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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on July 7, 2020, 8:50 pm

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07 Jul: @ 20:44:54 
June 2020 TUVU report [Diann MacRae]
07 Jul: @ 16:13:36 
Re: Strange warbler family in Seattle [Matt Bartels]
07 Jul: @ 15:53:32 
Re: Two dead Chickadees [Jennifer Jarstad]
07 Jul: @ 12:32:55 
Strange warbler family in Seattle [Dave Slager]
07 Jul: @ 11:59:31 
Westport Pelagic Trip [Bruce LaBar]
07 Jul: @ 11:42:07 
Murmuration [Robert Gray]
06 Jul: @ 23:54:09 
Skagit Long-billed Curlew [Gary Bletsch]
06 Jul: @ 22:15:40 
Re: Two dead Chickadees [dgrainger]
06 Jul: @ 17:45:25 
Two dead Chickadees [Lynn Wohlers]
06 Jul: @ 17:08:03 
USA TODAY: White woman who called police on Black bird watcher charged with filing false report [Dan Reiff]
06 Jul: @ 16:31:31 
The Atlantic: Lockdowns Could Be the ‘Biggest Conservation Action’ in a Century [Dan Reiff]
06 Jul: @ 15:30:05 
Canon Service [Elston Hill]
06 Jul: @ 12:33:58 
KUOW Birding While Black [Clare McLean]
05 Jul: @ 23:56:16 
Re: Goodbye Northwestern Crow [strix.nebulosa1987]
05 Jul: @ 21:37:51 
Re: Canon repair experience? [Nadine Drisseq]
05 Jul: @ 18:29:36 
Birds east of the Columbia River [byers345]
05 Jul: @ 17:20:46 
Re: Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames [dgrainger]
05 Jul: @ 15:41:39 
Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames [Hubbell]
05 Jul: @ 14:33:34 
Hermit, Townsend's, and Black-throated Gray for that matter [Tim Brennan]
05 Jul: @ 13:01:01 
Bird tracks in the sky [Martha Jordan]
05 Jul: @ 11:16:29 
A Puffin Cruise to Smith Island and Lost Opportunities in Arizona [B B]
05 Jul: @ 00:12:35 
Cordilleran Flycatcher Question [D R]
04 Jul: @ 22:29:06 
Sno Falls Peregrines [Dave Templeton]
04 Jul: @ 17:09:35 
Hermit X Townsend's Warbler Hybrids in WA [Alan Knue]
04 Jul: @ 17:03:33 
Image of the Day: Flock in the Night | The Scientist Magazine® [Dan Reiff]
04 Jul: @ 16:57:40 
WIRED: A Bird’s Epic Migration Stuns Scientists and Wins Online Fans [Dan Reiff]
04 Jul: @ 16:56:25 
National Geographic: Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccine—but the ecosystem may suffer. [Dan Reiff]
04 Jul: @ 15:42:20 
Re: Canon repair experience? [AnthonyG.]
04 Jul: @ 14:56:02 
Re: Canon repair experience? [Marty]
04 Jul: @ 14:49:17 
Make that TWO Chats! [Gary Bletsch]
04 Jul: @ 14:22:05 
Skagit Chat [Gary Bletsch]
04 Jul: @ 14:03:26 
BirdNote, last week and the week of July 5, 2020 [Ellen Blackstone]
04 Jul: @ 12:48:32 
Oops, I mean millimeters! [Gary Bletsch]
04 Jul: @ 12:29:48 
egg question [Gary Bletsch]
04 Jul: @ 11:44:03 
Re: Canon repair experience? [Wayne Weber]
04 Jul: @ 11:22:56 
Corvid question [Jill Freidberg]
04 Jul: @ 10:29:56 
Re: Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3 [Doug Santoni]
04 Jul: @ 09:57:56 
probable dark murrelet sp. on Lake Washington, King Co. [Dave Slager]
03 Jul: @ 22:52:02 
Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3 [Al Wagar]
03 Jul: @ 20:47:42 
Four Northern Bobwhite at Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) [Denis DeSilvis]
03 Jul: @ 15:21:21 
Feather Atlas link [Douglas Irle Will]
03 Jul: @ 14:22:41 
Canon repair experience? [Mike Wagenbach]
02 Jul: @ 22:41:15 
Binocular cleaning [Roger Moyer]
02 Jul: @ 18:12:36 
Re: Binoc repair service - Zeiss [a good report!!] [Steve Loitz]
02 Jul: @ 17:50:27 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-07-02 [birdmarymoor]
02 Jul: @ 17:24:44 
Great-tailed Grackle at Para Ponds [Dalton Spencer]
02 Jul: @ 16:51:41 
Binoc repair service - Zeiss [a good report!!] [Matt Bartels]
02 Jul: @ 16:30:08 
Re: Feather id [Devon Comstock]
02 Jul: @ 16:27:29 
Feather id [Christina]
02 Jul: @ 13:54:05 
National Geographic: Sparrows are singing a new song, in a rapid, unprecedented shift [Dan Reiff]





Subject: June 2020 TUVU report
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 20:44 pm
From: tvulture AT gmx.com
 
Hi, Tweets



Almost forgot it was already July! Following are the Washington and Oregon turkey vulture reports for June 2020 - many thanks. Be sure to keep an eye out this summer for young turkey vultures (dark heads) possibly with adults. They usually don't head off on their fall migrations until very late August and mostly in mid-to-late September and early October.



May

31 -- 3 turkey vultures near Carnation; 5 turkey vultures along Oso Loop Road, Snohomish County.



June

01 -- a single turkey vulture soaring high over Whidbey Island before gliding off to the south; 7 at a Skokomish farm.

08 -- 3 over Belfair plus 1 more later.

09 -- 2 separate sightings over Belfair.

11 -- 16 at Theler.

13 -- one battered TV in high winds east of Kittitas; 1 at Belfair.

14 -- 2 at Belfair.

18 -- two turkey vultures at JBLM Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk; 2 at Theler

19 -- 1 at Belfair.

20 -- 7 at Dewatto Bay; 2 at Dewatto-Holly Road.

22 -- 1 at Belfair.

25 -- 5 at Theler.

28 -- 2 at Belfair.

29 -- one handsome Turkey Vulture sailed past an eighth-floor window in Portland around 1 p.m. today; 2 at Belfair.


Thanks for all the sightings - they are always much appreciatedl.

Cheers, Diann


Diann MacRae

Olympic Vulture Study

22622 - 53rd Avenue S.E.

Bothell, WA 98021

tvulture@gmx.com



Subject: Strange warbler family in Seattle
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 16:13 pm
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
First you took our crows away, now you are going to lump all our warblers - I knew it!
That Slager..

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

> On Jul 7, 2020, at 10:31 AM, Dave Slager wrote:
>
> Tweeters,
>
> This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events, so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.
>
> I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an instance?
>
> In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment facility.
>
> Dave Slager
> Seattle, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Two dead Chickadees
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 15:53 pm
From: jennjarstad AT gmail.com
 
I don't know about Chickadees, but I do know that Pine Siskins are very
vulnerable to disease from feeders that are not cleaned regularly.

Jenn Jarstad
Seattle, WA



Subject: Strange warbler family in Seattle
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 12:32 pm
From: dave.slager AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters,

This morning I saw a real oddity at Carkeek Park in Seattle: An adult
Wilson's Warbler feeding a fledgling Black-throated Gray Warbler. At first
I thought my eyes must be making a mistake, but I watched 7 feeding events,
so it was the real deal. The youngster did not appear to be a hybrid.

I can think of a few ways this might have come about, but they all sound
pretty far-fetched. I've never seen anything like this before. Has anyone
out there in Tweeterdom seen something like this, or heard about an
instance?

In case anyone is interested in looking for it, it was right by the Honey
Bucket in the middle of Carkeek Park, just below the water treatment
facility.

Dave Slager
Seattle, WA



Subject: Westport Pelagic Trip
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 11:59 am
From: blabar AT harbornet.com
 
This coming Saturday, there are a few spots remaining for any of you seafarers out there. Covid protocols are followed.
Weather looks great.
For further information and to make reservations, please visit the website at www.westportseabirds.com
Bruce LaBar
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Murmuration
Date: Tue Jul 7 2020 11:42 am
From: robertgary02 AT aol.com
 
We witnessed an enormous flock of large white birds, believed to be Terns, performing elaborate murmuration maneuvers near Goat Island on 7/04/20. This would be the Goat Island near La Conner. They were 3 or so miles from our vantage point on Whydby Island so identification was impossible but they were large, white and performed with the same precision you see with Dunlins.



Subject: Skagit Long-billed Curlew
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 23:54 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
This afternoon (sixth July) there was a Long-billed Curlew at Hayton Reserve. It was foraging out by the break in the dike, in and out of which the tidewaters flow. It stayed with a small flock of Greater Yellowlegs for a time, then disappeared.
Other cool Skagit birds today included the continuing YB Chat west of Hamilton, a Red Crossbill flying over my house, and three Purple Martins at Fox Road.
Once I had seen a few nifty birds in my neighborhood this morning, I decided to try to best the July big-day record for Skagit County, which was 77 species. I think I ended up with 98 for the day. If I had not gotten off to such a late start (0800), I likely would have made it to a hundred species--but even tardy birders gets a few worms.
Good old Ken Knittle. If it were not for Ken andWashington Birder, I would not have known about that 77, would not have decided to go chasing it today, and would not have seen all the cool birds that were out there! Wherever you are, Ken, thanks!
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch



Subject: Two dead Chickadees
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 22:15 pm
From: dgrainger AT birdsbydave.com
 
Certainly hope this is not the same infection that hit the Pine Siskins
so hard last year! Anybody expert in that field out there with info?
________________________________________________________________
On 2020-07-06 15:44, Lynn Wohlers wrote:
> We just found a dead Chickadee under our feeders, the second one in
> about 7 days. I didn't see any injuries in either bird. I believe both
> were Black-capped. The first one we found was very disheveled, and I
> had noticed a disheveled, weak-looking Chickadee at the feeder the day
> before. That was the day we had pretty heavy rain all day (we're in
> Anacortes).
>
> It seems unusual for two birds to die in the same spot so close in
> time. We have Barred owls but they would have made off with a meal,
> and a cursory look showed no injuries.
>
> Does anyone have an idea why this would happen? A dirty feeder
> possibly? We do have a big Chickadee population (Black-capped &
> Chestnut-backed).
>
> Thanks!
>
> --
>
> Lynn Wohlers
>
> Blogging at Bluebrightly [1]
> Photography on Flickr [2]
> And at Lynn Wohlers.com [3]
>
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1] https://bluebrightly.com/
> [2] https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
> [3] http://lynn-wohlers.artistwebs...
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Two dead Chickadees
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 17:45 pm
From: wohlers13 AT gmail.com
 
We just found a dead Chickadee under our feeders, the second one in about 7
days. I didn't see any injuries in either bird. I believe both were
Black-capped. The first one we found was very disheveled, and I had noticed
a disheveled, weak-looking Chickadee at the feeder the day before. That was
the day we had pretty heavy rain all day (we're in Anacortes).
It seems unusual for two birds to die in the same spot so close in time. We
have Barred owls but they would have made off with a meal, and a cursory
look showed no injuries.
Does anyone have an idea why this would happen? A dirty feeder possibly? We
do have a big Chickadee population (Black-capped & Chestnut-backed).
Thanks!

--
Lynn Wohlers

Blogging at Bluebrightly
Photography on Flickr
And at Lynn Wohlers.com



Subject: USA TODAY: White woman who called police on Black bird watcher charged with filing false report
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 17:08 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
White woman who called police on Black bird watcher charged with filing false report
Cooper is facing a misdemeanor charge of filing a false report, Manhattan's district attorney announced Monday.

Read in USA TODAY: https://apple.news/Az6bzXSE-R6...


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: The Atlantic: Lockdowns Could Be the ‘Biggest Conservation Action’ in a Century
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 16:31 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Lockdowns Could Be the Biggest Conservation Action in a Century
Acknowledging the viruss silver linings can feel ghoulish. But mounting evidence suggests that were in the midst of an unprecedented roadkill reprieve.

Read in The Atlantic: https://apple.news/AMx5I4JY7Qs...


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Canon Service
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 15:30 pm
From: elstonh AT yahoo.com
 
Just want to say my experience with Canon does not jive with the last email about sending in a 7D.

I send in Canon cameras and lenses to Canon several times a year. They usually turn around my orders in one day. Prior to using Canon, I took my 7d Mark ii to the local repair shop which is very reputable. They quoted me $600 for a repair. I then sent the 7D to Canon which charged me $70. I damaged a new lens which was under warranty with blowing sand down in the Falklands. I sent the lens in to Canon expecting to be billed and they repaired it under warranty even though the warranty did not cover damage to the lens.

The Sony might disappoint you. Slower and less reliable focus. If you are aiming for a mirrorless camera, rumor has it that the Canon R5 coming out in a couple months will be much superior to any other mirrorless currently on the market.

Elston
_______________________________________________
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Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: KUOW Birding While Black
Date: Mon Jul 6 2020 12:33 pm
From: clareishere AT hotmail.com
 
A very belated thanks to Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser for bringing out attention to how some birding communities have responded to posts and conversations re: Black Birders' Week, Birding While Black, etc. (her original post was a few weeks ago).

Here's yesterday's segment on KUOW about the subject--a good, fair-minded overview of recent events and conversations. It also mentions of some of the groups and individuals that explicitly aim to make birding communities more inclusive and open to discussion, rather than shutting down conversations:

https://www.kuow.org/stories/b...


Clare McLean
Mountlake Terrace, WA
clareishere@hotmail.com


**Please excuse typos or weird formatting due to unruly voice recognition software.**



Subject: Goodbye Northwestern Crow
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 23:56 pm
From: strix.nebulosa1987 AT gmail.com
 
Actually all native Corvids including crows are protected under the Migratory Bid treaty Act and their take outside of an authorized hunting season is illegal. Some sates do have hunting seasons on crows just like they do on waterfowl. As with waterfowl, crow seasons are tightly regulated when they are authorized. If you want to see the official list see this link.

https://www.fws.gov/birds/mana...



Mike





From: Tweeters On Behalf Of J Christian Kessler
Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 8:32 PM
To: Robert O'Brien
Cc: TWEETERS tweeters
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Goodbye Northwestern Crow



Starlings, as an introduced species, are not covered by the Migratory Bird Treaty & Act, and many states classify them as vermin. Crows are excluded from the Treaty/Act and most states also classify them as vermin. In most states there are no restrictions on shooting vermin (whether birds or rodents) - only restrictions on where one can discharge a firearm (populated areas, from roads, etc), but animals classified as vermin are vulnerable all days & seasons in most states. Deer & Elk know when & where hunting them is permitted, I think Crows are smarter ...



Chris Kessler

Seattle



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 6:14 PM Robert O'Brien > wrote:

I agree with Dennis about the wrong end of the gun. An adjacent property owner had a teenage son. This is a rural area and they were hunters.

The son spent a lot of time shooting Starlings which was assumed to be quasi legal. I suspect he shot Crows when he could.

This was more than 25 years ago, before we purchased that property. To this day I have _never_ seen a crow on the ground anywhere in the area, even though flocks fly overhead all the time. There are about 100 acres of farmland in the area. Fallow some years and in the winter. Never on the ground. A few days ago, I was amazed that a few were mobbing a Barred Owl in a large cedar tree on the property. Maybe they heard the Robins/Steller's Jays? I don't recall ever having seen them even land in a tree before in all these years.

Crows have long memories. But, they quite happily walk around on my daughter's tiny lawn in Portland. Not a care in the world there. Crows are smart, but that's not news.

Another interesting factoid. So far as is known the (former) Northwestern Crow never made it to Oregon. BUT, the beach crows here are also very small and seem to be confined to the beach areas, often congregating on tidal flats. Wish I was a good enough birder to have compared these crows with the larger, inland ones or with NW Crows. I guess that could be easily done through the Macaulay Library. And by inland, I don't mean far inland. I just mean a few miles from the beach where the crows appear quite a bit larger. And less prone to moving around in flocks. (Hopefully, this last paragraph isn't a Fake Factoid, a part of my imagination).



Bob OBrien Portland



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 5:22 PM Dennis Paulson > wrote:

Northwestern Crows are thought to have evolved in coastal areas with Native American villages, thus adapted to living around people. Why the eastern crows didnt do the same, I dont know, except that crows have been agricultural pests in the East for a very long time and were often sighted at the end of a gun barrel. That may be why they arent so tame.



Dennis Paulson

Seattle



On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Catherine Joy > wrote:



Behaviorally, I have noticed the crows on the West coast are more "tame" than East coast birds. I would never see crows just walking around with the pedestrians on busy city streets out East. And I never was able to approach crows so closely until moving here.



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 4:26 PM Hans-Joachim Feddern > wrote:

This has been a long time in coming and is based on scientific data. Personally I feel there is a difference in vocalization with American Crows and the size difference can be quite obvious. Also habitat: "Northwestern" Crows are rarely found too far from shore. To me there also is a difference between calls of American Crows here in the Northwest and birds on the East Coast. I have never heard a crow in Maryland doing the "meow" call you can hear here frequently. Another interesting observation, is that I have never seen a roadkill-ed crow on the East Coast, but see many around here! Just thinking!



On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:55 PM dick > wrote:



The 2020 AOS Supplement is out! - American Birding Association





https://www.aba.org/2020-aos-s...









Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



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http://mailman11.u.washington....






--

Hans Feddern
Twin Lakes/Federal Way, WA
thefedderns@gmail.com

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



--

"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson



Subject: Canon repair experience?
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 21:37 pm
From: drisseq.n AT gmail.com
 
My 7DII was damaged in an accident. I sent it to the Costa Mesa location
for repair as the corner of the lcd screen was chipped and I wanted to
ensure the internal electronics checked out ok too. They replaced the
screen but with a tiny bubble. I was glad to have the camera back after 6
weeks of waiting, and thought not much of a small bubble in the lcd. A year
later the bubble had grown to cm squared, so I called Canon, but the
warranty on the repair is only 6 months and they told me I was out of luck.
Two years on the bubble is now about a cm2. It's super annoying. I should
have sent it back within 6 months but I didn't want to wait another 6
weeks. I will probably get it repaired locally. Won't be using Canon repair
again unless I have no other choice. Honestly, I am looking at ditching
Canon entirely, and going with a mirrorless Sony for a future body. Sooner
than later, I hope.

Nadine



Subject: Birds east of the Columbia River
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 18:29 pm
From: byers345 AT comcast.net
 
Hello Tweeters,

Since we don't feel comfortable spending a night away from
home yet, we decided to do a long one-day trip to eastern Washington to
visit Grant and Adams counties. Our first stop was the County Line Ponds on
Hwy 26, a few miles this side of Othello. There were a few American
Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, and Wilson's Phalaropes on the north side of
the highway. Our presence didn't seem to bother the birds at all and they
began to interact with one another, flying around, calling, wading, feeding.
These birds are all so graceful and beautiful, it almost doesn't matter what
they do. They are wonderful to observe. The light wasn't very good but we
took lots of pictures.

Following the County Line Ponds, we headed to the Para
Ponds. A Long-tailed Grackle had been seen there on July 2. It wasn't
there on July 3, but we had a good look at the American White Pelicans, a
few Tricolored Blackbirds, and other birds that were hanging out there. We
drove up through the Columbia NWR to Potholes State Park for lunch. There
we saw some distant Forster's Terns among the usual birds that live there.
Finally we stopped at Martha Lake (right near George, WA) and then headed
home.

I have put the best of these photos in a small album
commemorating the day if you are interested in seeing some of these birds.



https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
80443293/



Happy safe birding, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds



Subject: Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 17:20 pm
From: dgrainger AT birdsbydave.com
 
On that set of Flicker photos, Pat and I especially like your 2015 photo
of the bird on tree trunk looking up at a burl structure that looks for
all the world like a monkey face!


On 2020-07-05 13:40, Hubbell wrote:
> Tweeters,
>
> The title of this weeks post may not remind you of a local bird.
> However, I hope enjoy my efforts to link the ideas to the birds.
>
> https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...
>
> Have a great day on Union Bay, where Black Birders are welcome!
>
> Larry Hubbell
> ldhubbell at comcast dot net
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Union Bay Watch } Freedom and Flames
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 15:41 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

The title of this weeks post may not remind you of a local bird. However, I hope enjoy my efforts to link the ideas to the birds.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay, where Black Birders are welcome!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: Hermit, Townsend's, and Black-throated Gray for that matter
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 14:33 pm
From: tsbrennan AT hotmail.com
 
Hey tweets,

To piggy-back on Alan's post about those Hermit x Townsend's hybrids: I want to highlight the song pitfall with a comparison to Townsend's and Black-throated Gray Warblers. The songs for those two warblers are fairly variable, and it leads to some songs that essentially overlap in too many ways (cadence, quality, etc.), for an identification, or even a guess worth a nickel. However, within that variability, there are also some songs that are more classic BTGW or TOWA, where . . . I just don't remember putting binoculars on the bird and finding that I'd been fooled. The overlap exists, for sure, but there's some songs from individuals of both species that make for easier identifications for sure.

These other guys, in part because of the hybridization, and in part because of normal variability, just aren't even remotely friendly. I've heard a song that was perfect textbook Hermit Warbler stuff from a bird that had (as far as I could see?) every field mark you would want from a Townsend's Warbler. I don't even know what that means?? My ears still enjoy the different song from Hermits - it's like hearing an accent that you don't get to hear often - but I've just come to understand that this accent may be giving me zero information about the identity of that bird.

May all of your birds be identified enjoyed!

Tim Brennan
Renton



Subject: Bird tracks in the sky
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 13:01 pm
From: mj.cygnus AT gmail.com
 
This is a recent National Geographic article on "If birds left tracks in
the sky, they'd look like this"
Truly something to see.
I hope this link works:
https://www.nationalgeographic...



Martha Jordan
Everett, WA



Subject: A Puffin Cruise to Smith Island and Lost Opportunities in Arizona
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 11:16 am
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
COVID-19 has affected us all - making every birding trip a calculation of risk, protection and reward. After exploring precautions taken by San Juan Cruises out of Bellingham, I signed on for a "Puffin Cruise" to smith Island on July 3rd. The large boat was at less than 50% capacity, seating was socially isolated, and masks were required of all aboard. Less than perfect weather but very calm seas and some clearing when we reached our destination.
Bottom line was more than 2 dozen Tufted Puffins, NO Horned Puffin and many other nice birds. Details and photos are in the following blog post. TheCOVID-19 risk/reward calculation was favorable for that excursion but not so for a hoped for trip to Arizona where there was a good chance to add a number of specialties and rarities to my ABA Life List. Photos by others of the "opportunities lost" are also in the Post.
I stress that while I am disappointed in missing the trip to Arizona (as well as others), I have no right to complain as so many others are hit so much harder by this terrible Pandemic and its mishandling in the U.S. I am thankful that my glass is more than half full.
https://blairbirding.com/2020/...



Subject: Cordilleran Flycatcher Question
Date: Sun Jul 5 2020 0:12 am
From: somegum2 AT hotmail.com
 
Hi there,
Yesterday, I noticed that someone reported a Cordilleran Flycatcher sighting on eBird on July 3, complete with sound recording. Now, when I search for it under Explore Species, I am finding no COFL sightings from after early June. Normally, I would think that this would mean that the record was under review, but when I use the alerts tools for Washington Needs or for Washington Rare, the sighting does not come up, despite many other unconfirmed sightings appearing on the list. I dug further and found the actual checklist (under recent visits to the Mt. Spokane SP--XC Ski Trails hotspot) that does indeed still show COFL on the list (thus it was not removed or changed by the eBirder). Does this mean that the COFL sighting was rejected? Even despite that audio evidence? And if there is a policy-level decision to reject COFLs, then why have other records made it though this year?
Thanks,
Dave Robichaud
Seattle WA



Subject: Sno Falls Peregrines
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 22:29 pm
From: crazydave65 AT gmail.com
 
Hi

Got a note from Scott Dodson he finally got to the falls. He saw two
fledglings and one adult. Adult is probably the male he calls velocity.
They probably used the scrape site farthest to the right but they are
already out of the nest. I drove by but just kept going. Too crowded for
my taste.

Others might want to give it a shot later in the week.

Regards,

T

crazydave65
At
Gmail daught commie



Subject: Hermit X Townsend's Warbler Hybrids in WA
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 17:09 pm
From: temnurus AT gmail.com
 
Hello All,

On a recent visit to Mt. Walker near Quilcene, I encountered several Hermit
X Townsend's Warbler hybrids, including one that looked very good for
Hermit until I got a good look at it's front and saw a faint wash of yellow
below the black throat. In fact every bird I saw well at this location was
a hybrid which prompts me to bring up what I believe to be an
underappreciated ID pitfall in WA. There are two hybrid zones in WA, one on
the eastern side of the Olympics near the border of Clallam and
Jefferson counties (where Mt. Walker is located) and the second one in a
broad swath of the Cascades south of Mt. Rainier to nearly the Columbia
River. These are well described in this paper by two prominent
ornithologists, Sievert Rohwer and Chris Wood, affiliated with the Burke
Museum:

https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def...

This paper also provides the methods they used to score the plumages of
specimens to ascertain whether they were looking at either species or a
hybrid. They discovered the hybrids are highly variable. They can look very
similar to either parent species- like a Hermit Warbler but with a faint
wash of yellow just below the black throat or like a Townsend's with a
faint wash of yellow or mostly white on the underparts. Hybrids can
have practically
every combination of characteristics in between the two species. The
hybrid types are not well illustrated in most field guides with only one
type illustrated in both the National Geographic and Sibley Guides and none
in Peterson's Guide. There is a great illustration on the cover of the
issue of the Auk where the paper referenced above appears. WA
ornithologist, Dale Herter, painted this illustration and it provides 6
examples of hybrid plumages plus both parents; it is a great reference to
familiarize yourself with:

https://sora.unm.edu/sites/def...

Also note that in these hybrid zones both songs and calls are highly
variable with no consistent differences and the two species and their
hybrids cannot be reliably identified on vocalizations alone. Having birded
in both of these zones, I can vouch for having been fooled or no idea which
species or hybrid was singing until I had a visual. So it would be best to
leave unseen birds unidentified to specific species.

If anyone is interested in studying these hybrids, some great locations to
try, in addition to Mt. Walker mentioned earlier, are along Highway 123
north of Packwood and the west side of Mt. Adams including the Takhlakh and
Horseshoe Lakes area along Forest Service Road 2329 off of Forest Service
Road 23 which runs between Randle and Trout Lake. But be aware, use extra
caution when recording either of the two parent species in these areas.

Good Birding,

Alan Knue
Edmons, WA



Subject: Image of the Day: Flock in the Night | The Scientist Magazine®
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 17:03 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
https://www.the-scientist.com/...


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Subject: WIRED: A Bird’s Epic Migration Stuns Scientists and Wins Online Fans
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 16:57 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
A Birds Epic Migration Stuns Scientists and Wins Online Fans
As researchers tracked his flight over 27 countries, a cuckoo became a celebrity and raised questions about how climate change could affect his species travel.

Read in WIRED: https://apple.news/AF8RbahHiQW...


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: National Geographic: Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccine—but the ecosystem may suffer.
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 16:56 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Horseshoe crab blood is key to making a COVID-19 vaccinebut the ecosystem may suffer.
Conservationists worry the crustaceans, which are vital food sources for many species along the U.S. East Coast, will decline in number.

Read in National Geographic: https://apple.news/Avy0lAZv6QF...


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Canon repair experience?
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 15:42 pm
From: birds AT ocbirds.com
 
Hello Mike & Tweeters,



I joined the Canon CPS program though unsure of the specifics and how this applies to binoculars (may wish to investigate). I have used Canon CPS repair service several times with a full frame camera and handful of lenses mostly for routine maintenance and 2 repairs over 10 years. Once on a 1.4 version III teleconverter which had presented a malfunction. After 3 attempts they were unable to repair successfully thus I was sent a brand new one at no charge.

There are 3 CPS levels (silver, gold and platinum) worth looking into as various discounts apply depending on CPS contract. Theres also free shipping overnight both ways with the Platinum that will absorb some of the costs and a max 30% discount on Canons repair prices. My experience is solely with their cameras and lenses.



The work has been quite good however they are undoubtedly the most expensive of all the repair shops.



My repairs went to the Costa Mesa, California location.



Of recent, please take note of all service centers being closed except Newport News, VA for USA repairs.



https://www.usa.canon.com/inte...



If you do go with the Platinum, you may wish to search online for 10% promo on Canon CPS Platinum discounts by being a member of other photography web sites. They will ask for a membership # of that site you joined, that is all.



Anthony G.

Camano Island



From: Tweeters [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman11.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Mike Wagenbach
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 12:20 PM
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?



Since the subject of binocular service has come up, has anyone sent optics back to Canon for repair?



I have their 15 x 50 image-stabilized binocs, purchased at Captain's Nautical in 2001. I've been super-happy with them. Some time in the last year, I noticed that the image in the right barrel doesn't seem as sharp as the left. It's not my eye, because flipping them upside down moves the imperfection to the left eye. I don't remember dropping or banging them, but I suspect something has shifted out of alignment in the optics. I have been procrastinating about sending them for service since the problem is not extreme.



Subject: Canon repair experience?
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 14:56 pm
From: namaste AT wavecable.com
 
I have use canon repair services twice.  After you contact Canon and mail the camera and or Lynns to them they will contact you with the cost for repair, refurbishment or cleaning.
Once they receive the payment they will take action on your request and mail the camera back to you.
Both of my experiences were very good. They completed the process quickly and completely. I would use them again.
I am in the Seattle area and I used Glazers Camera ones with the same results. The only difference was hand drop off and personally picking it up.

Marty - Port Orchard

@ www.martykramerimages.com
Every day is an opportunity to do, touch and taste something new.


On Jul 4, 2020, at 12:05 PM, tweeters-request@mailman11.u.washington.edu wrote:

Canon repair experience?



Subject: Make that TWO Chats!
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 14:49 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
There are two YB Chats singing simultaneously in same spot!

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Subject: Skagit Chat
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 14:22 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Singing now Fourth of July YBCH same place asa year or two ago along Rails to Trails by Skagit River just S of S end of Cabin Creek Road and maybe 80 meters west.

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 5, 2020
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 14:03 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hello, Tweeters!

Heard last week on BirdNote:
* Olive-Sided Flycatcher - A Unique Voice
http://bit.ly/1aWXxMe
* Crow Parents, Fearless Defenders
http://bit.ly/13e3rYS
* Migration and Fat
https://bit.ly/2Zy15nD
* What Do Desert Birds Drink?
http://bit.ly/2O4Cujt
* Rufous Hummingbirds in Summer
https://bit.ly/2Ztxj36
* The Painted Bunting
http://bit.ly/29Gk47j
* National Symbol - Turkey vs. Eagle
http://bit.ly/1w7vVSt
========================Next week on BirdNote: A bird with sideburns?
and more! https://bit.ly/38utkHY
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:info@birdnote.org
------------------------------------------------
BirdNote is in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
There's a journal, too -- for your notes and sketches and lists:
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-journal
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bird...
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podca...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1600+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Subject: Oops, I mean millimeters!
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 12:48 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Sorry, Tweeters...once again Ive bungled a measurement...the egg in my driveway was about thirty millimeters long, not centimeters! Rocs dont breed here!

Thats two mistakes with numbers, and today is only the fortieth of July!

Gary Bletsch

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Subject: egg question
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 12:29 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
This morning (the 4th of July) there was a bird's egg on my gravel driveway. Actually, it was just two thirds of an eggshell. It looks like it comes from the "big end" of the shell, as a Blefuscudian might have called it. The shell is an ivory color, white with just a tiny hint of creamy color. I estimate that the intact egg would have been about 30 cm long, and 22 cm broad at its broadest. The eggshell was not there on Friday afternoon, so I am guessing that it was dropped there late yesterday evening or early this morning, either by a parent bird, or by a nest predator. Inside of the eggshell, remnants of a network of membrane is visible, mostly blood-colored; the inside of the eggshell is the same color as the outside.
I have a guess as to what species this came from, but I thought I'd put it out for other Tweeters' suggestions. If I'm not mistaken, most of the birds in my neck of the woods, near Lyman in Skagit County, would lay colored eggs.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch



Subject: Canon repair experience?
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 11:44 am
From: contopus AT telus.net
 
Mike and Tweeters,



I have a Canon camera that needs repairs. When I checked their website a few weeks ago, it said their repair shop was closed because of Covid-19. Phooey! They are happy to sell you a new camera (which I was forced to do), but were not prepared to do repairs on a camera I already own.



Wayne Weber

Delta, BC

contopus@telus.net









From: Tweeters [mailto:tweeters-bounces@mailman11.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Mike Wagenbach
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 12:20 PM
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Canon repair experience?



Since the subject of binocular service has come up, has anyone sent optics back to Canon for repair?



I have their 15 x 50 image-stabilized binocs, purchased at Captain's Nautical in 2001. I've been super-happy with them. Some time in the last year, I noticed that the image in the right barrel doesn't seem as sharp as the left. It's not my eye, because flipping them upside down moves the imperfection to the left eye. I don't remember dropping or banging them, but I suspect something has shifted out of alignment in the optics. I have been procrastinating about sending them for service since the problem is not extreme.



Subject: Corvid question
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 11:22 am
From: jill.freidberg AT gmail.com
 
During a family picnic near Seward Park last night, we saw the famous
Seward Park Brown Crow. He or she had three healthy fledglings following
her and begging. That seems like a lot of fledglings for one crow. Is it
normal for that many to survive? Or, do corvids feed the young of extended
family? BTW, the fledglings were all black despite possibly having a brown
parent.
Jill



Subject: Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 10:29 am
From: dougsantoni AT gmail.com
 
Thank you, Al!  The images of butterflies and dragonflies were a nice bonus!

Doug Santoni
Seattle

> On Jul 3, 2020, at 8:51 PM, Al Wagar wrote:
>
> If interested in some vicarious birding, these are from Yesler Swamp, Montlake fill, and Magnuson park.
>
> https://youtu.be/JqKjCg5mlzM
>
> Al
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: probable dark murrelet sp. on Lake Washington, King Co.
Date: Sat Jul 4 2020 9:57 am
From: dave.slager AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters,

This morning July 4 around 6:30am, I saw what was likely a dark *Brachyramphus
*murrelet flying north past Magnuson Park. I was birding binocs only and it
was fairly far out. I lost it when it was out in the direction of Juanita
Bay, so I'm not sure if it landed or continued flying north on the lake.

A dark murrelet on freshwater would be really interesting, because not only
are Marbled Murrelet very rare away from saltwater, but this is also the
time of year when Long-billed Murrelet is possible, and vagrants of that
species sometimes show up on fresh water.

Although I'm not positive on this sighting, I'm not really sure what else
it would have been. Just getting the word out that it may be worth scoping
northern Lake Washington today if you happen to be in the area.

Good birding,
Dave Slager
Seattle



Subject: Link to a 4-minute video of some Seattle birds seen July 1 & 3
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 22:52 pm
From: jalanwagar AT gmail.com
 
If interested in some vicarious birding, these are from Yesler Swamp, Montlake fill, and Magnuson park.

https://youtu.be/JqKjCg5mlzM

Al



Subject: Four Northern Bobwhite at Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM)
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 20:47 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

At the Coyote Bridge (named per a JBLM biologist I know) over Muck Creek on Joint Base Lewis McChord (47deg 0' 20.83"N, -122deg 33'25.42"W), I was looking for a Yellow-breasted Chat (on the off-chance one was there), when I heard four different NORTHERN BOBWHITES (NOBO) singing. All were singing from markedly different directions. As I walked back to my car, one NOBO came in from the east and landed on the concrete barrier on the bridge (see not-good photos on the eBird checklist below). I've tallied Northern Bobwhite quite a few times over the past 40 years at this location, but this was the first instance I've had four different singing Bobwhites at the same time.



View checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...



Also, I've searched for the (or a) Yellow-breasted Chat since I found one on my property at Roy on June 19, but I've not heard it since just after noon that day. I've looked on Training Area 13 (between 8th Ave S and SR 507) along Muck Creek, as well as in other likely areas on JBLM, but no luck.

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com



Subject: Feather Atlas link
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 15:21 pm
From: diwill AT uw.edu
 
Try

https://www.fws.gov/lab/feathe...

which worked for me.

Doug Will
UW and Lake Forest Park



Subject: Canon repair experience?
Date: Fri Jul 3 2020 14:22 pm
From: wagen AT uw.edu
 
Since the subject of binocular service has come up, has anyone sent optics
back to Canon for repair?

I have their 15 x 50 image-stabilized binocs, purchased at Captain's
Nautical in 2001. I've been super-happy with them. Some time in the last
year, I noticed that the image in the right barrel doesn't seem as sharp as
the left. It's not my eye, because flipping them upside down moves the
imperfection to the left eye. I don't remember dropping or banging them,
but I suspect something has shifted out of alignment in the optics. I have
been procrastinating about sending them for service since the problem is
not extreme.



Subject: Binocular cleaning
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 22:41 pm
From: rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com
 
Can someone recommend a good place in western Washington to get my binoculars professionally cleaned.

Roger Moyer
Chehalis, WA


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject:
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 18:12 pm
From: steveloitz AT gmail.com
 
Good to hear. My experience with Zeiss warranty service was similarly
positive and prompt (roughly 1 week), on par with Nikon's excellent and
prompt warranty service.

Steve Loitz
Ellensburg

On Thu, Jul 2, 2020 at 2:51 PM Matt Bartels wrote:

> Hi all -
> A couple years back, I reported on how Leica took a year to replace my
> scope when I sent it in pretty miserable service, and Im glad recent
> reports here seem to show Leica has improved.
> But today a much different story.
> In March, I broke my Zeiss binocs the hinge broke and I had 2
> monoculars. I emailed Zeiss and they said send them in, well replace
> ...Then Covid hit, and I didnt want to go near a Post Office.
> ...Then I forgot [having an old pair of binocs made it less urgent]
> ...Finally, I took action.
> On Saturday June 27, I mailed my binocs to Zeiss.
> Today, July 2 , 5 days later, a new pair of replacement binocs appeared at
> my door.
>
> Five days from mailing to receiving the replacement thats pretty
> astounding. I just transit to and from Kentucky would have to have taken
> most of that time.
>
> So, 5 stars for Zeiss repair services.
>
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>


--
Steve Loitz
Ellensburg, WA
steveloitz@gmail.com



Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2020-07-02
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 17:50 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
 
Tweets  not the nicest of mornings, though not terrible.  Cool, dark, and breezy, but no rain.  Many birds have reduced or even stopped singing for the season.  Some may have moved on already.  So not terribly birdy, though some of that feeling is because the light was bad for much of the morning.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Duck one clutch of 5 ducklings
b.. Mallard at least 4 clutches of ducklings, plus a small flotilla of presumed teens
c.. Hooded Merganser one at the Rowing Club
d.. Black Swift brief look at two from the Rowing Club; they swiftly disappeared
e.. American Coot lone bird remains. Really wonder if it cant fly
f.. Caspian Tern at least 4 from the Lake Platform
g.. Coopers Hawk Matt saw one about 5:15 a.m.
h.. Barn Owl Matt saw one over East Meadow very early
i.. Western Screech-Owl Matt saw one near east end of boardwalk very early
j.. Hairy Woodpecker one on far side of slough, south of Rowing Club
k.. HUTTONS VIREO one at the Rowing Club parking lot right at 10 a.m.
l.. Purple Martin we only saw two, both males sitting inside gourds
m.. Northern Rough-winged Swallow two below weir
n.. Swainsons Thrush still LOTS of singing
o.. White-crowned Sparrow first juveniles of the season
p.. Dark-eyed Junco overrun with juvies, especially in the northern half of the park
q.. Bullocks Oriole probably 4 seen
r.. Brown-headed Cowbird babies being fed by Swainsons Thrush and Bewicks Wren
s.. Yellow Warbler maybe just one singing male
t.. Wilsons Warbler one unseen singing male at the Rowing Club
u.. Lazuli Bunting still 2-3 males seen
No sign of the Indigo Bunting. The last eBird reports seem to be from last Thursday, June 25th.

Based on the last several weeks of glimpses, I think its likely BULLOCKS ORIOLES nested in the grove just east of the weir, and may have fledged one or more young this week. Bullocks Orioles, Lazuli Buntings, and Tree Swallows are all likely finishing up breeding, and will be gone from the park after about the first week in August if not sooner. They are the first to leave.

Misses today included Canada Goose, Rock Pigeon, Green Heron, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Red-eyed Vireo, Cliff Swallow, and Yellow-rumped Warbler.

For the day, 64 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= BirdMarymoor@gmail.com



Subject: Great-tailed Grackle at Para Ponds
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 17:24 pm
From: offthehookflyshop AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all!
After spending the last 6 weeks working in the Eastern Montana prairies I was very excited to come home and bird. My second stop in Washington at Para/McCain Ponds near Othello turned out to be phenomenal stop.
I just photographed a female GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE in the area of the first pond! Last I saw her she dove into a patch of Bulrush on the other side of the first pond on the south road. Nesting is not out of the question...
Also, lots Tricoloreds in the area as well.
Good luck!
Dalton SpencerCentralia, Washington
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



Subject:
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 16:51 pm
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Hi all -
A couple years back, I reported on how Leica took a year to replace my scope when I sent it in pretty miserable service, and Im glad recent reports here seem to show Leica has improved.
But today a much different story.
In March, I broke my Zeiss binocs the hinge broke and I had 2 monoculars. I emailed Zeiss and they said send them in, well replace
...Then Covid hit, and I didnt want to go near a Post Office.
...Then I forgot [having an old pair of binocs made it less urgent]
...Finally, I took action.
On Saturday June 27, I mailed my binocs to Zeiss.
Today, July 2 , 5 days later, a new pair of replacement binocs appeared at my door.

Five days from mailing to receiving the replacement thats pretty astounding. I just transit to and from Kentucky would have to have taken most of that time.

So, 5 stars for Zeiss repair services.


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Feather id
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 16:30 pm
From: devonc78 AT gmail.com
 
Feather atlas!!!

https://www.fws.gov/lab/feathe...

On Thu, Jul 2, 2020, 14:27 Christina wrote:

> Hey all,
> I am looking for a way to identify feathers, hopefully online.
> Thank
> Christina Woodinville
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: Feather id
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 16:27 pm
From: joannabird413 AT gmail.com
 
Hey all,
I am looking for a way to identify feathers, hopefully online.
Thank
Christina Woodinville



Subject: National Geographic: Sparrows are singing a new song, in a rapid, unprecedented shift
Date: Thu Jul 2 2020 13:54 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Sparrows are singing a new song, in a rapid, unprecedented shift
White-throated sparrows across Canada are abandoning an old song in exchange for a trendy new tune. The reason remains a mystery.

Read in National Geographic: https://apple.news/AtNhQ4I1aQf...


Shared from Apple News


Sent from my iPhone



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