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Washington Tweeters bird news by date

Updated on October 21, 2018, 2:40 pm

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21 Oct: @ 14:25:39 
Union Bay Watch } The Eagles Return [Hubbell]
21 Oct: @ 13:17:33 
Maritime Katydids , and Other Things [Jeff Gibson]
21 Oct: @ 12:50:47 
Gyrfalcon on Midway Beach [Gary Fredricks]
21 Oct: @ 10:18:08 
Shorebirds at Ocean Shores [Gary Fredricks]
20 Oct: @ 23:16:02 
Edmonds marsh northern harrier 10-20-18 [Bill Anderson]
20 Oct: @ 20:21:53 
Westport Bar-tailed Godwit [Gary Fredricks]
20 Oct: @ 17:56:03 
Noble Knob raptors [Scott Ramos]
20 Oct: @ 14:03:25 
BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 21, 2018 [Ellen Blackstone]
20 Oct: @ 12:25:35 
First of Season Varied thrush / Caryn / Wedgwood [Caryn Schutzler]
20 Oct: @ 10:40:25 
banded bird report [pan]
19 Oct: @ 19:18:21 
Snow Bunting [Debbie Sutherland]
19 Oct: @ 17:15:19 
Snow Bunting at Nature Conservancy [shadowfax4jctm]
19 Oct: @ 16:08:53 
Duck? [Larry Schwitters]
19 Oct: @ 11:27:25 
Brewer's Blackbird partial albino [Mike & MerryLynn]
18 Oct: @ 22:12:34 
Leach's Storm-Petrel at Carkeek Park [Ryan Merrill]
18 Oct: @ 20:24:02 
Longspurs at Midway Beach [Gary Fredricks]
18 Oct: @ 19:23:14 
South Lake Union Palm Warbler seen at 3:45 [Lonnie Somer]
18 Oct: @ 16:06:19 
Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-10-18 [Janka and Michael Hobbs]
18 Oct: @ 14:40:36 
Palm Warbler (correction ) [William]
18 Oct: @ 14:38:12 
South Lake Union Park Palm Warbler refound today [William]
18 Oct: @ 13:22:48 
band-tailed pigeons [Martha Jordan]
18 Oct: @ 10:43:22 
White-throated sparrow, Clark Co., WA [Bob]
18 Oct: @ 09:44:19 
Black swan [Gloria Lawrence]
17 Oct: @ 18:38:23 
Northern Shrike at Ridgefield, life bird for me. [Michelle Maani]
17 Oct: @ 16:41:46 
Re: Palm Warbler at South Lake Union [Mark Robinson]
17 Oct: @ 15:36:31 
Re: Snohomish/Skagit birding [Patricia Taylor]
17 Oct: @ 14:55:26 
Palm Warbler at South Lake Union [Ryan Merrill]
17 Oct: @ 14:17:45 
Snohomish/Skagit birding [Marv Breece]
17 Oct: @ 12:49:17 
Edmonds turnstones and sandpipers (10-15/16-18) [Bill Anderson]
16 Oct: @ 21:26:44 
Red Knots at Hayton Reserve on Fir Island [Marv Breece]
16 Oct: @ 15:32:44 
Band-tailed Pigeons [Jeremy Schwartz]
16 Oct: @ 13:56:33 
Band-tailed Pigeons [Andrew McCormick]
16 Oct: @ 13:44:03 
Tour of Clark County [Roger Moyer]
15 Oct: @ 22:22:06 
Snohomish County Northern Goshawk. [stan Kostka lynn Schmidt]
15 Oct: @ 21:08:35 
Band-tail pigeons [adrienne]
15 Oct: @ 20:18:36 
Them Eagles Has Landed, etc. [Jeff Gibson]
15 Oct: @ 19:30:26 
Re: Phainopepla Fail [Peggy Mundy]
15 Oct: @ 19:20:25 
Phainopepla Fail [Louise Rutter]
15 Oct: @ 19:09:16 
Them Eagles Has Landed, etc. [Jeff Gibson]
15 Oct: @ 18:41:08 
Nov 5 WOS meeting [cynthia burrell]
15 Oct: @ 18:04:32 
Okanogan County - Snow Bunting [Ron McCluskey]
15 Oct: @ 15:28:41 
Band Tailed Pigeons [Burney Huff]
15 Oct: @ 14:32:40 
Re: Bothell crow roost [Diane Yorgason-Quinn]
15 Oct: @ 12:57:08 
Lake Sammamish State Park question [Barry Brugman]
15 Oct: @ 11:22:25 
Edmonds marsh northern shrike 10-14-18 [Bill Anderson]
14 Oct: @ 22:45:14 
Omak Trip [Hank H]
14 Oct: @ 21:35:31 
FOY DOA [Marcia Ian]
14 Oct: @ 20:51:01 
two scoters in eastern WA [Dennis Paulson]
14 Oct: @ 19:21:46 
Birding in Missouri and Some History of the Eurasian Tree Sparrow [B B]
14 Oct: @ 18:48:28 
Re: Band-tailed Pigeons [Jeremy Davis]





Subject: Union Bay Watch } The Eagles Return
Date: Sun Oct 21 2018 14:25 pm
From: ldhubbell AT comcast.net
 
Tweeters,

This week our newest pair of local Bald Eagles, Monty and Marsha, have returned to Union Bay. I hope you enjoy the photos and the discussion.

https://unionbaywatch.blogspot...

Have a great day on Union Bay, where nature lives in the city!

Larry Hubbell
ldhubbell at comcast dot net



Subject: Maritime Katydids , and Other Things
Date: Sun Oct 21 2018 13:17 pm
From: gibsondesign15 AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters having lived in, or spent time in The Great Humid East in
summertime, must be familiar with the loud song of the Common True Katydid:
one of the loudest insect callers ever. Back there, on rare trips to places
like southern Ontario, New England, and Wisconsin, this maritime north
westerner was thrilled to hear these big bugs. Typically up in trees they
gave the auditory illusion of the trees themselves singing, especially
trees isolated out in fields.

Of course, around here we don't have those big loud things. But we do have
very quiet ones. To find them I go to the beach, down to the maritime.
Really.

That's because half the Katydids I've seen here in Washington state have
been down near the beach, previous to now. The first Katydid was found by
my daughter Roxanne (known to some as Roxy etc - I call her Rox) down on
Kalaloch beach, just about ready to get drownt. I ,( with my old Peterson
field guide to NA insects) figured it to be a Meadow Katydid of some sort,
A small brilliant green surprise along the great Pacific.

The second Katydid I didn't find (I didn't but Roxydid) turned up at
Wildberry Lake, Mason County - a big fat Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid about 2"
long, looking like a green leaf with legs.Cool.

This summer I've Been Katydid rich down at Indian Island County Park - a
stellar spot for the all-around naturalist - where I've found plenty of
Katydids. First I noted about a million small grasshoppers flying out of
the low Salicornia patches in the salt marshes down there, Several of these
would fly up with every boot step and scatter in all directions, sorta
hard to track, but I finally (with my close-focusing binocs) got good looks
at them : some sort of small Melanoplus grasshoppers - of whatever
species.But in amongst the little grasshoppers was a somewhat smaller
different bug, hard to see but finally revealed to be Katydids (the Slender
Meadow Katydid near as I can tell) - and lots of 'em still around this week
but thinning fast with colder weather.Unlike the big loud Katydids of the
Great Humid East , these guys make a very high-frequency call beyond my
ability to hear. I did hear a crackling (crepitating ) big Carolina
Grasshopper down on the beach though.

There are a number of interesting maritime plants in the salt marshes along
the shore down there, like Plantago maritima, Cakile maritima, and Armeria
maritima if you want to get specific. The Plantago I've noticed on seaside
rocks for years, not knowing what it was ( ol' lazy-eyes me wrote it off as
some kinda grass) but on closer inspection it has succulent leaves, which
along with salty Salicornia, are pickled and eaten by some human's. Cakile
is a pretty little beach flower (introduced, but it doesn't look like it's
bothering anyone and bee's love it).

Then the Sea Thrift - a fine little flower which I've mostly seen on rocky
bluffs and in peoples yards - it domesticates well. But here on Indian
Island it grows all over the sandy, gravelly shores of the salt marsh
behind the drift wood barrier along the beach. It's all done blooming
(usually in spring) but in an example of autumnal recrudescence, I did find
one fresh pink flower amongst the hundred of old dry seedheads.

The Sea Thrift has a wide circumboreal distribution, yet I was surprised to
see it on the documentary film "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" which I watched
on netflix when I got home from the beach. Yup, there it was, growing on
the sea island where Luke Skywalker retired. Clearly visible as Luke, or
somebody, was tip-toeing up the grassy cliffs.

Jeff Gibson
may the force be with you
Port Townsend Wa

P.S. I forgot to mention that I saw a Short-eared Owl down at Indian Island
the other day flying in to hide in a Dougfir at noon. It appeared to be
fleeing another bird from above, but I never saw what. The little tidal
channels there can be good for shorebirds at appropriate tides, and the
rocks (jetty and shoreline) down by the Portage also get some rocky shore
birds.

P.P.S Rather than being long ago, in a galaxy far, far away, it turns out
that Luke Skywalker retired in Ireland. I checked the film location
credits, so as to be accurate about the thrift. Just sayin'



Subject: Gyrfalcon on Midway Beach
Date: Sun Oct 21 2018 12:50 pm
From: glfredricks55 AT gmail.com
 
About 10:30 this morning a gray phase Gyrfacon was on the upper beach
between the Midway Beach and Warrenton Cannery Road access points. The
blue-gray legs and bill indicated a probable first year bird.

Gary Fredricks
Washougal



Subject: Shorebirds at Ocean Shores
Date: Sun Oct 21 2018 10:18 am
From: glfredricks55 AT gmail.com
 
Yesterday, I checked out the high tide roosting flock on the Oyhut game
range. Present were hundreds of dunlin and black-bellied plovers, dozens
of Western sandpipers, a few least sandpipers, six long-billed dowitchers
and seven red- knots. I also flushed a couple of pectoral sandpipers near
the western most pond. Of course, predators were also present with a
Merlin, a peregrine, harriers, and bald eagles causing some excitement.
Also, a northern shrike was hunting among the yards near the West end of
Marine View Drive.

Gary Fredricks
Washougal



Subject: Edmonds marsh northern harrier 10-20-18
Date: Sat Oct 20 2018 23:16 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Another (the same?) harrier was at the marsh Saturday afternoon. Photos can be seen by scrolling down page 15:
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Westport Bar-tailed Godwit
Date: Sat Oct 20 2018 20:21 pm
From: glfredricks55 AT gmail.com
 
The Bar-tailed Godwit was among the usual hundreds of Marbled Godwits late
this afernoon in the Westport marina. Best viewed from float 21 next to the
boat ramp and Coast Guard station.

Gary Fredricks
Washougal



Subject: Noble Knob raptors
Date: Sat Oct 20 2018 17:56 pm
From: lsr AT ramoslink.info
 
Sorry for the late post. On Sunday, Oct 14, Dave Swayne, Sam Woods and I led a Seattle Audubon birding hike to Noble Knob. October has been a good month to observe migrating raptors and the Knob is well situated between two north-south oriented drainages that offers decent views of the migration. On this occasion, we had a good collection, including Golden and Bald Eagle, Sharp-shinned (about a dozen!) and Cooper™s Hawk, Red-tailed and Rough-legged Hawk, a Merlin and a possible Northern Goshawk.

In addition to the target raptors, there were some bonus birds, including a perched Sooty Grouse along the forested trail, one or more Northern Shrike, a late Mountain Bluebird, several Townsend™s Solitaire and a very tame Horned Lark. We were able to stand very close to the lark for great views as it fed in the alpine meadow. At one point, it took a break from feeding to do a little dust bathing:
https://youtu.be/5-NZqM5S9XQ

Two of the lakes below the Knob had small groups of Barrow™s Goldeneye. Then, on what would be our last stop at a pullout on the way out, a Northern Pygmy-Owl flew in to Dave™s calling.

Scott Ramos
Seattle

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 21, 2018
Date: Sat Oct 20 2018 14:03 pm
From: ellenblackstone AT gmail.com
 
Hey, Tweeters,

We celebrate the artist of the 2019 federal duck stamp ”
http://bit.ly/BirdNote-Celebra...
----------------------------------------------
Last week on BirdNote:
* Why Birds Collide with Buildings
http://bit.ly/2NEsOLu
* Woodpeckers Carve Out Roost Cavities, Too
http://bit.ly/2woQCLv
* Mistaken Identity
http://bit.ly/2ywiyiD
* The World's Most Abundant Bird
http://bit.ly/2Cz1OM4
* Chickadees on a Cold Night
http://bit.ly/2QMEe1J
* Monk Parakeets
http://bit.ly/2QG3iqU
* Researching High-flying Bar-headed Geese
http://bit.ly/2CB7YLB
-------------------------------------------------------
Check out next week's stories:
Here Come the Merlins! + Blue Jays, Chipping Sparrows, and more
http://bit.ly/2J6BKZl
-------------------------
BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
https://www.birdnote.org/birdn...
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Did you have a favorite story this week? Please let us know.
mailto:[email protected]
========================Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podca...
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... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnotera...
or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bird...
Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podca...
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
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Subject: First of Season Varied thrush / Caryn / Wedgwood
Date: Sat Oct 20 2018 12:25 pm
From: bluedarner1 AT seanet.com
 
Good morning, birders near and far,

On this foggy autumn morning, I just happened to spot the first Varied thrush of the season. With all the glorious color, I thought it was just a dogwood leaf on the birdbath, but it was a thrush”perfectly camouflaged!

The birds have been enjoying seeds and berries from this late fall™s bounty.

What magnificent birding weather!

Caryn / Wedgwood
Neighborhood birder
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Subject: banded bird report
Date: Sat Oct 20 2018 10:40 am
From: panmail AT mailfence.com
 
Tweets,

A banded Caspian Tern I saw at the mouth of the Cedar River in Renton on 9/15 (while looking at Pectoral Sandpiper and both dowitcher spp.) was banded as a chick in 2010 near Bellingham. (You can report banded birds at https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/... .)

Cheers,

Alan Grenon
Seattle
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Subject: Snow Bunting
Date: Fri Oct 19 2018 19:18 pm
From: shadowfax4jctm AT gmail.com
 
Warning: if you come out to find the bird beware of the . They are out on the trail about 6 ft in.
Debbie Sutherland
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Subject: Snow Bunting at Nature Conservancy
Date: Fri Oct 19 2018 17:15 pm
From: shadowfax4jctm AT gmail.com
 
Found a Snow Bunting in Kitsap county at the Nature Conservancy this afternoon.  Walk the trail out to the water.  Turn left, notice the white and black No clamming signs, walk the beach south until you come to the second sign and look left toward the marsh.  The bird was just foraging along the ground from the drift wood toward the marsh.  Last seen in the reeds.  It was either not well or didn't care about my presence as I was able to get okay pics with my phone at about 8 feet.  List is on ebird.

Debbie Sutherland
Cashmere, WA
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Subject: Duck?
Date: Fri Oct 19 2018 16:08 pm
From: leschwitters AT me.com
 
Duck? One with a Red Head hanging out with a couple Scaups and a mess of coots off sunset beach in Issaquah™s Lake Sammamish State Park. First seen yesterday and again today.

Larry Schwitters
Issaquah
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Subject: Brewer's Blackbird partial albino
Date: Fri Oct 19 2018 11:27 am
From: m.denny AT charter.net
 
Hello all,

We have seen many blackbirds with some white - but this one is
exceptional - pic on Blue Mountain Audubon FB page - scroll down to
October 7. This bird was at the Dodd Rd blood pond.

Enjoy, M&ML

https://www.facebook.com/BlueM...

--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"



Subject: Leach's Storm-Petrel at Carkeek Park
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 22:12 pm
From: rjm284 AT gmail.com
 
This evening at Carkeek Park I was rather shocked to see a Leach's
Storm-Petrel foraging in the distance to the southwest! I got on it shortly
after the sun went behind the Olympics and stayed on it in the scope for
about 15 minutes. Several gulls also spotted it and were chasing after it,
seemingly trying to eat it! It got away from all the attempts I saw and
continued to forage in the general area before I lost track of it.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Seattle



Subject: Longspurs at Midway Beach
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 20:24 pm
From: glfredricks55 AT gmail.com
 
While checking the shorebird ponds near Midway Beach today I encountered
the largest flock of Lapland Longspurs I have seen on the coast They were
flighty and hard to count but I would estimate between 60 and 75 in the
flock. They were feeding on beach grass seed heads out near the open beach
a bit north of the old Midway Beach access road. The pond levels are high
for shorebirds and I only saw one long-billed dowitcher among the many
ducks. Also, saw one American Bittern.

Gary Fredricks
Washougal



Subject: South Lake Union Palm Warbler seen at 3:45
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 19:23 pm
From: mombiwheeler AT gmail.com
 
Hi Tweeters,

The Palm Warbler first reported by Ryan Merrill was present at 3:45. It
took me an hour and a half to finally spot it, and even then it only gave
me brief looks before vanishing again. It was gleaning in a birch on a
raised bed to the SE of the round pool, SW of MOHAI. Many thanks to Ryan,
who also found a Swamp Sparrow at this unlikely spot nearly 2 years ago (as
well as all of the other vagrant species that he not only finds but reports
on Tweeters).

Lonnie Somer
Seattle



Subject: Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-10-18
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 16:06 pm
From: MJCT_Hobbs AT msn.com
 
Tweets “ A gorgeous day, but rather uneventful birding.  Very few surprises, but a wonderful time to be out anyway.  Temps ranged from 39-64, and the early morning fog burned off quickly.

Highlights:

* Cackling Goose “ a couple of big flocks few north before 7:30 “ first large flocks of fall
* Ring-billed Gull “ First of Fall (FOF), but only 1
* Green Heron “ one along the slough
* Barn Owl “ Matt saw one, East Meadow, before 7
* SHORT-EARED OWL “ FOF “ accidentally flushed from east of East Meadow
* NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL “ FOF “ Matt heard one (maybe 2) south of East Meadow, early
* American Pipit “ one flew over us, NE of Viewing Mound
* Yellow-rumped Warbler “ our only warblers

For mammals, besides Eastern Gray Squirrel, we had a young buck MULE DEER. Along the near edge of the slough, just south of the Dog Area, was a deceased AMERICAN BEAVER. Looked like it just climbed up out of the water and died. ?!?!?

Misses today included Wood Duck, Gadwall, Virginia Rail, Mew Gull, California Gull, and Lincoln™s Sparrow.

For the day, 53 species.

== Michael Hobbs
== www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
== [email protected]



Subject: Palm Warbler (correction )
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 14:40 pm
From: wrboyington AT msn.com
 
I meant plantings area just SE of pool.

Bill Boyington

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: South Lake Union Park Palm Warbler refound today
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 14:38 pm
From: wrboyington AT msn.com
 
Spotted the Palm Warbler in the plantings area just sw of the circular pool at 12:20 pm.

Thanks to Ryan for reporting this nice bird.

Bill Boyington
Shoreline, WAd

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: band-tailed pigeons
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 13:22 pm
From: mj.cygnus AT gmail.com
 
This is the season for band-tails. I now have about 25-30 at my feeders
daily. The downside is that when they flush for whatever spooked them, the
poop does land on my car or walkways at times.
They are wonderful to watch, the chatter they have, the pecking order,
and above all if the feeders get empty at least one will fly over to my
window, hit it gently, slide down and hang on to the outside sill for a few
seconds, then fly back up the top of the feeder. Repeat several times until
I come out and fill the feeders.
Amazing how they learned that the light in the window meant someone
was in there that could fulfill their food needs if only they flew towards
the light and the ritual slide that followed.

Martha



Subject: White-throated sparrow, Clark Co., WA
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 10:43 am
From: rflores_2 AT msn.com
 
One showed up in my yard near Ridgefield this morning. After several years of absence as a yard bird it is good to see one.

Bob Flores
Ridgefield, WAPOST: Send your post to [email protected]
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Subject: Black swan
Date: Thu Oct 18 2018 9:44 am
From: woodygl AT yahoo.com
 
A black swan was seen this morning on the Columbia River in front of the sandbar east of Columbia City OR. It was on the WA side of the river. We saw it from Dike Road @ 7:45 am.
Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Northern Shrike at Ridgefield, life bird for me.
Date: Wed Oct 17 2018 18:38 pm
From: lamoustique AT yahoo.com
 
I saw this juvenile Northern Shrike at Marker 11 (Rest Lake side) on the River S auto tour route, This is a new bird for me, since where I came from all the shrikes were Loggerhead Shrikes. The photo is very heavily cropped...all you can see in the original is a dead shrub with a pale beige blob in it.https://www.flickr.com/photos/...  



Michelle MaaniSalmon CreekVancouver, WA



Subject: Palm Warbler at South Lake Union
Date: Wed Oct 17 2018 16:41 pm
From: blobbybirdman AT gmail.com
 
Looking at it now, I™m the flowerbeds immediately west of the Mohai.

Ryan™s reports have now helped me find three state nemesis birds: Palm Warbler, Swamp Sparrow and of course Swallow-tailed Gull (which I had almost given up on in WA)

Mark

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 17, 2018, at 12:54 PM, Ryan Merrill wrote:
>
> There is a Palm Warbler at Lake Union Park in Seattle today. It's been moving around and calling a lot but seems to be hanging out there, especially in the various plantings southwest of MOHAI and also in the vegetation bordering the inlet south of the bridge.
>
> Good birding,
> Ryan Merrill
> Seattle
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Snohomish/Skagit birding
Date: Wed Oct 17 2018 15:36 pm
From: pat.mary.taylor AT gmail.com
 
Tweeters

You may have heard about the Pine Bunting discovered and fortunately
photographed on October 15 in Victoria. It was not reported because it
was initially ID as a Lapland Longspur. Despite an extensive search
today (OCT 17) it was not refound. This is the second such scenario
this fall when a Common Ringed Plover was photographed and
misidentified until the photo was inspected 3 weeks after the fact.

Keith Taylor Victoria BC

On 10/17/18, Marv Breece wrote:
> Yesterday morning, at Polson Rd & Dry Slough Rd on Fir Island, there was a
> flock of over 20 WESTERN MEADOWLARKS, feeding in a plowed field and singing
> like it was spring. A lone AMERICAN PIPIT was in the field as well. An
> AMERICAN KESTREL observed from nearby.
>
> Before high tide there was a large number of shorebirds at Hayton Preserve
> on Fir Island in Skagit County. The birds were distant and back lit as usual
> in the AM, but as the sun moved across the sky, there were moments when
> distant ID of birds was possible. Shorebirds were:
>
> Killdeer
> Black-bellied Plover
> Semipalmated Plover
> Greater Yellowlegs
> Long-billed Dowitcher
> Pectoral Sandpiper - 3
> Dunlin
> Red Knot - 3 in basic or juv plumage
> Peeps
>
> Three immature PEREGRINE FALCONS hunted the shorebirds. One peregrine was
> much smaller than the other two and could easily be mistaken for a Merlin.
> Over 100 SNOW GEESE were also at Hayton.
>
> On Wylie Road a MERLIN chased blackbirds.
>
> Passerine activity was nearly absent at the Game Range (Wylie Slough). I
> could hear BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES & PURPLE FINCHES. A NORTHERN SHRIKE made
> the brief stop worthwhile.
>
> In Snohomish County, south of Stanwood, the dark morph RED-TAILED HAWK was
> perched at the intersection with Boe Rd. This bird has been in that area for
> a few years. At the other end of Boe Road was my first HARLAN'S RED-TAILED
> HAWK of the season. This bird was a dark morph adult. As is typical with
> harlan's, close approach was not permitted. Also at the end of Boe Road was
> another NORTHERN SHRIKE.
>
> On 7th off of Pioneer, just west of Interstate 5, there was an AMERICAN
> KESTREL. I was hoping to see the light morph Harlan's Red-tailed Hawk that
> spent last winter there. No luck..... yet.
>
> --
> Marv Breece
> Tukwila, WA
> [email protected]
>
> "what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to
> spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but
> rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The
> Attention Merchants by Tim Wu
>
>
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Subject: Palm Warbler at South Lake Union
Date: Wed Oct 17 2018 14:55 pm
From: rjm284 AT gmail.com
 
There is a Palm Warbler at Lake Union Park in Seattle today. It's been
moving around and calling a lot but seems to be hanging out there,
especially in the various plantings southwest of MOHAI and also in the
vegetation bordering the inlet south of the bridge.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Seattle



Subject: Snohomish/Skagit birding
Date: Wed Oct 17 2018 14:17 pm
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
Yesterday morning, at Polson Rd & Dry Slough Rd on Fir Island, there was a flock of over 20 WESTERN MEADOWLARKS, feeding in a plowed field and singing like it was spring. A lone AMERICAN PIPIT was in the field as well. An AMERICAN KESTREL observed from nearby.

Before high tide there was a large number of shorebirds at Hayton Preserve on Fir Island in Skagit County. The birds were distant and back lit as usual in the AM, but as the sun moved across the sky, there were moments when distant ID of birds was possible. Shorebirds were:

Killdeer
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Long-billed Dowitcher
Pectoral Sandpiper - 3
Dunlin
Red Knot - 3 in basic or juv plumage
Peeps

Three immature PEREGRINE FALCONS hunted the shorebirds. One peregrine was much smaller than the other two and could easily be mistaken for a Merlin. Over 100 SNOW GEESE were also at Hayton.

On Wylie Road a MERLIN chased blackbirds.

Passerine activity was nearly absent at the Game Range (Wylie Slough). I could hear BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES & PURPLE FINCHES. A NORTHERN SHRIKE made the brief stop worthwhile.

In Snohomish County, south of Stanwood, the dark morph RED-TAILED HAWK was perched at the intersection with Boe Rd. This bird has been in that area for a few years. At the other end of Boe Road was my first HARLAN'S RED-TAILED HAWK of the season. This bird was a dark morph adult. As is typical with harlan's, close approach was not permitted. Also at the end of Boe Road was another NORTHERN SHRIKE.

On 7th off of Pioneer, just west of Interstate 5, there was an AMERICAN KESTREL. I was hoping to see the light morph Harlan's Red-tailed Hawk that spent last winter there. No luck..... yet.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
[email protected]

"what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu



Subject: Edmonds turnstones and sandpipers (10-15/16-18)
Date: Wed Oct 17 2018 12:49 pm
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Monday afternoon (10-15-18) a pair of black turnstones were on the marina breakwater opposite the fishing pier.

A few sandpipers were at the marsh Tuesday morning (10-16-18).

Photos can be seen by scrolling down page 15:http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Red Knots at Hayton Reserve on Fir Island
Date: Tue Oct 16 2018 21:26 pm
From: marvbreece AT q.com
 
Today there were 3 RED KNOTS at Hayton Reserve on Fir Island in Skagit County. Complete report later.

--
Marv Breece
Tukwila, WA
[email protected]

"what are the costs to a society of an entire population conditioned to spend so much of their waking lives not in concentration and focus but rather in fragmentary awareness and subject to constant interruption?" - The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu



Subject: Band-tailed Pigeons
Date: Tue Oct 16 2018 15:32 pm
From: jschwartz1124 AT gmail.com
 
Jumping on the Band-tailed bandwagon:

We typically get 2-3 per week at our feeder in Lake Forest Park. In the
past when we had safflower seed out, we would get as many as 12 or 13 at
one time.

Keep watching the skies!

Jeremy Schwartz
jschwartz1124 at gmail dot com
Lake Forest Park



Subject: Band-tailed Pigeons
Date: Tue Oct 16 2018 13:56 pm
From: andy_mcc AT hotmail.com
 
Hello Tweets,

We have 8-13 Band-tailed Pigeons at our feeders one mile north of downtown Bellevue on any given day.

Andy McCormick
Bellevue, WA



Subject: Tour of Clark County
Date: Tue Oct 16 2018 13:44 pm
From: rogermoyer1 AT hotmail.com
 
I'm wondering if anyone from Clark County has the time and interest in showing me some good spots in the county. I'd like to take half a day or so this Saturday. Please contact me off list if you're interested.

Roger Moyer

Chehalis, Wa


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Subject: Snohomish County Northern Goshawk.
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 22:22 pm
From: lynnandstan AT earthlink.net
 
Hi Tweets,

For the second time in my twenty five years of serious birding, here in the foothills east of Bryant, I have seen and positively identified a Northern Goshawk, based on the photo and description in 1988 Audubon Western Birds. Both times I observed the birds at very close range, the first one was eating a chicken it killed the previous day, this was about twenty years ago, and the second one while it was attempting to kill a chicken. Both events occurred this time of year, the more recent this past Sunday morning. First time I got extensive video of the bird, this time I did not. I decided to post to Tweeters after seeing just how few sightings have been reported this year on Ebird in this area.

Stan Kostka
lynnandstan at earthlink.net
Arlington (East Bryant)
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Subject: Band-tail pigeons
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 21:08 pm
From: adrienne AT nwveggie.com
 
There is a flock of about 10 that hang out near my house in the Haller Lake
neighborhood.



Adrienne



Subject: Them Eagles Has Landed, etc.
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 20:18 pm
From: gibsondesign15 AT gmail.com
 
A few nights ago I had a really cool dream about Bald Eagles. It was nice
seeing eagles again, even in a dream. About six or seven of 'em off Port
Townsend. I guess they got off the astral plane here in town today - I saw
three.

The last several months here in PT have been totally eagle-free as far as
I've seen. I haven't seen any at all. The last eagles I saw were the pair
next door to my ma's house up on castle hill. At that time (back in July)
the gigantic youngsters were thrashing around the tall firs up around their
nest, learning to fly. They did look especially large. I think I read
somewhere that the young eagles wings *are* actually larger than the
adults, since as newly fledged birds, the feathers haven' t worn down in
use yet. Hmmmm...... well whatever.The youngsters were having a real time
of it manipulating those big 'ol things,

So this morning I was out at Pt. Wilson just after sunrise and spotted the
first eagle perched right on a chimney on one of the buildings. As I walked
around looking for Meadowlarks, the eagle disappeared over the big boulders
at the point, flying low. I expected to see it just offshore, pestering
some gulls, but was surprised to finally find it way way out on Admiralty
Inlet most of the way to Whidbey, circling and diving down amongst a huge
number of big gulls having a feeding frenzy out there.

Back home in late afternoon I was pleased to see Ma and Pa Eagle perched
together on the "Eagle Tree" - their lookout tree with a territorial Sound
view. Back again from their summer vacation to some BC or Alaska salmon
streams, or something like that.

Back to Pt Wilson, where I was looking for Meadowlarks. That's because I
saw some out there on the sunny morning of October 11th, at least two of
'em, one singing loudly the whole time I was out there. As I listened to
the Meadowlark, I spotted a monster-sized California Sea Lion just off the
point, sort of an odd juxtaposition of creatures. The Sound and the Furry.
No Meadowlarks today.

Jeff Gibson
lurking around in
Port Townsend Wa



Subject: Phainopepla Fail
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 19:30 pm
From: peggy_busby AT yahoo.com
 
That's a shame, Louise. I was there on Saturday. Hung out in the area for over two hours, with only a brief sighting by someone else, then I took a lunch break and when I returned he was out flycatching for a small group. He was seen yesterday, so you may have been unlucky in your timing. I hope you get another chance. My ebird report with not-great photo (bad sun location) is linked:
https://ebird.org/view/checkli...

Peggy.
On Monday, October 15, 2018, 5:20:06 PM PDT, Louise Rutter wrote:


I spent a little over two and half hours today unsuccessfully looking for the west Sequim phainopepla. I was hoping some other people would be there to add extra eyes, but no such luck “ I definitely missed the boat there, I think the big rush was over two weeks ago



I staked out the mulberry bush behind the painted rocks house. I roamed along Runnion past the house with the big russet maple and all the mountain ash berries. The only birds with crests I saw were Steller™s jays (plenty of those) and California quail. I did find a Say™s Phoebe enjoying the sun, which was a nice surprise, a Clallam code 4, but not quite a phainopepla.



On the up side, I spent time outside in some very pleasant sunshine “ I took along sweater and fleece, but only ever wore a T-shirt. I™ve definitely spent a few hours failing to find a bird in less pleasing conditions!



Louise Rutter

Kirkland
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Subject: Phainopepla Fail
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 19:20 pm
From: louise.rutter AT eelpi.gotdns.org
 
I spent a little over two and half hours today unsuccessfully looking for
the west Sequim phainopepla. I was hoping some other people would be there
to add extra eyes, but no such luck - I definitely missed the boat there, I
think the big rush was over two weeks ago.



I staked out the mulberry bush behind the painted rocks house. I roamed
along Runnion past the house with the big russet maple and all the mountain
ash berries. The only birds with crests I saw were Steller's jays (plenty of
those) and California quail. I did find a Say's Phoebe enjoying the sun,
which was a nice surprise, a Clallam code 4, but not quite a phainopepla.



On the up side, I spent time outside in some very pleasant sunshine - I took
along sweater and fleece, but only ever wore a T-shirt. I've definitely
spent a few hours failing to find a bird in less pleasing conditions!



Louise Rutter

Kirkland



Subject: Them Eagles Has Landed, etc.
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 19:09 pm
From: gibsondesign15 AT gmail.com
 
Just two nights ago I had a  really cool dream about Bald Eagles, it was
nice to see them even if only in a dream. About 6 or 7 of 'em flying off
Port Townsend.



Subject: Nov 5 WOS meeting
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 18:41 pm
From: cinnyb AT yahoo.com
 
WOS is excited to welcome Tom Aversa and Hal Opperman, authors of the Birds of the Pacific Northwest- A Photographic Guide, as presenters for the Nov 5 meeting.  They will recount their ten year "adventure in persistence" that, along with Dick Cannings, produced the 2016 photographic guide. Their goal in setting out on this project was to create a combined field guide and handbook covering the species of an entire bioregion, that would facilitate understanding the status and distribution on a landscape scale.

WOS meetings are held at the Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st St Seattle 98105. Social begins at 7PM, meeting starts at 7:30PM. GoToMeeting will be available (for members) to attend remotely.
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Subject: Okanogan County - Snow Bunting
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 18:04 pm
From: rmcclsky AT mindspring.com
 
With the reports in the last few weeks of Common Redpoll, Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch and others in the southern end of Okanogan Co., my buddy Gene Wick and I headed to Alta Lake St. Pk. and on to Chelan Ridge.

Alta Lake was fairly birdy, but did not see anything special.

Chelan Ridge was not birdy at all except for groups of Juncos. However, about 2 miles before the trail to the Hawk Watch area we had a small bird suddenly show up running ahead of us in the middle of the road. My first impression was actually of a small plover. But once Gene got glass on it he exclaimed Snow Bunting!

I think it might be a record for early date for that species in the county. Don't see a middle stripe on the bar graph for Oct. on Ebird.

Gene has photos of another bird we could not ID on the camera view and may post that later.

Snow bunting photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

If you want to check Gene's photos later:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/...

Ron McCluskey
rmcclsky at mindspring dot com


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Subject: Band Tailed Pigeons
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 15:28 pm
From: burney.huff AT mindspring.com
 
I regularly have Band Tailed Pigeons at my backyard feeder in Lakewood,
Pierce County, from about February through October, maybe into November.
They usually disappear for about 60 days, or so, in the December - January
period. I limit the amount of black oil sunflower seeds I provide for them
to contain the cost. If I kept the feeder full, I think they would be there
almost the entire day! I like them; but, there are limits! Cooper's Hawks
like them, too.



Subject: Bothell crow roost
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 14:32 pm
From: avosetta AT hotmail.com
 
I went to this crow roost last night, and it was even better than Scott had indicated!  Two other cars came to see the spectacle, but left early, disappointed that it wasn't happening as they had hoped (just a few groups of 10-30 fairly distant).  We stuck around, and 5 minutes after sunset (sunset last night 6:23 PM), it started quite suddenly with hundreds of birds descending on the parking garage all around us, very loud.  More and more came from at least 2 different directions.  It continued until quite dark, then suddenly at 7 PM they all dropped down into the trees and became silent.  They flew very close to us many times, and the noise was deafening.  A very stunning spectacle for me and Adam.


We put down 5000 on eBird, but there could very well have been 10,000, as Scott had estimated. Just couldn't tell which birds we'd already counted, and they were on all sides.


Thanks to Scott for directing us to the roof of the north parking garage.


Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Gig Harbor, WA

[email protected]



________________________________
From: Tweeters on behalf of Scott Ramos
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2018 2:49 PM
To: Dennis Paulson
Cc: Tweeters Newsgroup
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bothell crow roost

Dennis,

I work in a complex just east of the UW Bothell/Cascadia CC campus. I cant speak to the crow exodus during the summer and early fall because my return home (to Seattle) is much earlier than their roosting times. However, once dusk approaches the evening commute time, the flocks of crows staging and roosting become truly impressive. The congregations tend to move around a bit from year to year, however.

Last winter, the entire area east of I-405due east of the campus, from NE 195th all the way south to Hwy 522would fill with crows just before dusk as they used the lawns, buildings and trees to stage before retreating toward their roosts in the campus wetlands. Without exaggeration, you could see 1000s of crows during this period of the evening. Imagine creating a tapestry of crows with free space of about 2-3 crow-widths as packing density and you get the idea of just how many birds you could see.

On the days when my commute homeheading west and south on 522was a little earlier, if you could take your eyes off the traffic, you could see one continuous river of crows as it moved north and east toward Bothell. The flocks are so thick then that they color the sky for miles. Of course, crows dont fly in any coordinated fashion, but move in the general direction of the flock, with lots of swooping up and down and back and forth.

When I have taken the time to go over to the campus, what I found productive was to drive on to the roof level of the North Parking Garage which gives a great vantage point of the wetlands area. The first time I did this, several years ago, my initial focus was on the crows coming from the region to the south and west. But, when I turned my gaze, there was another river of crows coming from the north and east. Doing a quick survey of numbers in neighboring grids of a few degrees at a time, it seemed that there could have been 10,000 crows coming from each of the two main sources. And that is probably a low-ball estimate.

Definitely worth the effort to experience this event. Ill post an update when the numbers and timing are noteworthy.

Scott Ramos
Seattle


> On Sep 30, 2018, at 8:09 AM, Dennis Paulson wrote:
>
> Hello tweets,
>
> Ive thought about visiting the crow roost at Cascadia Community College in Bothell for some years but have never got around to it. Does anyone out there know what the seasonal parameters are of the roost? Are they going there in large numbers now, or does it get better later in the winter?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Dennis Paulson
> Seattle
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> [email protected]
> https://nam01.safelinks.protec...

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Subject: Lake Sammamish State Park question
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 12:57 pm
From: bbrug15 AT gmail.com
 
I see on eBird that Chestnut-backed Chickadees are reported regularly at
Lake Sammamish SP. Could someone who has seen Chestnut-backed Chickadees
there recently let me know in what part of the park they were seen? I'm
not very familiar with the park, so the more explicit the directions the
better.

Thanks very much,

Barry Brugman
Kirkland
.



Subject: Edmonds marsh northern shrike 10-14-18
Date: Mon Oct 15 2018 11:22 am
From: billandersonbic AT yahoo.com
 
Sunday a local birder spotted a northern shrike at the Edmonds marsh. I wonder if it the same bird that was seen there a week ago. My photos of the shrike and a mystery shorebird can be seen by scrolling down page 15:
http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum...
Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA



Subject: Omak Trip
Date: Sun Oct 14 2018 22:45 pm
From: h.heiberg AT yahoo.com
 
>> We just returned from a birding trip to Omak via Snoqualmie and Blewett Passes.
>>
>> At Alta Lake near Pateros we came across this pigment deficient House Finch. (Thanks to some of our birder friends for helping us ID this bird.)
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>> Apparently even gulls love Washington State apples (video):
>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>
>> Northeast of Waterville on the plateau we ran into a flock of Bluebirds. We think that each bird in the following photos is a Mountain(?) Bluebird.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>> Here is an album of all of the photos from the trip.
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/...
>>
>> Hank & Karen Heiberg
>> Issaquah, WA



Subject: FOY DOA
Date: Sun Oct 14 2018 21:35 pm
From: gnudle AT icloud.com
 
Last fall and winter we had a flock of a dozen varied thrushes at our suet feeders every day. I have been looking forward to their return. Today one arrived alone with a BANG to the window, even though the window is sheltered by a low overhanging roof and much shrubbery. He was an instant casualty. Alas! Poor birdie!

Marcia Ian
Bellingham
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Subject: two scoters in eastern WA
Date: Sun Oct 14 2018 20:51 pm
From: dennispaulson AT comcast.net
 
Hello, tweeters.

Today, 14 October 2018, Netta Smith and I photographed a juvenile White-winged Scoter in a small lake in the ponderosa pine zone on the W side of Cameron Lake Road, south of Omak, Okanogan County.

We also photographed a juvenile Surf Scoter from the park at the south end of Banks Lake, Grant County.

For those who don™t know it, Cameron Lake Road is full of many hundreds of Sandhill Cranes in mid October. They feed out in the fields. They™re not especially tame, as every relatively close flock we passed flew up and away, but they are quite a spectacle. Not much else in the way of birds except quite a few ducks of a variety of species in some of the lakes at the north end of the road. This is the second year we™ve seen this.

Dennis Paulson
Seattle
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Subject: Birding in Missouri and Some History of the Eurasian Tree Sparrow
Date: Sun Oct 14 2018 19:21 pm
From: birder4184 AT yahoo.com
 
Earlier this month I spent 8 days birding in 5 states in the Midwest as part of a 50 State Project I have undertaken. The first state was Missouri - joining an excellent local birder (and professional guide in another life with Naturalist Journeys) Pat Lueders. The goal in each state was to see 50 species in a single day. In Missouri, there was the additional objective of seeing my first Eurasian Tree Sparrow. It was successful in Missouri and each of the other states as well. I will be adding blog posts on each visit. The first is of that Missouri visit and includes some history for the Eurasian Tree Sparrow.
https://wp.me/p79yl0-5vR



Subject: Band-tailed Pigeons
Date: Sun Oct 14 2018 18:48 pm
From: davisjp23 AT hotmail.com
 
We™ve got some in the Finn Hill neighborhood of Kenmore.

Jeremy

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 14, 2018, at 2:18 PM, Faye McAdams Hands > wrote:


Hi Joan,


Band-tailed Pigeons are the default here in Belfair - both in my yard and at Theler Wetlands.

Happy Birding,

Faye

Belfair, WA


Faye McAdams Hands

Life is Simple -- Eat, Sleep, Bird.


________________________________
From: Tweeters > on behalf of Joan Miller >
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2018 12:16 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: [Tweeters] Band-tailed Pigeons

Hi Tweets,

Are there any neighborhoods where BT pigeons are regularly seen?

Thanks.

Joan Miller
West Seattle
jemskink at gmail dotcom
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