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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on April 22, 2018, 8:55 pm

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22 Apr: @ 20:48:02 
Tufted Duck at Mandy Road, Lewis County [Gary Wiles]
22 Apr: @ 20:35:26 
Re: Seeking advice on planning a trip to Columbia (places and resouces, not guides) [johanna striar]
22 Apr: @ 19:52:32 
Migrants in the yard [Joshua Glant]
22 Apr: @ 14:12:01 
The Birdbooker Report [Ian Paulsen]
22 Apr: @ 14:02:28 
Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival [jimullrich]
22 Apr: @ 13:57:51 
Seeking advice on planning a trip to Columbia (places and resouces, not guides) [Margaret Pepe]
22 Apr: @ 13:23:26 
N. Goshawk, Ridgefield, Clark Co, WA [Bob]
22 Apr: @ 12:48:02 
Skamania Co BN Stilt - no [Pointers]
22 Apr: @ 12:21:17 
Marymoor Mountain Bluebirds - yes [Michael Hobbs]
22 Apr: @ 11:14:06 
Lewis County Tufted Duck (“TUDU”) [Tom Mansfield]
22 Apr: @ 10:34:05 
Re: Union Bay Watch } The Feast [Hubbell]
22 Apr: @ 10:22:59 
RE: Union Bay Watch } The Feast [Jeff Kozma]
22 Apr: @ 09:38:09 
Re: First Barred owl calls / Caryn / Wedgwood [ck park]
22 Apr: @ 05:55:21 
First Barred owl calls / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler]
22 Apr: @ 00:35:51 
Call for merlin sightings [Benjamin Johnson]
21 Apr: @ 23:57:38 
Re: flashlight for owling RFI [Josh Adams]
21 Apr: @ 23:53:18 
Lewis County Birding 4/21 (Tufted Duck, White-throated Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, Rough-legged Hawk) [Tim Brennan]
21 Apr: @ 23:34:59 
Re: Skamania County Black-necked Stilt [4/21/18] [Wilson Cady]
21 Apr: @ 22:43:55 
flashlight for owling RFI [Gary Bletsch]
21 Apr: @ 20:52:01 
Skamania County Black-necked Stilt [4/21/18] [Matt Bartels]
21 Apr: @ 19:34:20 
Lewis Co. Tufted Duck [Dave Hayden]
21 Apr: @ 18:53:14 
Re: Urban Merlins [Kevin Lucas]
21 Apr: @ 18:00:28 
Banded Barred owl. [Dan Reiff, PhD]
21 Apr: @ 17:20:39 
Merlin pair mating / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler]
21 Apr: @ 16:49:19 
Tufted Duck not Gifted Duck [Becky K]
21 Apr: @ 16:34:12 
Gifted Duck [Becky K]
21 Apr: @ 15:59:04 
Union Bay Watch } The Feast [Hubbell]
21 Apr: @ 14:57:14 
Chipping Sparrow [Philip Dickinson]
21 Apr: @ 14:52:02 
Urban Merlins [Bud Anderson]
21 Apr: @ 14:24:41 
Re: Merlins in Kirkland and Lake Forest Park? [birdmarymoor]
21 Apr: @ 14:04:27 
BirdNote, last week and the week of April 22, 2018 [Ellen Blackstone]
21 Apr: @ 13:58:13 
FOY Pacific-slope Flycatcher, West Seattle [Tucker, Trileigh]
21 Apr: @ 13:42:34 
Lewis County Tufted Duck [Roger Moyer]
21 Apr: @ 13:39:34 
Merlins in Kirkland and Lake Forest Park? [Jeremy Schwartz]
21 Apr: @ 11:07:50 
Merlin calls continue in Wedgwood / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler]
21 Apr: @ 10:30:26 
Saturday morning Snipe [Dee Dee]
21 Apr: @ 09:52:03 
Tufted Duck Lewis County [Kevin Black]
20 Apr: @ 23:26:50 
Re: Magnuson Park, 20 April 2018 [J Christian Kessler]
20 Apr: @ 21:56:02 
RE: Washington Big Day Record [Randy Hill]
20 Apr: @ 19:52:24 
FOY Rufus Hummingbird, Vancouver [David Haveman]
20 Apr: @ 19:25:50 
Discovery Park this afternoon [Lonnie Somer]
20 Apr: @ 17:31:55 
Magnuson Park, 20 April 2018 [Scott Ramos]
20 Apr: @ 15:50:44 
White Pelicans of Padilla Bay [Cathy Scott]
20 Apr: @ 15:01:34 
Arboretum [Dan McDougall-Treacy]
20 Apr: @ 12:57:32 
Marymoor Purple Martin [birdmarymoor]
20 Apr: @ 11:44:29 
RE: White-tailed Kite-Lewis County Airport [Randy Hill]
20 Apr: @ 11:25:34 
Vaux's Happening [Larry Schwitters]
20 Apr: @ 10:35:07 
Subject: Hawking [J Crouch]
19 Apr: @ 22:28:26 
Bamded Tundra Swan reported earlier [Keith Carlson]
19 Apr: @ 21:47:20 
Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk -4-19-2018 - early arrivals+ [Denis DeSilvis]





Subject: Tufted Duck at Mandy Road, Lewis County
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 20:48 pm
From: wilesharkey AT yahoo.com
 
Tweeters,
The Tufted Duck was still present at the gravel quarry pond along Mandy Road in Lewis County this afternoon from 4:10 to 5:15 pm. The bird was present near shore in the southeastern corner of the pond, where it spent much of its time diving near 3 Ring-necked Ducks. The bright white flanks are the most notable field trait to watch for. Viewing is best from along the roadside just north of a row of small fir trees lining the road. The roadside is also wide enough there to allow parking for several vehicles.
Gary WilesOlympia



Subject: Seeking advice on planning a trip to Columbia (places and resouces, not guides)
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 20:35 pm
From: jlstri AT gmail.com
 
I dated a guy who went to Columbia on the upper west side of Manhattan.
Colombia, however, is a country, not a house of learning.

Cheers, mistake easily made! Made the exact same one myself. The
Colombians may appreciate your knowing the difference.

Johanna

On Sun, Apr 22, 2018 at 11:56 AM, Margaret Pepe wrote:

> Wondering if anyone out there has advice on good places to stay in
> Columbia for a 10-12 day birding trip late December 2018.
>
> We don't generally use guides or bird in groups as my son especially likes
> to find the birds himself (he's quite good). But we do like to be in birdy
> places and we do like to meet birders along the way. We especially like to
> stay at birding/eco lodges and hike in places where some guidance can be
> had at the visitor center. We also wouldn't want too many long or harrowing
> car rides.
>
> If you have any suggestions at all we would be most appreciative. Please
> respond to [email protected]
>
> Thanks
> ==Margaret and Mike Pepe (Seattle)
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>



Subject: Migrants in the yard
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 19:52 pm
From: josh.n.glant AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweets,

I was so happy to return from Maui and see everything so verdant and lively. This morning as I was listening from my window, I heard a Hammonds Flycatcher calling from the forest, and a Huttons Vireo was repeating its metallic notes.

While working on my homework in the evening, I heard vireo song once more. But suddenly the song departed from the monotone repetition I expected - this vireo was no Huttons!

While I never laid eyes on the Cassins vireo, even as I sprinted outside to get a look, I still got to enjoy the birds lovely sliding notes, one of my favorites of any bird. My pishing did not lure in the vireo, but did succeed in attracting my FOY Black-throated Gray Warbler, singing softly and catching flies, with missing feathers on the left flank.

In the evening, sunlight concentrates on the east side of the ravine where I live, bringing insects towards the warmth and subsequently drawing in migrant passerines. This is my theory for why good migrants come by my yard late in the day such as the Nashville Warbler last spring around the same time of month and similar time of day in the same tree as the Black-throated Gray!

Good birding, Joshua Glant
Mercer Island, WA
_______________________________________________
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[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: The Birdbooker Report
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 14:12 pm
From: birdbooker AT zipcon.net
 
HI ALL:
This week's titles are:

1) The Feather Thief
2) The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

3) Butterflies of the Pacific Northwest
4) Fossils Frogs and Toads of North America

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

5) The Blue Tit

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

6) Science Comics: Sharks

https://birdbookerreport.blogs...

sincerely
--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
Visit my BIRDBOOKER REPORT blog here:
https://birdbookerreport.blogs...
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 14:02 pm
From: jimullrich AT gmail.com
 
Hello Tweeters:
Save the dates this coming weekend for the Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival, 4/27-29. Visit www.shorebirdfestival.com for details.
All trips and activities leave from the Hoquiam Middle School or Grays Harbor NWR.
Jim
Ullrich

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Seeking advice on planning a trip to Columbia (places and resouces, not guides)
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 13:57 pm
From: mspepe AT uw.edu
 
Wondering if anyone out there has advice on good places to stay in Columbia
for a 10-12 day birding trip late December 2018.

We don't generally use guides or bird in groups as my son especially likes
to find the birds himself (he's quite good). But we do like to be in birdy
places and we do like to meet birders along the way. We especially like to
stay at birding/eco lodges and hike in places where some guidance can be
had at the visitor center. We also wouldn't want too many long or harrowing
car rides.

If you have any suggestions at all we would be most appreciative. Please
respond to [email protected]

Thanks
==Margaret and Mike Pepe (Seattle)



Subject: N. Goshawk, Ridgefield, Clark Co, WA
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 13:23 pm
From: rflores_2 AT msn.com
 
I get them occasionally and a nice adult male just soared over the house as I sat out here watching the feeder. I am not sure if this is just a random occurance or a movement  but regardless keep those eyes up.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WAPOST: Send your post to [email protected]
JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/...
OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
Contact moderator: [email protected]



Subject: Skamania Co BN Stilt - no
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 12:48 pm
From: pointers AT pacifier.com
 
Lyn Topinka
Vancouver,Wa.
NorthwestJourney.com
ColumbiaRiverImages.com

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Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Marymoor Mountain Bluebirds - yes
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 12:21 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
 
Yesterday's two females remain in the East Meadow now.

Also saw Lincoln's Sparrow, American Goldfinch, Wilson's Snipe, Purple
Martin, and heard Orange-crowned Warbler.

- Michael Hobbs



Subject: Lewis County Tufted Duck (“TUDU”)
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 11:14 am
From: birds AT t-mansfield.com
 
Continues Sunday morning as of the time of this post at the Mandy Road gravel pit pond. Signage says public access for fishing regardless of gate status but gravel pit operating today. Employee in truck told me to leave, which I did.  Thanks Black & Brennan for finding TUDU!

Tom Mansfield headed north

Sent from my iPhone



Subject: Union Bay Watch } The Feast
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 10:34 am
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Jeff,

What a wonderful cheeseburger analogy! That must have been truly fun to see.

Larry

> On Apr 22, 2018, at 8:21 AM, Jeff Kozma wrote:
>
> This reminds me of a Hairy Woodpecker nest I was observing in order to conduct feeding rate observations. A male Hairy brought an absolutely enormous wood-boring beetle larvae, probably from Ceryambicidae or Buprestidae beetles, to the nest cavity. The young were old enough to come up near the hole to be fed so the adult did not need to enter the cavity. It tried multiple times over about 5 minutes to feed that grub (which hung out the end of the adults bill) to its nestlings. I think it was just too big for the chicks to eat. Finally, the adult looked around and as if to say, well if they wont eat it, I will, and swallowed the grub. These beetle larvae are kind of like cheeseburgers, full of fat and protein.
>
> Jeff Kozma
>
> Yakima
> <>
> From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected] ] On Behalf Of Hubbell
> Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2018 1:57 PM
> To: Tweeters >
> Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Feast
>
> Tweeters,
>
> If there was a contest to determine the largest food item a Downy Woodpecker might eat, this weeks post would provide a potential winner.
>
> I hope you enjoy the brief escape into the life of a Downy.
>
> http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....
>
> Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!
>
> Larry Hubbell
> [email protected]



Subject: Union Bay Watch } The Feast
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 10:22 am
From: jcr_5105 AT charter.net
 
This reminds me of a Hairy Woodpecker nest I was observing in order to conduct feeding rate observations.  A male Hairy brought an absolutely enormous wood-boring beetle larvae, probably from Ceryambicidae or Buprestidae beetles, to the nest cavity.  The young were old enough to come up near the hole to be fed so the adult did not need to enter the cavity.  It tried multiple times over about 5 minutes to feed that grub (which hung out the end of the adults bill) to its nestlings.  I think it was just too big for the chicks to eat.  Finally, the adult looked around and as if to say, well if they wont eat it, I will, and swallowed the grub.  These beetle larvae are kind of like cheeseburgers, full of fat and protein.  



Jeff Kozma



Yakima



From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Hubbell
Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2018 1:57 PM
To: Tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } The Feast



Tweeters,



If there was a contest to determine the largest food item a Downy Woodpecker might eat, this weeks post would provide a potential winner.



I hope you enjoy the brief escape into the life of a Downy.



http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....



Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!



Larry Hubbell

[email protected]



Subject: First Barred owl calls / Caryn / Wedgwood
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 9:38 am
From: travelgirl.fics AT gmail.com
 
i heard my FOY call just a few nights ago.  i love my greenbelt :)

00 caren
ParkGallery.org
george davis creek, north fork

On Sun, Apr 22, 2018 at 3:54 AM, Caryn Schutzler
wrote:

> Was awoken at 3am to the first barred owl. Two were calling and when I
> stepped out barefoot onto the pollen-laden deck to say hello, It sounded
> nearly overhead.
> Happy Earth Day!
> Never a Silent Spring...
>
> Caryn / Wide awake in Wedgwood
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>



Subject: First Barred owl calls / Caryn / Wedgwood
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 5:55 am
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Was awoken at 3am to the first barred owl. Two were calling and when I stepped out barefoot onto the pollen-laden deck to say hello, It sounded nearly overhead.
Happy Earth Day!
Never a Silent Spring...

Caryn / Wide awake in Wedgwood



_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Call for merlin sightings
Date: Sun Apr 22 2018 0:35 am
From: tiger80 AT hotmail.com
 
Hello All.  Spring is here, and the merlins are starting to "sing".  Kim and I will be continuing our Seattle-area merlin project investigating merlin nest site characteristics, nesting success and density, site and pair fidelity, and annual movements.  Weve seen some Tweeters posts about merlin activity already this spring, and as always, merlin observations and resightings of banded merlins are invaluable to our study.  We'd be very interested to hear about any banded merlin sightings or possible breeding activity that you may observe, or even general merlin observations, particularly in North Seattle, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, and Edmonds.  If you are so inclined to share your observations please contact Ben Vang-Johnson (bvjohnson87 at gmail dot com) or Kim McCormick (kim.mccormick at comcast dot net).  We'll keep any information shared with us confidential, and we greatly appreciate any help you can provide.

A little more about the bands:
To track individual merlin movements and relationships we band some merlins with blue or red color bands. Each color band has a two-character code that identifies the merlin. Blue bands use two letters, stacked one on top of the other, read top to bottom. Red bands use two numbers, side-by-side, read left to right. These bands can be read with a spotting scope or powerful camera. If you happen to be watching a merlin through your scope/camera take a look at its legs when it stretches or moves around and you might see a colored band.

Thanks for your help!

Ben



Subject: flashlight for owling RFI
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 23:57 pm
From: xjoshx AT gmail.com
 
Gary,
I've had good luck with the 500 lumen Duracell LED flashlights Costco
sometimes sells in two packs for $20. They take 3 C batteries, have the
adjustable beam you mention, and have lasted well for me. Just make sure
you remove the batteries when storing for long periods of time. Alkaline
batteries are notorious for leaking and killing electronics.

Unfortunately Costco seems to currently be only carrying a single pack 4 C
1000 lumen model for the same price. I'm sure it's fine, but the larger
size and higher price are annoying.

Worth noting that lumen ratings should be taken with a grain of salt,
especially with online retailers.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA



> ---------- Forwarded message ---------
> From: Gary Bletsch
> Date: Sat, Apr 21, 2018, 8:43 PM
> Subject: [Tweeters] flashlight for owling RFI
> To: Tweeters Tweeters
>
>
> Dear Tweeters,
>
> My little LED flashlight went kaputt after only a year and a half. I have
> bad luck with LED flashlights, but also realize that the old flashlights
> with light bulbs are pass.
>
> I would love some recommendations for a good owling light. My criteria
> would be as follows.
>
> 1. Not too big--hopefully no bigger than a knockwurst.
>
> 2. Adjustable beam that can vary from wide-angle to narrow, and that can
> shine a good long way, to illuminate distant owls, goatsuckers, and so
> forth.
>
> 3. No oddball batteries--preferably either AAA or else some sort of
> rechargeable arrangement.
>
> 4. Durable--so far, I have bought two LED flashlights, with one lasting
> only a month, the other eighteen months. Meanwhile, I have a whole pile of
> decades-old light-bulb style flashlights, including one that weighs more
> than a whole package of the aforementioned wurst.
>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Yours truly,
>
> Gary Bletsch
>
> PS This evening, the 21st of April, a Sora is serenading me at my house!
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>



Subject: Lewis County Birding 4/21 (Tufted Duck, White-throated Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, Rough-legged Hawk)
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 23:53 pm
From: tsbrennan AT hotmail.com
 
Hey Tweets!


Kevin Black and I met early this morning to look for the Ross's Goose that had been playing around with the Cowlitz/Lewis border but had not luck. We did, as posted by Kevin, come across a Tufted Duck on Mandy Road, which was a great start to a great day. I joked as we made the decision to stop there for the possibility of a Greater Scaup, that we'd probably find a Redhead instead. Close enough? Mandy Road gave us a few first of year county birds - Common Yellowthroat (everywhere), Band-tailed Pigeons, and 15-20 Least Sandpipers in a puddle in a pasture, as well as Wood Duck, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, American Pipit, Wood Duck and Ruddy Duck - all at the gravel pit pond.


Our next stop was Napavine, following up on a White-throated Sparrow sighting. It seems to be using brambles over a stretch of 4-5 blocks or so, along the railroad tracks in downtown Napavine. It was my first time getting to hear one sing! Always fun to take a bird off of the "seen only" list and move it onto the good one.


We traveled east from there on Highway 508, and stopped at a produce stand in a rickety old barn next to a silo. We were treated to a sample of some delicious navel oranges, and I got my first view of a Barn Owl ... in a barn! The guy running the stand was happy to let us have a look, so stop by and buy some fruit and veggies and take a look.


We ran out to the East end of Riffe Lake, expecting to be surprised by what we found, and this great location met expectations. Our first surprise was a Vesper Sparrow, on a long walk to the water. We are still getting our bearings out there, but from Dave Hayden's site guide (www.wabirder.com/docs/Lewis_County_Hwy_12_D_Hayden_Site_guide_2016.pdf) on wabirder.com, we thiiiiink it's the second stop mentioned on page 14. We had seen and heard so many Savannah Sparrows, but the Vesper just flew out onto a large log in the middle of the concrete path (which may be a waymarker of sorts if anyone needs one), and sat there posing for pictures for a few minutes before flying back into the tall grass - silent the whole time.


The second surprise was a Rough-legged Hawk! While walking back from the Vesper Sparrow, Kevin spotted it and we watched it off and on all the way until we were driving to the final boat launch, when we lost it. From the boat launch, we added Common Loon, Ring-billed Gull and Townsend's Solitaire to our year lists for the county. The TOSO was sadly a heard only bird, but was calling persistently from some perch across the water.


At Peters Road, we had Snipe (which seem to be peppered throughout Lewis County. I have already omitted 4 or so sightings from the day), Greater Yellowlegs, and Sora.


At this point, we went back to Toledo, where I had left my car, making a few stops on the way back with no really amazing results. I made stops in Centralia and Chehalis on the way back. Galvin Road had 5-10 Greater Yellowlegs in the flooded fields, and a Sora that called fairly actively while I was there. Goodrich Pond had a flock of wigeon, which included one Eurasian. The Centralia Steam Plant was my final stop, and gave me some Dunlin, and the geese I was *really* expecting to see since the start of the day: 25 Greater White-fronted Geese.


Happy birding!


Tim Brennan

By: Dave Hayden Ver. 1.0 (2016) Hwy. 12 (I-5 to White Pass)
www.wabirder.com
By: Dave Hayden Ver. 1.0 (2016) Hwy. 12 (I-5 to White Pass) This guide is designed not only to key in on certain species, but to point out places on



Subject:
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 23:34 pm
From: gorgebirds AT juno.com
 
A BLACK-NECKED STILT is a very good bird for Skamania County where we can go all year without a dowitcher or yellowlegs being reported. This "pond' Is probably one of the most unlikely bodies of water in the county to find a shorebird, it is a puddle of water over a man-made surface left over from when the old town of North Bonneville was demolished for the construction of the second powerhouse at Bonneville Dam. Although Matt emailed me from the field I was outside enjoying the fine Spring day and did not check my emails until after dinner. After reading the message I drove up to the dam racing the sunset and was surprised to find the bird still there at 7:40pm  Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Matt Bartels
To: tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] Skamania County Black-necked Stilt [4/21/18]
Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2018 18:51:16 -0700

Hi all -
Stumbled across a Black-necked Stilt today in Skamania County - apparently a county first.
The Stilt was hanging out in North Bonneville a small puddle/pond just west of the turn-off from SR 14 to the dam/Hamilton Island the pond was visible from SR 14 , but easier to park and get to from the entrance road to Hamilton Island at the Coyote Rd. road.

Otherwise, in Skamania today a couple other birds were around Least Sandpipers along the shore at the Stevenson Rock Creek Mill Pond - also at that spot, 6 Red-breasted Mergansers under the bridge, and 2 Greater White-fronted Geese mixed in with the much bigger-sized domestic geese.


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

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Tweeters mailing list
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http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: flashlight for owling RFI
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 22:43 pm
From: garybletsch AT yahoo.com
 
Dear Tweeters,
My little LED flashlight went kaputt after only a year and a half. I have bad luck with LED flashlights, but also realize that the old flashlights with light bulbs are pass.
I would love some recommendations for a good owling light. My criteria would be as follows.
1. Not too big--hopefully no bigger than a knockwurst.
2. Adjustable beam that can vary from wide-angle to narrow, and that can shine a good long way, to illuminate distant owls, goatsuckers, and so forth.
3. No oddball batteries--preferably either AAA or else some sort of rechargeable arrangement.
4. Durable--so far, I have bought two LED flashlights, with one lasting only a month, the other eighteen months. Meanwhile, I have a whole pile of decades-old light-bulb style flashlights, including one that weighs more than a whole package of the aforementioned wurst.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
Yours truly,
Gary Bletsch
PS This evening, the 21st of April, a Sora is serenading me at my house!



Subject:
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 20:52 pm
From: mattxyz AT earthlink.net
 
Hi all -
Stumbled across a Black-necked Stilt today in Skamania County - apparently a county first.
The Stilt was hanging out in North Bonneville a small puddle/pond just west of the turn-off from SR 14 to the dam/Hamilton Island the pond was visible from SR 14 , but easier to park and get to from the entrance road to Hamilton Island at the Coyote Rd. road.

Otherwise, in Skamania today a couple other birds were around Least Sandpipers along the shore at the Stevenson Rock Creek Mill Pond - also at that spot, 6 Red-breasted Mergansers under the bridge, and 2 Greater White-fronted Geese mixed in with the much bigger-sized domestic geese.


Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Lewis Co. Tufted Duck
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 19:34 pm
From: dtvhm AT nwrain.com
 
The male Tufted Duck was seen by Sherry and I along with others between 4:00 and 4:30 pm. The bird remains close to the shore of the pond nearest the road, so patience is the key for locating this bird. 
Thanks to Kevin Black for posting and finding this rare county bird.

Dave Hayden
Centralia, WA
dtvhm AT nwrain.com



Subject: Urban Merlins
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 18:53 pm
From: vikingcove AT gmail.com
 
Bud,
Thank you for your informative post. I had no idea. Your ending was very
nice too.
Kevin Lucas
Selah

On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 12:51 PM, Bud Anderson
wrote:

> Lynn Oliphant was the first person to document Merlins moving into a North
> American city back in 1971 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
>
> The next year they found 2 pairs and by 1982, there were 16. Lynn
> estimates that there are now around 30-40 pairs in that city.
>
> A similar Merlin expansion also took place about that time in Edmonton,
> Alberta.
>
> Here in Washington, nesting Merlins had always been very rare despite many
> experienced raptor people looking for them for decades.
>
> There is very little historic information about them for our state.
>
> That all started to change in the 1980's thanks to people like Tom
> Gleason, Jim Fackler and others who started finding nesting pairs on the
> Olympic Peninsula and up the Skagit and Stillaguamish Rivers among other
> locations.
>
> The first known city pair that I am aware of was found in a neighborhood
> in Bellingham in 2000.
>
> The number increased to at least four pairs in Bellingham over the next
> few years.
>
> Then Merlins started a slow southward "colonization", showing up over the
> next few years in Burlington, Mt. Vernon, Anacortes, Stanwood, Everett,
> Edmonds and finally Seattle.
>
> Fortunately, we have had Ben Vang-Johnson and Kim Mc Cormick documenting
> and studying this expansion in Seattle since 2013.
>
> This phenomenon of raptors moving into cities is, of course, not just
> limited to Merlins.
>
> We first saw it in Red-tailed Hawks after the I-5 freeway opening back in
> the mid-60's, Bald Eagles showed up in Kirkland and Seward Park shortly
> afterwards, peregrines arrived in 1994, and who knows when the first
> Cooper's Hawks started to breed in Seattle. Butch Olendorff had a pair on
> the hillside west of the Duwamish Slough in the late 1960's.
>
> Ospreys are likely to have been nesting on Lake Washington even further
> back in time.
>
> This colonization involving raptors moving into urban habitats is
> happening all across our continent.
>
> It is also underway in Europe with goshawks and sparrowhawks also moving
> into cities.
>
> So Merlins are likely to keep increasing in numbers locally, and Seattle
> should be no exception.
>
> How wonderful is that?
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>



Subject: Banded Barred owl.
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 18:00 pm
From: dan.owl.reiff AT gmail.com
 
Tweets,
At 1:00 AM this morning, we had a Barred owl on our deck actively hunting.
When I showed my wife the video clips this afternoon, we noticed a band on the left foot/leg that had a circle with four equal areas of color, alternating yellow and orange. No visible numbers.
Of the many Barred owls I have observed, none were banded.
Any thoughts?
Thank you,
Dan Reiff
MI

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Merlin pair mating / Caryn / Wedgwood
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 17:20 pm
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
About 3 pm, hiked over the calling merlin, spotted it and soon after a male came in and observed mating. 

Caryn / Wedgwood neighborhood

Sent from my iPhone
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http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Tufted Duck not Gifted Duck
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 16:49 pm
From: astrokt AT gmail.com
 
> On Apr 21, 2018, at 2:33 PM, Becky K  wrote:
>
> Russ Koppendrayer and I are seeing The Tufted Duck in Lewis County on Mandy Rd. as of 2:30pm
>
> Becky Kent
> Longview
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Subject: Gifted Duck
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 16:34 pm
From: astrokt AT gmail.com
 
Russ Koppendrayer and I are seeing The Tufted Duck  in Lewis County on Mandy Rd.  as of 2:30pm

Becky Kent
Longview_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Union Bay Watch } The Feast
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 15:59 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

If there was a contest to determine the largest food item a Downy Woodpecker might eat, this weeks post would provide a potential winner.

I hope you enjoy the brief escape into the life of a Downy.

http://unionbaywatch.blogspot....

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
[email protected]



Subject: Chipping Sparrow
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 14:57 pm
From: pdickins AT gmail.com
 
New yard bird just showed up on the fence next to my feeders: Chipping Sparrow sporting a nice rusty cap.

Phil Dickinson
Lake Stevens

Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Urban Merlins
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 14:52 pm
From: falconresearch AT gmail.com
 
Lynn Oliphant was the first person to document Merlins moving into a North
American city back in 1971 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

The next year they found 2 pairs and by 1982, there were 16. Lynn estimates
that there are now around 30-40 pairs in that city.

A similar Merlin expansion also took place about that time in Edmonton,
Alberta.

Here in Washington, nesting Merlins had always been very rare despite many
experienced raptor people looking for them for decades.

There is very little historic information about them for our state.

That all started to change in the 1980's thanks to people like Tom Gleason,
Jim Fackler and others who started finding nesting pairs on the Olympic
Peninsula and up the Skagit and Stillaguamish Rivers among other locations.

The first known city pair that I am aware of was found in a neighborhood in
Bellingham in 2000.

The number increased to at least four pairs in Bellingham over the next few
years.

Then Merlins started a slow southward "colonization", showing up over the
next few years in Burlington, Mt. Vernon, Anacortes, Stanwood, Everett,
Edmonds and finally Seattle.

Fortunately, we have had Ben Vang-Johnson and Kim Mc Cormick documenting
and studying this expansion in Seattle since 2013.

This phenomenon of raptors moving into cities is, of course, not just
limited to Merlins.

We first saw it in Red-tailed Hawks after the I-5 freeway opening back in
the mid-60's, Bald Eagles showed up in Kirkland and Seward Park shortly
afterwards, peregrines arrived in 1994, and who knows when the first
Cooper's Hawks started to breed in Seattle. Butch Olendorff had a pair on
the hillside west of the Duwamish Slough in the late 1960's.

Ospreys are likely to have been nesting on Lake Washington even further
back in time.

This colonization involving raptors moving into urban habitats is happening
all across our continent.

It is also underway in Europe with goshawks and sparrowhawks also moving
into cities.

So Merlins are likely to keep increasing in numbers locally, and Seattle
should be no exception.

How wonderful is that?



Subject: Merlins in Kirkland and Lake Forest Park?
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 14:24 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
 
Merlins seem to be increasing in suburban areas in the greater Puget Sound area.  I would not call them rare now.  At Marymoor, weve seen Merlin 5 of the first 16 weeks of 2018, and its not all been one individual based on coloration.  They also nest in some neighborhoods; friends in North Kirkland have some nesting near them.  I believe someone is tracking the many Merlin nests within the City of Seattle.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== [email protected]

From: Jeremy Schwartz
Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2018 11:38 AM
To: Tweeters Washington
Subject: [Tweeters] Merlins in Kirkland and Lake Forest Park?

Hi Tweeters!

Are Merlins particularly rare for the Kirkland and Lake Forest Park areas? My wife and I have heard what I'm 99% sure is the call of a Merlin multiple times, but the Merlin app is describing them as rare for my location. I've also seen a Merlin-sized bird making this sound a few times, but at a distance.

Thanks, and keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com
Lake Forest Park



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of April 22, 2018
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 14:04 pm
From: ellen AT 123imagine.net
 
Hello, Tweeters,

Celebrating Earth Day on April 22!

Last week on BirdNote:
* Sprague's Pipit - The Missouri Skylark
https://bit.ly/2EJJfBq
* American Bittern, Timberdoodle
https://bit.ly/2IOQKcI
* Sage Thrasher and Sagebrush
https://bit.ly/2GWhnvU
* Wood Buffalo National Park,
Birthplace of Whooping Cranes
https://bit.ly/2GKyq3v
* Limpkin - Bird of the Swamp
https://bit.ly/2EJU0DU
* Suburbs, Juncos, And Evolution
With Dr. John Marzluff
https://bit.ly/2GXNC1Z
* Restoring the Land, Sharing the Land Ethic
With Seattleite Susan Leopold Freeman,
granddaughter of Aldo Leopold and illustrator of
the new book, "Saving Tarboo Creek"
https://bit.ly/2qP9Qs4

Next week: What's Inside a Woodpecker's Nest Hole?
https://bit.ly/2vvLCsr
---------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out our new book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:[email protected]
========================Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
... or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bird...
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcas...
... or SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/birdnot...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



Subject: FOY Pacific-slope Flycatcher, West Seattle
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 13:58 pm
From: TRI AT seattleu.edu
 
Hello Tweets,

On a walk through Lincoln Park (West Seattle) on this lovely morning, I was surprised and delighted to hear and then get visual confirmation of the return of Pacific-slope Flycatchers. I only saw one, but their calls seemed to be coming from multiple birds. (Photo here.)

Good birding to you,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker, PhD
Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies
Seattle University

Pelly Valley, West Seattle
Natural Presence Arts website
Photography



Subject: Lewis County Tufted Duck
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 13:42 pm
From: rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com
 
The bird was on a pond as of 945 at a gravel pit.  Directions are as follows.  Take Jackson Highway south out of Toledo.  Take Mandy Road about 3-5 miles south of Hwy 505. There are two gravel pits on Mandy Rd.  Go to the 2nd gravel pit. The bird was on the shallower of the two ponds.

PLEASE NOTE: The gravel pit is an active pit. The men on site said the ponds are off limits inside the gate. The bird is visible from the road.

Roger Moyer
Chehalis, Wa



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Merlins in Kirkland and Lake Forest Park?
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 13:39 pm
From: jschwartz1124 AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters!

Are Merlins particularly rare for the Kirkland and Lake Forest Park areas?
My wife and I have heard what I'm 99% sure is the call of a Merlin multiple
times, but the Merlin app is describing them as rare for my location. I've
also seen a Merlin-sized bird making this sound a few times, but at a
distance.

Thanks, and keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com
Lake Forest Park



Subject: Merlin calls continue in Wedgwood / Caryn / Wedgwood
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 11:07 am
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Morning birders, 

Stepped out to listen to the morning calls and the merlin/s were tic-ing and kee-ing as they were last night as I returned home around 7pm. Still in the same area as I first heard them.

Does this mean they are nesting there?

Ill walk down and inspect and report.

Also, I have found a pair of blk-capped chickadees beginning to build in a nest box my mother had given us years ago. Saw Bewicks wren gathering nest material and hoping they select one of the other nest boxes. Weve got a nest of bumblebees (red tailed I think) in the dovecote and trying to discourage them with a spray of Dawn suds. Does not seem to have bee-terred yet and I am a bit perturbed. If any suggestions are out there how to best relocate or discourage their residence, Id appreciate it. I did have The Bee Guy come for a relocation of bees under our old shed, but this is a small infestation.

Caryn / Wedgwood

A Bewicks is belting out its call in the smoke tree as I type. Funny to see its feathers being bristled up in the breeze.

Also, sadly both the bushtit and hummer nests were destroyed.


_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Saturday morning Snipe
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 10:30 am
From: deedeeknit AT yahoo.com
 
First thing I noticed when I put the bedroom window shade up this morning around 7ama Wilsons Snipe standing on a small pile of compost in our back yard. It blended in perfectly but did a bit of classic snipe-bobbing and then slowly snipe-bobbed a few feet to stay for over an hour near 2 of our blueberry bushes. 
It has done only a few moments of poking/probing at the slightly damp soil and mostly just standing or sitting in one place. I am sending this post and it is still standing quietly just 4 feet from the first place I noticed it.

I know they are not unusual in Edmonds with our marsh, etc, but I never expected to see a Snipe in my back yard!

DeeW
Edmonds area
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Tufted Duck Lewis County
Date: Sat Apr 21 2018 9:52 am
From: kevblack787 AT gmail.com
 
Tim Brennan and I  found a Tufted Duck at the Mandy Rd., ponds (address is
in Toledo) with a few Lesser Scaup and Bufflehead. The ponds are behind a
gate but the gate is unlocked and open to public. Youll see signs public
access fishing area. The pond is less than a mile North of Rodgers. Also of
interest Northern Rough-Winged Swallow, American Pipit, and Wood Duck.

Kevin Black & Tim Brennan
In Lewis County
--
Kevin Black
Vancouver, WA



Subject: Magnuson Park, 20 April 2018
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 23:26 pm
From: 1northraven AT gmail.com
 
while birding the Promontory Ponds at Magnuson this morning with another
birder named Ben (we only exchanged first names when we started to bird
together) he identified several male Cinnamon Teal, all tucked in among the
sticks & growth on the far shore where we could look maybe 100 yards across
open water. Several Green-wing Teal were more readily identified along
that shore, but the Cinnamon were striking even if a bit obscured in
outline by their distinctive color.

Chris Kessler
Seattle

On Fri, Apr 20, 2018 at 3:28 PM, Scott Ramos wrote:

> Fabulous day at the park, with just about perfect weather40s and 50sand
> partly cloudy skies. Bird activity was non-stop, with many new arrivals,
> and many notables.
>
> Cackling Goose - small flock flying high, northbound, over lake
> California Quail - a couple in the blackberries by the lake shore; first
> of year
> Coopers Hawk - an immature flying at North End; of the pair that look to
> nest, female was sitting on edge of nest, male holding sentry nearby.
> Virginia B observed copulation of the pair this morning
> Virginia Rail - at least 5 birds!; 2 heard at Frog Pond, 1 in the
> Connector Ponds, 2 in the Entrance Ponds
> Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1 seen a couple of times, north end; first of year
> Annas Hummingbird - at least 5 active nests, 3 with young, 2 with female
> sitting
> Rufous Hummingbird - at least 2; first of year
> Merlin - one streaking northbound over the meadows
> Huttons Vireo - 1 calling on Promontory Point, another in the Uplands
> Bushtit - 3 nests under construction
> Hermit Thrush - a couple, calling
> Yellow-rumped Warbler - lots!!, mostly Audubons, mostly males
> Black-throated Gray Warbler - a couple, both male, one singing; first of
> year
> Townsends Warbler - one singing
> White-crowned Sparrow (gambellii) - singing; moving through
> Purple Finch - at least 4, singing cheerio song
>
> For the day, 69 species.
> Checklist: https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...
>
> Also noteworthy, Joe Sweeney found Least Sandpiper and Cassins Vireo; Ben
> Roberts found Cinnamon Teal and Chipping Sparrow.
>
> Scott Ramos
> Seattle
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> http://mailman1.u.washington.e...
>
>


--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson



Subject: Washington Big Day Record
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 21:56 pm
From: re_hill AT q.com
 
http://wabirder.com/docs/bigda...


-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Eric Heisey
Sent: Friday, April 20, 2018 3:11 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: [Tweeters] Washington Big Day Record

Does anyone know the current Washington big day record? The ABA website
lists it as 201 from the 80s (updated in 2011), but I think I recall that
being broken somewhat recently?

Thanks,

Eric Heisey_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...

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Subject: FOY Rufus Hummingbird, Vancouver
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 19:52 pm
From: dmhavmn AT pacbell.net
 
My first spring in WA a Rufus Hummingbird was a first for my yard, county and state lists.
Merry Haveman
Vancouver

Sent from my iPad
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Tweeters mailing list
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Subject: Discovery Park this afternoon
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 19:25 pm
From: mombiwheeler AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

Having concluded that it was impossible to catch up on my work, I decided
to bird instead. I went to Discovery Park a little after noon and found it
to be much birdier than when I was there 2 afternoons ago. Species seen
included lots of YELLOW-RUMPED (both types), 3 ORANGE-CROWNED, 2
BLACK-THROATED GRAY, AND 1 TOWNSEND'S WARBLER. Approximately 250
BONAPART'E'S GULLS were on the exposed mud at low tide along the North
Beach feeding on invertebrates as well as hanging out in the water just
offshore. Some were mixed in with MEW GULLS. I had never seen them
together on land and was surprised at how much larger the Mews were. Very
striking seeing so many Bonies on land and hearing their buzzy calls; most
were in breeding plumage. About 75 Brant came flying in as well, some
eventually rounding the lighthouse and feeding along the southern side of
the point. There were a few HORNED and RED-NECKED GREBES, all in breeding
colors. There were a number of SAVANNAH SPARROWS setting up territories in
the grassy areas; I hadn't seen any 2 days ago. In all, nearly 50
species. Much better than working.

Good birding,

Lonnie Somer
Seattle



Subject: Magnuson Park, 20 April 2018
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 17:31 pm
From: lsr AT ramoslink.info
 
Fabulous day at the park, with just about perfect weather40s and 50sand partly cloudy skies. Bird activity was non-stop, with many new arrivals, and many notables.

Cackling Goose - small flock flying high, northbound, over lake
California Quail - a couple in the blackberries by the lake shore; first of year
Coopers Hawk - an immature flying at North End; of the pair that look to nest, female was sitting on edge of nest, male holding sentry nearby. Virginia B observed copulation of the pair this morning
Virginia Rail - at least 5 birds!; 2 heard at Frog Pond, 1 in the Connector Ponds, 2 in the Entrance Ponds
Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1 seen a couple of times, north end; first of year
Annas Hummingbird - at least 5 active nests, 3 with young, 2 with female sitting
Rufous Hummingbird - at least 2; first of year
Merlin - one streaking northbound over the meadows
Huttons Vireo - 1 calling on Promontory Point, another in the Uplands
Bushtit - 3 nests under construction
Hermit Thrush - a couple, calling
Yellow-rumped Warbler - lots!!, mostly Audubons, mostly males
Black-throated Gray Warbler - a couple, both male, one singing; first of year
Townsends Warbler - one singing
White-crowned Sparrow (gambellii) - singing; moving through
Purple Finch - at least 4, singing cheerio song

For the day, 69 species.
Checklist: https://ebird.org/pnw/view/che...

Also noteworthy, Joe Sweeney found Least Sandpiper and Cassins Vireo; Ben Roberts found Cinnamon Teal and Chipping Sparrow.

Scott Ramos
Seattle



Subject: White Pelicans of Padilla Bay
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 15:50 pm
From: catsatbow AT gmail.com
 
The first group has arrived!! The last two years the first sightings were
in early May. I just saw 16 flying around Bayview Edison Road close to
Samish Flats (04.20.18 at 9:45 a.m.). I created a Facebook page last year
for them. It's at
https://www.facebook.com/photo...
or just do a search for the group, White Pelicans of Padilla Bay. There is
a blurb on their short history and photos. This is their 3rd year.

Cathy Scott



Subject: Arboretum
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 15:01 pm
From: danmcdt AT gmail.com
 
Friday morning a Black-throated Gray Warbler.
And... (good news/bad news) nice views of a Sharp-shinned Hawk devouring
nestlings of unknown species.

Dan
--

Dan McDougall-Treacy
Seattle, WA
[email protected]
206.402.9426



Subject: Marymoor Purple Martin
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 12:57 pm
From: birdmarymoor AT gmail.com
 
Went down this morning at 8:00, on a day without fog.  Still very few warblers, just Yellow-rumped and Common Yellowthroat.

But just before I left, a heard and saw a PURPLE MARTIN high over the Viewing Mound, first of 2018.

The only other species of any note was a WESTERN MEADOWLARK that flew from the East Meadow to the model airplane field.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== [email protected]



Subject: White-tailed Kite-Lewis County Airport
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 11:44 am
From: re_hill AT q.com
 
Easily found yesterday as well at 3:30pm.

Randy Hill
Ridgefield WA

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Ken Trease
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 10:02 AM
To: tweeters
Subject: [Tweeters] White-tailed Kite-Lewis County Airport

Present at this time.

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...



Subject: Vaux's Happening
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 11:25 am
From: leschwitters AT me.com
 
Our camera now shows six Vauxs Swifts in the Monroe Wagner chimney. Didnt see them last night. Oops. They just left.

Our Audubon project could use some more man/woman power.

Send me an email.

Larry

Larry Schwitters
Project coordinator
Audubon Vauxs Happening

http://www.vauxhappening.org



Subject: Hawking
Date: Fri Apr 20 2018 10:35 am
From: dipper2c AT gmail.com
 
Mark Lockwood and Brush Freeman's The TOS Handbook of Texas Birds is the
2nd ed of Texas bird records.

Northern Goshawk A.g. atricapilus subspecies is a rare winter visitor to
the Trans-Pecos (Big Bend) and Panhandle of Texas with a few scattered
records across the northern 2/3rds of Texas.

The Review List developed in 1988 has only 24 documented records, only 8
with photos. 26 submissions were unacceptable. 64 records without
documentation before the list started in 1988.

My appreciation to Gary Bletsch for reaching out and guiding this visitor
from Texas to the Skagit - Fir Island area four years ago on a Bar-tailed
Godwit day!

Julie Crouch
New Braunfels, TX
Central Texas Hill Country

On Apr 15, 2018 2:00 PM, wrote:

Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
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Today's Topics:

1. BirdNote, last week and the week of April 15, 2018
(Ellen Blackstone)
2. Or-crowned Warblers Singing (Carol Schulz)
3. Skamania County Junco (Wilson Cady)
4. Union Bay Watch } New Neighbors (Hubbell)
5. Hawking (Nelson Briefer)
6. Jeff Gibson (Will's Email)
7. Jay having escargot (Ed Swan)
8. Status of Northern Bobwhite on Orcas Island (Matt Dufort)
9. Whidbey Mountain Bluebirds (Tom Mansfield)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2018 12:03:03 -0700
From: Ellen Blackstone
Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of April 15, 2018
To: [email protected]
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8;

Hey, Tweeters,

Heard last week on BirdNote:
* The Lark Ascending
http://bit.ly/1D3PB9N
* Sunning with Doves
http://bit.ly/2Eq4IPY
* Frank Bellrose, Champion of Wood Ducks
http://bit.ly/2qaFuQv
* Birds Dress for Spring
http://bit.ly/1q2h5DI
* Double-crested Cormorant
http://bit.ly/1JZbl8v
* American Woodcock, Timberdoodle
http://bit.ly/2H57QpF
* Raptor Breeding - Why So Early?
http://bit.ly/2qaFJLi

Next week: Wood Buffalo Park, Birthplace of Whooping Cranes - and more
http://bit.ly/2HBoVp4
---------------------------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out our new book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:[email protected]
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdn...
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcas...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find nearly 1500 episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2018 12:15:22 -0700
From: Carol Schulz
Subject: [Tweeters] Or-crowned Warblers Singing
To: Tweeters
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed

Hi Tweets:
On my quick walk this morning between rains, I went up to 18th Ave which
has some small fields; and heard 2 singing Orange-crowned Warblers.
FOYear Orange-crown singing for me.
2 days ago, the Golden-crowned sparrows were singing their mournful Oh,
Dear Me songs.
Yours, Carol Schulz
Des Moines


------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2018 19:26:05 GMT
From: "Wilson Cady"
Subject: [Tweeters] Skamania County Junco
To: [email protected]
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

We have what appears to be a possible "White-winged' Dark-eyed Junco at
our feeders in Skamania County. It is an pale gray bird with a dark mask,
large bill and a considerable amount of white in the tail along with white
wing-bars. I have posted photos on several facebook sites including
Washington Birding, Western Washington Birders and Advanced Bird ID and
would appreciate any feedback on this bird. Wilson Cady
Columbia River Gorge, WA
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Message: 4
Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2018 12:49:35 -0700
From: Hubbell
Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } New Neighbors
To: Tweeters
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Tweeters,

This weeks post will introduce you to a new set of bald eagles who are now
nesting on Union Bay. I suspect it is their very first nest and clearly a
new territory. I also find it interesting to consider how the existing
eagle pairs are adapting, particularly, the Talarus pair. They have lost
part of their summer territory to Chester and Lacey - the new osprey who
moved in two years ago. Now, they appear to have lost all the area south of
Husky Stadium to this new eagle pair. It makes me wonder what is the
minimum territory they need to survive? Are these additional nesting birds
long-term examples of the recovery from DDT? If we can clean up the water
in Union Bay will more fish survive and therefore further increase the
avian, fish-eating carrying capacity?

I hope you enjoy the post:

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot... <
https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay, where eagles nest in the city!

Larry Hubbell
[email protected]
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Message: 5
Date: Sun, 15 Apr 2018 00:55:43 +0000
From: Nelson Briefer
Subject: [Tweeters] Hawking
To: "[email protected]"
Message-ID:

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Dear birders and hawk watchers and there is a world of difference. Look
whos back. Did you see movie or book. But that is another subject. I have
recently started a blog, Common Northern Goshawk,
www.goshawktalker.blogspot.com. And have a post On Gary Bletsch. In
concert with Garys fine field-work I will gift a publication to Gary.

A Lane/ABA birdfinding guide. A Birders Guide To The Texas Coast, by
Harold R. Holt,1993. However in the index was no mention of goshawks. Under
Accidentals is goshawk. Gary can also contact me 360 420 9320.

Since the publication was 1993, I think I can understand the omission of
goshawk in the index.

In the past, I have roasted some birders. I am not proud of my actions or
happy about it. If you wish to castigate me, well then, cast away.
I will not retaliate.

The best to all of you, Nelson- Anacortes.
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Message: 6
Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2018 19:45:08 -0700
From: "Will's Email"
Subject: [Tweeters] Jeff Gibson
To: tweeters
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

We always enjoyed Jeffs emails, but we havent seen any in quite awhile.
He was having some health issues. Has anyone heard from him?

Will Markey
Living and Loving Ellensburg
Cell - 253-569-8455
Sent from my IPhone

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Message: 7
Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2018 19:49:06 -0700
From: Ed Swan
Subject: [Tweeters] Jay having escargot
To: "[email protected]"
Message-ID:

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

We have a couple of active jay pairs in the neighborhood. Recently my wife
watched one land in a Japanese maple a grab one of the snails climbing
along a branch.

Ed
Ed Swan
Nature writer and guide
www.theswancompany.com
[email protected]
206.949.3545


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Message: 8
Date: Sat, 14 Apr 2018 22:58:10 -0700
From: Matt Dufort
Subject: [Tweeters] Status of Northern Bobwhite on Orcas Island
To: Tweeters Newsgroup
Message-ID:

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Hi tweets,

I saw a recent eBird report of Northern Bobwhite on Orcas Island, and
wanted to share some information about their status there. About two years
ago, a non-birding friend who lives on the island sent me an audio
recording of a Bobwhite that he had been hearing at his property near West
Sound. Since then, I've learned that someone in the Crow Valley area was
raising captive Bobwhite, and I believe had a substantial number of them
escape some time in the last few years. This doesn't necessarily mean that
any Bobwhite on the island came from that location, but it does provide a
possible explanation for their origin.

Bobwhite were formerly established in the San Juan Islands after being
released there, but I believe there was a long gap between the last records
of that established population, and the few recent reports in the last
couple years.

Good birding,
Matt Dufort
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Message: 9
Date: Sun, 15 Apr 2018 18:57:54 +0000
From: Tom Mansfield
Subject: [Tweeters] Whidbey Mountain Bluebirds
To: Tweeters
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

As of the time of this post Matt Bartels and I have 7 Mountain Bluebird at
Pacific Rim Institute next to the staff buildings. No sign of Western
Bluebird (yet).

Tom Mansfield near Coupeville, Whidbey Island

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
[email protected]
http://mailman1.u.washington.e...

End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 164, Issue 15
*****************************************



Subject: Bamded Tundra Swan reported earlier
Date: Thu Apr 19 2018 22:28 pm
From: kec201814 AT cableone.net
 
The banded Tundra Swan I photographed and reported earlier from Mann Lake, Nez Perce county, Idaho  has been identified as a female banded on 29 July 2006 at APPROX. 10 ST MI SSE KOTZEBUE, ANCHORAGE BOROUGH, ALASKA, USAIt was born in 2005 or earlier, making our Swan almost 13 years old as a minimum. https://www.flickr.com/photos/... E CarlsonLewiston



Subject: Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course monthly bird walk -4-19-2018 - early arrivals+
Date: Thu Apr 19 2018 21:47 pm
From: avnacrs4birds AT outlook.com
 
Tweeters,

This gorgeous sunny, blue-sky day was perfect in many ways for this 5th anniversary of the JBLM Eagles Pride GC birdwalk. A cool 38degF warmed quickly to low 60's by 11:30 AM. The 22 of us had excellent views of some early arrivals, as well as some usual suspects. A WARBLING VIREO was seen by many, as was at least one of the three WILSON'S WARBLERS (another was vocalizing). One surprise at the start of our walk was a SAVANNAH SPARROW perched about 30 feet up in an Oregon (Garry) white oak along the 18th fairway across from the driving range. While not early (according to eBird), a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER near the Dupont housing area was a bonus. Swallows included BARN, VIOLET-GREEN, and TREE. (The nest boxes at Hodge Lake are hosting many Tree and Violet-green Swallows.) We had a sighting and many vocalizations from the first PILEATED WOODPECKER recorded in several years. (This bird, (perhaps two?) was coursing around our route for most of the morning.) Although expected, a singing ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER gave many of us one of the best views we had of this species -- brilliantly front-lit in a low oak, with the orange "crown" exceptionally striking. And for the second month in a row, a NORTHERN HARRIER perked up all the hawk watchers.



Unfortunately our sponsor for the walk, Dave W., was tied up doing REAL work at the golf course. He would have had a blast with just keeping track of all we saw. Thanks to Jon A for keeping score as we went! And to Russ S for getting the eBird site location and overall eBird tallies sorted.



The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

May 17

June 21 (Summer Solstice)

July 19

Anyone is welcome to join us!


52 species (+8 other taxa)



Mallard (Northern) 4 A pair at Hodge Lake and another pair at the 12th hole pond.

Ring-necked Duck 4 All at Hodge Lake.

Bufflehead 11 Hodge Lake.

Pied-billed Grebe 1 Hodge Lake.

Turkey Vulture 3

Osprey 1

Northern Harrier 1

Bald Eagle 3

Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis) 3

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 5 This may be a new species for the birdwalk - to be checked.

Band-tailed Pigeon 8

Mourning Dove 2

Anna's Hummingbird 6

Rufous Hummingbird 8

Red-breasted Sapsucker 1 Drumming.

Downy Woodpecker 1

Downy Woodpecker (Pacific) 3

Northern Flicker 2

Pileated Woodpecker 1

woodpecker sp. 1 We knew a woodpecker flew by, but no positive ID.

Hutton's Vireo 1 Vocalizing near the Dupont housing area.

Warbling Vireo 1 * Flagged as early. Seen by many; Grey, black line through the eye, whitish supercilium. With Wilson's Warbler also feeding nearby in the road behind Hodge Lake.

Steller's Jay (Coastal) 9

California Scrub-Jay 2

American/Northwestern Crow 12

Common Raven 2

Tree Swallow 6 All of these were at or near the nestboxes at Hodge Lake.

Violet-green Swallow 15 Several near the driving range, and most of the rest at the nestboxes at Hodge Lake.

Barn Swallow 7

Black-capped Chickadee 14

Chestnut-backed Chickadee 24

Bushtit (Pacific) 8 One nest being built near the 12th hole pond.

Red-breasted Nuthatch 8

Brown Creeper 6

Pacific Wren 11

Bewick's Wren 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 18

American Robin 36

Varied Thrush 1

European Starling 4

Orange-crowned Warbler 10

Orange-crowned Warbler (lutescens) 2

Common Yellowthroat 4

Yellow-rumped Warbler 18

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) 6

Black-throated Gray Warbler 1

Wilson's Warbler 3 *Flagged as early. 2 Males seen, yellow with black cap; one vocalizing

Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon) 9

White-crowned Sparrow 4

White-crowned Sparrow (pugetensis) 18

Savannah Sparrow 1 30 feet up in a Garry Oak along the 18th fairway across from the driving range.

Song Sparrow 26

Spotted Towhee 4

Spotted Towhee (oregonus Group) 3

Red-winged Blackbird 9

Brown-headed Cowbird 6

Purple Finch 3

Pine Siskin 42



View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checkli...



May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis

[email protected]



Contact us.

  • 93 Clinton Street Suite ABA
  • Delaware City, DE 19706
  • Toll Free: (800) 850-2473
  • Phone: (302) 838-3660
  • Fax: (302) 838-3651

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