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Updated on January 20, 2021, 7:15 pm

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20 Jan: @ 19:10:44 
Winter Wren Sunday January 17 (posting on behalf of Jennifer Kauffman) [elc]
20 Jan: @ 16:30:47 
Skagit birding [Marv Breece]
20 Jan: @ 00:22:11 
Re: kittitas raptors [jstewart]
19 Jan: @ 19:44:04 
Camano Island Great Egret [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 17:19:00 
spam issue [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 06:21:40 
Access to Gibson Spit [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 03:36:39 
kittitas raptors [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 03:22:57 
Re: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 03:18:20 
Re: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 03:09:44 
Re: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 02:56:03 
Re: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River [Northwest birding e-mail]
19 Jan: @ 02:43:27 
Great Egret on Camano Island [Northwest birding e-mail]
18 Jan: @ 21:00:25 
Ancient Murrelets from PT [Northwest birding e-mail]
18 Jan: @ 20:44:02 
possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River [Odette B. James]
18 Jan: @ 20:24:11 
Re: [Tweeters] Washington County Year List Project 2020 summary & 2021 launch [Dennis Paulson]
18 Jan: @ 20:12:41 
Washington County Year List Project 2020 summary & 2021 launch [Matt Bartels]
18 Jan: @ 18:34:43 
Found - Nikon Lens Hood [Marcy D'Addio]
18 Jan: @ 05:42:38 
Shout out for Gibson Spit - many Ancient Murrelets today [BRAD Liljequist]
18 Jan: @ 05:15:44 
Ocean Shores Gyrfalcon [Christopher Hinkle]
18 Jan: @ 04:28:52 
Queen Anne Snowy Owl [Nagi Aboulenein]
18 Jan: @ 02:04:24 
Re: FW: Winter Wren Sunday January 17 [Beth Thompson]
18 Jan: @ 01:55:25 
Winter wren [Qblater]
18 Jan: @ 01:23:55 
WOS's Tweeters Archives [Jane Hadley]
18 Jan: @ 01:20:56 
Re: FW: Winter Wren Sunday January 17 [Doug Santoni]
18 Jan: @ 01:08:59 
FW: Winter Wren Sunday January 17 [J. Acker]
18 Jan: @ 00:47:47 
Re: Winter Wren Sunday January 17 [Mason Maron]
18 Jan: @ 00:44:23 
Re: Winter Wren Sunday January 17 [J. Acker]
17 Jan: @ 23:44:48 
Black Phoebe at Frager Road in Kent [Rex Takasugi]
17 Jan: @ 22:44:01 
Winter Wren Sunday January 17 [Al n Donna]
17 Jan: @ 21:42:28 
Union Bay Watch } L'esprit de 'escalier [Hubbell]
17 Jan: @ 03:15:34 
Fwd: Today's Video: Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them [Will Markey]
17 Jan: @ 03:06:48 
Fwd: Today's Video: Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them [Will Markey]
17 Jan: @ 00:54:10 
A Northwest genre: "moss porn" flics [Hal Opperman]
16 Jan: @ 22:30:39 
JBLM January Birdwalk coming up next week [Denis DeSilvis]
16 Jan: @ 22:18:30 
Yellow-headed Blackbird - Neal Rd (King) [Carl Haynie]
16 Jan: @ 22:17:08 
Re: [Tweeters] contest: Guess the next 5 state birds! [Matt Bartels]
16 Jan: @ 20:51:00 
Okanogan County Birding [Eric Heisey]
16 Jan: @ 20:03:45 
BirdNote, last week and the week of Jan. 17, 2021 [Ellen Blackstone]
16 Jan: @ 19:09:29 
Re: spam [jstewart]
16 Jan: @ 04:00:30 
Re: spam [Twink Coffman]
16 Jan: @ 01:54:36 
Earthshine Alert [Jeff Gibson]
15 Jan: @ 17:02:06 
From Tweeters Administration - update #2 ("Incursions" Tweeters-linked invasion of your email...) [elc]
15 Jan: @ 16:41:14 
Re: Black-Billed Magpie [Lynn Wohlers]
15 Jan: @ 05:32:02 
WOS Presentation: Monday, Feb. 1, Dinosaurs Amongst Us with Kim Adelson [meetings]
15 Jan: @ 03:33:16 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2021-01-14 [birdmarymoor]
15 Jan: @ 02:34:06 
Black-Billed Magpie [Joan Bird]
14 Jan: @ 20:20:02 
Douglas County Birding - with the link this time [Tim Brennan]
14 Jan: @ 20:17:26 
Douglas County Birding [Tim Brennan]
14 Jan: @ 20:14:12 
a few recent Clark County birds [Jim Danzenbaker]
14 Jan: @ 18:12:04 
Where to report bad replies to RFI [Caryn Schutzler]





Subject: Winter Wren Sunday January 17 (posting on behalf of Jennifer Kauffman)
Date: Wed Jan 20 2021 19:10 pm
From: elc AT uw.edu
 
Hello, Tweeters,
I have noted the discussion about the use of playback to identify the Winter Wren, and on behalf of the Washington Ornithological Society (WOS), would like to respond.

WOS provides a forum for birders from throughout the state to meet and share information on bird identification, biology, population status and birding sites. Membership is open to all persons interested in birds and birding. https://wos.org

WOS has previously endorsed the American Birding Association’s Code of Birding Ethics. The code of ethics can be found on our web site at this link: https://wos.org/aba-code-of-bi...

With regard to the Winter Wren situation, the ABA code of ethics clearly suggests limiting playback, especially for species that are rare in an area. In this case, the Winter Wren would fall into the category of a rare or unusual bird, and minimizing stress to the bird associated with playback or approaching the bird would be in order.
WOS encourages birders to review the ABA code of ethics periodically, and to consider their actions in light of these guidelines.

Sincerely,
Jennifer Kauffman, WOS President
Seattle


Date: Sun, 17 Jan 2021 16:43:43 -0800
From: "J. Acker" >
To: "'Al n Donna'" >,"'Tweeters’" >
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17


I would consider the use of playback against this individual bird as harassment. The ABA code of ethics states "Limit the use of recordings and other audio methods of attracting birds, particularly in heavily birded areas, for species that are rare in the area." Where does the WOS Board stand on this? (Their website is not user friendly when searching for a Code of Ethics).

J. Acker owler@sounddsl.com
Bainbridge Island, WA



Subject: Skagit birding
Date: Wed Jan 20 2021 16:30 pm
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
Yesterday (01.19.21) on Polson Rd on Fir Island all 4 zonotrichia sparrows were in a single tree within a 10 minute period.
WHITE-CROWNED, GOLDEN-CROWNED, WHITE-THROATED & HARRIS'S SPARROW.

The GREAT EGRET was at the one of the Moore Rd ponds and the LIGHT MORPH HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK continues at Hayton Reserve.

Here are 3 short videos of the Eide Rd (Leque Island) SNOW BUNTING; taken yesterday. It's a gorgeous bird!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/...




Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
marvbreece@q.com
Pbase Images : https://www.pbase.com/marvbree...
Flickr Videos : https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channe...



Subject: kittitas raptors
Date: Wed Jan 20 2021 0:22 am
From: jstewart AT olympus.net
 
Nice!!



Wings,

Jan



Jan Stewart

922 E. Spruce Street

Sequim, WA 98382-3518

(360) 681-2827

jstewart@olympus.net



From: Tweeters On Behalf Of Northwest birding e-mail
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2021 7:36 PM
To: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] kittitas raptors



Hi tweets:



Took a drive over the hill and was rewarded with a young golden eagle at the party barn near Thorpe and a grey gyrfalcon near the on ramp east of the rest stop. Had a male kestrel in between. Around 1300 today, January 18.



Regards,



T



Dave Templeton



Crazydave

65

At

Inbox

Dot

Com







Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Camano Island Great Egret
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 19:44 pm
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
The Great Egret has been hanging around Rekdal Road for over a month, having been first reported on eBird on December 14th. It moves around but has been showing site fidelity at the corner of Rekdal and Utsalady Roads. The food there must be readily available.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds, WA
cariddellwa at gmail dot com
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: spam issue
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 17:19 pm
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
happy to hear they are working the spam issue...
--

Twink
wilber4818@gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
out on the beach
be kind to one another



Subject: Access to Gibson Spit
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 6:21 am
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
Hi,

I received queries about the best way to access Gibson Spit. The only way to get there is to drive to the Port Williams County Park and walk south. The park has plenty of parking, picnic tables, nasty outhouse, and even a couple fire grates if you really want to go crazy, in addition to a small boat boat launch. Terrific access. Great birding in the fields on the way there, and then if you want to head over past the Greymarsh Farm en route to Dungeness.

Brad Liljequist
Phinney Ridge, Seattle, WA



Subject: kittitas raptors
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 3:36 am
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
Hi tweets:Took a drive over the hill and was rewarded with a young golden eagle at the party barn near Thorpe and a grey gyrfalcon near the on ramp east of the rest stop.  Had a male kestrel in between.  Around 1300 today, January 18.Regards,TDave Templeton Crazydave65AtInboxDotComSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 3:22 am
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
It appears that the excerpt by Nick Mrvelj wasn’t included on my response.
Hopefully it goes through now:

“Interesting gull. At first glance, I thought this was a good candidate for
a GWGU x GLGU. However, after a deeper dive, I feel that Emily may be on to
something in regard to this individual having a pigment issue. I agree that
the hue of the mantle and primaries just seems a bit off for a Seward Gull;
the former a bit too pale and oddly mottled and the latter a weird pale,
brownish hue (which translates to me as primaries that should look blackish
but have a melanin deficiency). The size and shape of the bill seems good
for an Olympic Gull (or even a Western Gull or GWGU). I wonder if the iris
has a similar pigment issue, which is why its so pale? The coloration of
other bare parts, like the legs and bill, seem normal.”

- Alex Sowers

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 7:17 PM Northwest birding e-mail <
tweeters@u.washington.edu> wrote:

> Hey tweets,
>
> It seems like this bird has been around for quite some time now and at
> this point has been photographed quite a bit. I’ve seen this bird
> consistently identified to multiple species/hybrids (like Glaucous,
> Glaucous x Herring, Kumlien’s Iceland, and Glaucous-winged x Glaucous) and
> yet there has never appeared to be a really solid ID on this bird. The
> general consensus amongst reviewers, or at least the one who confirmed it,
> seems to be that this is Glaucous-winged x Glaucous Gull (hybrid). However,
> many other experts believe that this is just a Glaucous-winged with pigment
> issues and not a Glaucous-winged with any other species in it (except maybe
> Western just because).
>
> I am no gull expert myself and don’t have any experience with
> Glaucous-winged x Glaucous, but i’d have to say that this is likely just a
> Glaucous-winged with pigment issues. The structure is pretty typical for a
> Glaucous-winged/Western type bird (not that that’s a big deal) and the
> weird brown tones and faint mottling all point towards a bird with pigment
> issues.
>
> Here’s a better explanation by Nick Mrvelj:
>
> “Interesting gull. At first glance, I thought this was a good candidate
> for a GWGU x GLGU. However, after a deeper dive, I feel that Emily may be
> on to something in regard to this individual having a pigment issue. I
> agree that the hue of the mantle and primaries just seems a bit off for a
> Seward Gull; the former a bit too pale and oddly mottled and the latter a
> weird pale, brownish hue (which translates to me as primaries that should
> look blackish but have a melanin deficiency). The size and shape of the
> bill seems good for an Olympic Gull (or even a Western Gull or GWGU). I
> wonder if the iris has a similar pigment issue, which is why its so pale?
> The coloration of other bare parts, like the legs and bill, seem normal.”
>
> All that being said, I am no gull expert, but it appears that this gull
> isn’t going to have a solid ID anytime soon.
>
> - Alex Sowers
>
> On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 6:55 PM Northwest birding e-mail <
> tweeters@u.washington.edu> wrote:
>
>> I saw a bird that fits Odette's description in October at the Cedar River
>> mouth. In addition to what Odette described the bird has yellow eyes. I
>> have some poor digiscoped photos here:
>> http://www.birdingwashington.i...
>>
>> If you right click on an image and select "View Image" you can see the
>> photo at full size.
>>
>> Odette has seen these photos and thinks it may be the same bird.
>>
>> Does anyone have an idea what it is?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Randy Robinson
>> Seattle, WA
>> rwr DOT personal AT gmail DOT com
>>
>> > On Jan 18, 2021, at 12:46 PM, Odette B. James wrote
>> >
>> >The possible Iceland Gull has returned to the delta of the Cedar River
>> at
>> >the south end of Lake Washington. It is with other gulls on a patch of
>> >gravel exposed among the logs on the submerged delta. The bird has a
>> very
>> >pale mantle and pink legs, is an adult (has red gonydeal spot on bill),
>> is
>> >smaller than nearby Glaucous winged, has no streaking on back and sides
>> of
>> >neck. There at 12:30 in the afternoon on Jan. 18.
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
>> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 3:18 am
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
Hey tweets,

It seems like this bird has been around for quite some time now and at this
point has been photographed quite a bit. I’ve seen this bird consistently
identified to multiple species/hybrids (like Glaucous, Glaucous x Herring,
Kumlien’s Iceland, and Glaucous-winged x Glaucous) and yet there has never
appeared to be a really solid ID on this bird. The general consensus
amongst reviewers, or at least the one who confirmed it, seems to be that
this is Glaucous-winged x Glaucous Gull (hybrid). However, many other
experts believe that this is just a Glaucous-winged with pigment issues and
not a Glaucous-winged with any other species in it (except maybe Western
just because).

I am no gull expert myself and don’t have any experience with
Glaucous-winged x Glaucous, but i’d have to say that this is likely just a
Glaucous-winged with pigment issues. The structure is pretty typical for a
Glaucous-winged/Western type bird (not that that’s a big deal) and the
weird brown tones and faint mottling all point towards a bird with pigment
issues.

Here’s a better explanation by Nick Mrvelj:

“Interesting gull. At first glance, I thought this was a good candidate for
a GWGU x GLGU. However, after a deeper dive, I feel that Emily may be on to
something in regard to this individual having a pigment issue. I agree that
the hue of the mantle and primaries just seems a bit off for a Seward Gull;
the former a bit too pale and oddly mottled and the latter a weird pale,
brownish hue (which translates to me as primaries that should look blackish
but have a melanin deficiency). The size and shape of the bill seems good
for an Olympic Gull (or even a Western Gull or GWGU). I wonder if the iris
has a similar pigment issue, which is why its so pale? The coloration of
other bare parts, like the legs and bill, seem normal.”

All that being said, I am no gull expert, but it appears that this gull
isn’t going to have a solid ID anytime soon.

- Alex Sowers

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 6:55 PM Northwest birding e-mail <
tweeters@u.washington.edu> wrote:

> I saw a bird that fits Odette's description in October at the Cedar River
> mouth. In addition to what Odette described the bird has yellow eyes. I
> have some poor digiscoped photos here:
> http://www.birdingwashington.i...
>
> If you right click on an image and select "View Image" you can see the
> photo at full size.
>
> Odette has seen these photos and thinks it may be the same bird.
>
> Does anyone have an idea what it is?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Randy Robinson
> Seattle, WA
> rwr DOT personal AT gmail DOT com
>
> > On Jan 18, 2021, at 12:46 PM, Odette B. James wrote
> >
> >The possible Iceland Gull has returned to the delta of the Cedar River at
> >the south end of Lake Washington. It is with other gulls on a patch of
> >gravel exposed among the logs on the submerged delta. The bird has a very
> >pale mantle and pink legs, is an adult (has red gonydeal spot on bill),
> is
> >smaller than nearby Glaucous winged, has no streaking on back and sides
> of
> >neck. There at 12:30 in the afternoon on Jan. 18.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 3:09 am
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
To whomever - What is "Northwest Birding E-mail,” a separate list-serve? Just curious.

George Neavoll
S.W. Portland

> On Jan 18, 2021, at 6:54 PM, Northwest birding e-mail wrote:
>
> I saw a bird that fits Odette's description in October at the Cedar River mouth. In addition to what Odette described the bird has yellow eyes. I have some poor digiscoped photos here: http://www.birdingwashington.i...
>
> If you right click on an image and select "View Image" you can see the photo at full size.
>
> Odette has seen these photos and thinks it may be the same bird.
>
> Does anyone have an idea what it is?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Randy Robinson
> Seattle, WA
> rwr DOT personal AT gmail DOT com
>
> > On Jan 18, 2021, at 12:46 PM, Odette B. James wrote
> >
> >The possible Iceland Gull has returned to the delta of the Cedar River at
> >the south end of Lake Washington. It is with other gulls on a patch of
> >gravel exposed among the logs on the submerged delta. The bird has a very
> >pale mantle and pink legs, is an adult (has red gonydeal spot on bill), is
> >smaller than nearby Glaucous winged, has no streaking on back and sides of
> >neck. There at 12:30 in the afternoon on Jan. 18.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 2:56 am
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
I saw a bird that fits Odette's description in October at the Cedar River
mouth. In addition to what Odette described the bird has yellow eyes. I
have some poor digiscoped photos here:
http://www.birdingwashington.i...

If you right click on an image and select "View Image" you can see the
photo at full size.

Odette has seen these photos and thinks it may be the same bird.

Does anyone have an idea what it is?

Thanks,

Randy Robinson
Seattle, WA
rwr DOT personal AT gmail DOT com

> On Jan 18, 2021, at 12:46 PM, Odette B. James wrote
>
>The possible Iceland Gull has returned to the delta of the Cedar River at
>the south end of Lake Washington. It is with other gulls on a patch of
>gravel exposed among the logs on the submerged delta. The bird has a very
>pale mantle and pink legs, is an adult (has red gonydeal spot on bill), is
>smaller than nearby Glaucous winged, has no streaking on back and sides of
>neck. There at 12:30 in the afternoon on Jan. 18.



Subject: Great Egret on Camano Island
Date: Tue Jan 19 2021 2:43 am
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
Hi Tweets!

I think this is rather unusual, but today I saw a Great Egret on Camano
Island. It was alone in a field, hunting. Not sure what it was going to eat
at this time of year! I took a bunch of photos from my open car window.

You can view them at Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/...


It was in a field along Rekdal Road, just south of the intersection with
Utsalady Rd, on the west side of Rekdal.

Is it unusual for winter, or even this region?

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dot com



Subject: Ancient Murrelets from PT
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 21:00 pm
From: tweeters AT u.washington.edu
 
Adding to the report from Sequim, ANMU have been regular winging around Point Wilson in Port Townsend, with some in the water and many flying by. The other day they were passing south in the morning at a rate of 30-50/minute for at least half an hour, so thousands total. A scope is necessary.

Good birding,

Steve Hampton



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: possible Iceland Gull at mouth of Cedar River
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 20:44 pm
From: o.b.james AT verizon.net
 
The possible Iceland Gull has returned to the delta of the Cedar River at
the south end of Lake Washington. It is with other gulls on a patch of
gravel exposed among the logs on the submerged delta. The bird has a very
pale mantle and pink legs, is an adult (has red gonydeal spot on bill), is
smaller than nearby Glaucous winged, has no streaking on back and sides of
neck. There at 12:30 in the afternoon on Jan. 18.



Subject: Washington County Year List Project 2020 summary & 2021 launch
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 20:24 pm
From: dennispaulson AT comcast.net
 
Matt, thanks so much for compiling all this information. It’s really interesting to see the big picture!

Dennis Paulson
Seattle

> On Jan 18, 2021, at 12:12 PM, Matt Bartels wrote:
>
> Hi Tweeters & INWBers -
>
> Here’s the year-end report for the 2020 round of the county year-list project. Full results posted here:
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy...
>
> [for those waiting for fresh excel checklists for 2021 - stay tuned, we’re getting close!]
>
> This was the 14th year we’ve recruited compilers from every county to keep track of sightings. The idea behind the project is to get behind the fun of individual county listing to compile a ‘community’ list — rather than just birds seen by a single individual, we attempt to pull together birds seen by anyone over the course of the year. It provides one perspective on the birds of Washington in 2020.
>
>
> Some results for 2020:
> Overall, I’m mostly surprised by how ’normal’ the results look despite this year’s disruptions.
> 393 species were reported statewide. That’s just a little below average [394.6], and one lower than 2019’s total.
> 323 species for Eastern Washington. That’s six above last year, and almost exactly at our average [323.3]
> 368 species for Western Washington. That’s four below last year, but still three higher than the overall average [365.0].
>
>
> Record high totals were reported for fourteen counties. That might be a result of more birders staying close to home? Records highs were tallied for: Asotin [225], Benton [235], Cowlitz [209], Franklin [222], Grant [262], Island [243], King [292], Kitsap [241], Lewis [213], Mason [213], San Juan [216], Spokane [254], Thurston [243], and Whitman [239]
>
> 25 Counties came in with totals higher than last year, 14 came in lower.
>
> 32 counties had totals higher than their 2007-2020 average. The counties with the biggest variance from their average included King [27], Whitman [27], Island [25], Mason [22], Lewis [22], San Juan [22], and Thurston [21].
>
>
> Species:
> 84 species were seen in all 39 counties, 171 were seen in 30 or more counties. That’s in line with last year, a sign of the ‘stable abundant’ portion of the state list, maybe? At the other end of the spectrum, 26 species were reported in only one county this year.
> The only missing species that are not a Washington Bird Records Committee review-list species were pelagic birds - not surprising with the limited Westport schedule and the lack of repositioning cruises: Parakeet Auklet, Short-tailed Albatross, & Murphy’s Petrel.
>
>
>
> In addition to the year list at the link [https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy... ] , I've included a simple sheet that compiles the annual county totals for each county from 2007-2020 -- if you'd like to see how any county has trended over the years, this is the sheet to study.
>
> 2021 compiling is underway, and I encourage you to look up the compiler for counties you bird in and send along unusual sightings -- most compilers are checking eBird reports already, but eBird still misses a good bit and we appreciate the help making sure we hear about these sightings. You can find a list of the compilers at the above link
>
> Thanks to all the compilers who track each county, and here's to a fun and surprising 2021. If you notice anything not noted on the 2020 list, let us know and make a resolution to report your sightings to the compiler this year .
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, WA
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy...



Subject: Washington County Year List Project 2020 summary & 2021 launch
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 20:12 pm
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Hi Tweeters & INWBers -

Here’s the year-end report for the 2020 round of the county year-list project. Full results posted here:
https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy...

[for those waiting for fresh excel checklists for 2021 - stay tuned, we’re getting close!]

This was the 14th year we’ve recruited compilers from every county to keep track of sightings. The idea behind the project is to get behind the fun of individual county listing to compile a ‘community’ list — rather than just birds seen by a single individual, we attempt to pull together birds seen by anyone over the course of the year. It provides one perspective on the birds of Washington in 2020.


Some results for 2020:
Overall, I’m mostly surprised by how ’normal’ the results look despite this year’s disruptions.
393 species were reported statewide. That’s just a little below average [394.6], and one lower than 2019’s total.
323 species for Eastern Washington. That’s six above last year, and almost exactly at our average [323.3]
368 species for Western Washington. That’s four below last year, but still three higher than the overall average [365.0].


Record high totals were reported for fourteen counties. That might be a result of more birders staying close to home? Records highs were tallied for: Asotin [225], Benton [235], Cowlitz [209], Franklin [222], Grant [262], Island [243], King [292], Kitsap [241], Lewis [213], Mason [213], San Juan [216], Spokane [254], Thurston [243], and Whitman [239]

25 Counties came in with totals higher than last year, 14 came in lower.

32 counties had totals higher than their 2007-2020 average. The counties with the biggest variance from their average included King [27], Whitman [27], Island [25], Mason [22], Lewis [22], San Juan [22], and Thurston [21].


Species:
84 species were seen in all 39 counties, 171 were seen in 30 or more counties. That’s in line with last year, a sign of the ‘stable abundant’ portion of the state list, maybe? At the other end of the spectrum, 26 species were reported in only one county this year.
The only missing species that are not a Washington Bird Records Committee review-list species were pelagic birds - not surprising with the limited Westport schedule and the lack of repositioning cruises: Parakeet Auklet, Short-tailed Albatross, & Murphy’s Petrel.



In addition to the year list at the link [https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy... ] , I've included a simple sheet that compiles the annual county totals for each county from 2007-2020 -- if you'd like to see how any county has trended over the years, this is the sheet to study.

2021 compiling is underway, and I encourage you to look up the compiler for counties you bird in and send along unusual sightings -- most compilers are checking eBird reports already, but eBird still misses a good bit and we appreciate the help making sure we hear about these sightings. You can find a list of the compilers at the above link

Thanks to all the compilers who track each county, and here's to a fun and surprising 2021. If you notice anything not noted on the 2020 list, let us know and make a resolution to report your sightings to the compiler this year .

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA



Subject: Found - Nikon Lens Hood
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 18:34 pm
From: marcydaddio89 AT gmail.com
 
I found a Nikon Lens Hood at Ebey's Landing, Whidbey Island on Jan. 17.
Contact me off post with description and to make arrangements for return
of the item.
-Marcy D'Addio
Redmond, WA
marcy daddio eighty-nine at g mail dot com



Subject: Shout out for Gibson Spit - many Ancient Murrelets today
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 5:42 am
From: bradliljequist AT msn.com
 
Gibson Spit, in my mind, is an underappreciated and -mentioned gem.  Located at the mouth of Sequim Bay, it is by itself a gorgeous location, which also brings in a lot of great birds.  In particular, the light is very special there, forelighting nearly everything through a rainshadowy spotlight. Today, lots of Common Goldeneye, Buffleheads, Harlequins, Brant, and most surprising, many Ancient Murrelets - some as close as 100 feet.  Lots of to-ing and fro-ing so it was hard to put a guess on numbers, but I would say at least 50 (they were moving in and out of the Bay so who knows exactly).  Definitely get down to the end of the spit and plan to sit for some time and just take in whatever moves by.  Also a great place later in the year to watch the Protection Island Rhino Auklets.  I am assuming a lot of fish moves through the tight channel thus the attraction.  Also, an excellent place for a small boat or kayak - next time, we plan to bring the Avon and just do an quiet offshore float and see what flies over.

Brad Liljequist
Phinney Ridge, Seattle, WA, USA.



Subject: Ocean Shores Gyrfalcon
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 5:15 am
From: christopher.hinkle2 AT gmail.com
 
Hi All,

There was a GYRFALCON in Ocean Shores this evening. I first saw it
terrorizing a murmuration of Dunlin at the Oyhut Game Range at high tide,
but an unhappy Peregrine quickly chased it off. At sunset I refound the Gyr
cruising around Damon Point. What was presumably the same bird was in
Westport yesterday. Birding was otherwise slow, although I did have a
Black Phoebe and nice looks at nine Rock Sandpipers with turnstones and
Surfbirds behind the Ocean Shores STP.

Cheers,

Chris Hinkle



Subject: Queen Anne Snowy Owl
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 4:28 am
From: nagi.aboulenein AT gmail.com
 
Hi All -

For unrelated reasons, my wife and I may find ourselves in Seattle tomorrow, with a little bit of time to kill. As best as I can tell, the Queen Anne Snowy Owl has been seen as recently as yesterday.

Have there been any sightings today (Jan 17)? Any info that might help us locate it tomorrow afternoon  would be appreciated at my email at: aboulenein at yahoo dot com .

Best regards,

Nagi Aboulenein



Subject: FW: Winter Wren Sunday January 17
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 2:04 am
From: calliopehb AT comcast.net
 
With Winter Wrens, they have such a beautiful song. Ever notice how quiet they get as soon as you focus on them?
I know I've been tempted to play recordings  but it's not the right thing to do. I limit pishing too as it can detract birds from their foraging and bring them up where a predator could snag them. Nothing wrong with listening to recorded bird songs in order to ID a bird though. 

Planned on birding today but worked at home instead. ????
Kind regards,
Beth ThompsoArlington WA
Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone
On Jan 17, 2021 5:07 PM, "J. Acker" wrote:
>
> So what exactly is wrong with waiting for it to sing on its own, as it was originally discovered?
>
> I disagree with your logic, especially as this bird has been confirmed. Now it is a series of state tickers personally verifying what has already been established. Harassment from the bird’s point of view.
>
> J. Acker
>
> owler@sounddsl.com
>
> Bainbridge Island, WA
>
> From: Mason Maron
> Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 4:47 PM
> To: J. Acker ; Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17
>
> I don't see any real harm in using a limited amount of playback for this bird, especially given the requirements for an ID on it. Given the physical similarities to our local Pacific Wren, vocalizations from the bird are essentially going to be the only way to confidently identify it, so the use of playback may become next to necessary in order to be sure you're actually seeing this state first.
>
> Mason Maron
>
> On Sun, Jan 17, 2021, 4:44 PM J. Acker wrote:
>>
>> I would consider the use of playback against this individual bird as harassment. The ABA code of ethics states “Limit the use of recordings and other audio methods of attracting birds, particularly in heavily birded areas, for species that are rare in the area…” Where does the WOS Board stand on this? (Their website is not user friendly when searching for a Code of Ethics).
>>
>> J. Acker
>>
>> owler@sounddsl.com
>>
>> Bainbridge Island, WA
>>
>> From: Tweeters On Behalf Of Al n Donna
>> Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 2:43 PM
>> To: Tweeters
>> Subject: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17
>>
>> Found just before noon on both sides of the small white shed. Responded well to recording. My best photo is at: https://pbase.com/image/171351...
>>
>> Al in Tacoma
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
>> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Winter wren
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 1:55 am
From: qblater AT yahoo.com
 
On the subject of overuse of playback for this poor bird
Please keep in mind that this rural area has feral cats or “ barn cats” and repeated singing will attract them and make their job of locating the bird a lot easier.
With 6 to 12 birders a day, enough is enough
we need to give it a rest

Clarice Clark
Puyallup, WA
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: WOS's Tweeters Archives
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 1:23 am
From: hadleyj1725 AT gmail.com
 
Dear Tweeters - All Tweeters messages for the year 2020 have now been
added to WOS's Tweeters Archive, which can be found at
https://tweetersarchives.org/

There were a total of 3,542 Tweeters messages during 2020, ranging from
a low of 220 messages in February to a high of 364 in September.

The Tweeters Archive, sponsored by the Washington Ornithological Society
(WOS), now contains Tweeters messages from 1994 through 2020.? You can
search or browse to find the message or messages you're looking for.

To find messages for the current year (2021), look at the archive on the
University of Washington site:

http://mailman1.u.washington.e...

Jane Hadley

hadleyj1725 AT gmail DOT com

Seattle, WA



Subject: FW: Winter Wren Sunday January 17
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 1:20 am
From: dougsantoni AT gmail.com
 
I would like to respectfully weigh in in support of J. Acker’s position.  I don’t think recordings should be used in a case like this.  Making “carve-outs” or trying to make exceptions to sound ethical policy seems like a slippery slope, and not in the interests of the birds.  It isn’t the poor bird’s fault that it is drab and small!  I appreciate the siren call of listing, but I think we need to put the birds first.

Doug Santoni
DougSantoni@gmail.com

> On Jan 17, 2021, at 5:08 PM, J. Acker wrote:
>
> ?
> So what exactly is wrong with waiting for it to sing on its own, as it was originally discovered?
>
> I disagree with your logic, especially as this bird has been confirmed. Now it is a series of state tickers personally verifying what has already been established. Harassment from the bird’s point of view.
>
> J. Acker
> owler@sounddsl.com
> Bainbridge Island, WA
>
> From: Mason Maron
> Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 4:47 PM
> To: J. Acker ; Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17
>
> I don't see any real harm in using a limited amount of playback for this bird, especially given the requirements for an ID on it. Given the physical similarities to our local Pacific Wren, vocalizations from the bird are essentially going to be the only way to confidently identify it, so the use of playback may become next to necessary in order to be sure you're actually seeing this state first.
>
> Mason Maron
>
> On Sun, Jan 17, 2021, 4:44 PM J. Acker wrote:
> I would consider the use of playback against this individual bird as harassment. The ABA code of ethics states “Limit the use of recordings and other audio methods of attracting birds, particularly in heavily birded areas, for species that are rare in the area…” Where does the WOS Board stand on this? (Their website is not user friendly when searching for a Code of Ethics).
>
> J. Acker
> owler@sounddsl.com
> Bainbridge Island, WA
>
> From: Tweeters On Behalf Of Al n Donna
> Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 2:43 PM
> To: Tweeters
> Subject: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17
>
> Found just before noon on both sides of the small white shed. Responded well to recording. My best photo is at: https://pbase.com/image/171351...
>
> Al in Tacoma
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: FW: Winter Wren Sunday January 17
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 1:08 am
From: owler AT sounddsl.com
 
So what exactly is wrong with waiting for it to sing on its own, as it was originally discovered?



I disagree with your logic, especially as this bird has been confirmed. Now it is a series of state tickers personally verifying what has already been established. Harassment from the bird’s point of view.



J. Acker

owler@sounddsl.com

Bainbridge Island, WA



From: Mason Maron >
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 4:47 PM
To: J. Acker >; Tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17



I don't see any real harm in using a limited amount of playback for this bird, especially given the requirements for an ID on it. Given the physical similarities to our local Pacific Wren, vocalizations from the bird are essentially going to be the only way to confidently identify it, so the use of playback may become next to necessary in order to be sure you're actually seeing this state first.



Mason Maron

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021, 4:44 PM J. Acker > wrote:

I would consider the use of playback against this individual bird as harassment. The ABA code of ethics states “Limit the use of recordings and other audio methods of attracting birds, particularly in heavily birded areas, for species that are rare in the area…” Where does the WOS Board stand on this? (Their website is not user friendly when searching for a Code of Ethics).



J. Acker

owler@sounddsl.com

Bainbridge Island, WA



From: Tweeters > On Behalf Of Al n Donna
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 2:43 PM
To: Tweeters >
Subject: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17



Found just before noon on both sides of the small white shed. Responded well to recording. My best photo is at: https://pbase.com/image/171351...



Al in Tacoma



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: Winter Wren Sunday January 17
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 0:47 am
From: mmaron101 AT gmail.com
 
I don't see any real harm in using a limited amount of playback for this
bird, especially given the requirements for an ID on it. Given the physical
similarities to our local Pacific Wren, vocalizations from the bird are
essentially going to be the only way to confidently identify it, so the use
of playback may become next to necessary in order to be sure you're
actually seeing this state first.

Mason Maron

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021, 4:44 PM J. Acker wrote:

> I would consider the use of playback against this individual bird as
> harassment. The ABA code of ethics states “Limit the use of recordings
> and other audio methods of attracting birds, particularly in heavily birded
> areas, for species that are rare in the area…” Where does the WOS Board
> stand on this? (Their website is not user friendly when searching for a
> Code of Ethics).
>
>
>
> J. Acker
>
> owler@sounddsl.com
>
> Bainbridge Island, WA
>
>
>
> *From:* Tweeters *On Behalf
> Of *Al n Donna
> *Sent:* Sunday, January 17, 2021 2:43 PM
> *To:* Tweeters
> *Subject:* [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17
>
>
>
> Found just before noon on both sides of the small white shed. Responded
> well to recording. My best photo is at: https://pbase.com/image/171351...
>
>
>
> Al in Tacoma
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>



Subject: Winter Wren Sunday January 17
Date: Mon Jan 18 2021 0:44 am
From: owler AT sounddsl.com
 
I would consider the use of playback against this individual bird as harassment.  The ABA code of ethics states “Limit the use of recordings and other audio methods of attracting birds, particularly in heavily birded areas, for species that are rare in the area…”  Where does the WOS Board stand on this?  (Their website is not user friendly when searching for a Code of Ethics).



J. Acker

owler@sounddsl.com

Bainbridge Island, WA



From: Tweeters On Behalf Of Al n Donna
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 2:43 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Winter Wren Sunday January 17



Found just before noon on both sides of the small white shed. Responded well to recording. My best photo is at: https://pbase.com/image/171351...



Al in Tacoma



Subject: Black Phoebe at Frager Road in Kent
Date: Sun Jan 17 2021 23:44 pm
From: RexTak AT msn.com
 
Surprised to see a Black Phoebe on Frager Road in Kent near the Cottonwood Grove Park.  The GPS coordinates are 47.388743, -122.273720 (or 47?23'19.5"N 122?16'25.4"W).  Park along Frager Road at Cottonwood Grove, walk past the gate that closes the road to traffic.  Look in the marshy area to the left (west).  It was perching on the dead tree branches and singing away.  It may be the one Mary Saylor reported seeing at Kent Ponds two or three weeks ago, as Kent Ponds is close by (maybe 1.5 miles away).

Good birding!

Rex Takasugi
Kent, WA



Subject: Winter Wren Sunday January 17
Date: Sun Jan 17 2021 22:44 pm
From: alndonna AT wamail.net
 
Found just before noon on both sides of the small white shed. Responded well to recording. My best photo is at:  https://pbase.com/image/171351...

Al in Tacoma



Subject: Union Bay Watch } L'esprit de 'escalier
Date: Sun Jan 17 2021 21:42 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

The title of this week’s post looks like a reference to, 'The Spirit of the Escalator’. Actually, it is a bit more bird-related than that. I hope you enjoy it.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city and Black Birders are welcome!

Sincerely,
Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: Fwd: Today's Video: Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them
Date: Sun Jan 17 2021 3:15 am
From: yekramw AT gmail.com
 
Another great Mel's Video of the day.

Will Markey
General Adjuster
Cell - 253-569-8455


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Mel's Video Of The Day!
Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 4:02 AM
Subject: Today's Video: Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them
To: Will


Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them
View this email in your browser


*Mel's Video Of The Day!*
Date: Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Hello Will,

*Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them
*



In the middle of the winter, Black Swans in Holland sometimes lay their
eggs, because their biological clock is still set to Australia. Mom will
sit patiently on her nest, in the middle of the ice. I had seen this ending
wrong last year, with beautiful little Swanlings that unfortunately had all
died the next morning... this time I was going to intervene.

*Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them
*





*Forward this email to a friend

Today's T-shirt Bird or Bunny Optical Illusion

*
Free Shipping With Prime At Amazon.com
Thanks for watching and sharing the videos!

Mel
Buy Mel a Coffee


*More of Mel's Videos:*
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If you received this email from a friend and you like to watch Mel's Video
Of The Day... Click Here To Subscribe
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Subject: Fwd: Today's Video: Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them
Date: Sun Jan 17 2021 3:06 am
From: yekramw AT gmail.com
 
Really enjoyed this video of Mel’s.

What happened to photoperiodicity?

Will Markey
General Adjuster
Cell - 253-569-8455


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Mel's Video Of The Day!
Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 4:02 AM
Subject: Today's Video: Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them
To: Will


View this email in your browser
Mel's Video Of The Day!
Date: Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Hello Will,

Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them



In the middle of the winter, Black Swans in Holland sometimes lay their eggs, because their biological clock is still set to Australia. Mom will sit patiently on her nest, in the middle of the ice. I had seen this ending wrong last year, with beautiful little Swanlings that unfortunately had all died the next morning... this time I was going to intervene.

Stealing Black Swan's eggs... to save them

Forward this email to a friend

Today's T-shirt
Bird or Bunny Optical Illusion

Free Shipping With Prime At Amazon.com
Thanks for watching and sharing the videos!
Mel
Buy Mel a Coffee

More of Mel's Videos:
New Videos
Most Popular
Random Video
Pet Videos
Previous Videos Of The Day

Games:
Spider Solitaire
Sudoku

If you received this email from a friend and you like to watch Mel's Video Of The Day... Click Here To Subscribe. There is no cost to subscribe and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Copyright © 2019 Mel's Video Of The Day! All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted in at our website at http://mvotd.com or http://coolestone.com.

Our mailing address is:
Mel's Video Of The Day!
13 Wes Jones Rd
Newland, NC 28657 United States

Add us to your address book


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.



Subject: A Northwest genre: "moss porn" flics
Date: Sun Jan 17 2021 0:54 am
From: hal AT catharus.net
 
To console those stuck at home who can’t make it out to our muddy trails in these choice winter weeks to get their optics steamed up and boots soaked through, here’s an introduction to a Northwest film genre that will make you long for what you’re missing:

https://crosscut.com/culture/2...

Hal Opperman
Seattle
hal at catharus dot net


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters@u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington....



Subject: JBLM January Birdwalk coming up next week
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 22:30 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

The Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course (GC) first birdwalk for 2021 is scheduled for this coming Thursday, January 21. The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit.



We must follow the prescribed rules:

1. Maintain social distancing throughout the walk.
2. Stay in groups of not more than five - we can divide up before we start trekking.
3. Do not share birding or other gear, including scopes, binoculars, etc.
4. Wear a cloth mask. Don't put others or yourself at risk by not wearing one.

Hope to see you there!



May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis

avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com



Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Neal Rd (King)
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 22:18 pm
From: hayncarl AT gmail.com
 
Hi tweets,

There’s an adult female Yellow-headed Blackbird in with a big flock of
Red-winged Blackbirds near the end of Neal Rd right now. More details and
photo in my checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Carl Haynie
Sammamish, WA



Subject: contest: Guess the next 5 state birds!
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 22:17 pm
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Hi all -
Last reminder to get in your guesses for the next 5 new species for WA -
I need to receive your guesses by the end of this long weekend to count.
Join in the fun w/ just 5 quick guesses

Thanks,

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

> On Jan 9, 2021, at 6:59 AM, Matt Bartels wrote:
>
> Hi Tweeters & INWBers
> A reminder that we are getting close to the deadline to join in the ‘guess the next 5 state birds’ contest this round.
> I’m accepting responses for a couple more weeks —
> See message below and the linked article for details.
>
> One fun note: With the appearance of a pretty solid looking Winter Wren yesterday, I’m not accepting guesses of Winter Wren from anyone who has not yet submitted a list. I believe 2 participants so far got that one, so there are early leaders in the game.
>
> Best,
>
> Matt Bartels
> Seattle, WA
>
>> On Dec 11, 2020, at 5:18 AM, Matt Bartels > wrote:
>>
>> hi everyone -
>> I wanted to ping the list to participate in a contest if interested. In the current issue of WOS News [https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://wos.org/documents/wosnews/wosnews188.pdf*page=1__;Iw!!JYXjzlvb!ypddDiqRcKtoD0Hs-PC0yeieZuoQQXON9JCdR36H3z1kC2FfWfO1SDgGN1R0XhXg1op38JNobA$ ], I’ve got a summary of the last round of this game. 31 people sent in guesses last time [late 2017-2018], predicting the next 5 birds that would be added to the official state list of birds. After adding 8 [or 7, depending on how you count] species, there were 3 winners last time: Congrats to Evie Merrill, Grace Oliver, and Brad Waggoner for correctly predicting two of the new species.
>>
>> This will be the 4th time this contest has been run - once by Dennis Paulson in 1994, twice more recently by me, and now this new round.
>>
>> Will a Cerulean Warble come to visit? How about a Winter Wren? Maybe the next bird will see us finally add a phylloscopus warbler to our list... or a Mississippi Kite….. too many choices!
>>
>> To join in: Read the article above for details and ideas, spend some time with the state checklist and other resources to figure out what seems likely, and then make your guesses. Send a list of 5 species to me here, by mid-January. Then, in a couple years or so, we’ll see how we all did.
>>
>> Looking forward to seeing what the collective wisdom of the crowd comes up to this time around.
>>
>> Matt Bartels
>> Seattle, WA
>>
>>
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> https://urldefense.com/v3/__yy...



Subject: Okanogan County Birding
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 20:51 pm
From: magicman32 AT rocketmail.com
 
Hi all,

On Wednesday and Thursday I birded around the varied habitats of Okanogan County. Unfortunately the wind was quite strong on Wednesday, which conferred very few birds, but things really calmed down on Thursday, which turned out to be a gorgeous day!

I started out Wednesday morning along Fancher Rd, which runs through shrub steppe and fields along the eastern base of a tall cliff (the butte blocked the wind nicely!). I normally stop here in the hopes of a calling Chukar or maybe a soaring Golden Eagle. On this morning I got all this and more! I flushed two Gray Partridge off the road approaching the cliff, my first time seeing this species at this location. At the cliffs, three Chukar called along with a Canyon Wren as the sun warmed the fairly calm, sheltered air. My personal highlight was a soaring Golden Eagle, which alit on an exposed branch about halfway up the cliff, allowing wonderful views with great lighting. As I watched it, another Golden Eagle appeared, presumably the male of the pair that breeds here, and began its majestic swooping display right above my head!! Absolutely magical…

Well, it was all downhill from there. Emboldened by my great start to the morning, I eagerly charged up into the highlands and found…. very little. The wind howled, and the temperatures were unseasonably warm, keeping most birds in hiding. I scoured the highlands for five hours before turning tail, finding little more interesting than a small flock of Snow Buntings along Havillah Road and a few Red Crossbills along Hungry Hollow Rd. My 30 minute stint along Mary Anne Creek Rd (normally one of the premier spots) was indicative of the day: I saw a grand total of two Black-billed Magpies on the ENTIRE 6 miles road, despite multiple stops in the prime habitat. It was really slow… at least it was sunny and beautiful!

A bit discouraged, I decided Great Gray Owls and the like would be a fantasy on such a day, and opted to head down to Osoyoos Lake in hopes of waterfowl and gulls. Well, it was just as windy here, which made scoping for waterfowl very difficult and caused the gulls to wheel in the air, neglecting to present me with very good views. I was just about to give up, when suddenly the wind virtually stopped as the sun set! Finally I was able to get some bearing on the birds present, finding three Red-breasted Mergansers, 12 Trumpeter Swans, Barrow’s Goldeneyes, Herring, California and Olympic Gulls, and a Merlin. A pleasant respite to end the day…

Thursday was much more lucrative. I decided I would do something I had always wanted to do, but never really found the time for: walk the entirety of Cassimer Bar Wildlife Area. This place is truly awesome, and it is not birded even close to enough. It’s the kind of place that if situated near a larger populace could perhaps garner 240+ species and thousands of eBird lists. As it stands, there are still fewer than 200 checklists for the location, amounting to almost 190 species. Anyways, the birds! I found a number of interesting birds on my survey, including a continuing American White Pelican, Glaucous Gull, Virginia Rails and Marsh Wrens, as well Dunlin, Say’s Phoebe, Barn Owl, Hermit Thrush, Purple Finch, American Tree Sparrow, Cackling Goose, Pine Siskin, both Kinglets, Wilson’s Snipe and 15 species of duck. All of these are fairly difficult to come by in Okanogan county winters, so I was quite pleased! I totaled 57 species for the morning, easily my highest total at single location in January in Okanogan county. Below my report I will outline some tips for birding Cassimer Bar, in hopes that I can convince a couple birders to check out this fantastic place and find some great birds!

Afterwards, I crossed the road from Cassimer Bar and scoped the Okanogan River at the junction of hwy 17 and hwy 97, which was swarming with waterfowl! Here I estimated around 650 American Wigeon, though I was unable to pick out an Eurasian. It seems like the spot to do so, though! There was also a single Tundra Swan mixed in with 44 Trumpeter Swans, a Purple Finch, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Cedar Waxwings.

I drove to Grand Coulee afterwards, spending an unexciting 45 minutes hoping for gulls below the dam or at Electric City. My only sighting of any note was a continuing American Dipper below the dam. My real reason for coming this way was to bird the Columbia River west of Nespelem, something I had never done before. This place is vaunted as the only reliable place in Okanogan county for interesting gulls, attracted to three large aquiculture operations. Though the riverside access points were closed to non-tribal members due to COVID, I was able to spy some interesting birds right along the road. Oh, and did I mention that this area is just drop dead gorgeous?! Worth the trek for the scenery alone. On my drive there I had a Townsend’s Solitaire fly over my car and noticed several Northern Shrikes perched on telephone wires. Along the river, I found one spot along Nespelem Bar where I could scan perching gulls while Canyon Wrens called, finding a Thayer’s (Iceland) Gull, and one interesting 1CY gull that I believe was likely a Herring x Glaucous-winged Gull amongst the Herring, Ring-billed and Olympic Gulls. Not much else of note was around, but as I mentioned, it was gorgeous and I didn’t mind. I rounded out the day with 71 species, a lovely day of Okanogan birding.

Alright, now for the Cassimer Bar directions! Previously, I have mostly accessed the bar by parking at the pullout just east of the bridge on hwy 97 the crosses the Okanogan River. This can be good, but there’s a fair bit of road noise, it’s a fair walk out to the Columbia, and even once you get to the Columbia you can’t really view everything without walking further. Instead, I suggest you park at the west end of Cassimer Bar Rd (48.0960933, -119.7086949; this can be pretty muddy, but it’s entirely manageable in an AWD car) and walk south to the river at (48.0921492, -119.7107153). This is where many of the good birds I mentioned above were viewed from, including AWPE, GLGU, ATSP, SAPH, DUNL and more. This spot allows a nice view of the river, where you can identify almost all the waterfowl within view on Lake Pateros. From there, either walk west and complete a shorter loop back to the parking area, or if you’re feeling adventurous, walk south to this general area (48.0875577, -119.7067684), which has some nice thick trees. This is where the HETH, PUFI, BANO and most passerines were, and has prime habitat for something like a Long-eared Owls or migrants in the spring or fall. Cows have made some paths through the trees, making it fairly easy to get back into the thickets themselves. This area also often has mud in the fall, making it a good spot to look for shorebirds. From there, I would just backtrack and finish walking the loop. In this reasonable walk, you are able to cover the best parts of the bar, probably finding some cool birds!

Happy birding all,

Eric Heisey
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Jan. 17, 2021
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 20:03 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hello, Tweeters,

Aired last week on BirdNote:
* Why Do Owls Bob Their Heads?
http://bit.ly/1PmYGxD
* The Hoopoe’s Smelly Family
http://bit.ly/3ig9t49
* Why Do Some Birds Flock?
http://bit.ly/2FwbAgo
* Long-eared Owls Fly at Night
http://bit.ly/3bPONyN
* Why Arctic Terns Have Short Beaks
http://bit.ly/2m1w6gL
* Why Do Grebes Eat Their Feathers
http://bit.ly/3oRAahT
* Hooded Merganser
http://bit.ly/2iRD1VZ
=========================
Next week on BirdNote: The Noisy Willet +
Treeswift Nest - Exquisite Minimalism,
61 Tons of Robins, and more!
http://bit.ly/38LBJse
--------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Another comment?
Please let us know. mailto:info@birdnote.org
------------------------------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
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... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bird...
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podca...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show,
plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on
the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1600+ episodes and more than 1200 videos in the archive
Thanks for listening!

Take care, stay safe, and enjoy the birds!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



Subject: spam
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 19:09 pm
From: jstewart AT olympus.net
 
I haven’t gotten any; wonder why I am so fortunate?



Wings,

Jan



Jan Stewart

922 E. Spruce Street

Sequim, WA 98382-3518

(360) 681-2827

jstewart@olympus.net



From: Tweeters On Behalf Of Twink Coffman
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 8:00 PM
To: Ellen Cohen
Cc: tweeters@u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] spam



getting lots of spam lately... wonder what's up..







On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 9:28 AM Ellen Cohen > wrote:

problem with spam replies. Am I the only one?

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--



Twink

wilber4818@gmail.com

Ferndale, WA

out on the beach

be kind to one another



Subject: spam
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 4:00 am
From: wilber4818 AT gmail.com
 
getting lots of spam lately... wonder what's up..



On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 9:28 AM Ellen Cohen wrote:

> problem with spam replies. Am I the only one?
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>


--

Twink
wilber4818@gmail.com
Ferndale, WA
out on the beach
be kind to one another



Subject: Earthshine Alert
Date: Sat Jan 16 2021 1:54 am
From: gibsondesign15 AT gmail.com
 
If you look West (or WSW from Port Townsend) you maybe you can see the Moon, and if you look carefully you may note Earthshine -the sunlight reflecting from Earth to gently light up the the darkish part of of the Moon with a dim blue-ish glow allowing you to see the entire side of the Moon that faces us. It’s the coolest thing ever, and is visible every crescent Moon. If you can see the moon at all that is.

Jeff Gibson
Moon watching in
Port Townsend
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Subject: From Tweeters Administration - update #2 ("Incursions" Tweeters-linked invasion of your email...)
Date: Fri Jan 15 2021 17:02 pm
From: elc AT uw.edu
 
Sadly, we are being dragged into deeper Lowlands, Tweets.  An active investigation continues, thanks to the UW-IT folks.  But meanwhile, the last 24 hours has made clear that worse infiltration is occurring.  That is, you may have seen that low-life “xyz" has posed as a legitimate new subscriber, and using email address “abc” managed to post into our listserv, yesterday.    As soon as detected, “abc” was removed from the database (and indeed banned), but sorry to say that is only one single incursion, blotted out.

To the untold numbers of birding enthusiasts who enjoy what Tweeters represents, new dents and bruises aside, this Forum will do its best to adapt and roll, and strengthen wherever possible.

To our 3600+ members (some subscribed since the inception of Tweeters), who are heartily appreciated for joining and often contributing to Tweeters, you are therefore Tweeter's “Living Bird” with apologies to Cornell. One word - Solidarity.

Here is information on two new items: one is an action we have initiated Jan 14, 2021 for new subscribers. And the second, one you will see effective over the next 24 hours, along with revised heading and footing you will soon see attached to each day's Digest. The first will not specifically affect many of you, for you are already subscribers. The second is key for those who post to Tweeters.

= New applicants (subscribers, members): after an individual applies on the website this information now passes through an additional review step.

= Posting to Tweeters (as you know, one must be a member to post): “Posters” (those who send material to Tweeters) will no longer see your personal email displayed in the “From” field on Tweeters. It will henceforth be key to our ability to engage with each other “off-line” on specific details or in offering assistance to one another, for all “posters” to please, please place your “coded” email address at the bottom of what you send in, where your name and location should already be shown. For example: johndoe at gmail dot com


[ THIS below is essentially identical to what ended Administration "Update #1” ]

We continue to ask for your actions and cooperation, as directly below

1. Please do carry forth with all the fabulous exchange that has made Tweeters what it is today, and has been for these many decades.
2. Let’s try not to soil what is held and seen (and retained) in Tweeters; we can exclude that type of notoriety.
3. If you are newly affected because you have posted something, follow for now THIS set of requests to assist the search for solutions:
- please do not post into tweeters your report of the “incursion” … or even great suggestions you might have
- please do not forward the offending material
- consider sending a short report to us by writing to: tweeters-owner@mailman11.u.washington.edu
- in the subject line (title) kindly place "Incursions" Tweeters-linked invasion of email (or something of that sort)
- include screenshots of material (as well as whether you are a “Digest" or “Immediate” subscriber to tweeters)

Should anyone be hugely experienced in cyber-sleuthing, please do make contact (tweeters-owner@mailman11.u.washington.edu).
Stay tuned for future updates. And a personal thank you to all those who have taken the time to help in our investigations to date. Best wishes, all!

Elaine Chuang, Seattle
List Administrator … along with Hal Opperman and Dan Victor, the original masterminds (est. 1992)
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Elaine



Subject: Black-Billed Magpie
Date: Fri Jan 15 2021 16:41 pm
From: wohlers13 AT gmail.com
 
Joan, a Black-billed Magpie was being seen on Fidalgo last year. I heard
about it and went to find it on Oct. 1st when it was at the Skyline Marina,
which isn't far from Rosario Beach. I wonder if it's the same bird. I don't
see a local sighting after Oct 2nd but maybe I'm missing something, or
maybe it wasn't reported for a few months.

Lynn
www.bluebrightly.com


Virus-free.
www.avast.com

<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 6:34 PM Joan Bird wrote:

> Joanne Weldon and I included Rosario Head on our Skagit County birding
> route today in the hope that the Yellow-billed Loon might make an
> appearance. As we stepped out into the open at the bay (just past the
> parking lot and lawn area) we were startled by a very loud bird
> vocalization. We immediately looked up "when what to my wondering eyes
> should appear" but a Black-billed Magpie flying about 50' up and 50' out, a
> large and vivid black and white bird with a very long tail, flying
> southward. It proceeded across the bay and then up and over Rosario Head,
> vocalizing as it disappeared from sight. A quick trip up to the top of
> Rosario Head did not give us another sighting. No Yellow-billed Loon for
> us today, but the Magpie at a beach in Western Wash. on a brilliantly
> clear and sunny day put a big smile on our faces and was certainly our bird
> of the day. Perhaps it was blown off course by the recent storms?
>
> Joan Bird
> Bellingham
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters@u.washington.edu
> http://mailman11.u.washington....
>


--
Lynn Wohlers

Blogging at Bluebrightly
Photography on Flickr
And at Lynn Wohlers.com



Subject: WOS Presentation: Monday, Feb. 1, Dinosaurs Amongst Us with Kim Adelson
Date: Fri Jan 15 2021 5:32 am
From: meetings AT wos.org
 
In recent years our old conceptions about dinosaurs have been swept aside as new fossil finds and technologies have
yielded revolutionary insights into their evolution and their world, the world that birds emerged in.

What do we now know about the relationship between dinosaurs and birds?  Our presenter on February 1, Kim Adelson,
says that virtually all paleontologists agree that birds evolved from dinosaurs, and most even go so far as to claim that birds
are, in fact, living dinosaurs.  In her presentation, she will explain the structural and behavioral similarities between birds
and the more “classic” dinosaurs they evolved from.

She guarantees that you will not only be surprised as to how dinosaur-like birds are, but also how very bird-like dinosaurs
were.  After this talk, you will never think about T. rex in the same way again!

What:  Dinosaurs Amongst Us with Kim Adelson
When:  Monday, February 1, 7:30 pm
Where:  Via GoToMeeting (Sign-in begins at 7:15 pm)

The Washington Ornithological Society’s Monthly Meetings remain open to all as we continue to welcome the wider birding
community to join us online via GoToMeeting.

For login information, go to http://wos.org/about-wos/month... there, if you are not yet a member, I hope
you will consider becoming one.

Please join us!

Vicki King, WOS Program Coordinator
Seattle
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Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2021-01-14
Date: Fri Jan 15 2021 3:33 am
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
 
Tweets – A stunningly glorious sunrise and a wonderful, warm, sunny morning at Marymoor today.  The park is extensively flooded, however, and even with tall boots we were not able to get into some of the southern end of the park.  Worse, the whole place was OVERRUN with very active American Robins (plus enough vocalizing European Starlings to muddle birding by ear), to the point that it made finding any other birds a challenge.  Still, we managed.

Highlights:
a.. Wood Duck – pair hidden in the willows at the Rowing Club
b.. American Wigeon and Green-winged Teal – huddled in the middle, closed sections of the flooded Dog Meadow
c.. Ring-necked Pheasant – “Lonesome George II” heard from Viewing Mound just before 8
d.. Horned Grebe – 2 or 3 FAR out on the lake, from the flooded Lake Platform
e.. Cooper’s Hawk – three sightings, at least 1 adult, and one juvenile
f.. Hairy Woodpecker – Mason had one in the East Meadow
g.. Northern Shrike – one in the East Meadow, seen by most of us
h.. Cedar Waxwing – 3 at Dog Central, mixed in with American Robins. Very unusual at Marymoor in winter
i.. Western Meadowlark – Jordan’s group had 2 in fields 7-8-9
A late scan of the lake turned up a lone male HOODED MERGANSER, a female CANVASBACK, and a male and female LESSER SCAUP. We only had 8 Scaup sightings in 2020, and only one of those was definitely Lesser. Scaup were much more common at Marymoor 20+ years ago.

Near the Art Barn, ENE of the mansion, we had a DOUGLAS SQUIRREL, only the 5th time we’ve seen one in the park (compared with almost 1000 sightings for Eastern Gray Squirrel).

Misses today included Ring-billed Gull (though a flock of gulls took flight when I was only 1/2 way through scoping them), Marsh Wren, and Purple Finch.

For the day, 60 species plus a probable Barn Owl that went down as owl sp. For 2021, we’re at 67 species.

= Michael Hobbs
= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
= BirdMarymoor@gmail.com



Subject: Black-Billed Magpie
Date: Fri Jan 15 2021 2:34 am
From: jbird202 AT hotmail.com
 
Joanne Weldon and I included Rosario Head on our Skagit County birding route today in the hope that the Yellow-billed Loon might make an appearance.  As we stepped out into the open at the bay (just past the parking lot and lawn area) we were startled by a very loud bird vocalization.  We immediately looked up "when what to my wondering eyes should appear" but a Black-billed Magpie flying about 50' up and 50' out, a large and vivid black and white bird with a very long tail, flying southward.  It proceeded across the bay and then up and over Rosario Head, vocalizing as it disappeared from sight.  A quick trip up to the top of Rosario Head did not give us another sighting.  No Yellow-billed Loon for us today, but the Magpie at a beach in Western Wash.  on a brilliantly clear and sunny day put a big smile on our faces and was certainly our bird of the day.   Perhaps it was blown off course by the recent storms?

Joan Bird
Bellingham



Subject: Douglas County Birding - with the link this time
Date: Thu Jan 14 2021 20:20 pm
From: tsbrennan AT hotmail.com
 
The link would help, yeah?

www.douglascountybirding.blogspot.com.



Subject: Douglas County Birding
Date: Thu Jan 14 2021 20:17 pm
From: tsbrennan AT hotmail.com
 
Tweets and Inland Birders,

Belated post, but I wanted to share that I'm birding Douglas County this year, and will be blogging. Three posts are up from a Jan 1-3 trip, and I'm pretty excited to explore this beautiful place in 2021.

Cheers,
Tim Brennan
Renton, WA



Subject: a few recent Clark County birds
Date: Thu Jan 14 2021 20:14 pm
From: jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters,

Just a quick update from Clark County:

A BRANDT'S CORMORANT was found yesterday along the Columbia River at
Vancouver by birders in Portland. It is perched on one of the cement
pilings that support the I-5 Bridge. It seems to be within feet of the
state line - thankfully appearing to be on the Washington side. This may
be a first county record but I don't know that for sure.

https://ebird.org/pnw/checklis...

I found a female or immature male TUFTED DUCK at BluRock Landing which is
just west of Vancouver Lake. See the eBird checklist for the exact
location.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S7...

Keep your eyes and ears skyward or on the water.

Jim
--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker@gmail.com



Subject: Where to report bad replies to RFI
Date: Thu Jan 14 2021 18:12 pm
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Help! Who do I report bad replies to on this site?
Thanks,
Caryn
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