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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on July 23, 2018, 7:35 am

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23 Jul: @ 07:30:23 
Mt. St. Helens Thick-billed Fox Sparrows [22 Jul 2018] [Matt Bartels]
22 Jul: @ 14:32:36 
Re: What about those American/Northwestern Crows? [B B]
22 Jul: @ 14:05:53 
Re: What about those American/Northwestern Crows? [festuca]
22 Jul: @ 12:03:01 
Sunday morning at Edmonds [Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser]
22 Jul: @ 11:48:26 
American Bittern Continuing at The Fill [Carol Riddell]
22 Jul: @ 08:56:02 
Hungry, and intelligent crow at my sister's [mary hrudkaj]
21 Jul: @ 23:08:02 
More White Pelicans in Edmonds [Carol Riddell]
21 Jul: @ 22:28:36 
Pelicans over Edmonds [Jon Houghton]
21 Jul: @ 21:50:43 
What about those Crows? [George Heleker]
21 Jul: @ 18:01:20 
Cassia Crossbill trip - outside Washington trip report [Jim Danzenbaker]
21 Jul: @ 15:07:51 
Eaglet Progress [Hubbell]
21 Jul: @ 14:04:03 
BirdNote, last week and the week of July 22, 2018 [Ellen Blackstone]
21 Jul: @ 13:01:56 
Turkey Vulture Poetry Society [Hank H]
21 Jul: @ 02:29:53 
What would Trump's wall mean for wildlife? - BBC News [Dan Reiff, PhD]
21 Jul: @ 02:08:30 
Britain's Big Butterfly Count Begins, With David Attenborough Leading The Charge [Dan Reiff, PhD]
20 Jul: @ 17:36:25 
Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier [B B]
20 Jul: @ 16:18:03 
American Bittern at Montlake Fill [SchomakersGmail]
20 Jul: @ 14:26:06 
Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for July 18th, 2018 [Shep Thorp]
20 Jul: @ 11:02:03 
Fir Island [Marv Breece]
20 Jul: @ 00:50:05 
climate change and barnacle geese [Bill Anderson]
19 Jul: @ 22:15:54 
Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 7-19-2018 [Denis DeSilvis]
19 Jul: @ 22:12:00 
Ocean Shores to escape the heat [Hank H]
19 Jul: @ 19:13:51 
Correction [William]
19 Jul: @ 18:51:49 
Looking for Mountain Quail (long, too long, my apologies.) [William]
19 Jul: @ 15:48:49 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-07-19 [Michael Hobbs]
19 Jul: @ 15:31:08 
Sanderling in Chelan county [shadowfax4jctm]
19 Jul: @ 12:53:36 
Osprey nest building [Bill Anderson]
19 Jul: @ 12:10:48 
Edmonds marsh: adult spotted sandpiper + two chicks 7-18-18 [Bill Anderson]
19 Jul: @ 10:18:58 
Meet The Invasive Insect That Is Changing An Entire Forest Bird Community [Devorah the Ornithologist]
18 Jul: @ 20:12:44 
Ruff on San Juan Island - No [Dave Slager]
18 Jul: @ 15:59:35 
Puget Sound Bird Fest Photo Contest [Bill Anderson]
18 Jul: @ 15:23:06 
Re: A second Osprey nest in Montlake? [Larry Hubbell]
18 Jul: @ 13:41:32 
Edmonds Marsh - Good Shorebird Variety This Morning [Carol Riddell]
18 Jul: @ 12:48:36 
A second Osprey nest in Montlake? [Dan McDougall-Treacy]
18 Jul: @ 10:15:37 
Late song question [Jack Stephens]
18 Jul: @ 08:24:27 
Gull ID help please [Hank H]
18 Jul: @ 06:55:55 
County Yearlist Project mid-year update available at WA Birder [Matt Bartels]
17 Jul: @ 11:06:01 
Crow with Blue Beak [Dayna yalowicki]
17 Jul: @ 09:00:11 
?Blue-throated or Magnificent Hummingbird in Ravenna [Beverly Osband]
17 Jul: @ 00:52:22 
Kitsap Birding [Dalton Spencer]
17 Jul: @ 00:30:33 
Hummingbird Feeder That does not attract bees [Dan Reiff, PhD]
16 Jul: @ 19:37:50 
Virginia Rail Chicks [Darcy Thomas]
16 Jul: @ 18:07:00 
Birding trips over Christmas vacation [Victoria Moffatt]
16 Jul: @ 18:03:27 
Lesser Goldfinches, Washtucna [rwlawson]
16 Jul: @ 15:57:41 
Westport Seabirds trip report Saturday July 14 [Cara Borre]
16 Jul: @ 15:44:20 
Non -breeding Vaux's Swifts [Larry Schwitters]
16 Jul: @ 09:14:13 
Re: Birding at Paradise [Jane Hadley]
16 Jul: @ 01:30:41 
Re: RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier? [Josh Adams]
16 Jul: @ 00:00:02 
RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier? [Vicki King]
15 Jul: @ 23:46:49 
Ruff on San Juan Island [Dave Slager]





Subject:
Date: Mon Jul 23 2018 7:30 am
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
I made another trip up to Windy Ridge at Mt. St. Helens in Skamania County yesterday. That™s a beautiful place for a hike. A couple weeks ago, I enjoyed Rock Wren and a couple Calliope Hummingbirds amongst the many Rufous Hummers. Last weekend, there were reports of Lewis™s Woodpecker ” seems like a promising place and I™m looking forward to a fall migration visit eventually....

Anyway, after a long hike along the pumice plains, I was driving back down and stopped at Meta Lake. I realized the Fox Sparrows I™d been assuming to be Slate-colored Fox Sparrows were giving a very strong chip note , more of a ˜pink pink™ than the ˜check check™ sound of other FOSP types. That call note should be pretty definitive for Thick-billed Fox Sparrow ” a subspecies we still review in the WBRC and one whose range in WA is still being sorted out.

Visually, I have a tough time telling our Thick-billed from Slate-colored ” maybe a bit less streaking on the underside, but how many times do I study the Slate-colored to get a good gauge of the amount of streaking on them? The songs are pretty similar to Slate-colored to me, so I™m left with the chip note as the definitive mark.

I made some recordings, and think there are several Thick-billed Fox Sparrows around the wet areas of Meta Lake. But now what about the others up on Mt. St. Helens? Up at Windy Ridge, taking the trail towards the Pumice Plains, Fox Sparrows sing from the larger brush areas - I™ve been assuming they were Slate-colored, but did not notice any call notes. Are they all Thick-billed? Maybe more likely, do we have a mix of both types up there? It would be great for any others up there to pay attention and report back on what they find. And any potential Thick-billed could definitely use documentation to the WBRC.

Here™s an eBird NW article on our WA Fox Sparrows for reference:
https://ebird.org/pnw/news/fox...

Thanks, and I look forward to any other reports / feedback.

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA



Subject: What about those American/Northwestern Crows?
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 14:32 pm
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
In a WOS program maybe 3 years ago crow expert Professor John Marzluff from UW basically said it was not likely that there were any "pure Northwestern Crows" until at least as far north as the Queen Charlotte Islands - if there is such a separate species at all. I have submitted Ebird reports from Neah Bay designating Northwestern Crows when I see what strike me as somewhat smaller crows feeding on the beach and sounding a bit different, but I have my doubts.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Sun, Jul 22, 2018 at 12:05 PM, [email protected] wrote: George Heleker wrote:
"I am wondering about the crows of northwestern WA, and am hoping that someone might have some new information."

Hi George - In 2015 Bill Tweit and Dave Slager put out an eBird article on crows here in the Northwest, that eBird regional editors are using; currently implementing the following review guidelines for eBird submissions in coastal Oregon and Washington. I believe that this is the most recent guideline for our eBirding:
https://ebird.org/pnw/news/nor...
Basically, they 'prefer' American Crow for coastal birds on the Oregon Coast, the lower Columbia River, and Pacific County, Washington. They 'prefer' that we use "American/Northwestern" for the "nearshore" areas of Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Clallam, Island, Whatcom, San Juan, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Kitsap, Pierce, Thurston & Mason Counties.

"American" Crow is "acceptable" for all those areas. "Northwestern" Crow is Not Acceptable for eBird reports along the Oregon coast, the lower Columbia, and Pacific County, nor in the southern Salish Sea.

For my part, I used the "American/Northwestern" designation along the lower Mainland in B.C. a while back, and got "flagged". The birds there sounded to me pretty much like the ones in Seattle and Olympia. I was up on Vancouver Island in May, and couldn't really tell much difference in the birds around Victoria, Sooke, etc., all the way up to about Nanaimo.
By the time I got to Campbell River, the crows on the beach sounded sufficiently distinct to me that I might even begin to "believe" in the NW Crow taxon . . . .
;-{)

But, for the most part, and until "they" get done with some DNA analyses, I tend to think along the lines that Greg Gillson wrote about:
http://nwbackyardbirder.blogsp... well as "Corey" in 10,000 Birds:
http://www.10000birds.com/crow...

Hope this helps,
- jon. anderson
olympia


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Tweeters mailing list
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http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: What about those American/Northwestern Crows?
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 14:05 pm
From: festuca AT comcast.net
 
George Heleker wrote:
"I am wondering about the crows of northwestern WA, and am hoping that someone might have some new information."

Hi George - In 2015 Bill Tweit and Dave Slager put out an eBird article on crows here in the Northwest, that eBird regional editors are using; currently implementing the following review guidelines for eBird submissions in coastal Oregon and Washington. I believe that this is the most recent guideline for our eBirding:
https://ebird.org/pnw/news/nor...

Basically, they 'prefer' American Crow for coastal birds on the Oregon Coast, the lower Columbia River, and Pacific County, Washington. They 'prefer' that we use "American/Northwestern" for the "nearshore" areas of Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Clallam, Island, Whatcom, San Juan, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Kitsap, Pierce, Thurston & Mason Counties.

"American" Crow is "acceptable" for all those areas. "Northwestern" Crow is Not Acceptable for eBird reports along the Oregon coast, the lower Columbia, and Pacific County, nor in the southern Salish Sea.

For my part, I used the "American/Northwestern" designation along the lower Mainland in B.C. a while back, and got "flagged". The birds there sounded to me pretty much like the ones in Seattle and Olympia. I was up on Vancouver Island in May, and couldn't really tell much difference in the birds around Victoria, Sooke, etc., all the way up to about Nanaimo.

By the time I got to Campbell River, the crows on the beach sounded sufficiently distinct to me that I might even begin to "believe" in the NW Crow taxon . . . .
;-{)

But, for the most part, and until "they" get done with some DNA analyses, I tend to think along the lines that Greg Gillson wrote about:
http://nwbackyardbirder.blogsp...
as well as "Corey" in 10,000 Birds:
http://www.10000birds.com/crow...


Hope this helps,
- jon. anderson
olympia



Subject: Sunday morning at Edmonds
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 12:03 pm
From: whitney.n.k AT gmail.com
 
Hi, Tweeters!

My husband and I went up to the Edmonds marsh this morning, arriving
around 7:15. We were thrilled to find the Spotted Sandpiper and her
chicks (big shout out of thanks to Bill Anderson for posting about
this delightful family). We saw at least 4 chicks, plus the watchful,
peeping, adult. And there's not much cuter than Spotted Sandpiper
chicks, scurrying and bobbing, scurrying and bobbing, puffy light gray
with a dark gray stripe down the center of their head and back. There
was a Least Sandpiper at the very back of the marsh, and some nearby
Killdeer allowed a size comparison that convincingly dashed our hopes
that it was a Pectoral Sandpiper.

We stopped by the pier on our way out, and were delighted to find a
few hundred Heerman's Gulls roosting on the very western end of the
breakwater.

Cheers,
Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser
Seattle
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: American Bittern Continuing at The Fill
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 11:48 am
From: cariddellwa AT gmail.com
 
The American Bittern, which is in the Union Bay backwater west of the Osprey nest at The Fill, was continuing this morning. Records on eBird for 2018 reflect sightings from July 14th forward. It has been seen in this same location, west of the Osprey nest, in previous years. A photo from this morning is in this checklist:

https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Hungry, and intelligent crow at my sister's
Date: Sun Jul 22 2018 8:56 am
From: mch1096 AT hotmail.com
 
Got an email last evening from my sister about the hungry crows at her place.  Two things:  for the past several months she's been throwing out stale bread and the crows have been bringing her bright shiny things like a metal spoon and a string of shiny beads.  Yesterday, Saturday, she and her daughter were working at their kitchen table which is under a clear skylight.  They heard a rapping and thought it was her husband coming back from a walk and finding the door locked.  A quick check of the door - no hubby.  The rapping continued and they looked up at the skylight and there was a crow rapping.  The crow even had its beak open as it rapped as if using that for a form of sign language - come feed us.  Having some outdated hotdogs in the fridge they put out the package of hotdogs which were scarfed up in an instant by the resident flock in their neighborhood.  The put out some water as that is getting to be in short supply.  They are also letting the crows have their plums and Asian pears this year.


They live in the South Kitsap area near Sedgewick and Bethel.


Happy birding


Mary Hrudkaj

Belfair/Tahuya



Subject: More White Pelicans in Edmonds
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 23:08 pm
From: cariddellwa AT gmail.com
 
This evening, about 8:10 p.m. a broad vee of 75 American White Pelicans flew north along the Edmonds Bowl, remaining at a high altitude. I watched from the marsh and it looked as if they followed Edmonds Way/SR 104 down the hill and then headed north through Edmonds. When I saw them from Water Street two years ago, a smaller number were crossing from Mukilteo to the south end of Whidbey Island. Given that they are not as accustomed to large expanses of saltwater, as are Brown Pelicans, I wondered if they were heading north for a crossing to Whidbey and back to Deer Lagoon for the night. There are a couple of photos in this ebird checklist:

https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Pelicans over Edmonds
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 22:28 pm
From: jon.houghton AT hartcrowser.com
 
Hi Tweets - Sitting on the deck just now (2020 hrs) enjoying the (last?) cool evening with a glass of wine.  I tipped my head back to look up and was startled to see a flock of about 40 Am. White Pelicans flying north!  Definitely a new yard bird!!  Happy Birding! - Jon Houghton, Edmonds

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone



Subject: What about those Crows?
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 21:50 pm
From: earthman1950 AT whidbey.com
 
I am wondering about the crows of northwestern WA, and am hoping that
someone might have some new information. I did a search and found several
great posts from birders on Tweeters from 2003, but that was quite a while
ago, at this point. Perhaps there is some new information out there?

When entering crow sightings from the Puget Sound region on eBird, I use
"American/Northwestern Crow" as suggested by the folks at Cornell:
https://ebird.org/news/crows_a...

Consequently, I get a LOT of emails from eBird for my Island County
"species needs list", for American Crow sightings. I have noticed that far
more people list American Crow than Northwestern crow, even in the north
sound. Could that be that most birders have come to the conclusion that
there is not a true Northwestern Crow, or at least not one in the Puget
Sound area? I also have seen two recent eBird checklists where people have
listed more than one crow species at the same time at my favorite birding
spot on south Whidbey island, one listing 2 American Crows and 3
Northwestern Crows, and another listing 4 Northwestern Crows and 3
American/Northwestern Crows. I would sure like to know if they know
something that I don't about our local crows.

After reading on the internet including the two articles below, I am
inclined to start listing my local crow sightings as American Crows. If you
have any information or an opinion on this subject, I would certainly
appreciate it.

http://earbirding.com/blog/arc...

http://nwbackyardbirder.blogsp...

Thanks,

George Heleker
Whidbey Island



Subject: Cassia Crossbill trip - outside Washington trip report
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 18:01 pm
From: jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters,


Stefan Schlick and I just completed the trek to see the Cassia Crossbill in
Idaho™s South Hills this last week. Here is the trip report written by
Stefan:



https://drive.google.com/file/...
sharing



Feel free to ask if you need more information.


Keep your eyes and ears skyward.



Jim

--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
[email protected]



Subject: Eaglet Progress
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 15:07 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

This week™s post contains updates about both of the eaglets from Monty and Marsh™s nest. The one, who I have been calling Charlie, is still at PAWS. The other juvenile eagle, who was left behind in the remains of a nest above Montlake Cut, has been facing more difficult choices. I hope you enjoy sharing the highlights of a week with Lucy.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 22, 2018
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 14:04 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hello, Tweeters,

Last week on BirdNote:
* Waterfalls, Caves, and White-collared Swifts
https://bit.ly/2zyH7iM
* Why Do Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers Look So Similar?
https://bit.ly/2N6XWTO
* Birds' Early Warning Systems
https://bit.ly/2zs3TJ0
* The Message of the Mourning Dove
https://bit.ly/2JeJeYJ
* Birds and Baseball
http://bit.ly/2LebvR2
* July before Dawn - Aldo Leopold
https://bit.ly/2LasIuu
* Trust and Partnerships Help Birds in Montana - The IBA Program
https://bit.ly/2zwlkYP
”””””””””””””””””””
Check out next week's shows ” Pterodactyls and Birds... and more
https://mailchi.mp/birdnote/we...
---------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out our new book: https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know. mailto:[email protected]
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcas...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Turkey Vulture Poetry Society
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 13:01 pm
From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
>> Yesterday I viewed 26 Turkey Vultures & 2 Bald Eagles circling the fields west of Sikes Lake in the Snoqualmie Valley.  This video
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>> and photo
>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>> inspired an anonymous viewer to pen the following:
>>
>> Poor Thumper, hit by a bumper
>> Or a random wheel; now a happy meal
>> For a Turkey Vulture without culture
>>
>> Hank Heiberg
>> Issaquah, WA
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPad



Subject: What would Trump's wall mean for wildlife? - BBC News
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 2:29 am
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Tweets,
For the past few years, I have asked my friends if the proposed border wall would affect bird migration. This has usually resulted in some laughter and comments like: just how high will that wall be?
I have wondered about certain species including roadrunners.
Today, I read this:

https://www.bbc.com/news/scien...



Subject: Britain's Big Butterfly Count Begins, With David Attenborough Leading The Charge
Date: Sat Jul 21 2018 2:08 am
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Do we have something like this in the US?

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/20...



Subject: Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier
Date: Fri Jul 20 2018 17:36 pm
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
Jon Houghton and I had a fun and successful day birding Mt. Rainier out of Sunrise today. Highlights were a probable heard only Pine Grosbeak, a heard and finally seen Sooty Grouse and a mother White Tailed Ptarmigan with at least 5 chicks on the Sunrise Rim trail about 1/4 mile back towards Sunrise from the junction with Burroughs Mountain trail. Great photos.
The weather was beautiful and the scenery spectacular.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject: American Bittern at Montlake Fill
Date: Fri Jul 20 2018 16:18 pm
From: schomakers AT gmail.com
 
My son and I found an American Bittern in the lagoon just west of the
Osprey platform at about noon today. It was out in the open along the shore
in the easternmost portion of the lagoon.

eBird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



Eric Schomaker



Subject: Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for July 18th, 2018
Date: Fri Jul 20 2018 14:26 pm
From: shepthorp AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweets,

we had a cool morning with clouds and a hot afternoon with sun and
temperatures in the 60's to 70's degrees Fahrenheit. There was a High
10.53ft Tide at 10:16am. The Autumnal Migration has started in earnest
with the departure of our breeding TREE SWALLOWS/CLIFF SWALLOWS and the
arrival of our first male WESTERN SANDPIPER in molt. If you want to be
bedazzled by juvenile and molting plumage's, check out the Orchard and the
Twin Barn Loop Trail to see all sorts of variety of AMERICAN GOLDFINCH,
SONG SPARROW, SAVANNAH SPARROW, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, both CHICKADEE,
YELLOW WARBLER, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, AMERICAN ROBIN,
CEDAR WAXWING, HOODED MERGANSER, and of course BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, we had great looks
at eclipse WOOD DUCK and two juvenile HOODED MERGANSER. The merganser
pre-occupied many of us with mis-identification of Pied-billed Grebe or
other. The Riparian Forest still has a lovely morning chorus, with hints
we are coming to the end of song. Von picked up a MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER
at the east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail.

The Orchard is good for baby CEDAR WAXWING, AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, SONG
SPARROW, YELLOW WARBLER and BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD. We had really nice looks
at a PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER at the entrance to the Education Center, as
well BUSHTIT and BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE. A Cascara Tree with ripening
cherries was a hot spot for BAND-TAILED PIGEON, WESTERN TANAGER,
BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, SWAINSON'S THRUSH and CEDAR WAXWING - aggression was
observed.

Along the Access Road we picked up SAVANNAH SPARROW, BEWICK'S WREN, SPOTTED
TOWHEE, and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW. Over the fields we observed BARN
SWALLOW and VAUX'S SWIFT. We observed high counts of BANK SWALLOW and had
at least 8-10 birds in the area. NORTHERN HARRIER was seen by some.

The West entrance to the Twin Barns Loop Trail was great for babies,
feeding, and molting adults collecting food. We enjoyed nice looks of
SWAINSON'S THRUSH, AMERICAN ROBIN RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD and ANNA'S
HUMMINGBIRD. There is a YELLOW WARBLER nest with chicks on the right side
of the Twin Barns Cut-off Boardwalk between the bridge and the access
road. The nest is below eye level in the Himalayan Blackberry and Thimble
Berry bramble 1/2 way between the stairs on the left and the transecting
access road, well hidden 10-15 feet from the trail on the right. Look for
feeding adults. Good luck!

At the Twin Barns Overlook, a pair of TREE SWALLOWS are still feeding young
in the nest box, but most of our breeders are gone and our Tree Swallow and
Cliff Swallow count was way down in comparison to last week. Both BANK
SWALLOW and NORTHERN ROUGH-WING SWALLOW were seen foraging with BARN
SWALLOW and CLIFF SWALLOW.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail we had a concentrated flurry
of activity in the fresh water marsh on the inside of the trail, where we
relocated the immature GREEN HERON, spotted an immature VIRGINIA RAIL, and
had great looks of LEAST SANDPIPER and molting male WESTERN SANDPIPER. Our
elusive AMERICAN BITTERN vocalized, and flushed to show us quick views
flying over the marsh.

On the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail, we observed a second cycle
BONAPARTE'S GULL at the photo blind. There is a BALD EAGLE chick in the
south nest south of the McAllister Creek Viewing Platform along the west
side of the McAllister Creek. We had nice looks at GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL,
CALIFORNIA GULL, RING-BILLED GULL and CASPIAN TERN. SPOTTED SANDPIPER and
additional Least Sandpiper were seen in the mudflat channels between marsh
plain from the Puget Sound Viewing Platform. DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT,
BELTED KINGFISHER and BARN SWALLOW were foraging along McAllister Creek.
PURPLE MARTIN x 4 were still attending the nest boxes off Luhr Beach, and
STELLER'S JAY was heard across the way

On our return, we had great looks of WILLOW FLYCATCHER and BROWN CREEPER
along the east side of the Loop Trail. Our hit or miss spot, the Riparian
Forest Overlook, was very good for awesome looks at BUSHTIT, BLACK-HEADED
GROSBEAK, WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, and CHESTNUT BACKED
CHICKADEE. A male WARBLING VIREO continues to sing on territory at the
cut-off for this trail.

Another great day, with great sightings and really neat behavior to enjoy,
with a total of 67 species seen and 145 species for the year!

Mammals seen included Columbia Black-tailed Deer, Harbor Seal and Rat.

Until next week when the Leader of our Gaggle returns, Phil Kelley, good
birding!

Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742



Subject: Fir Island
Date: Fri Jul 20 2018 11:02 am
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
Yesterday I visited Fir Island, Skagit County, to see if any shorebirds were about.

GAME RANGE (WYLIE SLOUGH)
Eastern Kingbird - 2 foraging by the trail
Black Phoebe - flying up from the gravel trail to catch insects as well as hawking insects from a tree perch. By the fork in the trail.
Least Sandpiper - 1
Western Sandpiper - 20
Greater Yellowlegs - 10
Barn, Tree & Bank Swallows
Cedar Waxwing w/ young
Yellow Warbler
the birds were many and active

HAYTON RESERVE
Black-bellied Plover - 13
Semipalmated Plover - 14
Long-billed Dowitcher - 5
Least Sandpiper - many in the vegetation
Western Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs - 1
It was a good day.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
[email protected]

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.



Subject: climate change and barnacle geese
Date: Fri Jul 20 2018 0:50 am
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Interesting article from NPR. Migrating Arctic Geese Are Confused, Exhausted By Rising Temperatures

|
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| | |

|

|
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Migrating Arctic Geese Are Confused, Exhausted By Rising Temperatures

Warmer weather means that barnacle geese fly faster to their breeding grounds, leaving them too tired to lay egg...
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Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 7-19-2018
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 22:15 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

A cool day (55-64degF start to finish), but with a record 25 participants in today's JBLM Eagles Pride Bird Walk (including four of us from the Seattle Audubon 2002-2003 Master Birder Class), we didn't think we missed too many species (45 ID'd) that might be vocalizing or in sight. Lots of young "squeakers" along the way, with no significant highlights, except for the numbers of individuals from some species, as shown in the list below. Well, I guess the six YELLOW WARBLERS should count as a bit out-of-the-ordinary. Oh, and the fact that two HOUSE WRENS were still at the maintenance shed. One of the wrens was carrying food and entered the lamp area of the street-style light fixture that held the nest last year and this. (I sure hope I got the right years for our Master Birder class -- if not, I bet Kristin or Nancy or Rachel will let me know!)

The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:
• August 16
• September 20
• October 18
Anyone is welcome to join us!


From the eBird Northwest report:


44 species (+1 other taxa)

Pied-billed Grebe 1 Hodge Lake
Red-tailed Hawk 2 Hodge Lake. The nest was empty, but an adult a juvenile were in the area.
Band-tailed Pigeon 6
Anna's Hummingbird 2
Downy Woodpecker 4
Northern Flicker 3
Western Wood-Pewee 15
Willow Flycatcher 4
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 11 Pacific-slope Flycatchers nest throughout the various wooded areas that surround the 27 holes of this golf course. This is by no means a high number, as attested by the regular participants of this bird walk.
Hutton's Vireo 1
Cassin's Vireo 2
Steller's Jay 9
California Scrub-Jay 1
American/Northwestern Crow 5
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1 Hodge Lake
Tree Swallow 15 Most at Hodge Lake
Violet-green Swallow 17 Most at Hodge Lake
Barn Swallow 60 Most at Hodge Lake
Cliff Swallow 12 Hodge Lake
Black-capped Chickadee 18
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 37
Bushtit 24
Red-breasted Nuthatch 7
Brown Creeper 2
House Wren 2
Bewick's Wren 2
Golden-crowned Kinglet 4
Swainson's Thrush 8
American Robin 24
European Starling 52
Cedar Waxwing 7
Yellow Warbler 6
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Dark-eyed Junco 14
White-crowned Sparrow 17
Song Sparrow 11
Spotted Towhee 15
Western Tanager 13
Black-headed Grosbeak 2
Red-winged Blackbird 3
Brown-headed Cowbird 12
House Finch 1
Purple Finch 6
Pine Siskin 38
American Goldfinch 7


View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis

[email protected]



Subject: Ocean Shores to escape the heat
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 22:12 pm
From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
> Recently we went to Ocean Shores to escape the heat and birded in Grays Harbor County and Pacific County.  Here is an album of photos.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
> Our favorite birding spots were the Hoquiam Sewage Treatment Ponds, Tokeland Marina and Oyhut Wildlife Area. As usual we used Birder's Dashboard to guide our birding.
>
> http://birdingwashington.info/...
>
> Hank & Karen Heiberg
> Issaquah, WA
>
>
> Sent from my iPad



Subject: Correction
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 19:13 pm
From: wrboyington AT msn.com
 
The book I referenced is titled A Birder™ Guide to Washington, Second Edition.  A great resource.

Bill Boyington
Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Looking for Mountain Quail (long, too long, my apologies.)
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 18:51 pm
From: wrboyington AT msn.com
 
Tweeters,

Realizing from eBird that this elusive bird was being seen lately, I decided yesterday to head for Belfair to, at long last, try for this lifer.
Using the valuable resource, Finding Birds in Washington, Second Edition, I decided to focus on the Tahuya-Blacksmith Road, especially the graveled part.

After a pleasant walk Wednesday morning in the Theler Wetlands under overcast skies, I decided after lunch to check out and familiarize myself with Tahuya-Blacksmith Road, never having been there before. I drove the length of it, noting varying stages of reforestation throughout, along the graveled portion of the road.

Driving back south, at one spot in the graveled section, I happened to espy ahead a gourd-like shaped, unmoving object , at the right edge of the road. Slowly creeping forward, now with binoculars in hand, I was able to see that it was indeed a bird, not moving, but looking around. Finally, it does move from its position a bit, though never facing me, and I can see the long plume extending straight up from the top of its head, before it turns and disappears into the brush at the side of the road. Huh. Mountain Quail, at 1:25 in the afternoon.
Well, sometimes luck overcomes no particular skill at finding birds, this day to my benefit.

The following morning, maybe not as early as I should have been, the best I could do was in a paved section of the road, where homes border the west side of a small lake that the road skirts. That was the glimpsing of a small bird in a mad dash to cover that I had flushed from the entrance of an earthen driveway leading to one of the homes, with a clear cut of a steep slope on the road™s other side. It seemed too small for an adult quail, but maybe it was, or a half-grown young bird. I don™t know what other possibilities there are in this area, but it was gamebird-like to me.

My apologies again to all who bothered to read through this. I appreciate everyone who posts their sightings and stories on Tweeters.
To borrow from Marv Breece. it was two good days.
Good birding,

Bill Boyington
Shoreline, WA

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-07-19
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 15:48 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT frontier.com
 
Tweets “ cooler temps, and a gloomy overcast that threatened rain, added to the end-of-breeding-season quiet, making birding somewhat uneventful and QUIET today.  We™re definitely seeing shifts in bird populations, such as large flocks of European Starlings and House Finches, and a large drop in the numbers of Great Blue Herons.  In general, we found fewer birds, less singing, and few good views today.  Many species were only glimpsed, with some just barely heard.  Swainson™s Thrush and Willow Flycatcher were both present in pretty good numbers still, but both were doing more whits than songs, and neither species was seen.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Duck “ again, at least one clutch of tiny ducklings “ every week there™re more
b.. BLACK SWIFT “ three or four overhead briefly, but close
c.. Rufous Hummingbird “ only one, a juvenile at the Pea Patch
d.. Killdeer “ adult with two chicks below weir
e.. Spotted Sandpiper “ adult near two chicks below the weir
f.. Great Blue Heron “ heronry empty or nearly empty; birds dispersed
g.. Cooper™s Hawk “ one aggressively chased an adult Bald Eagle “ nesting nearby?
h.. Barn Owl “ Matt heard juvenile in windmill very early, again
i.. Western Screech-Owl “ two heard, adult seen, early
j.. Tree Swallow “ only one seen, but entering a nest box in East Meadow
k.. Northern Rough-winged Swallow “ one over fields 7-8-9
l.. BANK SWALLOW “ at least two over fields 7-8-9
m.. Savannah Sparrow “ at least a few juveniles
n.. White-crowned Sparrow “ at least 2 young-looking juveniles
o.. BL.-THROATED GRAY WARBLER “ one seen 1500 feet downstream of weir along slough
p.. Yellow Warbler “ one made a couple of half-hearted songs, unseen
q.. Western Tanager “ adult male East Meadow south end, another singing near windmill
r.. Black-headed Grosbeak “ only one seen, one heard
s.. LAZULI BUNTING “ male north of fields 7-8-9; probably will leave soon
Critters seen included dozens of Eastern Cottontails, Matt had a Mule Deer, and a few of us spotted a LONG-TAILED WEASEL at the north end of the East Meadow.

Misses today included Rock Pigeon, Green Heron, Warbling Vireo, Cliff Swallow, and Marsh Wren.

For the day, 61 species. Bank Swallow was new for 2018 for us, but has been previously reported on eBird this year.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== [email protected]



Subject: Sanderling in Chelan county
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 15:31 pm
From: shadowfax4jctm AT gmail.com
 
Calling all county listers,

A Sanderling has been seen the last couple of days on the shore of the Columbia at the Will Risk Memorial park in Entiat. Park just below the museum in the park. The bird is on the shoreline to your left.

Debbie Sutherland
Cashmere, WA
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Subject: Osprey nest building
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 12:53 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Wednesday evening I checked out the osprey nest at the Meadowdale playfields. The playfields were torn up in 2017 for installation of artificial turf and there was no access to the nest. 

The mother osprey took off from the nest as I was setting up my photo equipment and returned with a branch. There was recent discussion about osprey building nests this late into the nesting season. It appears nest building continues even after the eggs have hatched.

My photos can be seen by scrolling down page 11 of this thread:http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Edmonds marsh: adult spotted sandpiper + two chicks 7-18-18
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 12:10 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Wednesday afternoon (7-18-18) I spotted an adult spotted sandpiper and two chicks at the marsh. The adult was bobbing up and down and calling to the chicks as it foraged. The chicks exhibited the same bobbing behavior as well. 

It is the first evidence I have seen of sandpipers nesting at the marsh as the two chicks looked recently hatched and too young to fly. I would like to hear the opinions of other. My photos can be seen by scrolling down page 11 of this link:

http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Meet The Invasive Insect That Is Changing An Entire Forest Bird Community
Date: Thu Jul 19 2018 10:18 am
From: birdologist AT gmail.com
 
Hello everyone,

here's an interesting story that you might enjoy: In an unusual role
reversal, one tiny invasive insect is controlling the species composition
and architecture of a large community of forest birds along the East Coast
of the United States


Meet The Invasive Insect That Is Changing An Entire Forest Bird Community
http://www.forbes.com/sites/gr...
tinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/y753j4b2


I hope you find this piece interesting and enlightening. I also hope you
share it amongst your bird pals, friends and family on social media and
twitter.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist
[email protected]
Blogs: Forbes | Evolution
Institute |
Medium
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter
Tiny bio: about.me
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]



Subject: Ruff on San Juan Island - No
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 20:12 pm
From: dave.slager AT gmail.com
 
Greetings,

This afternoon at 3pm the Ruff was not present at First Lagoon. No other
shorebirds either.

One Tweeters subscriber asked me what the full name of a Ruff is. To
clarify, that *is* the full name!

Good birding,
Dave

On Sun, Jul 15, 2018, 21:45 Dave Slager wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> This morning Breck Tyler photographed a Ruff at First Lagoon on San
> Juan Island. It was still present at 9pm this evening.
>
> First Lagoon is the obvious pond visible from the well marked Jakle's
> Lagoon Trail parking area near American Camp on the south end of San
> Juan Island.
>
> There were also 2 Pectoral Sandpipers.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Dave Slager
> Seattle, WA
>



Subject: Puget Sound Bird Fest Photo Contest
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 15:59 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Amateur and professional photographers are invited toparticipate in the 2018 Puget Sound Bird Fest Photo Exhibition/Contest inEdmonds. Prints of accepted entries will be exhibited during the festival onSaturday, September 15 from 10am “ 4pm at the Frances Anderson Center. 
Photos must be of bird species typically found in thePuget Sound region, and be submitted in either the adult or youth (under age18) category. A People™s Choice prize will be given to one entry in eachcategory with voting to occur by festival attendees on Saturday.

Complete instructions can be found on the attachedEntry Form, at http://www.pugetsoundbirdfest.... by contacting [email protected] more information. The first 60entries will be accepted; limit one entry per person.

Closing date for submission Aug 1st 2018.
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: A second Osprey nest in Montlake?
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 15:23 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Dan,

Interesting. I had thought they had quit bringing material. Nice to know they are still hanging around.

When the adults at the older nest were chasing an eagle away awhile back an osprey reinforcement showed up to help (it appeared to come from the north). I suspect one of the two from the new location maybe young from the 2016 nesting at UBNA. Of course I cannot prove it but the third bird certainly seemed to be helping out with the eagle patrol.

Larry

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 18, 2018, at 10:41 AM, Dan McDougall-Treacy wrote:
>
> This morning I observed Ospreys bringing nest material to a light standard in the UW sports fields across the street from U Village. Clearly a late start for raising young this year, but perhaps getting a head start on 2019 - presuming the nest isn't removed over the winter.
> Dan
>
> Dan McDougall-Treacy
> 206/402-9426

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Subject: Edmonds Marsh - Good Shorebird Variety This Morning
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 13:41 pm
From: cariddellwa AT gmail.com
 
We had unusually good shorebird variety this morning at the Edmonds marsh. There were the usual Killdeer, a couple of Western Sandpipers, about 8 Least Sandpipers, an immature Spotted Sandpiper cavorting among the peeps, a continuing Pectoral Sandpiper, a continuing Long-billed Dowitcher, and two Greater Yellowlegs that are the first of southbound migration. At least one had been seen in the spring.

For good measure, I got to watch an immature Common Yellowthroat moving in and out of some brambles.

As an aside, marsh visitors may notice metal stakes with orange caps, a couple of cameras on stakes, and some lengths of rope in the marsh. There has been an ongoing political discussion about the marsh, which was kicked off by the city having to update its critical areas ordinance. The upshot is that the City Council authorized funds for a consulting firm to study the marsh over at least the next year. The consultants will come and go as they study such things as water quality, vegetation, and wildlife. They are friendly folks and happy to explain what they are doing. We have given them the comprehensive list of Edmonds marsh birds that we provided to the City Council a year or so ago. It is divided into resident, rare, and migratory birds.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
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Subject: A second Osprey nest in Montlake?
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 12:48 pm
From: danmcdt AT gmail.com
 
This morning I observed Ospreys bringing nest material to a light standard in the UW sports fields across the street from U Village. Clearly a late start for raising young this year, but perhaps getting a head start on 2019 - presuming the nest isn't removed over the winter.
Dan

Dan McDougall-Treacy
206/402-9426
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Subject: Late song question
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 10:15 am
From: jstephens62 AT comcast.net
 
As breeding season ends, and bird song tapers off, I have noted that the
Orange-crowned Warbler in our neighborhood is still singing frequently.
Is this a species characteristic, or just something with this particular
individual? My hunch is the latter, does anyone know?


Jack Stephens

Edmonds, WA

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Subject: Gull ID help please
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 8:24 am
From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
>> We saw this gull yesterday at Ocean City State Park (Ocean Shores, WA) and would appreciate help identifying it.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>>
>> Thank you.
>> Hank & Karen Heiberg
>> Issaquah, WA
>>



Subject: County Yearlist Project mid-year update available at WA Birder
Date: Wed Jul 18 2018 6:55 am
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Hi Tweeters & Inland NW Birders

An updated version of the 2018 County Yearlist Project is up and available at Washington Birder. We've updated all 39 counties as of the mid-way point in the year. Thanks to everyone who has contributed by sending county compilers their sightings &/or posting on eBird.

At the mid-year point, as summer gets into full swing, this is a decent time to compare totals with previous years. 21 counties have reported higher species counts this year compared with last year. 16 have lower totals this year, and 2 counties have exactly the same mid-year total as last year.

29 counties have totals within ten of last year™s total, as with previous years, a sign of some stability in figuring out what the first half of the year looks like.

Statewide, the total of 367 is five higher than this time last year, and right in the middle of the total over the past 7 years. Western Washington is running 10 above last year and Eastern Washington is 5 higher this time around.

Here™s a side-by-side comparison with mid-way totals for the past 7 years:

Year 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012
Washington State 367 362 364 369 358 369 370
Western Washington 330 320 323 334 320 325 334
Eastern Washington 304 299 302 301 299 308 299


53 species have been seen in all 39 counties by this point;. This was very similar to last year™s tally of 54 ˜39ers™ by this point - I compared lists though, and they was less overlap than I expected - about 43 of the species were shared, and each year had 9 or 10 unique 39ers.
145 species have been seen in 30 or more counties ” those would be our most widespread Washington regulars ”

If you'd like to take a look at where things stand, the list and many other interesting files are at the Washington Birder website:

http://www.wabirder.com/


A direct link to the 2018 county yearlist & the list of county compilers contact info:
http://www.wabirder.com/county...


Thanks to all the compilers and all those pitching in to sketch a picture of another year's birds in WA.




Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA



Subject: Crow with Blue Beak
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 11:06 am
From: dlwicki AT comcast.net
 
Someone on the facebook Bothell community page noticed a crow with a bright blue beak. It was in a group of other crows that had black beaks. There is a photo but it™s a closed group, so I can™t share the post. Has this been seen before and does anyone have knowledge of what this could be?

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell

Buy Free Range
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Subject: ?Blue-throated or Magnificent Hummingbird in Ravenna
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 9:00 am
From: beveb AT earthlink.net
 
Yesterday (7/16), around 10:30 AM in my garden two+ blocks east & up the hill from Roosevelt HS, what looked like a small drone overhead caught my eye -- it hovered, darted, then swooped toward a large native dogwood in the my garden. I did not have my binoculars but as it perched briefly and preened I could see clearly it was a very large hummingbird -- it's song was a ratchet-like hiss; its wings in flight moved like fast pinwheels...not as blurry as those of the Annas hummers that frequent my garden. It was dark blue-gray with a slightly lighter underside. Checking my Sibley Guide, it seemed it could be either a Blue-throated or a Magnificent Hummingbird, both of which are identified as 'rare.'



Subject: Kitsap Birding
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 0:52 am
From: offthehookflyshop AT yahoo.com
 
Thanks all,

To everybody who gave me information on birding at Paradise, Thank You!
Enough people have told me that the snow is too much of a hindrance that we are postponing the trip until August. Instead we are going to the Kitsap Peninsula. After a morning in Tahuya we will probably visit Theler Wetlands.
My question to Tweeterdom is, Where is the best place on the Kitsap Pen. to find shorebirds. We are mainly looking for Pectoral Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Tringa sp, and the rocky shore sandpipers. Bonaprtes Gull is another need for the trip.
I know high tide is at 5:30pm so shorebirding wouldn't be good until probably 2 or 3.
I know nothing about the area do any information is good information.

Thanks,

Dalton SpencerChehalis, Washington
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject: Hummingbird Feeder That does not attract bees
Date: Tue Jul 17 2018 0:30 am
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
T™s,
We have had what appear to be honey bees- lots of them- take over our hummer feeders this and the past few years. The adults avoid the feeders when bees are near or on them. Young hummers- at times-will feed anyway. I am not sure if this puts them at risk for injury.
However, my wife, who loves hummingbirds and tends the feeders, found a solution-this type of feeder- that bees don™t use.
It seems to have solved the problem.
Hope this helps some of you that have had this situation.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/prod...
Best,
Dan Reiff



Subject: Virginia Rail Chicks
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 19:37 pm
From: darcy424 AT gmail.com
 
Hi everyone,
I thought you might like to know I saw two little Virginia Rail chicks with their parent at Edmond™s Marsh today. They kept going in and out of the marsh grasses following their mom. They were covered in black down. Very cute.

Darcy Thomas
Brier



Subject: Birding trips over Christmas vacation
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 18:07 pm
From: vlmoffatt3 AT gmail.com
 
Hello all I am trying to plan a vacation somewhere to enjoy birding along with some landscape photography preferably somewhere sunnier the the PNW in late December early January.

Thoughts on Cuba?

Victoria

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Lesser Goldfinches, Washtucna
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 18:03 pm
From: rwlawson AT q.com
 
Lesser Goldfinches sightings seem to be increasing, so I am not sure whether
this counts as unusual anymore, but Joseph Brown and I saw 2 Lesser
Goldfinches in Bassett Park in Washtucna on 11 July. One male was singing
from a wire, so he seems to be on territory.



Rachel Lawson

Seattle

[email protected]



Subject: Westport Seabirds trip report Saturday July 14
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 15:57 pm
From: cmborre1 AT gmail.com
 
*Westport Seabirds headed out on another trip Saturday, July 14 with the
team of Captain Phil Anderson, First Mate Chris Anderson, my fellow
spotters Scott Mills and Bill Shelmerdine, and 20 birders. Though bar
crossing conditions were a bit exciting due to an outgoing tide and seas a
bit bumpy on the way out, it was a beautiful, sunny, almost windless
day.Our first treat was a long, close look at a juvenile Cassin™s Auklet on
the water, a species often hard to see well as they fly away from the boat.
We had our first close looks at many "usual" species, including
Black-footed Albatross, Northern Fulmar, Pink-footed Shearwater, and
Fork-Tailed Storm-Petrels at a shrimp boat near the edge of the continental
shelf. These mid-summer pelagics are great for storm-petrels and this trip
was no exception. Later we had excellent looks at good numbers of both
Fork-tailed and Leach™s Storm-Petrels visiting our chum in deep water. Our
South Polar Skua experience was also quite remarkable. We ended up with 6
sightings, the most memorable two being one that flew directly over the
boat and another which landed very close to the boat. We all enjoyed great
looks and photo ops of this striking bird. The most unusual bird we had
for the day was a Short-tailed Shearwater which was seen near a shrimp boat
on our way back. Short-tails are not uncommon in the winter or fall off the
Washington coast, but quire rare this time of year. Here™s the complete
trip list for the day:Surf Scoter-8White-winged Scoter-1 Black-footed
Albatross-90 Northern Fulmar-150 Pink-footed Shearwater-106Sooty
Shearwater-2176 Short-tailed Shearwater-1Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel-96Leach™s
Storm-Petrel-71 Brandt™s Cormorant-104Double-crested Cormorant-7Pelagic
Cormorant-16Brown Pelican-1149Western Sandpiper-25Red-necked Phalaropes-11
South Polar Skua-6Pomarine Jaeger-1 Common Murre-141 Pigeon Guillemot-20
Cassin™s Auklet-3 Rhinoceros Auklet-31 Sabine™s Gull-1Heermann™s Gull-454
California Gull-17 Glaucous-winged/Western Gull-585 Small tern sp-2Harbor
Porpoise-1Harbor Seal-5Northern Fur Seal-1Elephant Seal-1California
Sea-Lion-1 Steller™s Sea Lion-3Blue Shark-2 The next Westport Seabirds
pelagic trips are scheduled for July 25 and August 4. To inquire about
reservations, schedules, and all other information, please visit our
website at www.westportseabirds.com Hope
to sea you out there soon!Cara BorreGig Harbor, WA *



Subject: Non -breeding Vaux's Swifts
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 15:44 pm
From: leschwitters AT me.com
 
We know of three Washington State roosts now with significant numbers of Vaux™s Swifts. 57 used the Port Angeles Catholic Church last night and Monroe Wagner and Selleck have been checked every night since mid-April and always have swifts.

This time of the year 50-150 of the wee birds can put on a pretty good show.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Subject: Birding at Paradise
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 9:14 am
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Dalton - Suggest you check out sightings at Rainier at Birders
Dashboard either by clicking on Hotspots or Choose any location or by
searching for a particular species. Here is the link:
http://birdingwashington.info/...


Also suggest you check out the section on birding Mt Rainier in A Birder's
be Guide to Wawshington, Second Edition, which is now online, at this
address:
http://wabirdguide.org/mount-r...

Jane Hadley
Seattle, WA



Subject: RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier?
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 1:30 am
From: xjoshx AT gmail.com
 
Hello Vicki,
To the best of my knowledge (and someone *please* correct me if I'm wrong),
no WT Ptarmigan have been observed on the Fremont Lookout in several years
with no shortage of people trying. If it was me, I would pursue one of the
other alpine hikes from Sunrise and hope for the best if Paradise is still
under snow.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA



Subject: RFI: Sightings of White-tailed Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier?
Date: Mon Jul 16 2018 0:00 am
From: vkbirder AT gmail.com
 
An Australian birding friend will be visiting Seattle next weekend for only
a few days and would like to see a White-tailed Ptarmigan while he's in
our area. We've decided to spend next Sunday at Mt. Rainier. Based on
recent reports at the WTA website, we assume that our chances of spotting
Ptarmigan will be better at the Fremont Lookout, which is already melted
out, than along the Skyline Trail/Panarama Point at Paradise, which still
seems to have a lot of snow cover.

I would be grateful for any current sightings, recommendations or advice on
how to maximize our chances of seeing Ptarmigan at Mt. Rainier.

Thanks for your consideration,

Vicki King
Seattle



Subject: Ruff on San Juan Island
Date: Sun Jul 15 2018 23:46 pm
From: dave.slager AT gmail.com
 
Greetings,

This morning Breck Tyler photographed a Ruff at First Lagoon on San
Juan Island. It was still present at 9pm this evening.

First Lagoon is the obvious pond visible from the well marked Jakle's
Lagoon Trail parking area near American Camp on the south end of San
Juan Island.

There were also 2 Pectoral Sandpipers.

Good birding,

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA
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