing on Ships.
I do not have the link.
Dan Reiff

See: Cornell Lab eNews


October 2017 9/11 Tribute in Light Reveals How City Lights Affect Migration
A new study provides the most compelling evidence yet that artificial lights cause radical changes in the behavior of birds migrating at night. Using radar data and observations during the Tribute of Light in New York City, researchers from the University of Oxford, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and New York City Audubon found densities of birds were up to 150 times higher over lower Manhattan when the tribute was illuminated. The birds dissipated when the lights were turned



Subject: Cruise ship question
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 22:47 pm
From: linda.talman AT gmail.com
 
Well, I figured that the wash down wasn't for the birds.  I was thinking
that the cruise ships and even the Navy ships might have learned someplace
along in their experiences -that when they wash down, they also provide
some fresh water for birds that have landed on the deck. And that
subsequently if they have a lot of birds on the deck, their routine wash
down would provide something good for the birds. Something that might
provide a holdover for them to survive till the next port - which is likely
in the morning. A simple announcement from the captain to be aware of
standing puddles and lingering birds would win them lots of friends and add
to the wild life experience of those many passengers seeking that.

I was hoping that if that actually works and it sounds like it does, it
would be good communicate with cruise lines and request that it become part
of their routine - should the occasion arise.

On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 9:24 AM, Denis DeSilvis
wrote:

> Perhaps I'm misinterpreting your note. If so I apologize in advance.
>
> In my story about the US Navy ship (it was the USS Nassau (LHA-4)), the
> fresh water washdown was to wash off the salt and other crud that the ship
> picked up while transiting from Norfolk to Fort Lauderdale. It wasn't done
> to provide water to the birds, which, I believe, were just opportunistic:
> they saw a large mass with water on it and landed.
>
> Navy ships routinely undergo wash-down procedures, especially before
> entering port or after many days at sea - helps keep corrosion at bay. I
> imagine cruise ships have the same maintenance procedures.
>
> May all your birds be identified,
> Denis DeSilvis
> avnacrs4birds@outlook.com
>
> Sent from my Windows Phone
> ------------------------------
> From: Linda Talman
> Sent: 10/20/2017 7:39
> To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
> Subject: [Tweeters] Cruise ship question
>
> Amazing fallout stories. I would like to know what cruise company it was
> and what they might have done to ease the way for the birds. The aircraft
> story made me wonder if the freshwater until they would get to land the
> next day might have helped. (They can adjust the speed to arrive at the
> same time at the next port - even with a detour.) Or is there another
> remedy?
> A letter from an expert to the company - and maybe other companies as well
> - might be useful. And it would serve to have passengers become more
> informed.
> Cruise ships are pretty responsive to concerns. Could a call or a visit
> to the main desk have prompted an appropriate response of the ship in a
> timely manner? Could the ship have moved closer to land sooner? And would
> that have helped? And could it be that the early morning wash down was
> actually a response to get fresh water to the birds?
>
> The company would gain nothing but positive PR for a positive action - but
> what would the right action be?
>
>
>
> --
> Linda Z. Talman
> PO Box 392
> La Conner, WA
>
> 360 840 1714 <(360)%20840-1714>
>
>



--
Linda Z. Talman
PO Box 392
La Conner, WA

360 840 1714



Subject: Bird Activity After the Rain?
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 22:12 pm
From: thefedderns AT gmail.com
 
They are coming out to feed, after taken cover from the rain and making up
for lost time! I have the same experience in our yard i.e. this morning.

Hans Feddern

On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 2:04 PM, Rick Tyler wrote:

> It's what got me started birding. Right after a long, heavy rainfall, my
> front yard exploded with all these birds I'd never noticed before. A month
> later I had several feeders, two new pairs of binoculars, and a little book
> called "The Birds of Puget Sound." It's only gotten worse since then.
>
> Rick Tyler
>
> On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:38 PM, Jeremy Schwartz
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Tweeters!
>>
>> Has anyone else noticed surges in bird activity in the inter-periods
>> between rain showers?
>>
>> I first noticed it weeks ago at my backyard feeders. Not five minutes
>> after a rainstorm let up and the sun came through, our feeders exploded
>> into life. Two-thirds of the 13 species on our backyard list came out of
>> the trees to feed. All at once.
>>
>> BC and CB Chickadees, Dark-eyed Juncos and Red-breasted Nuthatches
>> jockeyed for position on the feeders themselves, while Spotted Towhees and
>> American Robins patrolled the ground for dropped seeds. Two Anna's
>> Hummingbirds even came to the party, too.
>>
>> I've noticed it once or twice out in the field, while birding in the
>> wetlands near my office park in Bothell. The trees just seemed busier after
>> rainfall stops.
>>
>> Just curious.
>>
>> Keep watching the skies!
>>
>> Jeremy Schwartz
>> Lake Forest Park
>> jschwartz1124 AT gmail DOT com
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
>> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Rick Tyler
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>


--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
thefedderns@gmail.com



Subject: Snow Geese on Slater
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 20:09 pm
From: asmalllife AT gmail.com
 
Several hundred on south side of Slater between the bridge and Red River.

Michelle Landis
Ferndale, WA



Subject: Bird Activity After the Rain?
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 16:06 pm
From: rhtyler AT gmail.com
 
It's what got me started birding. Right after a long, heavy rainfall, my
front yard exploded with all these birds I'd never noticed before. A month
later I had several feeders, two new pairs of binoculars, and a little book
called "The Birds of Puget Sound." It's only gotten worse since then.

Rick Tyler

On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:38 PM, Jeremy Schwartz
wrote:

> Hi Tweeters!
>
> Has anyone else noticed surges in bird activity in the inter-periods
> between rain showers?
>
> I first noticed it weeks ago at my backyard feeders. Not five minutes
> after a rainstorm let up and the sun came through, our feeders exploded
> into life. Two-thirds of the 13 species on our backyard list came out of
> the trees to feed. All at once.
>
> BC and CB Chickadees, Dark-eyed Juncos and Red-breasted Nuthatches
> jockeyed for position on the feeders themselves, while Spotted Towhees and
> American Robins patrolled the ground for dropped seeds. Two Anna's
> Hummingbirds even came to the party, too.
>
> I've noticed it once or twice out in the field, while birding in the
> wetlands near my office park in Bothell. The trees just seemed busier after
> rainfall stops.
>
> Just curious.
>
> Keep watching the skies!
>
> Jeremy Schwartz
> Lake Forest Park
> jschwartz1124 AT gmail DOT com
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>


--
Rick Tyler



Subject: Bird Activity After the Rain?
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 15:39 pm
From: jschwartz1124 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters!

Has anyone else noticed surges in bird activity in the inter-periods
between rain showers?

I first noticed it weeks ago at my backyard feeders. Not five minutes after
a rainstorm let up and the sun came through, our feeders exploded into
life. Two-thirds of the 13 species on our backyard list came out of the
trees to feed. All at once.

BC and CB Chickadees, Dark-eyed Juncos and Red-breasted Nuthatches jockeyed
for position on the feeders themselves, while Spotted Towhees and American
Robins patrolled the ground for dropped seeds. Two Anna's Hummingbirds even
came to the party, too.

I've noticed it once or twice out in the field, while birding in the
wetlands near my office park in Bothell. The trees just seemed busier after
rainfall stops.

Just curious.

Keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 AT gmail DOT com



Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2017-10-19
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 14:16 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT frontier.com
 
Tweets “ Yesterday was dark and wet and a little bit breezy and quiet.  The weather was not good, though not horrible.  The birds were pretty quiet, though we did manage to see a few things.  We seem to be past the last remnants of thru-migration, and our winter birds are slowly showing up.

Highlights:
a.. Bufflehead “ First of Fall (FOF), 2 females
b.. RUDDY DUCK “ one female at lake “ FOF
c.. Green Heron “ two sightings, beaver lodge at Dog Central, and Rowing Club pond
d.. Sharp-shinned Hawk “ at least 1
e.. Cooper™s Hawk “ at least 1
f.. Barn Owl “ two flying the meadows, 6:50-7:18 a.m.
g.. Merlin “ third week in a row
h.. Varied Thrush “ at least a couple
i.. Western Meadowlark “ around 5, grass & gravel lot SE of Climbing Rock
We also saw two deer, and what might have been a MINK.

Gulls were playing hard-to-get; we still haven™t had a good flock sit down on the grass fields. Also, no big flocks of geese yet; we had about 23 CANADAs yesterday, and I had about that number of CACKLING GEESE on Wednesday.

For the day, 52+ species (the plus standing for the gulls we couldn™t positively ID).

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== BirdMarymoor@frontier.com



Subject: Re: White-throated Sparrow, Semiahmoo, Blaine
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 14:02 pm
From: ubarry AT qwest.net
 
I would say the sparrow is a juvenile White-throated Sparrow. It has a white throat and a yellow spot in front of the eye. Adult White-throated Sparrows would have clear breasts; the streaks indicate a first-year bird. Nice sighting.

As for the geese: there is a possibility that they could be Canada X White-fronted Goose hybrids, but I suspect that they are feral barnyard geese.

Barry Ulman




> On Oct 19, 2017, at 4:46 PM, Eric Ellingson wrote:
>
> Despite the wet weather, at least it was not windy, I checked the water and area around Semiahmoo Resort.
> Normally I do not check sparrow flocks too closely but I'm working on getting better at quickly telling White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows apart ... in their more similar looking plumage. One bird stood out as different. The broad bright eyebrow really separated it from the other sparrows.
> Snapped a few shots from my car window, most were blurry. Putting the window up to keep the rain out I scanned my birding apps and could not find a great match right away. Only when I got home could I 'positively' ID it after finding a few less blurry shots. This was only my 3rd viewing of one. The other viewings were of the white form with much more distinct white throat and facial markings.
>
> Also of interest, at least to me, a couple of Greater White-fronted-ish Geese. Maybe hybrids, domestic or in transitional plumage? They were in a huge mix of waterfowl at Birch Bay. photo link below
>
>
>
> https://flic.kr/p/YvDQcE
> White-throated Sparrow
> Tan form. Feeding on the ground with a mixed flock of Juncos, Golden & White-crowned Sparrows. Semiahmoo, Blaine WA
>
> https://flic.kr/p/ZxzWzq
> Greater White-fronted-ish Goose
> I'm not sure if these are hybrids, domestic or in a transitional plumage.
>
> Birding in the rain from my car.
>
>
> Eric Ellingson



Subject: Are birds evolving to eat from feeders?
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 13:17 pm
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
I thought this article was interesting:

https://www.washingtonpost.com...

Phil Dickinson
Lake Stevens



Subject: Re: My junco is back
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 11:59 am
From: dpvroman AT budget.net
 
Bob and OBOLers,

There was a "white-capped" Junco at our place last year, had a perfect white
cap...it's back too. Or, at least one that appears to have the same white
cap.

Dennis (north of Grants Pass)


----- Original Message -----
From: "Bob"
To: ; "Obol"
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 8:32 AM
Subject: [obol] My junco is back


>I am sharing this as one of those interesting bird stories. You may have
>seen a post from me before about a junco with a white collar well about two
>weeks ago it returned. I can not remember if this is year three or four it
>has wintered in my yard. Seems pretty healthy.
>
> Bob Flores
> Ridgefield, WAPOST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org
>
>


POST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: obol-moderators@freelists.org



Subject: Cruise ship question
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 11:25 am
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Perhaps I'm misinterpreting your note. If so I apologize in advance.

In my story about the US Navy ship (it was the USS Nassau (LHA-4)), the fresh water washdown was to wash off the salt and other crud that the ship picked up while transiting from Norfolk to Fort Lauderdale. It wasn't done to provide water to the birds, which, I believe, were just opportunistic: they saw a large mass with water on it and landed.

Navy ships routinely undergo wash-down procedures, especially before entering port or after many days at sea - helps keep corrosion at bay. I imagine cruise ships have the same maintenance procedures.

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs4birds@outlook.com

Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: Linda Talman
Sent: 0/0/017 7:39
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Cruise ship question

Amazing fallout stories. I would like to know what cruise company it was and what they might have done to ease the way for the birds. The aircraft story made me wonder if the freshwater until they would get to land the next day might have helped. (They can adjust the speed to arrive at the same time at the next port - even with a detour.) Or is there another remedy?
A letter from an expert to the company - and maybe other companies as well - might be useful. And it would serve to have passengers become more informed.
Cruise ships are pretty responsive to concerns. Could a call or a visit to the main desk have prompted an appropriate response of the ship in a timely manner? Could the ship have moved closer to land sooner? And would that have helped? And could it be that the early morning wash down was actually a response to get fresh water to the birds?

The company would gain nothing but positive PR for a positive action - but what would the right action be?



--
Linda Z. Talman
PO Box 392
La Conner, WA

360 840 1714



Subject: My junco is back
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 10:32 am
From: rflores_2 AT msn.com
 
I am sharing this as one of those interesting bird stories. You may have seen a post from me before about a junco with a white collar well about two weeks ago it returned. I can not remember if this is year three or four it has wintered in my yard. Seems pretty healthy.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WAPOST: Send your post to obol@freelists.org
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
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Subject: Cruise ship question
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 9:37 am
From: linda.talman AT gmail.com
 
Amazing fallout stories.  I would like to know what cruise company it was
and what they might have done to ease the way for the birds. The aircraft
story made me wonder if the freshwater until they would get to land the
next day might have helped. (They can adjust the speed to arrive at the
same time at the next port - even with a detour.) Or is there another
remedy?
A letter from an expert to the company - and maybe other companies as well
- might be useful. And it would serve to have passengers become more
informed.
Cruise ships are pretty responsive to concerns. Could a call or a visit to
the main desk have prompted an appropriate response of the ship in a timely
manner? Could the ship have moved closer to land sooner? And would that
have helped? And could it be that the early morning wash down was
actually a response to get fresh water to the birds?

The company would gain nothing but positive PR for a positive action - but
what would the right action be?



--
Linda Z. Talman
PO Box 392
La Conner, WA

360 840 1714



Subject: some birdie stories that are freely available
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 3:56 am
From: birdologist AT gmail.com
 
hi everyone,

recently, quite a few people expressed an interest in reading particular
stories that are behind FORBES' ant-ad-blockers "wall", but were unable to
do so. These stories were released to me 10 days after appearing on FORBES
and I've republished them on my Medium site, where all my material from
anywhere online, is curated and archived. Since i'm not sure exactly who
wanted to read which story, here are the links to several pieces that
generated interest (and complaints about FORBES -- once again, i sincerely
apologise!):

Where Do Birds Go In A Hurricane?
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ydgzsuas
https://medium.com/@GrrlScient...

How Do Darwin™s Finches Change Their Beak Size So Quickly?
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/yczp4ouu
https://medium.com/@GrrlScient...

How Migratory Birds Solve The Longitude Problem
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/y8o3jhzm
https://medium.com/@GrrlScient...

Why Do Wild Parrots Eat Dirt In The Amazon?
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/y9rqukp6
https://medium.com/@GrrlScient...

hope these are interesting to you.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist
grrlscientist@gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes | Evolution
Institute |
Medium
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter
Tiny bio: about.me
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]



Subject: Edmonds marsh northern shrike 10-19-17
Date: Fri Oct 20 2017 0:57 am
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Thursday afternoon (10-19-17) I spotted a first year northern shrike hunting small birds at the west end of marsh. Photos and narrative can be seen on page 26:http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...

Thanks to everyone who responded to my request to ID the mystery sandpiper.
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 10-19-2017
Date: Thu Oct 19 2017 21:27 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

Per the weather forecast, the eight of us were expecting quite a bit of rain during our walk, but were pleasantly surprised to be in light rainfall, and that only at times. (It started raining harder about an hour after our walk.) Fortunately, the golf course didn't get too battered from yesterday's windstorm, and the walk route had only a few pruned branches down. The birds were quiet, though, and it wasn't until about two-thirds through the route that we ran across a fairly sizeable mixed-species flock. Two other pleasant surprises: a first-of-season RING-NECKED DUCK (fem) on the Maintenance Pond, and a GREAT BLUE HERON lifting off from the 12th hole pond. The latter species isn't seen too often on our walks. The six BROWN CREEPERS were high for the year. Difficult to fathom was the lack of Spotted Towhees either being seen or heard.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

• November 16

• December 21

• January 18, '18

Anyone is welcome to join us!


>From the eBird list:

23 species (+1 other taxa)



Wood Duck 1 At Hodge Lake - looked like a male still in eclipse plumage.

Ring-necked Duck 1 At the Maintenance Pond.

Pied-billed Grebe 1 At Hodge Lake

Great Blue Heron 1 At the 12th hole pond.

Downy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 4

Steller's Jay 3

California Scrub-Jay 1 Silent; at the top of a tree along the road behind Hodge Lake where we've seen them quite often this year.

American/Northwestern Crow 6

Black-capped Chickadee 16

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 22

Bushtit 12

Red-breasted Nuthatch 1

Brown Creeper 6

Pacific Wren 2

Golden-crowned Kinglet 17

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1

American Robin 11

Varied Thrush 2

Fox Sparrow 2

Dark-eyed Junco 58

Golden-crowned Sparrow 11

Song Sparrow 8

Red-winged Blackbird 11



View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs4birds@outlook.com



Subject: White-throated Sparrow, Semiahmoo, Blaine
Date: Thu Oct 19 2017 19:46 pm
From: abriteway AT hotmail.com
 
Despite the wet weather, at least it was not windy, I checked the water and area around Semiahmoo Resort.

Normally I do not check sparrow flocks too closely but I'm working on getting better at quickly telling White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows apart ... in their more similar looking plumage. One bird stood out as different. The broad bright eyebrow really separated it from the other sparrows.

Snapped a few shots from my car window, most were blurry. Putting the window up to keep the rain out I scanned my birding apps and could not find a great match right away. Only when I got home could I 'positively' ID it after finding a few less blurry shots. This was only my 3rd viewing of one. The other viewings were of the white form with much more distinct white throat and facial markings.


Also of interest, at least to me, a couple of Greater White-fronted-ish Geese. Maybe hybrids, domestic or in transitional plumage? They were in a huge mix of waterfowl at Birch Bay. photo link below




https://flic.kr/p/YvDQcE

[X]White-throated Sparrow
Tan form. Feeding on the ground with a mixed flock of Juncos, Golden & White-crowned Sparrows. Semiahmoo, Blaine WA

[https://farm5.staticflickr.com...
[https://farm5.staticflickr.com...


https://flic.kr/p/ZxzWzq
[X]Greater White-fronted-ish Goose
I'm not sure if these are hybrids, domestic or in a transitional plumage.

[https://farm5.staticflickr.com...
[https://farm5.staticflickr.com...


Birding in the rain from my car.



Eric Ellingson



Subject: Edmonds Mystery Sandpiper 8-13-2010
Date: Thu Oct 19 2017 15:14 pm
From: dennispaulson AT comcast.net
 
Bill, it looks like a juvenile Curlew Sandpiper to me. You should submit the record to the Washington Bird Records Committee.

Dennis Paulson
Seattle

On Oct 19, 2017, at 12:00 PM, tweeters-request@mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:

> Date: Thu, 19 Oct 2017 08:02:10 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Bill Anderson
> Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Mystery Sandpiper 8-13-2010
> To: "tweeters@uw.edu"
> Message-ID: <1206481662.45738.1508400130901@mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> No, the date is not a typo. I have been going through old photos stored on hard drives and deleting ones that are bad or repetitive. I came across photos of a lone shorebird that I took on 8-13-10 at Shell Creek Spit in Edmonds. The spit can be seen during low tide by looking north up the shoreline from Sunset Ave. or Brackett's Landing. Birds use the spit as a source of fresh water for drinking and bathing.
>
> At first glance the bird looks like a dunlin, but its body seems taller and thinner and its legs seem longer. It also appears to be a lighter color than dunlin that I have photographed in Edmonds, especially in the breast and neck. I wonder if it could be a curlew sandpiper, a native to the Siberian Arctic that closely resemble dunlin. According to the the Audubon Guide to North American Birds, a few curlew sandpipers turn up on the Atlantic Coast every year, but it is only a rare visitor to the rest of North America.
> http://www.audubon.org/field-g...
>
> There have been reports in Tweeters of sightings of curlew sandpipers in Washington. I would like to hear the opinions of Tweetsters as to whether this is a curlew sandpiper, just another dunlin, or some other bird. My photos can be seen here:http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...
>
> Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: (no subject)
Date: Thu Oct 19 2017 14:22 pm
From: samneuffer AT gmail.com
 
Has anyone tried Gosky 20-60X 80 Porro Prism Spotting Scope? If so how did
you like it? I'm a graduate student so I am on a budget so I can't go much
higher in price for the optics (kinds of trying to stick below $250 for
now). I do plan on finding a nice tripod to go with the scope. Do you guys
have any recommendations for a tripod too?

The other options would be Celestron 52250 80mm Ultima Zoom Spotting Scope,
but I've heard mixed reviews.

https://www.amazon.com/Gosky-W...
Digiscoping-Adapter-Get/dp/B01EBS3AJ4/ref=c_cr_arp_d_
product_top?ie=UTF8&coliid=I3P0XB8UW2Z7CB&colidB0X8CV44UQS

Best regards,

Sam



Subject: Top 10 Dreaming during the Birding Doldrums
Date: Thu Oct 19 2017 10:00 am
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
Maybe it was the returning rain that got me in the mood. Here it is mid-October and the migration is basically over. I just returned from a trip East on which I was able to only fit in a little birding - two lifer Shearwaters at Provincetown :-). Nothing new is jumping off the Ebird or Tweeters reports. I would like to give Sunrise at Mt. Rainier another try but the weather is getting pretty iffy. Too early to go up to the Okanogan which for the first time in many years I have not visited. Still counting on Neah Bay to surprise us again - but not quite time. And oh yes...there was the disappointment of missing the Little Gull at Point No Point despite an otherwise fun visit and good bird talk with Carol Riddell, Ken Brown and others. All of this has conspired to put me in the Birding Doldrums...waiting for or better said, figuring out what is next. Idle minds are dangerous - but birding - even when we are not out actually doing it can be endlessly entertaining. So I decided to bird from my computer and to dream. I came up with a dream list of the Ten Birds I would most like to see - if only I could will it to be. Five would be lifers and five would be birds I have seen in the past but would like to add to my ABA or State photo lists. And then I looked back on my birding past - compiling a list of the Ten Best Birds I have seen after October 19th in years past. Thanks primarily to Neah Bay (and to the great birding community in Washington), it was a pretty great list. I wrote this all up in a blog post. Anyone interested can find it athttps://wordpress.com/post/bla... or just go to the blog at blairbirding.wordpress.com.
Here are my lists.

| Dream List | | Birds I have seen after October 19 List |
| | | |
| Smew | | Emperor Goose |
| Boreal Owl | | Northern Hawk Owl |
| Ivory Gull | | Rustic Bunting |
| Red Legged Kittiwake | | Eurasian Hobby |
| Spotted Redshank | | King Eider |
| McKay's Bunting | | Brambling |
| Little Bunting | | Dusky Capped Flycatcher |
| Whooping Crane | | Summer Tanager |
| California Condor | | Yellow Throated Warbler |
| Black Rail | | Northern Wheatear |


If you have nothing better to do or just want to dream your way out of your own doldrums, maybe you can up with your own lists - and maybe even share them
Blair Bernson



Subject: Edmonds Mystery Sandpiper 8-13-2010
Date: Thu Oct 19 2017 3:04 am
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
No, the date is not a typo. I have been going through old photos stored on hard drives and deleting ones that are bad or repetitive. I came across photos of a lone shorebird that I took on 8-13-10 at Shell Creek Spit in Edmonds. The spit can be seen during low tide by looking north up the shoreline from Sunset Ave. or Brackett's Landing. Birds use the spit as a source of fresh water for drinking and bathing. 

At first glance the bird looks like a dunlin, but its body seems taller and thinner and its legs seem longer. It also appears to be a lighter color than dunlin that I have photographed in Edmonds, especially in the breast and neck. I wonder if it could be a curlew sandpiper, a native to the Siberian Arctic that closely resemble dunlin. According to the the Audubon Guide to North American Birds, a few curlew sandpipers turn up on the Atlantic Coast every year, but it is only a rare visitor to the rest of North America.
http://www.audubon.org/field-g...

There have been reports in Tweeters of sightings of curlew sandpipers in Washington. I would like to hear the opinions of Tweetsters as to whether this is a curlew sandpiper, just another dunlin, or some other bird. My photos can be seen here:http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Fwd: Cruise ship fallout
Date: Thu Oct 19 2017 0:14 am
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Thanks, Ed. The eBird report brings back memories.

While in the US Navy,, I saw two major fallouts aboard ship during the Spring. The first was in the Mediterranean, about 30 miles south of Sicily (late March 1973). I had a mid-watch, and went out on deck about 0200 to grab some air. The storm we were in made the water rough, but the rain had slackened. When I closed the hatch, I realized I wasn't alone: Everywhere I looked on the deck were long, slim, bobbing birds - the ones closest to me were all Yellow Wagtails, and there were many hundreds of them just around me. When I walked aft, I had to take care not to step on any. It seemed as if the whole deck of the ship was alive and moving. Rain, wind, and wagtails - something I've never forgotten. (When I went back out after sunrise, I saw no birds, but by then we were entering Augusta Bay, and land.)

The second was in March 1988, almost exactly 100 miles off Cocoa Beach, FL. The ship was an LHA - looks like a baby aircraft carrier. We were getting ready to go into Fort Lauderdale the next morning, and the CO had ordered a fresh-water washdown. The whole flight deck was wet, with small pools of water scattered here and there. Suddenly, and for the next several hours, birds landed on the deck - first a few warblers, then many more. Then strange stuff, like a Spotted Sandpiper and a Yellow-billed Cuckoo; Many were drinking water, and a few even bathed. It was a gorgeous morning, and the birds made it that much more special. (Many of the sailors on deck just stopped and stared at the sight of about 300 birds that were there at one point.) As the water evaporated, the birds started lifting off. By noon, all were gone, likely continuing their northward migration.

May all your birds be identified,
Denis DeSilvis

avnacrs4birds@outlook.com

Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: Ed Swan
Sent: 0/8/017 20:28
To: tweeters tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Cruise ship fallout

Thought this was pretty cool.

Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com
edswan2@comcast.net
206.949.3545


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Doug Brown" >
Date: Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 7:31 PM -0700
Subject: Cruise ship fallout
To: >


Chirp,

This story was reported in the Vancouver Birds listserve.
People on a cruise off the BC coast had an unusual bird fallout on the boat.
Read the story and view Arnold Skeis photos and ebird list here .

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...

cheers, db



Subject: Fwd: Cruise ship fallout
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 23:02 pm
From: louise.rutter AT eelpi.gotdns.org
 
That looks and sounds rather tragic, but I suppose the ones that got on the ship in their exhaustion at least stood more of a chance. Thank you for the link, it™s definitely interesting.



Louise Rutter

Kirkland



From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Ed Swan
Sent: 18 October 2017 20:25
To: tweeters tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: Cruise ship fallout



Thought this was pretty cool.



Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com
edswan2@comcast.net
206.949.3545



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Doug Brown" >
Date: Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 7:31 PM -0700
Subject: Cruise ship fallout
To: >



Chirp,



This story was reported in the Vancouver Birds listserve.

People on a cruise off the BC coast had an unusual bird fallout on the boat.

Read the story and view Arnold Skei™s photos and ebird list here .



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...



cheers, db



Subject: Fwd: Cruise ship fallout
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 22:26 pm
From: edswan2 AT comcast.net
 
Thought this was pretty cool.


Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com
edswan2@comcast.net
206.949.3545





---------- Forwarded message ----------

From: "Doug Brown"

Date: Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 7:31 PM -0700

Subject: Cruise ship fallout

To:










Chirp,
This story was reported in the Vancouver Birds listserve.People on a cruise off the BC coast had an unusual bird fallout on the boat.Read the story and view Arnold Skei™s photos and ebird list here .
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ch...
cheers, db



Subject: Edmonds Harlequins 10-18-17
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 21:23 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Wednesday afternoon a dozen Harlequin ducks and a lone Heermann's gull were perched on the tethered log at the underwater dive park at Brackett's Landing North in Edmonds. 
Scroll down page 25 for photos.
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...

Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Book Recommendations List
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 18:33 pm
From: schasecredo AT gmail.com
 
Attached below: something new for all the listers to check off!
Thanks to all for your recommendations. I'm enjoying a Stryker book right
now, with another couple books from the attached list on hold at the
library. The miserable weather outside makes my book all the better.

Stephen in Everson



Subject: Dash Point Dock Franklin's Gull Continues
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 18:11 pm
From: thefedderns AT gmail.com
 
Checked Dash Point Dock about noon today. The previously reported
Franklin's Gull was flying merrily around the dock, doing figure eights etc.

Good Birding!

Hans

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
thefedderns@gmail.com



Subject: Northern Pygmy Owl in Robinswood neighborhood??
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 16:21 pm
From: habarnes AT earthlink.net
 
Hello-

There has been a thread on the Nextdoor Somerset West list about sighting of a robin-sized owl being chased by small birds, and thought to look and sound like a Northern Pygmy Owl. Has anyone reported and verified this?

The discussion thread is "Tiny Little Owl" and the identified sighting are is east of Robinswood Park on 24th. I have not been able to get over there, but wondered if this bird has been observed around here before, and if this has been confirmed.

https://somersetwestwa.nextdoo... (you'll need to create a login)
https://tinyurl.com/yc4aoljl

Hilary Barnes
habarnes@earthlink.net
206-331-6058 cell


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Long-Term Field Studies Explain Why These American Woodpeckers Are Communists
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 14:01 pm
From: birdologist AT gmail.com
 
Hi everyone,

Are you familiar with acorn woodpeckers? did you know these birds were
labeled "communists" almost 100 years ago? Here's an interesting set of
papers, and a video, that explain the genetics and evolution underlying
these birds' unique social system.

Long-Term Field Studies Explain Why These American Woodpeckers Are
Communists
http://www.forbes.com/sites/gr...
or, tiny: https://tinyurl.com/y9knm8ys

please do share this piece widely.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist
grrlscientist@gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes | Evolution
Institute |
Medium
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter
Tiny bio: about.me
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]



Subject: Seattle Audubon Whidbey trip ) Oct 17
Date: Wed Oct 18 2017 12:08 pm
From: bellasoc AT isomedia.com
 
Hi Tweets



Yesterday, Seattle Audubon took a trip to Whidbey Island. The day started
out overcast and windy and seemed somewhat problematic - the forecast was
for heavy rains and wind on Whidbey, but the enthusiastic group decided to
brave the forecast.



While waiting for the ferry at Mukilteo we scanned the waters off the
terminal and picked up GLAUCOUS-WINGED and MEW GULLs, ROCK PIGEONs and a
BELTED KINGFISHER, with moderately heavy winds resulting in a difficult sea
surface. As the ferry pulled away we had 2-4 foot swell with some whitecaps
and a lack of birds. It wasn't until we approached Whidbey that we finally
picked up birds near the terminal at Clinton - GREAT BLUE HERON, BALD EAGLE.
At Clinton Beach park at the terminal we managed to see SURF SCOTER,
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT (a real lack of cormorants - only two ), PELAGIC
CORMORANT (one). As we started out of town toward Deer Lake we had a
COOPER'S HAWK fly over.



At Deer Lake we started to have few sprinkles and it was still windy so not
many small birds. At the lake we saw CANADA GOOSE, NORTHERN FLICKER, a large
group of COMMON MERGANSERs, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT (1), DARK-EYED JUNCO,
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, NORTHERN SHOVELER (1), an unidentified scaup. With
the wind we missed most of the small birds that we usually can find there -
guess everybody was hunkering down.



Rollinghill Road was also really quiet with the wind but we did find
DARK-EYED JUNCO, AMERICAN CROW, BALD EAGLE (flying over), and an
unidentified kinglet.



On to Maxwellton where we saw EUROPEAN STARLING, BREWER'S BLACKBIRD, SONG
SPARROW and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW. At Dave Mackie Park the rains started and
we searched the waters of the south end of Useless Bay from under one of the
picnic shelters (again much disturbed by the weather with swell and chop
making finding bird difficult). We did find lots of MALLARDs, AMERICAN
WIGEON,PIED-BILLED GREBE, CALIFORNIA GULL, SURF SCOTER, WESTERN GREBE (1),
RED-NECKED GREBE, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, AMERICAN CROW and DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT.



The Ewing Road wetlands are still dry (could probably change with the
rains), but we did see a RED-TAILED HAWK.



At Deer Lagoon on Sunlight Beach Road there was a very low tide, but we did
see AMERICAN CROW, GREAT BLUE HERON, GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, a large flock of
AMERICAN WIGEON, two LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERs. We had just started to scan the
wigeon flock for a possible Eurasian when a young PEREGRINE FALCON came
zooming in and everybody flushed. A BALD EAGLE was perched out on the beach
and the wigeon flock was in the distance (too far for good i.d. of different
birds). On the way out we picked up DARK-EYED JUNCO and HOUSE FINCH. The
winds continued and seemed to be picking up.



We made a stop at Holmes Harbor for lunch where the cloud front passed over
and it got sunny, but still with high winds. We saw GLAUCOUS-WINGED and
RING-BILLED GULLs, AMERICAN CROW, RED-TAILED HAWK, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW,
and MEW GULL.



At Crockett Lake the water was very high and the winds continued and there
was a general lack of birds, but we did seem some GREEN-WINGED TEAL, GREAT
BLUE HERON and some very distant AMERICAN WIGEON (barely identifiable). We
scanned the old platform near the ferry terminal and saw DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT (mostly juveniles), PELAGIC CORMORANT and BRANDT'S CORMORANT. ON
the way into Coupeville we saw a SNOW GOOSE and a flock of EUROPEAN
STARLINGs.



With a very high tide Kennedy Lagoon was all water. We made a stop at Libby
Beach, and with fifty or so miles of the Strait of Juan de Fuca we had
extremely high winds and 7-8 foot swells and no birds. Similar conditions
were seen at the Hastie Road access and the ocean side of Swantown. Bos Lake
was somewhat quieter and we saw AMERICAN WIGEON, MALLARD, NORTHERN HARRIER
and BALD EAGLE.



At Ala Spit we had CANADA GOOSE, COMMON MERGANSER, a couple of COMMON LOONs,
RED-NECKED GREBE, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT and NORTHERN FLICKER (clinging
for dear life to the top of a wildly waving tree).



On the way home we had a flock of between 3-5,000 SNOW GEESE off of Dry
Slough Rd on Fir Island - a nice way to end the day.



Between constant winds (many times heavy) and rain our total number of
species was a relatively low 43, but we had a good day.



Good birding,



Brian H. Bell

Woodinville Wa

Mail to bell asoc a t iso me dia dot com



Subject: Seen and Heard
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 18:09 pm
From: tcstonefam AT gmail.com
 
We took advantage of Monday's good weather and headed to the coast. Best
bird(s) of a slow but beautiful day was a flock of 75 -100 Pine Siskins in
the alders west of the Hoquiam Sewage Lagoons.

Today we heard the repeated "tail chirps" of a displaying Anna's
Hummingbird demonstrating the autumnal recrudescence of the amatory urge.

Carol Stoner
West Seattle



Subject: Can a bird brighten your day ??
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 16:40 pm
From: tvarela AT hotmail.com
 
On the sunny day before the forecast Big Dark weather event,  I was gifted with the wonderful sight below. 

https://flic.kr/p/YqPLdC


It sure put a big smile on my face.




T. Varela
South Puget Sound, WA
tvarela at hotmail dot com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/t...



Subject: RFI Foreign Travel
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 16:04 pm
From: rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com
 
I have a question for the experienced foreign traveler.  I am going on a trip next month where I will be transiting through Western Europe and spending 10 days in West Africa and transiting through Kenya and W. Europe on the way home. It will be my first serious international trip in 15 years.  Do most of you who travel like this carry mostly cash or use credit cards.  I will be going where the U.S. dollar is not exchangeable.  So if I take cash I will need Eruos.  Please reply off list.


Thanks for the responses.


Roger Moyer

Chehalis, WA



Subject: Book Recommendations
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 15:43 pm
From: krneice AT gmail.com
 
Here's some I didn't see in previous lists:

Subirdia, by our own John Marzluff, UW crow expert, or any of his
crow/raven books

A Life of the Skies, by Jonathan Rosen

Mozart's Starling, by Lyanda Lynn Haupt, or any of this West Seattle
author's books.

And we're all familiar with Connie Sidles' books about the Montlake Fill!
All easy, inspirational reads.



Subject: California Scrub-Jay
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 15:35 pm
From: meganward28 AT gmail.com
 
Hi there,

A few of you have met my daughter Emily, who is 8 years old and quite an
avid birder. When a California Scrub-Jay turned up in our yard last
Saturday 10/7, she immediately asked me to "Post it on Tweeters!" So here
you go, Emily! Definitely a first yard bird for us, although we had been
keeping our eyes peeled since reading reports of Scrub-jays turning up in
nearby communities. We live right along the line between Bothell and
Kirkland.

Megan Ward (& Emily)



Subject: Dragon Fly vs Anna's
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 15:13 pm
From: dmcvay AT peak.org
 
Hi Tweeters,

We were watching several Anna's at our feeder when a large dragon fly started chasing one of the Anna's away from the feeder, pursuing it into a nearby Madrone. Explanation?

Don and Sandi McVay
Deer Harbor
dmcvay@peak.org


Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Steller's jays versus hummingbird feeder
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 14:08 pm
From: whitney.n.k AT gmail.com
 
Hi, Tweeters!

My boss told me the other day that the Steller's jays in his yard had
abruptly taken it upon themselves to peck at the yellow plastic flowers
surrounding the portals on his hummingbird feeder until the flowers fell
off.

He's never seen this before, have you?

Cheers,
Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser
Seattle, WA



Subject: Book Recommendations?
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 9:38 am
From: jcr_5105 AT charter.net
 
Yes, his raven books are great!  I even loved Bumblebee Economics.  A must for any interested in our native pollinators.



Jeff Kozma



Yakima



From: J Christian Kessler [mailto:1northraven@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2017 2:49 PM
To: Jeff Kozma
Cc: Stephen ; Tweeters (E-mail)
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?



I second Jeff's recommendations, among other things Heinrich is a very good writer as well as an old-fashioned scientist (bit of naturalist -- individuals of other species have individual identities/personalities). "One Wild Bird at a Time" is a series of stories/reports from that perspective. all of his other books should be on such a list too, his two Raven books are must reads for anyone who spends time in the high country here.



Chris Kessler

Seattle



On Sun, Oct 15, 2017 at 11:16 AM, Jeff Kozma > wrote:

I recommend "One Wild Bird at a Time" and "The Nesting Season", both by
Bernd Heinrich.

Jeff Kozma

Yakima

J c r underscore 1505 at charter dot net

-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman1.u.washington.edu ] On Behalf Of Stephen
Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:45 PM
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Book Recommendations?

Hi Tweeters,
Fewer daylight hours outside of work means less time to go birding myself,
but I can still enjoy it vicariously. I'd like to build up an inventory of
good winter reading. I'm looking for some book recommendations of great
birding stories. I've enjoyed the Big Year themes (Kingbird Highway, The Big
Year, Birding Without Birders, Lost Among the Birds, etc...). I'm hoping for
some more of the same - preferably less of the journal compilations and more
along the lines of great stories about birds, bird discoveries, bird
research stories, or anything remotely close to those.
Thanks for considering,
Stephen in Everson


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Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...

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http://mailman1.u.washington.e...




--

"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson



Subject: Point-no-Point Today
Date: Tue Oct 17 2017 1:46 am
From: thefedderns AT gmail.com
 
We birded the Point-no-Point - and other Hansville areas today, but did not
find the previously reported Little Gull. There were many Bonaparte's Gulls
present and as soon as we pulled into the parking lot by the lighthouse, we
found two Parasitic Jaegers harassing the Bonaparte's Gulls. Surprisingly,
we did not see any alcids at all at Point-no-Point. We did however, find
two pairs of Marbled Murrelets further out on the water on Hood Canal,
viewed at the end of NE Twin Spits Road.

Good Birding!

Hans

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
thefedderns@gmail.com



Subject: Book recommendations
Date: Mon Oct 16 2017 23:54 pm
From: maryjmetz AT yahoo.com
 
Maria Mudd Ruth's Rare Bird (http://www.mariaruthbooks.net/... is an entertaining and, if you don't already know everything there is to know about marbled murrelets, educational read. The Scott Weidensaul book recommendation reminds me of a book that is more of a coffee table book, but it also includes a great essay by Scott, as well some nice pieces by Barbara Kingsolver and Lyanda Lynn Haupt, among others: The Living Bird (https://www.birdnote.org/blog/... Gerrit Vyn's photos can perk up a drab winter too.
-Mary Metz



Subject: Another Steller's Jay Movement
Date: Mon Oct 16 2017 22:52 pm
From: thefedderns AT gmail.com
 
This afternoon I watched 30 or more Steller's Jays flying east past the
flagpole at the waterfront at Port Gamble.

--
*Hans Feddern*
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
thefedderns@gmail.com



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