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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on February 20, 2018, 12:20 am

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20 Feb: @ 00:15:58 
Bow Blue Jay continues [Ed Newbold]
19 Feb: @ 22:24:39 
Re: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley? [J Christian Kessler]
19 Feb: @ 20:01:01 
Fir Island tides [gmail]
19 Feb: @ 14:52:57 
Re: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley? [Jane Hadley]
19 Feb: @ 13:36:35 
UW NW Weather Modeling [Todd Wren]
19 Feb: @ 09:24:46 
RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley? [Emily Birchman]
18 Feb: @ 13:43:10 
The Birdbooker Report [Ian Paulsen]
18 Feb: @ 13:24:24 
tool using, reasoning crow? [Ed Swan]
18 Feb: @ 12:46:52 
Clark County WOS field trip the weekend of March 3 [Randy Hill]
18 Feb: @ 09:31:21 
King Cty. phoebe [pan]
18 Feb: @ 02:47:16 
Re: Snowy Owl Walla Walla County [Larry Schwitters]
17 Feb: @ 21:43:29 
Nisqually [Lea Mitchell]
17 Feb: @ 20:01:37 
Snowy Owl Walla Walla County [Mike & MerryLynn]
17 Feb: @ 17:28:23 
Brazilian Bird Songs CD [cousythecat]
17 Feb: @ 14:23:09 
Re: 4 Snowy Owls; Douglas County [J. Acker]
17 Feb: @ 14:03:55 
BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 18, 2018 [Ellen Blackstone]
17 Feb: @ 11:14:46 
Australia RFI [Gary Bletsch]
17 Feb: @ 10:59:41 
Arabica Versus Robusta: Which Coffee Is Better For Birds? [Devorah the Ornithologist]
16 Feb: @ 22:31:53 
Five-Falcon Day on Samish Flats including Gyrfalcon, Prairie [Gary Bletsch]
16 Feb: @ 22:16:10 
Eurasian wigeon at Matthews Beach [J Christian Kessler]
16 Feb: @ 18:17:33 
What Bird Is That? [Jeremy Schwartz]
16 Feb: @ 15:58:10 
Union Bay Watch } An Odd Duck [Hubbell]
16 Feb: @ 14:39:06 
White-throated Sparrow, Bellingham [Doug Brown]
16 Feb: @ 12:14:32 
results from guide service RFI [Gary Bletsch]
15 Feb: @ 20:37:19 
Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 2-15-2018 [Denis DeSilvis]
15 Feb: @ 18:53:24 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-02-15 [Michael Hobbs]
15 Feb: @ 16:41:15 
McNeil trail, DuPont , Pierce County rarities [Bruce]
15 Feb: @ 16:22:28 
Tulalip Ruddy Turnstone continues [Josh Adams]
15 Feb: @ 14:32:51 
SOY Snohomish Co Swallows [Josh Adams]
15 Feb: @ 12:39:39 
Re Whidbey Redpolls [STEVEN ELLIS]
15 Feb: @ 12:38:16 
Sno/Skagit [Marv Breece]
15 Feb: @ 09:59:48 
Redpolls Whidbey Island [STEVEN ELLIS]
14 Feb: @ 17:09:51 
Common Goldeneye Mating Competition [johntubbs]
13 Feb: @ 17:55:10 
Nandina [Dayna yalowicki]
13 Feb: @ 17:18:33 
Red Crossbills [Tom and Carol Stoner]
13 Feb: @ 16:21:04 
Re: Grebe's and swallows over Lake Sammamish [Kevin Lucas]
13 Feb: @ 11:06:01 
Grebe's and swallows over Lake Sammamish [Mason Flint]
13 Feb: @ 10:01:49 
Fwd: Hummer tongue [Robert O'Brien]
12 Feb: @ 22:26:27 
Re: Re Nandina [tomboulian]
12 Feb: @ 22:23:22 
4 Snowy Owls; Douglas County [merdave]
12 Feb: @ 21:03:45 
Re: Re Nandina [G M ARCHAMBAULT]
12 Feb: @ 20:36:03 
RE: Re Nandina [Tina Blade]
12 Feb: @ 19:39:33 
Arizona Report [B B]
12 Feb: @ 19:13:56 
Hummer tongue [David Selk]
12 Feb: @ 17:55:44 
Re Nandina [Linda Phillips]
12 Feb: @ 16:20:01 
Re: WDFW contact for Recovering America's Wildlife Act [Larry Schwitters]
12 Feb: @ 16:12:07 
WDFW contact for Recovering America's Wildlife Act [Denis DeSilvis]
12 Feb: @ 16:01:40 
Update on Recovering America's Wildlife Act (RAWA) [Denis DeSilvis]
12 Feb: @ 13:05:55 
Golden Eagle on road to Wylie Slough [Karen Wosilait]
12 Feb: @ 12:07:33 
Question about toxic Nandina--Heavenly Bamboo [Tina Blade]





Subject: Bow Blue Jay continues
Date: Tue Feb 20 2018 0:15 am
From: ednewbold1 AT yahoo.com
 
Hi all,
Just a post to note that the Blue Jay in Bow on the road toward Edison continues and showed up this mid morning (after a 10 minute wait) looking very dapper as usual for Brian and Darschelle Pendleton and Delia and I. A Varied Thrush was present there also, and Mourning Doves which seem worth noting in the era of Eurasian Collareds.
Growing up birding in PA, I never looked twice at a Blue Jay. Man are they gorgeous.
We all owe a tremendous thank you to Blue Jay Host Barry, a wonderful guy who we met on another occasion.


We had the usual 60% of a Five Falcon Day! and had the usual trouble this year of not finding Short-eared Owls in the Samish or Skagit until a kind birder pointed us to a distant female at Hayton. Brian alerted us to a flock of American Pipits at Hayton also.

Oddly we encountered no Tree Swallows but at least one Barn Swallow in Samish and at least 5 at Wiley Slough, seemingly chirping happily and foraging over a slough.
Good luck buddies!!!

Ed Newbold residential Beacon Hill Seattle [email protected]



Subject: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley?
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 22:24 pm
From: 1northraven AT gmail.com
 
Another way to find the Samish East 90s is to take Bayview Edison Rd west
out of Edison (the turn west just at the south end of town) & drive west
(maybe a mile) to where the road takes a sharp left turn to the south --
from that turn to the next sharp turn (right-hand turn back to the west)
the marsh to your left is essentially the core of the Samish east 90s, tho
the area from that second turn where Bayview Edison Rd heads west again to
the intersection with Samish Island Rd is also included. to make sense of
this, open Google Maps & search on Edison WA, then just follow the only
road that goes west out of town.

this for those of sufficiently old-fashioned that we need visual maps.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

On Mon, Feb 19, 2018 at 12:52 PM, Jane Hadley wrote:

> Emily Birchman, in search of a Gyrfalcon, asked how to find the East 90 in
> the Samish Flats.
>
> Paste in these coordinates at Google Maps to see the location of the East
> 90:
>
> 48.548735, -122.466579
>
> Here is another relevant point on the map, just to the north of the
> previous point:
>
> 48.553934, -122.466095
>
> The area between these two points along the Bayview-Edison Road is called
> "The East 90s."
>
> You can read about birding the West 90, East 90s and other parts of the
> Samish Flats in A Birder's Guide to Washington, 2nd Edition, which you can
> buy as a paperback book or read online. The relevant section is here:
> http://wabirdguide.org/samish-...
>
> Jane Hadley
>
> Seattle, WA
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson



Subject: Fir Island tides
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 20:01 pm
From: vlmoffatt3 AT gmail.com
 
Looking for a source to predict for Fir Island tides.  I got lucky today but I haven™t figured out which spot on the different tide table to check.

Thanks Victoria_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley?
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 14:52 pm
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
Emily Birchman, in search of a Gyrfalcon, asked how to find the East 90
in the Samish Flats.

Paste in these coordinates at Google Maps to see the location of the
East 90:

48.548735, -122.466579

Here is another relevant point on the map, just to the north of the
previous point:

48.553934, -122.466095

The area between these two points along the Bayview-Edison Road is
called "The East 90s."

You can read about birding the West 90, East 90s and other parts of the
Samish Flats in A Birder's Guide to Washington, 2nd Edition, which you
can buy as a paperback book or read online. The relevant section is
here: http://wabirdguide.org/samish-...

Jane Hadley

Seattle, WA



Subject: UW NW Weather Modeling
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 13:36 pm
From: catherpes.mexicanus AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweets,



I come across birders fairly regularly that aren't familiar with the
University of Washington's NW Weather modeling site.



I use this site all the time to look at where precipitation is likely to be
in western Washington before going birding, and find it to be much more
useful than the regular weather forecast. It often correctly predicts which
parts of the sound will be in the rain shadow.



Getting to the data takes a few clicks, but here is a method to get there
that is pretty easy to remember:



1. Go to https://atmos.washington.edu/

2. In the menus at the top, choose "Current Weather" -> "Northwest
Modeling"

3. On the new page, there is a section at the top left labelled "WRF-GFS".
Click the "4km" link in that section

4. On the new page, scroll down to a light blue section of the table
labelled "4km Precip." In the row labelled "Western WA 1-hour
precipitation," click the "Loop" link.


The new page will start looping through an hour by hour precipitation model
that is usually 84 hours long. There are buttons at the top you can use to
pause or step more slowly through the model.


The model is obviously more accurate in the nearer part of the predictions
than it is 2-3 days out, so it makes sense to wait until the last minute
before checking the model and possibly modifying your plans based on the
data.


Todd Sahl

Redmond, WA



Subject: RFI Gyrfalcon in Skagit Valley?
Date: Mon Feb 19 2018 9:24 am
From: stollea AT gmail.com
 
I saw the report from Saturday of a gyrfalcon by the "East 90" in Skagit
Valley and I am headed up there today with my family and wondered if anyone
saw it yesterday? Can someone tell me how to find the East 90? Birdweb.org
has a description of where the "west 90" is, but it doesn't mention the
East 90.

Thanks!
Emily Birchman
Kenmore, WA



Subject: The Birdbooker Report
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 13:43 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) Birds of Oman

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

2) A Field Guide to the Birds of Taiwan

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

3) A Swift Guide to Butterflies of Mexico and Central America

4) Field Guide to the Fishes of the Amazon, Orinoco, and Guianas.

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

ALSO, yesterday marked the 10th anniversary of my The Birdbooker Report.

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: tool using, reasoning crow?
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 13:24 pm
From: edswan2 AT comcast.net
 
I just watched a crow that really wanted the last chunk of suet in the suet feeder get it out by pulling the chain that the suet feeder mesh box was hanging from.  When the crow landed on the crook of the pole and then moved down to where the chain was hanging from under the crook, it found that it couldn™t quite reach the last bit of suet.  So then it grabbed the chain with its beak and pulled the mesh box with the suet in it up to where it could peck at the suet.  It then poked the suet enough that it got small enough to push through half inch holes of the box and knocked the suet out onto the ground and retrieved it there.  I don™t know if it figured out that last part of pushing it out or if that™s just the way it played out but the crow definitely used the chain as a tool to pull the suet within reach.  I thought only ravens were smart enough to do that.


Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com
[email protected]
206.949.3545



Subject: Clark County WOS field trip the weekend of March 3
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 12:46 pm
From: re_hill AT q.com
 
There is still plenty of space on the WOS field trip in Clark County which
is less than two weeks out. It is traditionally a mix of wintering and
early spring arrivals found along the Columbia River floodplain. Saturday
3/3 we will concentrate on the Vancouver lowlands where Snowy Egret,
Glaucous Gull, all four Zonotrichia sparrows, and Black Phoebe were present
over the last week. On a "scouting trip" Friday last weekend, collectively
our group of 6 had just over 100 species. I will try to secure access to
Post Office Lake which could determine whether or not we venture to
Steigerwald Lake and/or Ridgefield NWRs which already have well-established
access routes. There will be a mile or two of hiking but on flat terrain
and mostly groomed trails or roads. The Saturday trip meets at 07:30 at the
Salmon Creek Park-and-Ride, will be a full day, and has a limit of 10 in
addition to one or more "highly qualified" local co-leaders.



For those with a little extra time, or without all of Saturday available,
there is a separate Woodland Bottoms trip the afternoon of March 2; Russ
Koppendrayer will co-lead that trip so we will stop at all the right spots.
And if weather and road conditions are suitable there will be a Sunday
morning extension to east Clark County, hoping to access some higher
elevation forest with a different suite of species that could include N
Pygmy-Owl, American Dipper, and Gray Jay.



Please contact me directly for more information and to reserve a spot on any
or all of the above.



Randy Hill

Ridgefield

RE_HILL at Q dot COM



Subject: King Cty. phoebe
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 9:31 am
From: panmail AT mailfence.com
 
Hello, all,

Yesterday, Spencer H. and I visited a few south King County birds. The family of four Tundra Swans continues at Newcastle Beach, where we found them close in the morning wind and rain.

With Todd S., we haunted the 212th Street wetland in Kent from around 9:30 till after 1, when the Black Phoebe flew from in across the fields to the north. Then it showed the behaviors others report, flycatching from the flooded shrubby trees in the pond. This partly explains how we've missed it earlier visits. A few Cinnamon Teal continue, and seven Barn Swallows foraged overhead. We also saw American Bittern and, across the road, three Least Sandpipers roosting with a few dozen Killdeer. I was surprised we saw a couple Common Ravens above the ridge to the west, as well.

>From the east side of Kent Ponds, we saw a Common Raven again, mobbed by crows, perhaps one of the same birds.

At the mouth of the Cedar River in Renton, there were few birds, and no perched gulls other than a dead (shot?) one. We did have a quick visit from a couple of Dunlin.

Of 17 February, 2018,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Snowy Owl Walla Walla County
Date: Sun Feb 18 2018 2:47 am
From: leschwitters AT me.com
 
> On Feb 17, 2018, at 6:05 PM, Mike & MerryLynn  wrote:
>
> Hello all,
>
> Because of so many photographers trespassing on private property the access to the Snowy Owl has been closed. Fish & Wildlife put up signs - no vehicles. So if you want to see a Snowy Owl - head up to Mansfield!
>
> There are still many Snow Geese at McNary NWR - usually at the east end of Humorist Road - they were trying to fly in the strong wind today - fun to watch.
>
> Later, M&ML
> --
> Mike & MerryLynn Denny
> Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
> "If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Nisqually
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 21:43 pm
From: lea AT mitcub.net
 
A beautiful sight = 26+ yellowlegs feeding in mudflats by road as you exit
.They were on the right about 30 feet before large billy frank jr refuge
sign.



Subject: Snowy Owl Walla Walla County
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 20:01 pm
From: m.denny AT charter.net
 
Hello all,

Because of so many photographers trespassing on private property the
access to the Snowy Owl has been closed. Fish & Wildlife put up signs -
no vehicles. So if you want to see a Snowy Owl - head up to Mansfield!

There are still many Snow Geese at McNary NWR - usually at the east end
of Humorist Road - they were trying to fly in the strong wind today -
fun to watch.

Later, M&ML

--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"



Subject: Brazilian Bird Songs CD
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 17:28 pm
From: cousythecat AT centurytel.net
 
I've got a CD of Brazilian Bird Songs. There are over 1000 recordings (over 1000 species) in MP3 format. It's a commercial product, authored by Peter Boesman.

It's free to a good home. Contact me.

Randy Smith
Vashon Island

cousythecat at gmail dot com



Subject: 4 Snowy Owls; Douglas County
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:23 pm
From: owler AT sounddsl.com
 
At least two present east side of H. 28 degrees, light snow, road covered with a dusting. Also nearby was a prairie falcon and a flock of near 1000 snowbuntings overhead,

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 12, 2018, at 8:21 PM, [email protected] wrote:
>
>
> Winter brings some great birds, if you just wait long enough. While I was
> on vacation a friend found one Snowy Owl on H Rd. out of Mansfield.
> Yesterday two of us found 2 Snowy Owls between 16th and 18th. Today we
> found FOUR on the west side of H, between 17th and 18th. All could be
> seen at the same time. One was quite close, but the other 3 were far out;
> two on the ground; one on a rock. I know there is at least one field trip
> headed this way, so sure hope they stay around. Lots of Snow Buntings
> too. Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Feb. 18, 2018
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 14:03 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hey, Tweeters,

Share the latest BirdNote video ” Sing a Song of Sixpence ” with the kids you know and help them learn about North America's black birds:
https://www.birdnote.org/video...
======================Last week on BirdNote:
* Connectivity
http://bit.ly/2nQvQCh
* Franklin's Gull - The Half-time Gull
http://bit.ly/2ETxQRs
* Jacana - Lily-trotter
http://bit.ly/2nQyp78
* Valentine Lovebirds
http://bit.ly/2H0YJTY
* Nest Cavities - Book Early
http://bit.ly/2G3A5RE
* 2018 Great Backyard Bird Count - There's still time!
http://bit.ly/2H3iNp5
* Wood Storks and Climate Change
http://bit.ly/2nSHrzM
””””””””””””””””””””
Next week on BirdNote: What's with the Wattles? -- and more...
http://bit.ly/2Hq49Z8
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:[email protected]
========================Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcas...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



Subject: Australia RFI
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 11:14 am
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
It looks like I will have the opportunity to do some birding in Australia in July of this year, on my way to New Guinea. Since I have to fly by way of Brisbane, I might as well do an Aussie extension from there.
I have already birded in Queensland, having done a whirlwind two-week trip from Brisbane to Cairns, with a stop at O'Reilly's Rainforest Resort.
However, I have never seen an Emu. I think I could venture inland from Brisbane, and southwards as well, to see some of the Outback--or at least, approach thereof, and see some new birds in unfamiliar habitats.
Any suggestions about places to go, by way of a rented car? I know from the last trip that the car-rental firms Down Under do not want customers driving their rented cars on "unmetalled" roads, which can put a crimp in the areas one can visit. I don't think I would want to splurge on the price of a rental Land Rover or whatever it does take to drive on the bad surfaces.
Any ideas? Anyone? Bueller?
Thanks,
Gary Bletsch



Subject: Arabica Versus Robusta: Which Coffee Is Better For Birds?
Date: Sat Feb 17 2018 10:59 am
From: birdologist AT gmail.com
 
Hello everyone,

I became a coffee addict as a grad student, but this seemed to be in direct
conflict with my bird studies -- how could I drink coffee yet still be a
strong scientific advocate for birds? the answer could be found in
shade-grown coffee. but a new study has shown that in India, at least,
either shade grown or "sun grown" coffee is an environmentally sound choice:

Arabica Versus Robusta: Which Coffee Is Better For Birds?
http://www.forbes.com/sites/gr...
TinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/ybsv7g9h

I hope you find this piece to be enlightening and entertaining.

--
GrrlScientist | @GrrlScientist
[email protected]
Blogs: Forbes | Evolution
Institute |
Medium
Podcasts: BirdNote Radio
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter
Tiny bio: about.me
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]



Subject: Five-Falcon Day on Samish Flats including Gyrfalcon, Prairie
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 22:31 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
Today, February 16th, 2018, I finally managed to see five species of falcon in one day--long overdue!
All five were on the Samish Flats.
American Kestrels--at least 6 in all.
Merlin--one dark individual between East Edison and Edison, eying a little flock of Mourning Doves.
Peregrine--one immature on Field Road.
Gyrfalcon--one at the East Ninety. This bird flew right by me, around 1545 in the afternoon, as I stood at the more southerly of the two East Nineties. I watched it fly from the Samish River just east of the East Ninety, over my head, over the fields, and finally out to the bay south of the West Ninety.
Prairie Falcon--this, the last falcon of the day, was perched out on the dike at the West Ninety at about 1630 in the afternoon.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch



Subject: Eurasian wigeon at Matthews Beach
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 22:16 pm
From: 1northraven AT gmail.com
 
stopped at Matthews Beach mini-Park on Sand Point Way just before dusk &
found a male Eurasian Wigeon in a flock of American Wigeon grazing on what
the geese have left of the lawn between the bath house & the lake. did
not search well enough to determine whether he'd brought a consort, as
that's a much harder search.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson



Subject: What Bird Is That?
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 18:17 pm
From: jschwartz1124 AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweeters!

I've learned something about myself recently.

I love answering the question, "What bird is that?"

This became specifically obvious to me on a recent birding trip with four
of my colleagues. I've started monthly birding walks with members of my
team at work through the creek wetland that winds its way through our
office park. I work up in the North Creek area near Bothell.

I've only done two so far, in January and February, but my coworkers have
seemed to have great fun with them. One coworker in particular is
especially enthusiastic and asks lots of good questions.

Our most recent bird walk was today. Though in the low 40s and a bit breezy
and drizzly, my coworkers powered through. The birding was a little quiet,
even for a cold day. We still got 13 species for an hour's worth of work,
which is pretty much the average for this spot this time of year.

None of my coworkers is a birder, so the phrase "What's that?" is heard
pretty often. I have to say, I relish this opportunity. The chance to teach
someone something, even if it's as simple as saying "That right there is a
Ruby-crowned Kinglet" is priceless. Even if the lesson doesn't stick the
first time, it plants a seed. A seed of a interest and furthered knowledge
that I can only hope will grow through me continuing to share my passion
for birds with my coworkers.

It also brings me back to a time when I was inexperienced in the ways of
bird ID. When I was just starting out, I absolutely would not have been
able to consistently tell a kinglet from a sparrow, or likely any other
small bird, for that matter. Being able to answer this question, or even
admitting that I'm not sure what bird that is, makes me appreciate birding
all the more, and realize how far I've come in my own skills over the year
and a half I've been seriously birding.

When it comes to taking my coworkers out on birding walls, all I can really
ask for is a willingness to learn and an enthusiasm for the walk itself.
I'm glad to say I get that in spades. I am so fortunate in this regard.

Keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
Lake Forest Park
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com



Subject: Union Bay Watch } An Odd Duck
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 15:58 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

Please don™t judge me to harshly for calling an American Coot a duck. In my defense, I correct myself in the very first sentence of the post. Still, coots are odd. I hope you enjoy the post.

http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....


Thank you to Dennis Paulson for educating us about coot behavior and Dave Galvin for suggesting the subject.

Have a great day on Union Bay where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
[email protected]



Subject: White-throated Sparrow, Bellingham
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 14:39 pm
From: BirdBrain53 AT comcast.net
 
Chirp,

A White-throated Sparrow has reappeared in my yard the last few days.
It is very shy, but allows me a look now and then.
Images of it and also recent images of local sea birds can be seen here .

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

cheers,

Douglas L. Brown
Bellingham, Wa._______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: results from guide service RFI
Date: Fri Feb 16 2018 12:14 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
Quite a few Tweeters responded to my request a few weeks ago, in regard to recommendations for birding tour guide services. Several birders suggested that I make the results public; some also asked that I keep it anonymous, so I have summarized the comments in a little table. One hopes that the table (created in MS Word) will not blow up the Tweeters computers.
Almost all of the comments were from Tweeters or from other birding friends of mine. A very few are my own ratings of guides of whose services I have availed myself on past trips--so, please do not shoot the messenger.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
Birding Tour Companies Rated by Birders, Compiled byGary Bletsch, February 2018
| Company Name | # of Excellent ratings | # of good ratings | # of Fair ratings | # of poor ratings | comments |
| Across Bhutan | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Gary Bletsch's rating |
| Avian Journeys | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | Website lacked list of current tours, seems to need update; one respondent likes guide Gary Rosenberg |
| Bird Tour Asia | 2 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Recommended guides include Mike Nelson, Rob Hutchinson, James Easton. |
| Birding 2 Asia | 0 | 0 | 0 | 2 | |
| Birding Ecotours/BirdTrek | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Chris Lotz is a recommended guide. |
| Birdquest | 2 | 0 | 0 | 1 | One US birder said they were very good; he did a Tibet tour with them, and excellent European birders were on the trip, but the same US birder says that some Brits don™t like Birdquest, saying overpriced crock. |
| Borderland Tours | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | Only one respondent commented, but complained about guide Rick Taylor. |
| Bustamante, Elvis [in Belize] | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | Gary Bletsch's rating |
| Cheesemans | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | One birder thinks he recalled hearing good things about them from a friend who used them years ago. |
| Crawford, Chook | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Highly recommended as a guide in Australia by one respondent |
| Eagle Eye Tours | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | One Tweeter said that they might be good (he knows their guides and esteems them). |
| Field Guides | 3 | 0 | 0 | 0 | One Tweeter considers Field Guides to be the number one choice. |
| Finch, Brian [Nairobi, Kenya] | 2 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Gary Bletsch considers Brian Finch to be the best birding guide he™s yet encountered, for all-round superb knowledge of avifauna, jolliness, and knowledge beyond just birds. |
| High Lonesome | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | |
| Joint Adventures [in India] | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 | |
| Kolibri Expeditions | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 | |
| Legacy Tours | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Michael Carmody comes highly recommended by the one respondent. |
| Naturalist Journeys/Caligo Ventures | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | |
| Mongolia Quest | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | Fairly relaxed; excellent in terms of comfort and logistics; bird knowledge fair. |
| Neblina Forest | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | |
| PIB | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | |
| Remote Rivers Expeditions | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | Adequate at best (Madagascar) |
| Rockjumper | 3 | 1 | 0 | 1 | Recommended guides include Rich Linde; all respondents liked Rockjumper, with one strident exception. |
| Swordbilled Expeditions | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | |
| Tien, Bui Duc [Mr. Tien, words out of Cuc Phuong Nat™l Park, Vietnam] | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | Good to excellent, per Gary Bletsch |
| Trong, Henry [Mr. Trong, works out of Cat Tien Nat™l Park, Vietnam, and environs] | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Very good guide, per Gary Bletsch |
| Tropical Birding | 3 | 0 | 0 | 1 | One respondent complained about poor value; others gave more or less glowing reviews. Guide Sam Woods comes recommended by one Tweeter. |
| Tut, Fernando [in Belize] | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Very good, per Gary Bletsch |
| VENT | 2 | | 0 | 4 | Serious birders tend to disrecommend VENT. Comments include upscale, way overpriced, too laid back, for rich retirees and the infirm, and so forth. To be fair, VENT sounds like it might be quite nice for people who are not serious twitchers, and who like to be pampered. |
| Ventures Birding Tours | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | |
| Waanders, Peter [sp?] | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Highly recommended as a guide in Australia by one respondent |
| Wildside | 3 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Guide Adrian Binns comes recommended by one birder. One birder said that Wildside is very good, but expensive. |
| Wings | 3 | 1 | 0 | 0 | Guides recommended by various birders included Paul Holt, Steeve Rook [sp?], Brian Finch, James Lidster [latter said to be birding with other company now, based in Netherlands]. One birder reported negative experience with guide Rod Cassidy on a tour in Africa, but this guide is said to have left Wings for another company. |
| Naiu, Abhi | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | Local birding guide in Goa, India, highly recommended by Gary Bletsch |
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |



Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk - 2-15-2018
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 20:37 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

Cool (36degF/42degF start/finish), but nice for birding for the 11 of us today, with only a slight mist for about the first hour. Lots of singing, especially from Pacific Wrens, American Robins, and Song Sparrows. Our first ever MERLIN was a bit bizarre, in that we spotted it (thinking it was a Sharp-shinned Hawk initially) being followed by a flock of European Starlings. The Merlin landed on the top of a nearby Douglas-fir, where the backlighting at first kept it from being positively identified. Soon, though, the facial pattern made it apparent that it was our first Merlin. A few minutes later, it lifted off, flying strongly and high, up the 3rd hole fairway. Other highlights include a pair of HOODED MERGANSERS on the pond at the 6th hole, an area we haven't gone to before, but our sponsor, Dave, said he saw several ducks there yesterday. Sure enough, in addition to the merganser pair was a pair of Mallards and a male Bufflehead. A singing HUTTON'S VIREO at the cut-through area between the 4th hole of the Green Course and the area near the Dupont housing was an easy find. A large mixed flock (both Chickadees, Brown Creeper, Red-breasted Nuthatches, and both Kinglets) kept us scrambling to get a reasonable count of what was there. Naturally, we all thought we under-counted by a significant margin. Our usual lunch spot at the Nisqually Bar & Grill was a good finish for the day of fine birding at JBLM's Eagles Pride Golf Course.

The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:
• March 15
• April 15
• May 17
Anyone is welcome to join us!

Seen today: 32 species (+1 other taxa)



Canada Goose 35 Flyover near the driving range

Mallard 3

Ring-necked Duck 9 All at Hodge Lake

Bufflehead 14

Hooded Merganser 2 At 6th hole pond in front of the green

Red-tailed Hawk 1

Anna's Hummingbird 3 One at in the shrubs along the 16th hole; two interacting near the Dupont housing area

Downy Woodpecker 1

Northern Flicker 6

Merlin 1 First (ever) sighting of this species on our bird walk. Near the driving range.

Hutton's Vireo 1 Singing at the cut-through between the the 4th hole and the Dupont housing area. Same area as last year in the Spring.

Steller's Jay 5

American/Northwestern Crow 1

Common Raven 1

Black-capped Chickadee 10

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 10

Red-breasted Nuthatch 6

Brown Creeper 3

Pacific Wren 10 Quite a few singing

Bewick's Wren 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet 23

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5

American Robin 16

Varied Thrush 5

European Starling 50

Dark-eyed Junco 29 Most next to the driving-range shelter

White-crowned Sparrow 1 On blackberry patch near the driving range

Golden-crowned Sparrow 10

Song Sparrow 9

Spotted Towhee 7

Red-winged Blackbird 7

Purple Finch 1

Red Crossbill 2



View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis

[email protected]



Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-02-15
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 18:53 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT frontier.com
 
Tweets “ A very nice morning today.  Well pre-dawn, Mason and I scoped Saturn to the southeast; it™s really showing its rings right now.  And then we scoped Jupiter, fairly high to the south, and the four visible moons were lined up to the left.  Very nice way to start the morning.  The day continued well, with bits of sun, and temps rising into the 40™s.  And it was birdy, with much singing.

Highlights:
a.. Cackling Goose “ large flocks still around
b.. Western Grebe “ one not too far out from Lake Platform
c.. Green Heron “ one near Rowing Club dock, seen from Dog Area
d.. Sharp-shinned Hawk “ two sightings
e.. Barn Owl “ two seen, with great looks at one from Viewing Mound at 6:45am
f.. Hairy Woodpecker “ one across slough from Lake Platform
g.. TREE SWALLOW “ at least 3, first of 2018; earliest Marymoor record by a day
h.. Purple Finch “ three heard popping, seen briefly, Dog Meadow. First of 2018
i.. COMMON REDPOLL “ one heard, (and seen by me) in flight over Dog Meadow heading west
j.. Lincoln™s Sparrow “ one seen pre-dawn and again on the walk (NOT by me) at Viewing Mound
k.. Yellow-rumped Warbler “ one at Rowing Club pond
Singing birds included Anna™s Hummingbird (display flights too), Northern Flicker (drumming too), Black-capped Chickadee, Pacific Wren, Marsh Wren, Bewick™s Wren, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, American Robin, Spotted Towhee, Song Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, and Red-winged Blackbird. Ruby-crowned Kinglets were especially numerous today, though I only heard one sing.

in general, the number of birds of many species today was much higher than in recent weeks. But we picked up Western Grebe and Hairy Woodpecker at the Lake Platform, and didn™t add another species to the day list until we were coming out of the Rowing Club; we got things early and often, but the species total wasn™t huge.

For the day, 54 species, and adding Tree Swallow and Purple Finch puts us at 75 species for 2018. There was a River Otter seen briefly from the Lake Platform, new for the year.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== [email protected]



Subject: McNeil trail, DuPont , Pierce County rarities
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 16:41 pm
From: blabar AT harbornet.com
 
A trail that borders the Nisqually reach has been a jewel these past years for us Pierce County birders. We have had some great sightings seen from a viewing spot along this trail. Marbled Godwits, Black-bellied Plovers, White Pelicans, Brant and other hard to finds for Pierce have been recorded.
The two draw backs are you must have a scope and you can only count birds that are on the north side of the Nisqually river which runs through the middle of the reach.
This pass week there have been 2 Marbled Godwits seen in the closest channel to the left if viewing straight south. Lower tides are best for shorebirds with over 300 Dunlin, 12 Least Sandpipers and 3 Greater Yellowlegs seen yesterday.
Driving on I 5, get off at the city center exit to DuPont. This is center street. Continue to the Starbucks on the left and turn left on McNeil street. Drive to the very end and park along the street. Walk right on Ridge View Drive for a little ways and you will see the beginning of the trail that skirts the road on your left. Many locals use the trail which makes it easy to find. Walk the main trail as it will bare right then downhill. As the trail levels out there is the great viewing area on your left. You can also walk to the end and go down a steep trail towards the water but the viewing isn™t as good.
Bruce LaBar
Tacoma, Wa.
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Subject: Tulalip Ruddy Turnstone continues
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 16:22 pm
From: xjoshx AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweets,
Apologies, the below email was supposed to be sent from the field this
morning, but I accidentally sent it only to Maxine.

Carol Riddell and I both located the Ruddy Turnstone, originally found by
Maxine Reid on Tuesday, on a spit on the south side of bay. I was scoping
from the park area near the skate park which provided distant views. The
bird was near a group of 23+ Black Turnstones, but seemed to be using the
less rocky parts of the spit.

Josh Adams
Cathcart WA



Subject: SOY Snohomish Co Swallows
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 14:32 pm
From: xjoshx AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweets,
On my way to Tulalip this morning I encountered several groups of swallows
along Home Acres road between Snohomish and Everett. I had 5 unidentified
swallows fly over the road while I was driving a week ago, but fortunately
today's birds were much more cooperative. There were about five Tree
Swallows, but the vast majority (~20) were Barn Swallows.

I initially thought there was a Cliff Swallow with them, but fortunately
almost all the birds perched on a fence close to the road and I was able to
examine them closely with my scope. Most of the Barn Swallows were in their
quite-confusing brown plumage (I believe this is first-winter plumage, but
I could be wrong) and many foreheads were bleached enough to be completely
white, much like a Cliff Swallow. Other birds had some resemblance to Bank
Swallows, with a pale throat and "chinstrap". In flight, however, the tail
and flight style made it clear that they were also Barn Swallows.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA



Subject: Re Whidbey Redpolls
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 12:39 pm
From: sremse AT comcast.net
 
I inadvertently left off the fact that Whidbey Island is in Island County from my earlier redpoll post. Fidalgo Island (also mentioned) is in Skagit County. Mea Culpa- I was hurried to get to work on time.


-----Steve Ellis

[email protected] mailto:[email protected]

Coupeville, Whidbey Island

Island County



Subject: Sno/Skagit
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 12:38 pm
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
Yesterday (02.14.18) I was fortunate to see the Tulalip Bay RUDDY TURNSTONE that Maxine Reid had found and reported earlier. Best place to look seems to be the marina log booms near high tide.


The continuing adult light morph HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK was along 7th off of Pioneer Hwy, just west of I5. It's not a tick, but it's a cool bird.


Hayton Preserve on Fir Island (Skagit County) is once again open to visitors. DUNLIN put on their murmuration show yesterday. Other birds at Hayton include a light morph ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK and a SHORT-EARED-OWL. Also on Fir Island were an adult PEREGRINE FALCON and an adult male SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. Also loads of SNOW GEESE and SWANS. No Gyrfalcon.


Videos of the Ruddy Turnstone & Dunlin: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
If you haven't been to Hayton to see the Dunlin murmurations, you're missing out! They're much better in person.


It was a good day.


Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
[email protected]

Concepts shape our world.
Concepts are not hard wired.



Subject: Redpolls Whidbey Island
Date: Thu Feb 15 2018 9:59 am
From: sremse AT comcast.net
 
We had a flock of 40+ Common Redpolls in our yard in Coupeville this morning eating seeds from the alder cones. This is a county, island and of course, yard 1st ever for us( redpolls often visited our yard when I was a kid in Alaska).

Last Saturday we saw a flock in some scraggly alders on March Point, Fidalgo Island.

---Steve Ellis

[email protected]



Subject: Common Goldeneye Mating Competition
Date: Wed Feb 14 2018 17:09 pm
From: johntubbs AT comcast.net
 
Hi folks,

I briefly stopped by Luhr Beach in Thurston County (basically across from Nisqually NWR - end of the boardwalk) late this morning. There were two large rafts (approx. 150 birds) of Common Goldeneyes on the water which I unsuccessfully searched through for a Barrow's Goldeneye which I need for my list at that location. What was striking was the makeup of the group - all but 4-5 of this gathering were males, many of whom were doing their courting display of throwing their heads back. Hmmmm...150 males and maybe 5 females. Not very good odds, fellas!

Not sure how common this situation is, or what the reason(s) for it might be, so hopefully some of the waterfowl experts on the list will chime in.

John Tubbs
johntubbs AT Comcast.net
Lacey, WA



Subject: Nandina
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 17:55 pm
From: dlwicki AT comcast.net
 
I have had several Nandina Gulf Stream planted in my Bothell yard for 20 years and NEVER had berries on it. Furthermore, it has never suckered or seeded itself and has been perfectly behaved as well as slow growing.

Dayna Yalowicki
Bothell, Wa




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Subject: Red Crossbills
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 17:18 pm
From: tcstonefam AT gmail.com
 
I spotted a group of Red Crossbills foraging with Black-capped Chickadees
and Dark-eyed Juncos in our neighbor's pine trees. They were feeding for
at least an hour, and when they left I counted six birds in the air. We
are on Gatewood Hill above Lincoln Park in West Seattle.

A fine day!
Carol Stoner
West Seattle



Subject: Grebe's and swallows over Lake Sammamish
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 16:21 pm
From: vikingcove AT gmail.com
 
Sunday along Lateral C near Toppenish Creek (Yakima County) my wife Mary
Giovanini spotted Violet-green Swallows. I photographed them and Tree
Swallows, leaving a few swallows unidentified. Later in the afternoon, as I
was taking seed in to the Poppoff sparrow patch, I saw both Violet-green &
Tree, along with Barn Swallows. One of the Barn swallows had several white
spots on its back, rump and wings, as well as one on the right side of its
forehead. Seeing it head on, I first thought it was a Cliff Swallow, but my
photos proved me wrong. Another Barn Swallow, with the normal very forked
and spotted tail, had a chin/throat that appeared very light, along with a
breast band like a Bank Swallow. My photos of it were quite poor. I went
back yesterday afternoon and got one look at the breast band swallow, but
had even less luck with photos. I'd seen a swallow make a single pass over
the Union Gap Costco pond two weeks ago, but didn't identify it or get any
photos. I hope I get better at photographing them before I run out of film
;-) Still, it's been pretty neat seeing so many swallows this early in the
year. I guess Winter has sprung.

Also Sunday down at Lateral C x Toppenish Creek, Mary spotted the
Red-shouldered Hawk soaring. As I was photographing it, a Red-tailed Hawk
stooped on it. They both soon joined 3 Red-tails and a Prairie Falcon
soaring in a thermal just south of Pumphouse Road.

A while earlier we'd heard the Black Phoebe calling high in the willows on
the upstream/west side of Lateral C, just north of the bridge. Two birders
were there, and one of them described them seeing a Black Phoebe at that
same time, but low on the opposite side of the road and on the opposite
side of the creek. I've not heard, seen, nor heard of two Black Phoebes
there. I did recently learn of a Black Phoebe there in previous years.

listingaba.org/ethics/

Good Birding,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, Yakima County, WA

www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

On Tue, Feb 13, 2018 at 9:05 AM, Mason Flint wrote:

> I was doing my daily scan of Lake Sammamish through my scope to count
> Western Grebe™s and whatever else I see and was somewhat surprised to see a
> flock of 5-6 swallows way out over the lake. They were too far out to
> identify but I™m guessing probably Tree Swallows based on what I saw and
> timing.
>
>
>
> In terms of Grebe™s, I counted ~30 Western, 1 Horned and 1 Pied-billed.
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
> Mason Flint
>
> Bellevue
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>



Subject: Grebe's and swallows over Lake Sammamish
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 11:06 am
From: masonflint AT outlook.com
 
I was doing my daily scan of Lake Sammamish through my scope to count Western Grebe's and whatever else I see and was somewhat surprised to see a flock of 5-6 swallows way out over the lake. They were too far out to identify but I'm guessing probably Tree Swallows based on what I saw and timing.

In terms of Grebe's, I counted ~30 Western, 1 Horned and 1 Pied-billed.

Cheers,

Mason Flint
Bellevue



Subject: Hummer tongue
Date: Tue Feb 13 2018 10:01 am
From: baro AT pdx.edu
 
I had one of these here a couple of years ago at a feeder.  It wasn't
around very long so I don't think it survived. A few other people have
reported them down here. So it seems to be rare but now fairly widespread.
I don't know much else. Bob O'Brien Portland

On Monday, February 12, 2018, David Selk wrote:
> For several weeks we have a female Anna's coming to our feeder which
appears to have its tongue permanently stuck out. It seems to do ok at the
feeder but sometimes struggles to feed, often having to hover to gain entry
rather than perch. When perched in a tree or bush it does a lot of bill
wiping. It's been around for at least a month so is hanging in there. Has
anyone seen this before?
>
> Woodland Park Zoo saves wildlife and inspires everyone to make
conservation a priority in their lives.
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>



Subject: Re Nandina
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 22:26 pm
From: tomboulian AT comcast.net
 
Nandina is not invasive here in the Seattle area. As a landscaper, the berry toxicity was news to me, although it appears that the pulp may not be toxic but the seeds are. (Lots of seeds, even apple core seeds, have cyanide).  Usually I don™t like this plant due to it™s gangly habit, but I plant the dwarf varieties Gulf Stream, Firepower, and Moon Bay, all of which have the colorful foliage without (at least that I™ve seen here) producing berries, as they are vegetative clones. But if you have some full-sized nandina, (Purple Passion is a common selection of the species as well, and not a dwarf clone), do the web research and decide for yourself.  Those with small children, berry-eating pets, or livestock apparently should be advised. The berries are awfully pretty!  I will keep this in mind!

Mark Tomboulian

Seattle, WA

From: G M ARCHAMBAULT
Sent: Monday, February 12, 2018 7:03 PM
To: Linda Phillips ; [email protected]
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re Nandina

"nandina is a non-domestic, noxious and highly invasive weed that displaces the non-toxic, native plants on which local birds would thrive. Nandina has been imported from China and Japan and has invaded many natural areas. ... By working together, we can eliminate this toxic and noxious invasive plant."
Dear Washington State birders, PLEASE take a moment to research the dangers of Nandina online before you plant any! Too many people like the red color or the red berries, but this plant is HIGHLY invasive, and one established it is extremely difficult to extirpate, with tough runner-roots that go under fences and spread over time.

The commercial plant nurseries and retailers like Walmart, Lowe's and Home Depot push this plant because it is so easy to propagate and the profit margins are quite healthy. The sellers are part of the problem in the proliferation of non-native plants throughout our country and around the world.


How any thinking person could rationalize the purchase or planting of this noxious weed is beyond me. I've personally seen Waxwings and White-crowned Sparrows die from eating the cyanide-laced berries of Nandina. Please eradicate Nandina.
-Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama







On Monday, February 12, 2018 5:57 PM, Linda Phillips wrote:




I learned about Nandina™s poisonous berries JUST after I planted mine. Rather than dispose of the plant, I just cut the flowers off. The bright red berries are one of the things that make Nandina so attractive but I like the bush itself too and now I know I™m not harming wildlife.
Linda Phillips
Kenmore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Subject: 4 Snowy Owls; Douglas County
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 22:23 pm
From: merdave AT homenetnw.net
 
Winter brings some great birds, if you just wait long enough.  While I was
on vacation a friend found one Snowy Owl on H Rd. out of Mansfield.
Yesterday two of us found 2 Snowy Owls between 16th and 18th. Today we
found FOUR on the west side of H, between 17th and 18th. All could be
seen at the same time. One was quite close, but the other 3 were far out;
two on the ground; one on a rock. I know there is at least one field trip
headed this way, so sure hope they stay around. Lots of Snow Buntings
too. Meredith Spencer, Bridgeport

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Subject: Re Nandina
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 21:03 pm
From: gm72125 AT bellsouth.net
 
"nandinais a non-domestic, noxious and highlyinvasiveweed that displaces the non-toxic, native plants on which local birds would thrive.Nandinahas been imported from China and Japan and has invaded many natural areas. ... By working together, we can eliminate this toxic and noxiousinvasiveplant."Dear Washington State birders, PLEASE take a moment to research the dangers of Nandina online before you plant any! Too many people like the red color or the red berries, but this plant is HIGHLY invasive, and one established it is extremely difficult to extirpate, with tough runner-roots that go under fences and spread over time.The commercial plant nurseries and retailers like Walmart, Lowe's and Home Depot push this plant because it is so easy to propagate and the profit margins are quite healthy. The sellers are part of the problem in the proliferation of non-native plants throughout our country and around the world.
How any thinking person could rationalize the purchase or planting of this noxious weed is beyond me. I've personally seen Waxwings and White-crowned Sparrows die from eating the cyanide-laced berries of Nandina. Please eradicate Nandina. -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama



On Monday, February 12, 2018 5:57 PM, Linda Phillips wrote:


I learned about Nandina™s poisonous berries JUST after I planted mine. Rather than dispose of the plant, I just cut the flowers off. The bright red berries are one of the things that make Nandina so attractive but I like the bush itself too and now I know I™m not harming wildlife.Linda Phillips Kenmore Sent from Mail for Windows 10 _______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Re Nandina
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 20:36 pm
From: tinablade5051 AT gmail.com
 
This seems a good solution.



From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Linda
Phillips
Sent: Monday, February 12, 2018 3:55 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: [Tweeters] Re Nandina



I learned about Nandina's poisonous berries JUST after I planted mine.
Rather than dispose of the plant, I just cut the flowers off. The bright red
berries are one of the things that make Nandina so attractive but I like the
bush itself too and now I know I'm not harming wildlife.

Linda Phillips

Kenmore



Sent from Mail for Windows
10



Subject: Arizona Report
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 19:39 pm
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
I got back late Thursday from a concentrated 4.5 day trip to Arizona chasing some specific target birds. Specifically I was looking for four ABA Life Birds and five more ABA Life photos.
The Life Birds were Sinaloa Wren, Streak Backed Oriole, Ruddy Ground Dove and Rosy Faced Lovebird. The ABA Photo birds were Louisiana Waterthrush, LeConte's Thrasher, Black Chinned and Baird's Sparrows and Gilded Flicker. I missed the Ruddy Ground Doves completely and had to try twice (and go a long way) for the Waterthrush, Streak Backed Oriole and Sinaloa Wren but eventually I was successful with all the others.
I had helpful input from Bill Boyington, Todd Sahl and Melissa Hafting and had excellent guide help for a half day from Richard Fray (arizonabirder.com) who I met on the De Anza Trail the first time (unsuccessful) I looked for the Sinaloa Wren. Thank you to all of them. I will be happy to share information gained on this trip with anyone interested. I am not expecting to be back in Arizona for a while as I follow other "needs" but it sure is a fun place to bird. Next stop Texas in April - hoping finally to see a Whooping Crane.

I have written up some of the details/stories from the trip and included lots of photos on three blog posts. The last (mostly about the Oriole and the Wren) can be found atblairbirding.wordpress.com/2018/02/13/second-efforts-streak-backed-oriole-and-sinaloa-wren/ Other posts are at blairbirding.wordpress.com
Blair Bernson



Subject: Hummer tongue
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 19:13 pm
From: David.Selk AT zoo.org
 
For several weeks we have a female Anna's coming to our feeder which appears to have its tongue permanently stuck out. It seems to do ok at the feeder but sometimes struggles to feed, often having to hover to gain entry rather than perch. When perched in a tree or bush it does a lot of bill wiping. It's been around for at least a month so is hanging in there. Has anyone seen this before?

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Subject: Re Nandina
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 17:55 pm
From: linda_phillips1252 AT msn.com
 
I learned about Nandinas poisonous berries JUST after I planted mine. Rather than dispose of the plant, I just cut the flowers off. The bright red berries are one of the things that make Nandina so attractive but I like the bush itself too and now I know Im not harming wildlife.
Linda Phillips
Kenmore

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Subject: WDFW contact for Recovering America's Wildlife Act
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 16:20 pm
From: leschwitters AT me.com
 
> On Feb 12, 2018, at 2:10 PM, Denis DeSilvis  wrote:
>
> Tweeters,
>
> I failed to give you an email address for Meagan West, who is the Federal Coordinator in the WDFW Director's office. If you have any questions concerning the RAWA bill that's moving through the House of Representatives, please contact her directly at the following email address:
> [email protected]
>
> May all your birds be identified,
> Denis
>
> Denis DeSilvis
> [email protected]
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: WDFW contact for Recovering America's Wildlife Act
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 16:12 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,


I failed to give you an email address for Meagan West, who is the Federal Coordinator in the WDFW Director's office. If you have any questions concerning the RAWA bill that's moving through the House of Representatives, please contact her directly at the following email address:

[email protected]


May all your birds be identified,

Denis


Denis DeSilvis

[email protected]



Subject: Update on Recovering America's Wildlife Act (RAWA)
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 16:01 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

Here's an update from the Federal Coordinator at the WDFW. Note that RAWA is a Federal, not a Washington State bill. I don't know what the National Audubon Society is doing to support this bill, but I believe the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA) is the prime non-Governmental backer of this bill. Below is what I received today:



I wanted to send you a quick update. RAWA will be heard in the Federal Lands subcommittee of Natural Resources in the House [of Representatives] next Thursday the 15th. AFWA is in the process of drafting testimony and briefing the witness. See the hearing information here: https://naturalresources.house... You may also use the link to direct you to the livestream of the hearing.



Here's a link to the fact sheet and presentation that were given to the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission concerning RAWA last Thursday, Feb 8:

https://wdfw.wa.gov/commission...

https://wdfw.wa.gov/commission...


Thanks, and may all your birds be identified,

Denis



Denis DeSilvis

[email protected]



Subject: Golden Eagle on road to Wylie Slough
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 13:05 pm
From: karen.w.mobile AT gmail.com
 
Just enjoyed an adult Golden Eagle on the road to Wylie Slough. Initially perched on the west side of the road where we got good looks. Then it flew, and was escorted off to the west by 2-3 ravens. 

Karen Wosilait
Seattle, WA
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Subject: Question about toxic Nandina--Heavenly Bamboo
Date: Mon Feb 12 2018 12:07 pm
From: tinablade5051 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweets,

This question isn't directly about birds, but certainly affects them.



I'm curious about the prevalence of Nandina-a.k.a. Heavenly Bamboo-in local
gardens. It's a lovely plant, but apparently contains cyanide and other
alkaloids that are highly toxic to dogs, cats, birds, and other animals.
See: http://ar.audubon.org/news/nan... It is widely
available at local nurseries. I've almost chosen it for my own garden
without realizing its hazards.



Has there been any effort to get nurseries to stop selling it?



Thanks,

Tina Blade

Duvall, WA



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